Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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22051 05/15/2009 at 12:37:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22052 05/15/2009 at 12:37:28 PM Self     The sciences have proven embryonic stem cells are nowhere near as succesful as adult human stem cells. Embyronic stem cell research must be stopped. It is a wastefull expenditure of money. Stop wasting tax-payer money. Put the tax-payer dollar to good use in other areas of research.

 
22053 05/15/2009 at 12:39:29 PM Self     Please procede with this research. Add lung diseases to those studies, esp Alpha 1 antitrypsin defieciency with whcih I live

 
22054 05/15/2009 at 12:39:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22055 05/15/2009 at 12:39:45 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22056 05/15/2009 at 12:40:08 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22057 05/15/2009 at 12:40:31 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22058 05/15/2009 at 12:41:03 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22059 05/15/2009 at 12:41:17 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22060 05/15/2009 at 12:41:57 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22061 05/15/2009 at 12:42:25 PM Self     OPPOSE DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH National Institutes of Health (NIH) is proposing guidelines to destroy human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization - a "create to kill" policy. Our tax dollars will pay for this research! Please complete the following form, cut it out and send to the NIH: / oppose the destruction of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning.

 
22062 05/15/2009 at 12:43:21 PM Self     I object to the use of human embryonic stem cells for research. Even more basic, I object to the creation of embryos that will not be used to attempt a successful pregnancy. Thank you for the opportunity to comment, and for your consideration.

 
22063 05/15/2009 at 12:43:34 PM Self     As a practicing physician as well as a voting citizen, I oppose embryonic stem cell research, and I WHOLEHEARTEDLY endorse and URGE the funding of ADULT stem cell research! Adult stem cell research is where the useful science is at. It is absolutely FOOLISH to throw money at embryonic stem cell research which has extremely little promise, comparatively speaking, while adult stem cell research has not only ALREADY produced results, but also has the promise of MUCH more progress in the near future.

Furthermore, adult stem cell research has few, if any, of the ethical problems inherent to embryonic stem cell research.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22064 05/15/2009 at 12:44:14 PM Self     Greetings! Thank you for the opportunity to comment on NIH's proposed guidelines for federal funding of human embryonic stem-cell research (ESCR) I oppose expanding the availability of federal funding beyond the current restrictions because ESCR destroys nascent human life. Embryos left over from ferti/ity treatments, if allowed to develop, would become human lives and should not be used for scientific research. I would encourage federal funding be diverted to morally acceptable forms of research, such as those using stem cells derives from non-embryonic sources such as skin cells, placenta and umbilical cord blood. As a member of the Center for Moral Clarity, a non-partisan Christian grassroots organization, my wish is for NIH to support only morally neutral forms of research. Thank you for considering my opinion.

 
22065 05/15/2009 at 12:44:32 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22066 05/15/2009 at 12:45:38 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22067 05/15/2009 at 12:46:41 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22068 05/15/2009 at 12:47:14 PM Self     We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which forces taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destrcution of innocent human life. Support should be directred to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
22069 05/15/2009 at 12:47:28 PM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because I have suffered from Parkinson's for 11 years. Embryonic stem cell research offers millions hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise my health by restricting scientists. I need the best treatment science can provide

 
22070 05/15/2009 at 12:48:06 PM Self     Please do not allow the stem cells of unborn babies and instead focus on aduilt stem cells which have been proven to help create new cells. Thank you for your time and consideration. Thank you Sincerely,

 
22071 05/15/2009 at 12:51:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22072 05/15/2009 at 12:51:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

You must understand that this is a deeply held moral issue for me and one that can be deeply divisive to the country. Please use your good offices for research to promote life affirming research, and not life destructive research. My prayer is that adult stem cell research becomes the focal point for this research. This is the area where we have a chance to provide cures in a responsible manner.

