Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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20552 05/13/2009 at 06:33:35 PM Self     As a patient with multiple sclerosis I am pleased that Section II B should of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of exsisting stem cell previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However as drafted Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cells will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using exsisting stem cells that were created under ethic guidelines. This will allow reasearch to build on progress that has already been made. We need this so we can be able to have a better quality of life!

 
20553 05/13/2009 at 06:34:27 PM Self     - I am opposed to the destruction of innocent lives for embryonic stem cell research.

-I am also opposed to your draft guidelines which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

- Our government should not be supporting human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20554 05/13/2009 at 06:34:39 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research, especially taxpayer-funded research, for the following reasons: 1. Fund the program that is working. Adult stem cells, from a variety of sources, including the placenta, umbilical-cord blood, brain tissue, skin, bone marrow and body fat have been successfully used in treating leukemia patients and cancer patients. Research is proving that these cells may be almost as versatile as embryonic cells and are capable of converting into various types of cells for healing the body without destroying human embryos. Embryonic stem cells have not successfully been used in treatments and are prone to causing tumors and causing rejection problems. Why pour taxpayer money into research to use embryonic cells, when adult cell research is already proving more promising? Fund the program that is already working. The push to fund embryonic cell research so that we can develop “cures” is illogical when more progress is being made to develop cures, more rapidly, with adult stem cells. 2. Human life should be protected at all stages. The killing of human life is never justified for scientific gain. No provision is made to prevent embryonic cell research from developing into fetal tissue research, the next logical step. No provision is made to prevent human cloning or creation of embryos for research purposes. Consider the following excerpt from http://www2.focusonthefamily.com/focusmagazine/sohl/A000000160.cfm "Scientists conducting embryonic stem cell research initially said that destroying existing frozen embryos stored in fertility clinics would be sufficient to provide the cells needed for research. However, scientists at two privately funded laboratories recently lamented that additional sources of embryos are needed and announced that they are taking the quest for embryonic stem cells two further steps, shattering age-old limits in medical ethics. • The Jones Institute, a fertility clinic in Norfolk, Va., announced it is using donor sperm and eggs to create embryos for the sole purpose of destroying the embryos for stem cells. • Advanced Cell Technology, a private biotechnological company in Worcester, Mass., used cloning techniques to create embryos for lethal stem cell harvesting. The announcements confirm scientists’ intent to create human life for the express purpose of destroying it and set the stage for laboratories to create "embryo farms" to provide researchers with an unlimited supply of fresh embryonic stem cells. They also confirm what many critics of embryonic stem cell research fear: The thirst for embryonic stem cells is unquenchable. Proponents of embryonic stem cell research argue in favor of killing embryos (created for reproduction or destruction) for their stem cells based on the notion that is it acceptable to sacrifice embryos for the potential greater good of others. To argue that "surplus" embryos may be thrown away in any case arrogantly glosses over the fact that embryos are living human beings, created in the image of God and deserving protection. They are tiny boys and girls with complete genetic codes, not spare parts for medical experiments. To propose creating human embryos solely for scientific benefit and then destruction is unspeakably evil. It is never morally or ethically acceptable to advance medical science by sacrificing human life, regardless of the promised result. Modern history is rampant with examples of people who were considered expendable for the good of scientific advancement, including experiments conducted upon concentration-camp victims in Nazi Germany and syphilis-infected African-American men left untreated in Tuskegee, Ala. Medical research must have limits guided by ethics, morals and Scripture. If we allow researchers to destroy embryos for their stem cells today, what will prevent the same scientists tomorrow from the equally egregious act of dissecting 6-month-old unborn children in the womb for their body parts? Unless we delineate a clear line establishing that life is present and protected at conception, all human life is at risk." I agree.

 
20555 05/13/2009 at 06:36:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20556 05/13/2009 at 06:36:17 PM Self     We need stem cells, don't let people with a bad view on life, and religions, along with those that have old fashioned views limit the advancement of the future and medical cures.

 
20557 05/13/2009 at 06:36:54 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20558 05/13/2009 at 06:37:39 PM Self     As a person with Young Onset Parkinson's Disease, I firmly support the exploration of all Stem Cell types in the attempt to find a cure or better treatments for not only Parkinson's, but 1000's of other diseases.

From looking at at the NIH guidelines, I feel that they mirror the language in the original ESC bills that had been approved by Congress, prior to the veto by President Bush.

As a conservative, evangelical Christian, I believe that it is through these guidelines that we will be able to keep the research within reasonable standards ( use of embryo's from IVF only, and no SCNT).

