Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
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Comments Attachment
22151 05/15/2009 at 02:33:07 PM Self     The final guidelines need to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following best ethical practices at the time they were derived.

 
22152 05/15/2009 at 02:33:25 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22153 05/15/2009 at 02:34:35 PM Self     We are very much against Embryonic Stem Cell research, there are other proven and effective ways of doing this research other than sacrificing "live" babies. We recoil at the thought that our tax monies are going to support this type of activity.

 
22154 05/15/2009 at 02:35:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22155 05/15/2009 at 02:37:50 PM Self     I urge that the bill to legalize experimentation with human cells be defeated or vetoed. It is a biological fact that life is derived from live cells and therefore the fertilized egg is a human being deserving the rights of human beings; especially the right to life.

 
22156 05/15/2009 at 02:38:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22157 05/15/2009 at 02:40:49 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Again, I oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009.

Sincerely,

 
22158 05/15/2009 at 02:44:20 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22159 05/15/2009 at 02:44:41 PM Self     i have 2 points to express in this comment. The First Point: the potential that embryonic stem cell research for medical purposes is clear, however great caution must be taken in how this potential is explored. "research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization" the fact is, is that once the egg is fertilized there is a growing human being present in that cell. not forgetting that the embryo is destroyed in this precces, this could easily be considered to be the first step down the dark road of human experimentation. within this mindset the value of an individuals life and identity is lessened to that of a rat or monkey used for an experiment. on this basis funding the practice of this type of embryonic research

The Second Point: it is my understanding that these guidelines will implement policy that will fund this research with tax dollars.this becomes nothing less than a break down in what our governmental system is designed to achieve. which is to serve the people of the U.S.. although it is true that there is also a notable portion of the population that supports this research, the use of money from people who do not support this research is in principle, a betrayal.

 
22160 05/15/2009 at 02:45:17 PM Organization National Msrden Walker Organization P.OBox 239 New Haven KY 40051 As a nurse, a mother of 9 children, and having had to deal with the loss of child due to a debilitating fatal genetic syndrome, I have had the very real opportunity to study & research how stem cells can affect and potentially harm us. We are very close to falling into an abyss of fetal stem cell research. Using fetal stem cells goes against all ethical codes .It does harm to find good..."DOES HARM TO do good". The federal funding of tax payers monies to deliberatly use invitro to harness the fetal stem cells is nothing short of "societal vampireism" , with promises of cures to individulas who are desperate for cures. This makes the medical researchers nothing but snake oil sales men, forget the fact that in 2 decade the best results we have with fetal stem cells have been tumors and gross experiaments of rodents . I am 100% opposed to fetal stem cell research and I am deeply saddened that my money may potentially fund these troubling acts. The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22161 05/15/2009 at 02:46:39 PM Organization Catholic Diocese of Youngstown OH 144 W. Wood Street Youngstown OH 44503 The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22162 05/15/2009 at 02:47:48 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22163 05/15/2009 at 02:48:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22164 05/15/2009 at 02:49:11 PM Self     Cancer, diabetes, Crohn's, Celiac, Parkinson and many other diseases exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because I have Crohn's, my niece has Celiac, my cousin has diabetes and I have many friends who have been diagnosed with cancer. Embryonic stem cell research offers milliions hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise anyone's health by restricting scientists. We all deserve the best treatment science can provide.

 
22165 05/15/2009 at 02:54:40 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22166 05/15/2009 at 02:56:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22167 05/15/2009 at 02:57:40 PM Self     Embryonic Stem Cell research is a hoax. We can and will get more medical knowledge through the use of Adult Stem Cells. Please stop this barbaric action of creating and killing embryos.

 
22168 05/15/2009 at 02:57:41 PM Self     Adult stem cell research has given society numerous cures and countless oppertunities to wipe out many illnesses. However, what has embrionic-stem cell reasearch given us? Nothing. Not even a single cure. To make the situation worse, we have been destroying Human Beings by continuing to preform research in the embrionic-stem cell field. It should be obvious after so many failed attempts that nothing will ever come from embrionic-stem cell reasearch, except for more death and the destruction of human lives. In short,STUDY ADULT STEM CELLS ONLY.