 
22073 05/15/2009 at 12:51:54 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22074 05/15/2009 at 12:52:45 PM Self     On March 9, President Obama issued an Executive Order overturning President Buslf s stem cell research funding policies. On April 23, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft guidelines implementing the Obama directive. The public has until May 26 to submit comments. In response to the NIH draft guidelines, Reps. Diana DeGette (D-CO) and Michael Castle (R-DE) said they intend to move forward with Legislation that goes beyond the guidelines. People are urged (1) to send messages to Congress opposing any legislation promoting destructive embryonic stem cell research and (2) to send comments to NIH on the draft guidelines. E-mail messages can be sent to Congress and to NIH through the NCHLA Grassroots Action Center at: www.nchla.org/steincell. People are first directed to send e-mails to their U.S. Representative and two U.S. Senators. They are then directed to go to the NIH web form, where their name and a prepared pro-life message have already been inserted. Before submitting the comments, the user must complete a simple "Security Check" (fill in a random set of four provided numbers). Comments can be added to both messages. Please encourage your people to visit the NCHLA Grassroots Action Center. For more information, please see the attached Action Alert at: www.nchla.org/actiondisnlav.asn?ID=272. The USCCB Secretariat of Pro-Life Activities is preparing a special stem cell page on their web site. See "Oppose Destructive Stem Cell Research/' at: www.usccb.org/stenicellcanipaign. To facilitate people sending their e-mails messages to Congress and NIH. the bishops' web site will again link to the NCHLA Grassroots Action Center. Dear Director for NIH Stem Cell Guidelines. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes. I am Vice President of the Buffalo Regional Right to Live Committee and Blessed Mother House (Pregnancy House for Expecting Mothers). We have 1500 members.

Oppose Funding of Destructive Embryonic Stem Cell Research! Support Cures We Can All Live With On March 9, President Obama issued an Executive Order overturning the limits President Bush had placed on government funding of destructive embryonic stem cell research. On April 23, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft guidelines to implement the Obama directive. If these guidelines are approved, federal taxpayer funds will support research on human embryonic stem cells derived by killing human embryos created in fertility clinics through in vitro fertilization. Parents will be able to donate their embryonic children for such research when they feel they no longer need them for reproduction. The guidelines currently do not allow federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells derived from cloning or parthenogenesis, or from IVF embryos specially created for research purposes. See: www.nchla.org/dn" display.asp? [0=245. The public has until May 26 to submit comments. Cardinal Justin Rigali, chairman of the Catholic bishops' Committee on Pro-Life Activities, called the draft guidelines "a new chapter in divorcing biomedical research from its necessary ethical foundation." Without unconditional respect for human life, he said, experiments on human subjects become "another way for some human beings to use and mistreat others for their own goals." The Cardinal called for "increased support for promising and ethically sound stem cell research and treatments that harm no one." He expressed concern that some in Congress and the Administration want to go beyond the draft guidelines and use embryos specially created for research by in vitro fertilization or cloning. For the Cardinal's full statement, see: mvw.uscch.oi'g/comm/archives/2009/09-087.shtm. Calling the guidelines "'the first step," Reps. Diana DeGette (D-CO) and Michael Castle (R-DE) intend to move forward with broader legislation to "promote all forms of ethical stem cell research," which in their view includes cloning and the creation of embryos solely to destroy them. For important information, see the USCCB Secretariat of Pro-Life Activities' special stem cell page "Oppose Destructive Stem Cell Research" at: wwu.usccb.org/stenicellcampaigii. Also see: www.stemcellresearch.org, and nchla.org/issucs.asp?ID=6. ACTION: Through the NCHLA Grassroots Action Center, please send messages (I) to your two U.S. Senators and Representative opposing the DeGette/Castle legislation, and (2) to the NIH opposing its draft guidelines. Please click here: wyvw.nchla.org/steiiicell. Messages to Congress can also be sent by U.S. Mail, FAX letter, or phone. Call the Capitol switchboard at: 202-224-3121, or call Members' local offices. Full contact info can be found on Members' web sites at www.senate.gov and www.liousc.gov. Comments on the NIH guidelines can also be submitted online at: http://iiilioei-extra.nih.gov/ stem cells/add.htm or mailed to: NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892-7997. MESSAGE TO CONGRESS: "Do not use my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already producing treatments." MESSAGE TO NIH: "I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes."