 
20559 05/13/2009 at 06:38:11 PM Self     Any proposal that supports taxpayer funds to support the extermination of human life must be denied. Creating life for explicit purpose of experimentation is barbaric and wrong. Embryonic Stem Cell research has yielded NO science that has lead to cures for human diseases, while adult stem cell research has yielded many. I will not support any legislation that allows testing on embryonic stem cells nor will I support any legislator that supports such a proposal.

 
20560 05/13/2009 at 06:41:40 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20561 05/13/2009 at 06:42:10 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20562 05/13/2009 at 06:44:58 PM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos

 
20563 05/13/2009 at 06:47:20 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20564 05/13/2009 at 06:49:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20565 05/13/2009 at 06:50:25 PM Self     Embryonic Stem Cells have been shown to be unpredictable at best, and at worst, very dangerous, even causing tumors. There has been no successful treatment using embryonic stem cells to date. Yet over 70 different treatments have been shown to be successful using "adult" stem cells.

Why are we going to continue pouring money into an ineffective approach that appears to be a dead end while ignoring a very promising approach that is already producing measurable observable results. Money pushed into embryonic stem cell research is money that could be used for adult stem cell research without any of the political over tones and moral questions surrounding embryonic stem cells.

I urge that adult stem cell research be promoted and embryonic stem cell research be left to privately funded groups.

 
20566 05/13/2009 at 06:52:50 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20567 05/13/2009 at 06:55:27 PM Self     I am opposed to these draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I believe this research requires the destruction of innocent human life. I think that if taxpayer money is to be used at all, it should be used for adult stem cell research and treatments. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical and effective in treating patients. Also, it is very important that the proposed regulations should specifically prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This should be very clear, with no loopholes possible.

 
20568 05/13/2009 at 06:56:45 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20569 05/13/2009 at 06:57:06 PM Self     "As a concerned citizen, I fortunately do not suffer from a dibilitating disease that would need healing from stem cell research. Hopefully never. I can't believe anyone would not want stem cell research to go on and help cure a lot of people with serious disease's or paralsis and help them live a better life. I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
20570 05/13/2009 at 06:57:27 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20571 05/13/2009 at 06:57:42 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please consider the protection of human life and not the destruction of it.

 
20572 05/13/2009 at 06:57:48 PM Self     I am writing to oppose the draft guidelines that will force me, through my tax dollars, to fund embryonic stem cell research, which is the destruction of human life!!! Embryo-destruction stem cell research has been proven to be ineffective and at times dangerous. Funding should be limited to other stem cell and omit embryonic. Also, the loophole that can lead to future funds going to research of clones and human-animal hybrids must be closed. At a time when our government is so concerned with the welfare of American citizens, why do they turn a blind eye to the killing of innocent pre-born babies just for the sake of research. The end does not justify the means!

 
20573 05/13/2009 at 06:59:26 PM Self     Please support stem cell reseach. Hopefully it can help develope remedys for different ailments. I don't think it is a moral problem to use these when they are not going to be used to produce babies. You have already received from others all the lengthy text encouraging this, so this is just my personal feeling. I don't think God intends to neglect the infirm, and those with diseases that at present have no cures.

 
20574 05/13/2009 at 06:59:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20575 05/13/2009 at 07:00:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20576 05/13/2009 at 07:02:49 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embyonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of human life. Suport should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embyos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective, and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantlyeffective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I pray for Obama's soul!! He is an evil man, and we are all in alot of trouble!!!! No to the Freedom of Choice Act!!

 
20577 05/13/2009 at 07:03:12 PM Self     It is wrong to play God with science. Embryonic research hasn't produced one single cure. Adult stem cell research does not kill anyone and is more likely to find a cure for diseases. Don't use my tax money to kill innocent little babies. It's disgusting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
20578 05/13/2009 at 07:04:19 PM Self     I am a person diagnosed with Type I diabetes at the age of 27, and have been testing my blood and giving myself 4+ shots/day for the last 20 years. Even with advanced monitoring techniques and insulins, my control is good, but not even close to what a functioning pancreas can provide. I was an F-16 fighter pilot when diagnosed. I was willing to put my life on the line for my country, now I'm asking my country to help my life, and countless others. I support Section II B of the draft guidelines, which appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
20579 05/13/2009 at 07:04:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I would be much more inclined to support stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life. I don't see any case under which our government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos specifically for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has not even been proven to be entirely effective. It has been shown to be dangerous - with the formation of uncontrollable tumors and issues with rejection problems. Adult stem cells on the other hand are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

Another major concern is that the proposed regulation does not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research. My fear is that this could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please reconsider the guidelines in light of these concerns.

Thank you for your time.