 
22169 05/15/2009 at 03:00:28 PM Self     I am writing to you in good faith that you will consider the ethical limits we need to follow as we use science for stem cell research. Conscience dictates that we "do no harm" in our search; that we never allow our ends to justify a means that would destroy another. I hope that you do everything possible to put our taxpayer money toward adult stem cell research - where the outcomes have been promising. Much good for humanity can come from it, but only if there is funding. I hope that you will not allow resources to be redirected toward embryonic stem cell research, which has proved fruitless and will lead to the destruction of life that is not ours to take.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22170 05/15/2009 at 03:00:35 PM Self     embryonic stem cell research using federal funding violates the moral and religious rights of millions of U.S. CITIZENS who oppose the destruction of human life for research purposes. There has not been a single cure using embryonic stem cells.Adult stem cells have successfully treated more than 70 diseases. It is ethically irresponsible to destroy human beings in order to obtain stem cells.It violates the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights and the Nuremburg Code.

 
22171 05/15/2009 at 03:01:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22172 05/15/2009 at 03:04:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22173 05/15/2009 at 03:04:27 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22174 05/15/2009 at 03:08:50 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22175 05/15/2009 at 03:09:18 PM Self     Dear Mr. President,

My ten year old daughter wanted to know exactly what embryonic stem cell research was. I was very gentle and not very specific. However, she got the picture in her mind and cried. Killing life for the better of anyone is unacceptable. Why are you doing this? Please reconsider your position on embryonic stem cell research!

 
22176 05/15/2009 at 03:09:24 PM Organization Respect Life Office of the Archdiocese of Baltimore 320 Cathedral St., Baltimore, MD 21201 The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22177 05/15/2009 at 03:09:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22178 05/15/2009 at 03:10:20 PM Self     Advances in stem cell research have made it more desirable to proceed wtih adult stem cells. How about de-politicizing this process? We do not have to strain to please those who believe that a human embryo is nothing but a scrap of meaningless tissue. We can have the results we need with adult stem cells. Time to derail the political train on stem cell research.

 
22179 05/15/2009 at 03:10:28 PM Self     Human life begins at fertilization-----obviously---because if it is stopped at that point no child develops. No fertilized egg should be destroyed. They should be offered for "adoption".

It is killing human beings to destroy these embryos.

No embryonic stem cell study has shown medical help yet stem cells derived from other tissues have. There is no need for embryonic stem cells. It seems to be a political power play to insist on their use. This is a poor excuse for such.

 
22180 05/15/2009 at 03:12:29 PM Self     Section 1 of Executive Order 13505 issued March 9, 2009 states that "Advances over the past decade in this promising scientific field have been encouraging." That is correct, because there have been great strides made in developing knowledge of adult stem cells and in developing techniques to utilize them in treating upwards of 40 different diseases without costing a single human life. I object strenuously to my tax dollars being used to wantonly destroy human life in the name of advancing science when great strides have been and continue to be made in utilizing adult stem cells without wasting the resource of a single human life. Furthermore, some of the research conducted with existing embryonic cell lines have reported some highly negative results. Please put the funds into the research of promise ie adult stem cell research.

 
22181 05/15/2009 at 03:12:43 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22182 05/15/2009 at 03:13:01 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22183 05/15/2009 at 03:13:24 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22184 05/15/2009 at 03:13:33 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22185 05/15/2009 at 03:14:13 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22186 05/15/2009 at 03:14:43 PM Self     The following is copied text that clearly and professionally reiterates my personal feelings with regards to stem cell research. I have believed for a very long time that stem cell research holds the key to a cure for type I diabetes. We must pursue stem cell research and ALL of it's lines to find the cure we have been waiting too long to discover. Type I diabetes can be cured!

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22187 05/15/2009 at 03:14:50 PM Self     I applaud federal funding of embryonic stem cell research leading to cures for millions of deserving patients.

 
22188 05/15/2009 at 03:15:20 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22189 05/15/2009 at 03:15:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22190 05/15/2009 at 03:15:48 PM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America's over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22191 05/15/2009 at 03:16:15 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22192 05/15/2009 at 03:17:38 PM Self     I would like to add my voice to the many who opposed embryonic stem cell experimentation and use. It has been shown that adult stem cells work effectively and that embryonic stem cells can cause damage.