WHEN: NIH inns! receive comments bv May 26. Congress has not vet scheduled action.

 
22075 05/15/2009 at 12:55:14 PM Self     Dear NIH, Sunday (5-10-2009) I read Marion Roach's article in the L.A. Times. Please do not compromise any stem cell research, including embryonic. I believe that embryos are not people they simply have the possibility of becoming a person. If stem cell laboratories can use those embryos that are not going to be used in fertility clinics, they should be allowed to do so. I further believe that even creating embryos for stem cell research is necessary if the fertility clinics do not have enough left over for good research projects. We need to quickly find out what cures this exciting research can find for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, spinal injuries and other diseases. To let religious people control science is not good government policy.

 
22076 05/15/2009 at 12:55:29 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

My sister and many others suffer from Multiple Sclerosis. This is only one disease that will benefit from Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Any action to improve the use of stem cells is urgent.

 
22077 05/15/2009 at 12:56:01 PM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Even though millions of dollars have been spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. Also, these proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. What a waste. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids, which are unnatural and unethical!

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated! Taxpayer monies should be used only for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
22078 05/15/2009 at 12:56:20 PM Organization cancer Patient Legal Advocacy Network   I am a bone marrow transplant recipient lucky enough to have a sibling match. I became a patient advocate and know several families that became pregnant to harvest the stem cells to save their older sick children. Let's keep embryonic stem cell research. I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you

 
22079 05/15/2009 at 12:56:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22080 05/15/2009 at 12:56:41 PM Self     In 1996, Congress enacted the Dickey-Wicker Amendment, a rider to an appropriations bill that unambiguously prohibited federally funded research resulting in the creation or destruction of human embryos. The Balanced Budget Downpayment Act, I, Pub. L. No 104-99, paragraph 128, 110 Stat. 26 (1996). Specifically, the amendment prohibits federal funding for "the creation of a human embryo or embryos for research purposes" as well as "research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded or knowingly subjected to a risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero" under existing federal regulations. Id. To date, the Dickey-Wicker Amendment has been reenacted annually by Congress. See, for example, Consolidated appropriations - FY 2001, Pub. L. No. 106-554, paragraph 510, 114 Stat 2763 (2000) and Section 510 of Public Lawl 108-109, 118 Stat. 3, 277 (January 23, 2004).

 
22081 05/15/2009 at 12:57:28 PM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

Sincerely,

 
22082 05/15/2009 at 12:58:57 PM Organization Concerned Women for America 1015 Fifteenth St. N.W., Suite 1100 Washington, D.C. 20005 To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for Americaís over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obamaís Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Respectfully,

 
22083 05/15/2009 at 12:59:05 PM Self     Dear Dr. Kingston:

I commend to your further attention the comments of *****, ***** National Catholic Bioethics Center concerning the draft of the NIH Human Stem Cell guidelines. Those comments, sent to you in a letter dated May 14, 2009, provide conclusive arguments against the legality and morality of the guidelines in their current form.

I garee with ***** that the current guidelines do not treat embryos in the same fashion as they treat fetuses, as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment requires.

I also find it morally reprehensible for NIH to allow the deliberate destruction of human embryos for research purposes. The availability of pluripotent stem cells from adult sources is adequate for the possible therapeutic benefits that stem cell research promises, and I urge you to chan ge the guidelines to restrict federal funding for stem cells derived only from adult sources.

Thank you for considering my comments.

 
22084 05/15/2009 at 01:00:13 PM Self     "Long-standing Department of Health and Human Services regulations for Protection of Human Subjects, 45 CFR part 46, establish safeguards for individuals who are the sources of many human tissues used in research, including non-embryonic human adult stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells." The Dept of Health & Human Services should protect all human subjects, not just adults.

Human Embryos are human children, albeit at the earliest stagest of development. These children have not given consent. Even if their parents reject them, they are still children....still separate individual humans. Please protect them and their rights.

"Human embryonic stem cells are cells that are derived from human embryos..." To obtain those cells, one must first kill the embryo...the developing human. Please protect these human subjects by establishing safeguard that will not allow these humans to be killed.