 
20580 05/13/2009 at 07:05:53 PM Self     A new human is formed at conception. This is not an opinion nor a religious belief but rather a biological fact. To take a human's life is homicide. Another name for homicide is murder, which is illegal. Changing the words used will never change the facts. Using someone's body parts without his or her permission is illegal. For both of the aforementioned reasons, embryonic stem cell research is immoral. Stop this travesty of justice, please.

 
20581 05/13/2009 at 07:07:02 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20582 05/13/2009 at 07:08:02 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20583 05/13/2009 at 07:10:05 PM Self     I'm totally opposed to stem cell research using embroyoes.

 
20584 05/13/2009 at 07:10:45 PM       I am opposed to federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Support should be given to stem cell research that does not destroy a human life in the process. The creation of clones, human embryos for the purpose of research, and human-animal hybrids should be strictly prohibited.

The use of adult stem cells is ethical and has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diseases. In addition, the use of one's own stem cells does not trigger the problems with rejection that the use of embryonic stem cells does. Also, the use of embryonic stem cells has already been shown to create abnormalities and tumors.

It makes sense to continue adult stem cell research and to abandon the controversial, and potentially dangerous, use of embryonic stem cells in research.

 
20585 05/13/2009 at 07:13:37 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20586 05/13/2009 at 07:14:35 PM Self     Dear Mr. President: I cannot condone stem cell research & the cost to the American people when it has been done successfully already without the use of killing unborn fetes's. Please reconsider continuing to use the proven way to conduct research without using the unborn fetes's. I pray you will consider this option. Your's sincerely,

 
20587 05/13/2009 at 07:16:36 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20588 05/13/2009 at 07:19:23 PM Self     Comment Text (please copy and paste into Comments section) For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20589 05/13/2009 at 07:21:02 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately

 
20590 05/13/2009 at 07:21:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20591 05/13/2009 at 07:22:24 PM Self     We support research to SAVE life not research that takes life in the process.

 
20592 05/13/2009 at 07:23:43 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20593 05/13/2009 at 07:24:09 PM Self     Hello, I am a 57 years old animal scientist from Missouri. I am writing in support of Stem Cell Research by NIH and other federally supported agencies. As I get older, I fully expect to to be treated by stem cell lines that have been cultured to treat tissue failures in my body. This is why I am writing this note of support for all forms of stem cell transplant research. To ignore and dis-allow scientific processes not only hurts American Medicine and science but it also hurts the American economy.

 
20594 05/13/2009 at 07:25:54 PM Self     We oppose any scientific research that destroys human life. No viable cures have been found using embryonic stem cells. Taxpayer money should not be wasted by funding this futile unethical research.

 
20595 05/13/2009 at 07:26:16 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20596 05/13/2009 at 07:27:33 PM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20597 05/13/2009 at 07:27:52 PM Self     I strongly support human embryonic stem cell research. As a former cancer patient, as someone whose grandparents worried about their blood sugar levels, and as the daughter-in-law of a man who suffered from Parkinson’s disease, I hope that stem cell research will someday yield cures to many human diseases.

I am pleased to read that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I believe that Section II B and IV should allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. It is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20598 05/13/2009 at 07:28:09 PM Self     I feel this is an important step in the right direction to allow stem cell research, without restrictions binding them, in order to find cures for diseases AND help for rebuilding body tissues, bones, etc. for otherwise disabling conditions.

 
20599 05/13/2009 at 07:28:55 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20600 05/13/2009 at 07:31:20 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20601 05/13/2009 at 07:31:22 PM Self     Here in the US, our technology in this area has improved ten fold, and our ability to gather the Same information using Adult Stem cells, it seems ludicrous to use an unborn child for research. What if your mother or father chose to do that to you?! Does any one in Washington have a conscience?! I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
20602 05/13/2009 at 07:31:49 PM       I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20603 05/13/2009 at 07:32:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20604 05/13/2009 at 07:32:52 PM Self     Dear President, Please do not fund embrionic stem cell research. To date there has been no success cases using these cells, so not only are we killing human beings for research but it is wasting precious dollars. Adult stem cell research needs additional money, if there is any, because to date they have had huge success cases 81 at present. Please reconsider and stop the killing.

 
20605 05/13/2009 at 07:35:10 PM Self     As a person suffering from a spinal cord injury, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20606 05/13/2009 at 07:35:13 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank yo

 
20607 05/13/2009 at 07:38:01 PM Self     We urge you not to use our tax dollars to fund research on human embryos. They are genetically the same as live human beings, and should be protected from harm. Research on adult stem cells has already shown good results in treating diseases and conditions.

 
20608 05/13/2009 at 07:42:22 PM Self     Are not these "stem cell providing" entities human? Are not humans protected by our constitution?