I am opposed to abortion for any reason and stand for the fact that all in our country are assured of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness even babies in the woumb.

 
22193 05/15/2009 at 03:17:56 PM Organization BioFlow Technology, Inc.   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: Last month President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
22194 05/15/2009 at 03:18:43 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members,I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22195 05/15/2009 at 03:19:04 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I support loosening the current restrictions on this research. I work at Stanford University, and having federal funding to continue some of the work being done here would help quicken the pace, and increase the likelihood that people's lives could be improved or saved.

I feel that the current restrictions on embryonic stem cell research were overly influenced by religious rather than scientific or ethical concerns. Although real ethical concerns should be evaluated, having religious values play a role in this decision is not appropriate.

My brother has a disease which may be treatable using methods of embryonic stem cell research. Please do not deny him this possibility.

 
22196 05/15/2009 at 03:19:48 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22197 05/15/2009 at 03:20:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22198 05/15/2009 at 03:21:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22199 05/15/2009 at 03:21:15 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22200 05/15/2009 at 03:25:51 PM Self     I don't believe that the government should be spending any money to kill any living human embryos for research of any kind. It's wrong, and it isn't effective, either. We should be spending money for research on all the many other available stem cell research opportunities, which have been proving themselves so much more effective, and are completely moral.

 
22201 05/15/2009 at 03:25:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22202 05/15/2009 at 03:30:27 PM Self     "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
22203 05/15/2009 at 03:32:56 PM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

I call for funding adult stem cell research, a choice we can ALL support.

 
22204 05/15/2009 at 03:33:14 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22205 05/15/2009 at 03:33:38 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22206 05/15/2009 at 03:33:58 PM Self     "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
22207 05/15/2009 at 03:39:25 PM Self     May, 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women of America’s over 500,000 members, I a writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos.

Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective and are actually treating patients.

The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patient.

Sincerely,

 
22208 05/15/2009 at 03:40:54 PM Self     I would like to voice my personal concern regarding the Draft of the National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research currently being released for public comment. Full text available at http://stemcells.nih.gov/policy/2009draft

Although Section II B in the draft NIH guidelines would help many more existing lines of embryonic stem cells become eligible for financial support from the NIH, I am concerned Sections II B and IV of the draft NIH guidelines could be interpreted to prohibit federal funding for research on stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos.

I respectfully requests that sections IIB and IV be amended to allow federal funding for the use of stem cell lines derived in other ways, such as somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, or other in vitro fertilization techniques for the following reasons: • Embryos formed via parthenogenic or SCNT techniques should be allowed the same access to Federal funding as provided for embryonic stem cells. • Parthenogenetic cells are derived from unfertilized human eggs and are not human embryos. • The process of parthenogenesis does not lead to the creation of a viable human embryo. • Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, and in vitro fertilization techniques are the types of research that provide the benefits personalized medicine promises for the future. • Any new NIH guidelines should build upon the progress which has already been made in the field. • Restricting U.S. funding to only particular types of stem cells will limit opportunities for U.S. researchers and potentially lead to lost jobs and higher costs for American health care. Parthenogenetic stem cells are unique models for the study of immune rejection and DNA expression patterns. SCNT may also create stem cell lines useful in the study genetic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. U.S. companies developing parthenogenesis and SCNT technologies are receiving funding offers from the governments of Korea, India, and China. Without access to federal funding here in the U.S., these NIH excluded technologies could migrate to other countries. When disease cures are ultimately developed and sought by the U.S. population, those cost-savings technologies and jobs will be located outside the U.S.

Please consider my opinion as you determine any influence you can apply to the situation to let the field move forward as rapidly as possible. Please do what you can to allow federal funding for the use of stem cell lines derived in other ways, such as somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, or other in vitro fertilization techniques.

Sincerely,

 
22209 05/15/2009 at 03:42:56 PM Self     I am a registered nurse in Florida,but above all I am the mother of a 17 year old Type 1 Diabetic. Four years ago when my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes it was totally unexpected to say the least. Since then we have dealt with hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia and the anger felt by a teenager because he feels that it shouldn't be him having to check his blood glucose numerous times throughout the day and night and give himself insulin throughout the day. It is through research that the invention of an Insulin Pump was made available to diabetics. He now wears an insulin pump 24 hours a day just to give his body insulin around the clock. Stem cell research is necessary so that people like my son will have the hope of finding a cure for Diabetes and give them the chance to have a more normal life.