Please establish safeguards that will not allow children to be abandoned by their parents. If you will not ban all in vitro fertilization, please require all embryos created by invitro fertilization be implanted in the mother's womb and none frozen. Please limit the number of embryos created by invitro fertilization.

Even though the president lifted the ban for funding, his order cannot eliminate your obligation to protect human subjects, especially the most vulnerable. Please protect all humans.

Thank you for your consideration.

 
22085 05/15/2009 at 01:01:51 PM Self     Greetings! Thank you for the opportunity to comment on NIH's proposed guidelines for federal funding of human embryonic stem-cell research (ESCR) I oppose expanding the availability of federal funding beyond the current restrictions because ESCR destroys nascent human life. Embryos left over from ferti/ity treatments, if allowed to develop, would become human lives and should not be used for scientific research. I would encourage federal funding be diverted to morally acceptable forms of research, such as those using stem cells derives from non-embryonic sources such as skin cells, placenta and umbilical cord blood. As a member of the Center for Moral Clarity, a non-partisan Christian grassroots organization, my wish is for NIH to support only morally neutral forms of research. Thank you for considering my opinion.

 
22086 05/15/2009 at 01:02:25 PM Self     Greetings! Thank you for the opportunity to comment on NIH's proposed guidelines for federal funding of human embryonic stem-cell research (ESCR) I oppose expanding the availability of federal funding beyond the current restrictions because ESCR destroys nascent human life. Embryos left over from ferti/ity treatments, if allowed to develop, would become human lives and should not be used for scientific research. I would encourage federal funding be diverted to morally acceptable forms of research, such as those using stem cells derives from non-embryonic sources such as skin cells, placenta and umbilical cord blood. As a member of the Center for Moral Clarity, a non-partisan Christian grassroots organization, my wish is for NIH to support only morally neutral forms of research. Thank you for considering my opinion.

 
22087 05/15/2009 at 01:03:08 PM Self     Although the current prohibition on federal funding for human embryo research under the Dickey-Wicker Amendment would preclude use of NIH funds for research in the first two categories listed above, a specific prohibition in the NIH Guidelines of all three of the above categories of research would make it clear that such research will not be eligible for NIH funding even in the absence of the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. Sincerely,

 
22088 05/15/2009 at 01:03:35 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22089 05/15/2009 at 01:07:03 PM Self     I am opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to adult stem cell research and treatment that is both ethical and effective in treating patients. Adult stem cells continue to provide cures for thousands of patients with over 70 diseases. There is no case where government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

It is a scientific fact that embryos are human beings. The embryo has the entire DNA required to be a unique individual. All of us began life as an embryo, conceived at the moment of the union of the egg and sperm. Therefore, as a human individual, embryos are entitled to the same protection under federal law as other human beings. Research that involves the deliberate destruction of human life violates every principal found in existing law.

Despite years of research and billions of dollars poured into embryonic stem cell research using private funds, there has not been one single cure for any illness. In fact, embryonic stem cells have consistently proved that fatal tumors form when they are manipulated for use in treatments and because they are not patient specific.

In addition, the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22090 05/15/2009 at 01:09:47 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22091 05/15/2009 at 01:10:33 PM Self     Incurable, debilitating diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, MS and ALS exact a devastating toll on patients, their families and society in general. Embryonic stem cell research offers milliions hope for a better future, and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines in Section 11 B will permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made by allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise millions of people's health by restricting the ability of scientists to cure and prevent these devastating diseases. We all deserve the best healthcare science can provide.

 
22092 05/15/2009 at 01:11:19 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22093 05/15/2009 at 01:11:23 PM Self     I am adding my voice to those thousands whom you will be hearing from on the issue of embryonic stem cell research. For many years, I worked at a crisis pregnancy center and read everything I could about the abortion issue, and embryonic stem cell research, my reading covering a period dating back to the eighties. Technology at that time helped to show that the unborn was not "a clump of tissue" but a growing human being. Nothin ghas changed my mind since then that upon conception, we have a new life which deserves the protection of our laws. Please do not allow anything further to take away further protection from innocent life and treat it as a commodity. The advances in adult stem cells and the embilical cord tissue has rewarded us with many cures, and I would recommend that we put more money into that research. The end never justifies the means. Cures for disease never justify sacrificing someone else's life.