 
22210 05/15/2009 at 03:48:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22211 05/15/2009 at 03:48:27 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22212 05/15/2009 at 03:50:35 PM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
22213 05/15/2009 at 03:52:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22214 05/15/2009 at 03:53:15 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22215 05/15/2009 at 03:56:21 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22216 05/15/2009 at 03:56:35 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22217 05/15/2009 at 03:56:52 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22218 05/15/2009 at 03:57:09 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22219 05/15/2009 at 03:57:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22220 05/15/2009 at 03:59:37 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22221 05/15/2009 at 04:00:56 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22222 05/15/2009 at 04:01:39 PM Self     I am against embryotic stem cell research. It is killing a human life. I do not want my tax dollars to be spent on killing a human life. Adult stem cells have proved to be effective in helping people. Why do you insist on killing babies for research. Do you have a conscience?

 
22223 05/15/2009 at 04:01:55 PM Self     We are sending you comments that have been prepared by the Juvenil Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). We fully trust in their judgement on the subject of juvenile diabetes and stem cell research. Our daughter was diagnosed when she was 16 mos old. She is now 3.5 years. We are very, very hopeful that stem cell research will help identify a cure in her lifetime. Please consider the following comments:

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22224 05/15/2009 at 04:02:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22225 05/15/2009 at 04:02:56 PM Self     It is against my conscience for my tax dollars to pay for the killing of innocent human life by using stem cells from aborted fetuses for research. It is not right that I should be required to pay for something that I feel is terribly wrong. Please do not use abortion as a means to science, nor in vitro, nor cloning, especially when adult stem cells are available without killing anyone.

 
22226 05/15/2009 at 04:04:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22227 05/15/2009 at 04:07:14 PM Organization BIOCOM 4510 Executive Dr, Plaza One, San Diego, CA 92121 BIOCOM leads the advocacy efforts of the Southern California life science community with more than 570 members including biotechnology and medical device companies, universities and basic research institutions, and service support firms. We are actively engaged in ensuring that the life science industry remains a strong and growing part of the state’s and nation’s contributions to the global economy by improving the health and well being of citizens here and elsewhere. In keeping with this mission we appreciate the opportunity to make public our comments on the Draft National Institutes of Health (NIH) Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research. Although Section II B in the draft NIH guidelines would help many more existing lines of embryonic stem cells become eligible for financial support from the NIH, BIOCOM is concerned Sections II B and IV of the draft NIH guidelines could be interpreted to prohibit federal funding for research on stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. BIOCOM respectfully requests that sections IIB and IV be amended to allow federal funding for the use of stem cell lines derived in other ways, such as somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, or other in vitro fertilization techniques for the following reasons: • Embryos formed via parthenogenic or SCNT techniques should be allowed the same access to Federal funding as provided for embryonic stem cells. • Parthenogenetic cells are derived from unfertilized human eggs and are not human embryos. • The process of parthenogenesis does not lead to the creation of a viable human embryo. • Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, and in vitro fertilization techniques are the types of research that provide the benefits personalized medicine promises for the future. • President Barack Obama signed an executive order removing previous restrictions on the use of federal funds for research on any human embryonic stem cell line derived after Aug. 9, 2001; a ban on federal funding of SCNT or parthenogenetic cell lines is contrary to President Obama's proclamation. • Any new NIH guidelines should build upon the progress which has already been made in the field. • Restricting U.S. funding to only particular types of stem cells will limit opportunities for U.S. researchers and potentially lead to lost jobs and higher costs for American health care. Parthenogenetic stem cells are unique models for the study of immune rejection and DNA expression patterns. SCNT may also create stem cell lines useful in the study genetic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. U.S. companies developing parthenogenesis and SCNT technologies are receiving funding offers from the governments of Korea, India, and China. Without access to federal funding here in the U.S., these NIH excluded technologies could migrate to other countries. When disease cures are ultimately developed and sought by the U.S. population, those cost-savings technologies and jobs will be located outside the U.S. BIOCOM appreciates the opportunity to make our comments public and we hope the final form of the guidelines takes our concerns into consideration.

 
22228 05/15/2009 at 04:07:33 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22229 05/15/2009 at 04:11:35 PM Self     given the recent advances in Adult stem cell uses, the continued issues with embryonic stem cells - I strongly support the cessation of embryonic stem cell research. Money spent on the adult stem cells is much more likely to result in a cure for type I diabetes and is sustainable. Embryonic stem cell research not only results in the destruction of human being , but all the research I've read speaks of the necessity of growing the embryo to the point where the stem cells differentiate into distinct organ types. We have not yet sunk to such a barbaric level (I hope) that we have farms of fetuses for their spare parts. While the JRDF community supports stem cell research, we must keep in mind that the moral rules are set not for the extremity of circumstances, but for the protection of all. If I were in the hospital with my son dieing because he needed a heart, and another person were in the bed next to him with the heart he needed, I'd probably be capable of murder. The NIH needs to keep in mind not only the demands and desparation of the sick, but the protection of the weak and the innocent.

 
22230 05/15/2009 at 04:13:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22231 05/15/2009 at 04:16:58 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22232 05/15/2009 at 04:18:02 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Thank you very much.

 
22233 05/15/2009 at 04:18:52 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22234 05/15/2009 at 04:19:32 PM Self     I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22235 05/15/2009 at 04:20:41 PM Self    

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22236 05/15/2009 at 04:23:24 PM Self     B.3. Third word - Change the "was" to "is". That is to remove a retroactive requirement and make it a requirement of the present guideline. It is an unreasonable requirement to expect all clinics to have foreseen policies based on the current requirements proposed. Current cell lines in use should be grand-fathered.

B.4. This section should be stricken. It is not a quantifiable requirement. The subjectivity leaves every possible circumstance open for challenge which is counter productive to the intent of the guidelines. This had the potential to become a quagmire of debate for reviewing bodies and courts: an exceptionally costly exercise.

There should be some sort of clause for embryos where parents can no longer be identified or contacted. Should they default to no use at all, or for use if the current default possessor elects to donate them? This also would allow for fertility clinics to specialize by not electing to participate in such donations and therefore differentiate themselves from others by having the ability to provide such services to those who would prefer not to participate in ESC research.

 
22237 05/15/2009 at 04:26:07 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22238 05/15/2009 at 04:28:06 PM Self     Please allow federal funding (Section II B) for research using using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT.

As a grandmother of a 10 year old girl whose family is drastically affected by Huntington's Disease, stem cell research is the ONLY HOPE for a cure for her family. Havanna (my granddaughter) has a 50/50 chance of getting Huntington's Disease. Her mother and three of her four sisters have the Huntington's gene (that's four out of five sisters -their father died of it too). One sister has already died (early 30's) and two sisters are already handicapped by it. It's not supposed to start until 30's/40's, but these girls started in their 20's. The girl's mother and Havanna are watching them die one by one starting with brain cells dying, eye's can't focus, slurred speech, uncontrollable/jerky movements, and eventually wheelchair bound, then ending in a home with death. It can take 10 years or more to die. The emotional and physical suffering is horrible, and Havanna (10 years old) is destined to a life of Hell. I am begging you to do everything you can, as fast as you can, to get stem cell research approved and funded, for Havanna's family's sake and the other millions of people affected by other diseases that may be cured.

I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

Thank you so much for listening. You are so important to us and hold so many people's lives in your hands. Please bring this miracle to realization.