 
22094 05/15/2009 at 01:12:01 PM Self     I am supportive of ADULT stem cell research. I am strongly opposed to your draft guidelines for EMBRYONIC stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not DESTROY human LIFE and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

EMBRYO-destructive stem cell research has shown to be INEFFECTIVE and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. ADULT stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, EFFECTIVE in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22095 05/15/2009 at 01:12:05 PM Self     "These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose."

To date there have not been any cures using embryonic stem cells. Stop killing unique individuals in the name of medicine.

However, there have been cures using adult stem cells, and there is no killing any unique individuals, so that is the research that should be funded.

Sincerely,

 
22096 05/15/2009 at 01:13:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22097 05/15/2009 at 01:13:57 PM Self     I am oppossed to our tax dollars being used for embryonic stem cell research. The best success in using stem cells is when the cells are taken from the individual needing a stem cell transplant...their body is less likely to reject the stem cells. After years of research with embroyonic stem cells there has been no successful results in the the test labs. I believe that the false information about embroyonic stem cell research of curing certain medical conditions by Congress & scientists is another way for them to spend our tax dollars to justify abortion.

 
22098 05/15/2009 at 01:14:07 PM Self     My husband has Parkinson's Disease. He is doing everything he can to maintain his health in order to be a candidate for stem cell replacement therapy. The hope that this therapy may help him keeps us both going.

 
22099 05/15/2009 at 01:16:14 PM Self     I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22100 05/15/2009 at 01:17:06 PM Organization Hadassah  

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22101 05/15/2009 at 01:17:37 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22102 05/15/2009 at 01:17:38 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22103 05/15/2009 at 01:22:27 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22104 05/15/2009 at 01:23:38 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II Band IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22105 05/15/2009 at 01:25:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22106 05/15/2009 at 01:25:49 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22107 05/15/2009 at 01:28:10 PM Self     Re: NIH guidlines for ESCR (embryonic stem cell research)

Embryonic stem cell research is DESTRUCTIVE (DEADLY TUMORS) and OUTDATED. Thus it is ETHICALLY and FISCALLY irresponsible to use taxpayor $$ to clone and create embryos soley for destructive purposes.

Please focus $$ and energy on the more reliable research using adult stem cells.

Sincerely,

 
22108 05/15/2009 at 01:28:31 PM Self     To whom it may concern,

I agree that the proposed informed consent standards are a good idea going forward, however, they should not be retroactively applied as this would make a very large body of work useless.

Thank-you,

*****, MSc & MBA Candidate Research Associate Vancouver, BC Canada

 
22109 05/15/2009 at 01:29:15 PM Organization   MIddletown, CT Response to Draft NIH Guidelines on Allowable Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

*****l Stem Cell Researcher ***** University

As an embryonic stem cell researcher, I looked forward to the revised guidelines, given the impression that the Obama administration was looking to lift some of the current restrictions on cell line use, while maintaining appropriate ethical oversight of this research. Upon reading the draft guidelines, however, I find they would set this research back rather than facilitate it. Cell lines currently “approved” by the NIH may now become suspect due to their derivation under the less stringent guidelines in place at the time. The WiCell lines have been the “gold standard” in the field, with the vast majority of U.S. laboratories working on human ESCs using them. We understand the conditions that support their growth and are beginning to define conditions that support their differentiation. We have spent the past two years working extensively on defining conditions that promote neural differentiation of the H1 (WA01) and H9 (WA09) cell lines. If federal funds could no longer be used for research with these cells, we and many others would have to repeat much of our work. A majority of both the science and ethics communities supported the National Academy of Sciences guidelines for donation, including informed consent. I therefore urge that these be adopted by the NIH, or that cell lines previously approved and deemed to be ethically derived be grandfathered into the allowable category.

In addition, while it is understandable that the guidelines would not support research that derived new human ESC lines from embryos other than those created for reproductive purposes, it is unclear why funds could not be used to study lines created for research purposes, but generated with funding from other sources. This would include embryos created by parthenogenesis or somatic cell nuclear transfer.

 
22110 05/15/2009 at 01:30:39 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22111 05/15/2009 at 01:30:50 PM Self     "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
22112 05/15/2009 at 01:31:00 PM Self Wesleyan University   The current governmental administration is seemingly one wherein impacting science in the United States is at last being encouraged. Researchers, like myself, had hoped the news of lifted bans and new guidelines for stem cell research would alleviate the restrictions placed on the field 8 years ago. These drafted guidelines, as they are written here, stand to potentially lurch the field backwards, rather than forwards. These guidelines would potentially exclude gold standard lines from WiCell that have provided ourselves and myriad other researchers with so much of the knowledge we have now. Rather than creating an ESC research community better equipped to tackle mechanisms behind devastating diseases, these guidelines will send the field, and all of the brilliant research, in reverse and back to the drawing board to repeat all of this data with new lines created under these rules. As a member of the community, I ask the NIH to more closely model their guidelines after those established by the National Academy of Science, a set agreed upon by a majority of scientists and ethicists for governing responsible stem cell research.

 
22113 05/15/2009 at 01:31:14 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22114 05/15/2009 at 01:34:23 PM Organization     We welcome the expansion of federal funding, though the National Institues of Health (NIH), for support of research involving human embryonic stem cells (hESC)and apprciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research ("NIH Guidelines). In the Supplimental Infomration section of the Notice (Federal Register, 74 (77): 1857818580; 4/23/09), it is noted that the NIH consulted guidelines rom both national and international committees. The draft NIH Guidelines, however, makes no reference to international standards or guidelines. Given the global nature of science in general and, in particular, the need to encourage and allow international collaboration between and amontg stem cell researchers, consideration of international standards and guidelines is critical. To that end, the NIH Guidelines should specificallly acknowlege international or other nations' standards or guidelines that provide equivalent protections to those referenced in teh draft NIH Gidelines, e.g., content and timinng of informed consent, inducements for donation, etc. With regard to the categories of research using jESC that are ineligilble for NIH funding even in cases where the cells ome from aloowabole sources, we ask the NIH to add the following prohibitions, which are supported by both the National Acadamies and International Society for Stem Cell Research guidelines:

*Research in which hESC or human pluripotent stem cells (hPS) are introduced into human blastocysts *The transfer of human embryos into the uterus of a non-human species *The tranfer of hESC, hESC research products or hPS into a human uterus.

Although the current prohibition on federal funding for human embryo research under the Dickey-Wicker Amendment would preclue use of NIH funds for research in the first two categories listed above, a specific prohibition in the NIH Guidelines of all three of the above categories of research would make it clear that such research will not be eligible for NIH funding even in the absence of the Dickey-Wicker Amendment.

 
22115 05/15/2009 at 01:36:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22116 05/15/2009 at 01:36:35 PM Self     we are apalled by the actions of president obama and the demcratic party. we were democrats for all of our adult lives until the actions of president clinton and his impeachment dibacle.we well remember the photo op when all the democratic members posed with the president in support of his transgression despite being impeached!!! the american people are watching closely and i'm positive GOD is TOO.

 
22117 05/15/2009 at 01:38:10 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22118 05/15/2009 at 01:38:37 PM Self     I don't understand what all the fuss is about.I know I've read numerous articles concerning a company named Advanced Cell Technology that has perfected a procedure to remove just one cell from an embryo without harming said embryo.The embryo simply replaces the cell and can develope normally.Sounds like the gold standard to me. This certainly sounds like the way to go,and would make the religious argument a moot point.

If you have any other problems to solve,just drop me an e-mail.

Most sincerely,

 
22119 05/15/2009 at 01:39:07 PM Self     applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22120 05/15/2009 at 01:42:38 PM Self     To date, there is no solid scientific evidence to justify the use of embryonic stem cells instead of adult stem cells. This country obviously does not have enough money to fund an ideological crusade such as embryonic stem cell research. Do not earmark one more taxpayer dollar for this cause.