Thanks,

*****

Here is an article on Stem Cell Research and Huntington's Disease

Science News

Stem Cells Show Promise For Treating Huntington's Disease ScienceDaily (Sep. 26, 2007) — Paying close attention to how a canary learns a new song has helped scientists open a new avenue of research against Huntington's disease -- a fatal disorder for which there is currently no cure or even a treatment to slow the disease. ________________________________________ In a paper published Sept. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have shown how stem-cell therapy might someday be used to treat the disease. The team used gene therapy to guide the development of endogenous stem cells in the brains of mice affected by a form of Huntington's. The mice that were treated lived significantly longer, were healthier, and had many more new, viable brain cells than their counterparts that did not receive the treatment. While it's too early to predict whether such a treatment might work in people, it does offer a new approach in the fight against Huntington's, says neurologist Steven Goldman, M.D., Ph.D., the lead author of the study. The defective gene that causes the disease has been known for more than a decade, but that knowledge hasn't yet translated to better care for patients. "There isn't much out there right now for patients who suffer from this utterly devastating disease," said Goldman, who is at the forefront developing new techniques to try to bring stem-cell therapy to the bedside of patients. "While the promise of stem cells is broadly discussed for many diseases, it's actually conditions like Huntington's -- where a very specific type of brain cell in a particular region of the brain is vulnerable -- that are most likely to benefit from stem-cell-based therapy." The lead authors of the latest paper are Abdellatif Benraiss, Ph.D., research assistant professor at the University, and former post-doctoral associate Sung-Rae Cho, Ph.D., now at Yonsei University in South Korea. The latest results have their roots in research Goldman did more than 20 years ago as a graduate student at Rockefeller University. In basic neuroscience studies, Goldman was investigating how canaries learn new songs, and he found that every time a canary learns a new song, it creates new brain cells called neurons. His doctoral thesis in 1983 was the first report of neurogenesis -- the production of new brain cells -- in the adult brain, and opened the door to the possibility that the brain has a font of stem cells that could serve as the source for new cells. The finding led to a career for Goldman, who has created ways to isolate stem cells. These techniques have allowed Goldman's group to discover the molecular signals that help determine what specific types of cells they become, and re-create those signals to direct the cells' development. Benraiss has worked closely with Goldman for more than 10 years on the Huntington's project. "The type of brain cell that allows a canary to learn a new song is the same cell type that dies in patients with Huntington's disease," said Goldman, professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Pediatrics, and chief of the Division of Cell and Gene Therapy. "Once we worked out the molecular signals that control the development of these brain cells, the next logical step was to try to trigger their regeneration in Huntington's disease." Huntington's is an inherited disorder that affects about 30,000 people in the U.S. A defective gene results in the death of vital brain cells known as medium spiny neurons, resulting in involuntary movements, problems with coordination, cognitive difficulties, and depression and irritability. The disease usually strikes in young to mid adulthood, in a patient's 30s or 40s; there is currently no way to slow the progression of the disease, which is fatal. Stem cells offer a potential pool to replace neurons lost in almost any disease, but first scientists must learn the extensive molecular signaling that shapes their development. The fate of a stem cell depends on scores of biochemical signals -- in the brain, a stem cell might become a dopamine-producing neuron, perhaps, or maybe a medium spiny neuron, cells that are destroyed by Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, respectively. To do this work, Goldman's team set up a one-two molecular punch as a recipe for generating new medium spiny neurons, to replace those that had become defective in mice with the disease. The team used a cold virus known as adenovirus to carry extra copies of two genes into a region of the mouse brain, called the ventricular wall, that is home to stem cells. This area happens to be very close to the area of the brain, known as the neostriatum, which is affected by Huntington's disease. The team put in extra copies of a gene called Noggin, which helps stop stem cells from becoming another type of cell in the brain, an astrocyte. They also put in extra copies of the gene for BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), which helps stem cells become neurons. Basically, stem cells were bathed in a brew that had extra Noggin and BDNF to direct their development into medium spiny neurons. The results in mice, which had a severe form of Huntington's disease, were dramatic. The mice had several thousand newly formed medium spiny neurons in the neostriatum, compared to no new neurons in mice that weren't treated, and the new neurons formed connections like medium spiny neurons normally do. The mice lived about 17 percent longer and were healthier, more active and more coordinated significantly longer than the untreated mice. The experiment was designed to test the idea that scientists could generate new medium spiny neurons in an organism where those neurons had already become sick. Now that the capability has been demonstrated, Goldman is working on ways to extend the duration of the improvement. Ultimately he hopes to assess this potential approach to treatment in patients. "This offers a strategy to restore brain cells that have been lost due to disease. That could perhaps be coupled with other treatments currently under development," said Goldman. Many of those treatments are being studied at the University, which is home to a Huntington's Disease Center of Excellence and is the base for the Huntington Study Group. In addition to Benraiss, Cho, and Goldman, other authors include former Cornell graduate student Eva Chmielnicki, Ph.D.; Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Amer Samdani, M.D., now at Shriners Children's Hospital in Philadelphia; and Aris Economides of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. The work was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, and the High Q Foundation. ________________________________________ Adapted from materials provided by University of Rochester Medical Center. Related Stories ________________________________________ Test Reveals Effectiveness Of Potential Huntington's Disease Drugs (Oct. 31, 2006) — A test using cultured cells provides an effective way to screen drugs against Huntington's disease and shows that two compounds -- memantine and riluzole -- are most effective at keeping cells alive ... > read more Huntington's Disease Linked To Overactive Immune Response In The Brain (July 16, 2008) — The damage to brain tissue seen in Huntington's disease may be caused by an overactive immune response in the bloodstream and the brain. Working separately, two teams found evidence in both brain ... > read more Drug Treatment Promising For Halting Huntington's-related Nerve Death (Feb. 1, 2005) — Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that drugs commonly used to treat psychiatric illnesses and blood disorders in humans may protect the brain cells that die in people with ... > read more Fatal Brain Disease Holds Clues To Dementia (Apr. 27, 2005) — Scientists at Melbourne's Howard Florey Institute have uncovered a clue about the causes of dementia in Huntington's disease by showing that mice susceptible to Huntington's disease have ... > read more Huntington's Disease Study Shows Animal Models On Target (Aug. 2, 2007) — Gene expression in several animal models of Huntington's disease closely resembles that of human HD patients, according to new article. Huntington's disease is an incurable and fatal hereditary ... > read more Link Between Huntington's And Abnormal Cholesterol Levels Discovered In Brain (Dec. 1, 2006) — Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered a protein interaction that may explain how the deadly Huntington's disease affects the brain. The findings, published in and featured on the cover of the ... > read more Mental And Physical Exercise Delays Dementia In Fatal Genetic Disease (Jan. 29, 2008) — Scientists have discovered that mental and physical stimulation delays the onset of dementia in the fatal genetic disease, Huntington's disease. This research opens up new therapeutic possibilities ... > read more Physical Activity Delays Onset Of Huntington's In Mouse Model (Apr. 2, 2008) — The simple act of running in an exercise wheel delays the onset of some symptoms of Huntington's disease in a mouse model of the fatal human disorder according to new research. These findings add ... > read more