 
22121 05/15/2009 at 01:42:41 PM Self     NOW is the time to support the promising breakthrus in stem cell research. We have many friends with Parkinsons disease and diabeties. Section II B needs the federal funding to advance the research efforts on some exsisting stem cell lines. In addition, at this time of discovery it is important to support SCNT as a way to provide the stem cells to futher advance possible cures. We know additional ways to provide necessary stem cells for futher research are being explored, but advances need to continue to as all avenues of cure are explored. The USA is capable of being a leader in this field if the proper support is secured for these reaschers.

 
22122 05/15/2009 at 01:46:09 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22123 05/15/2009 at 01:46:37 PM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America?s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama?s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
22124 05/15/2009 at 01:46:53 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

As a proponent of protecting human life, as a human being, as an American and as a taxpayer of the United States of America, I pray that you adhere to my wishes and oppose embryonic stem cell research. Sincerely,

CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 
22125 05/15/2009 at 01:48:06 PM Self     Please allow stem cell research to obtain Federal funding and be pursued with the vigor you personally would appreciate if you or a loved one have PD. I have had it for ten years and it's progression continues unabated because of the short sighted persectives of the previous 8 years of administration. Wouldn't it have been nice for me and tens of thousands like me if I could have lived out my retirement more comfortably. If you don't fathom what I am feeling, try PD for awhile and let me know how the tremors, Dystonia and Dyskenisia feel

 
22126 05/15/2009 at 01:51:56 PM Self     Dear NIH:

It is not really realistic legally for consent to work in a retrograde manner. It is clear that the current stem cell lines should be "grandfathered" in. If the government is willing to "grandfather in" coal companies, willing to give industries time to adjust to new standards, then the same should apply to one of the few industries which truly aims at serving the health of the American people and people around the world. The new stem cell guidelines should not apply to the current stem cell lines, at least not for another 10 years.

 
22127 05/15/2009 at 01:53:00 PM Self     We oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like us to fund research we believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Also, these regulations open the door for funding additional unethical experiments such as human cloning and animal-human hybrids whenever NIH wants to experiment in the future.

 
22128 05/15/2009 at 01:57:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22129 05/15/2009 at 01:59:31 PM Self     Whatever happened to the promises of our forefathers of "LIFE, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"? Who gives the government the right to take a human life? What is America doing to it's future? What will be the consequences of our actions? Will God continue to bless America? We are already killing our children in in numbers that far exceed the numbers of victims in the Holocaust with the legal genocide of abortion in America(over 50 million children and still counting). We are commiting a homocide with every child we arbitrarily 'choose' to initiate then eliminate. It's outrageous and heartbreaking. As an American taxpayer I believe that Embryonic Stem Cell Research is always morally and ethically wrong because it snuffs out life at it's most vunerable stage. Life begins at conception, and those who's life is snuffed out for the so called (unsubstiantiated and unproven) 'benefit' of others is not something I will ever support.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
22130 05/15/2009 at 01:59:34 PM Organization Iowa Catholic Conference 530 42nd St., Des Moines, IA 50312 I am writing on behalf of the Iowa Catholic Conference, the public policy agency of the Catholic Church in Iowa, in response to the draft NIH guidelines for human stem cell research.

We are opposed to the draft guidelines, which require taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

In addition, we are concerned that there is still room under these guidelines for subtle incentives to create embryos for the purpose of destroying them. There should be an enforceable mandate concerning the separation between the roles of the researcher and the reproductive-care provider.

We do support the provision in the draft guidelines which forbid federally funded stem cell research using embryos specially created for research purposes by in vitro fertilization or cloning. We hope that the NIH and Congress will continue to respect this ethical norm.

Let us retain the prohibition on the use of federal money for research on deadly research on human beings.

 
22131 05/15/2009 at 02:01:27 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22132 05/15/2009 at 02:02:09 PM Self     Ensure Strong Federal Support for Embryonic Stem Cell Research

As you know, President Barack Obama recently signed an Executive Order designed to reverse restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research that have been in place for the last eight years. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are now in the process of developing guidelines to implement the Order.

NIH has released its draft guidelines, and will be reviewing public comments on the draft over the next several weeks. So far, NIH has received far more comments opposed to stem cell research than in support. It is therefore critical that NIH hear from as many stem cell supporters as possible during the comment period.

While the draft guidelines would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics, as drafted, it is unclear whether current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlined and be eligible for federal funding.

Further, the draft does not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). SCNT is a very promising scientific technique for creating embryonic stem cells, yet opponents of SCNT mistakenly liken it to reproductive cloning. This comparison is completely false. The purpose of reproductive cloning is to create another human being; the purpose of SCNT is to create stem cells for research.

Embryonic stem cell research holds the promise to treat and potentially cure many devastating diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis – illnesses which affect over 100 million Americans.

As a world leader in stem cell research at our Goldyne Savad Institute of Gene Therapy in Israel and as a leading advocate for stem cell research in the United States, Hadassah has a special interest in ensuring that the NIH guidelines are crafted so to advance stem cell research as quickly as possible.

Action Needed: Submit the following comments to NIH:

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22133 05/15/2009 at 02:03:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22134 05/15/2009 at 02:04:43 PM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22135 05/15/2009 at 02:06:07 PM Self     Dear Sirs and Madams, In the past many years there has not been one single discovery or advance in the field of embryonic stem cell research. On the other hand, many have been made using adult stem cells. This is clearly just a partisan issue. Please look at the facts and only use what works. I think we all know that makes sense instead of using viable human babies and millions of tax-payer dollars in futile research. Thank you.

 
22136 05/15/2009 at 02:08:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22137 05/15/2009 at 02:08:32 PM Self     Human life starts at conception and should be protected and defended from that point on. Please do all in your power to protect human life. Thank you,

 
22138 05/15/2009 at 02:09:47 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22139 05/15/2009 at 02:09:56 PM Self     The new informed consent rules should only apply to new donations after a certain date. Existing lines of ESC should be grandfathered in.

 
22140 05/15/2009 at 02:11:34 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson's community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22141 05/15/2009 at 02:12:16 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22142 05/15/2009 at 02:14:33 PM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. At age 46 ***** was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and now at age 57 it is increasingly difficult to maintain a the simplist lifestyle due to high costs of medications, doctors and help needed. Embryonic stem cell research offers her and milliions hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise my wife's health by restricting scientists. She deserves and needs the best treatment science can provide. Sincerely,

 
22143 05/15/2009 at 02:15:08 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22144 05/15/2009 at 02:17:19 PM Self     "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
22145 05/15/2009 at 02:24:11 PM Self     As a member of Concerned Women for America it has been brought to my attention of the legislation that is about to be brought before the Senate in the near future regarding using viable embyros for human stem cell research....this is not good legislation and very immoral...there are other alternatives to be used. Please do not do this....God commands "thou shall not kill"....and this is killing a living being. Remember, we will all be held accountable for our actions on this earth come judgement day and killing innocent life will result in a very comdemming and serious consequence. Thank You.

 
22146 05/15/2009 at 02:27:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22147 05/15/2009 at 02:27:55 PM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

I oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to the executive order that President Obama issued March 9.

As a taxpayer, I do not wish to be forced to pay for unethical research that requires the murder of embryonic human beings.

As a Californian, I know that millions of dollars have already been spent on such unethical research in my state, but that no scientific advances have come from that research. Instead, only mutations and tumors have resulted.

Through adult stem cells, we have had many successes and scientific breakthroughs. These adult stem cells also come without the ethical and moral controversy that surrounds embryonic stem cell research.

Do we really want to divide our country at this time, by forcing American taxpayers to fund what they consider to be murder? During this economic crisis, do we really need to waste the money that we do have on something that has already proven to be a boondogle? Please put this money toward ethical alternatives to embryonic stem cell research.

I would also like to note that the funding proposed by President Obama will likely lead to the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed, and open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Such things are truly morally reprehensible.

Sincerely,

 
22148 05/15/2009 at 02:28:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22149 05/15/2009 at 02:30:24 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am a scientist and I strongly support the ES research as a promising strategy to defeat life-threatening diseases. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22150 05/15/2009 at 02:31:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 



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