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22239 05/15/2009 at 04:30:09 PM Self     I am totally in favor of NIH funding of research based on the derivation of stem cells from human embryos. My father has Parkinson's and my son has type 1 diabetes. My family could be saved a great deal of pain and suffering if this new research were to be funded by NIH. Therefore, I fully support the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines, as announced in the April 23, 2009 Federal Register Notice. Thank you,

 
22240 05/15/2009 at 04:30:42 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Besides Embryo destructive stem cell research has been ineffective and dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Support should be directed here.

We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

Government support should not be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22241 05/15/2009 at 04:32:08 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22242 05/15/2009 at 04:32:31 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22243 05/15/2009 at 04:33:15 PM Self     I know from my fifty year career as a physician caring for patients and family members who have had diseases such as cancer, diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, neurologic conditions(just to mention a few), that diseases such as these and others exact a devastating toll on the unfortunate person suffering with the disease but, also, on that person's family. Embryonic stem cell research offers millions hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureacratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress. While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer(SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited. I urge that the final guidelines include a clause enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created while following ethical practices at the time the cell lines were derived. Patients need the best treatments that science can provide.

 
22244 05/15/2009 at 04:33:59 PM Self     Do not use embyonic stem cells for research!

 
22245 05/15/2009 at 04:34:18 PM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22246 05/15/2009 at 04:34:46 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22247 05/15/2009 at 04:37:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22248 05/15/2009 at 04:38:37 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22249 05/15/2009 at 04:38:58 PM Self     i support human embryonic stem cell research.

 
22250 05/15/2009 at 04:40:48 PM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because I am a friend of someone who suffers from the disease. . Embryonic stem cell research offers people hope for a better future, and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise our health by restricting scientists. We deserve the best treatment science can provide.

 



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