History will regard this administration as heinously evil, exploiting weak, defenseless human beings.

I most strenuously object to these proceedings and feel bitterly used that my tax dollars are being used to support such evil practices.

 
20609 05/13/2009 at 07:42:49 PM Self     Use of embryonic stem cells is unethical and immoral by any standard of natural laws. I oppose the use of my tax money for such a purpose. Regardless, such use is totally unnecessary, since there have been no proven benefit from any related embryonic stem cell research; whereas, adult stem cell research has had abundant results!

Funding of such research is an abuse and misuse of government power and represents a total disregard for formative human life and a violation of basic morality.

DO NOT FUND SUCH RESEARCH!

 
20610 05/13/2009 at 07:43:08 PM Self     There is no basis for killing any eggs that can produce a life. Embrionic Stem Cells have never peoduced any advances in medicine. In fact they can cause cancer in individuals that they have been used on. Adult stem cells, cord blood have produced more cures and advancementd then embrionic stem cells have. Life comes from God and only He takes life. This is called the natural law. Remember, you will meet Him some day and will have to answer for all of your killing of innocent lives.

 
20611 05/13/2009 at 07:44:44 PM Self     It's about time !!!!

 
20612 05/13/2009 at 07:45:00 PM Self     We the undersigned urge the Obama Administration not to fund stem cell research that destroys human life! STOP THIS NONSENSE NOW!!

-We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force us as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that DO NOT DESTROY HUMAN LIFE and are already proven successful. WE THINK THIS IS EASY TO UNDERSTAND!! NOT TO DESTROY HUMAN LIFE!

There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. ADULT STEM CELLS are NON-CONTROVERSIAL, ETHICAL, and most importantly, EFFECTIVE in treating patients. We should NOT fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. THIS LOOPHOLE MUST BE CLOSED IMMEDIATELY!!!

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." -Edmund Burke

 
20613 05/13/2009 at 07:45:07 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20614 05/13/2009 at 07:46:28 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

This is a destruction of human life.

 
20615 05/13/2009 at 07:47:56 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20616 05/13/2009 at 07:49:07 PM Self     “Section II B should read to allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT.

"As a patient suffering from diabetes and auto immune hemolytic anemia and myodisplasia, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. " Respectfully submitted,

 
20617 05/13/2009 at 07:50:01 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20618 05/13/2009 at 07:50:14 PM Self     I would like it to be known that, I believe that doing testing on embryonic stem cells, is the taking of life and I believe that adult stem cells hold more hope for cures to diseases So it's not even necessary to deal with Embryonic Stem cells and the taking of live This present Administration is just "changing" things to go against George Bush"s policy or just to change it Do you not fear God? Heaven help us, one and all I do not believe you should force the tax payers to pay for something we don't believe in

 
20619 05/13/2009 at 07:50:26 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20620 05/13/2009 at 07:50:56 PM Self     The final draft of NIH human stem cell guidelines must include stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived to be elibible for federal funding. I strongly support the inclusion of stem cell lines from SCNT.

 
20621 05/13/2009 at 07:52:15 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20622 05/13/2009 at 07:53:42 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20623 05/13/2009 at 07:54:00 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you!

 
20624 05/13/2009 at 07:54:57 PM Self     We wish to state that we are absolutely, categorically opposed to any and all research or other activity which either directly or indirectly causes, involves, or is related in any way to the destruction of human embryos. We believe that human embryos are fully human, endowed with the same inalienable right to life guaranteed to all others as observed by our founding fathers in their wisdom. As such, we view the draft guidelines published by the National Institute of Health as they refer to embryonic stem cell research to be not only immoral, but illegal according to the U.S. Constitution's own words. Use of federal money, which is, ultimately, money essentially extracted from the public and purportedly for the public good, often without the benefit of popular input, to in any way fund destructive embryonic research is therefore something we vehemently and comprehensively oppose. This is not, in our view, a debatable or negotiable issue. The destruction of a human embryo is murder, and must be absolutely prohibited. Further, no credible research findings have yet demonstrated that significant medical benefits or treatments have been realized via any form or volume of embryonic stem cell research. All unbiased statistical analysis has shown that the only genuinely promising efforts involve the use of adult stem cells. All moral arguments aside, the sheer economic weight of that fact must prohibit further government involvement in embryonic research. With our economy already in a shambles as the result of decades of ridiculously incompetent government, spending more money on research which shows so little real promise, let alone which is completely heinous in nature, would be inexcusable.

 
20625 05/13/2009 at 07:58:16 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20626 05/13/2009 at 07:58:23 PM       There is enough baby killing going on through the use of abortion as birth control, without our killing innocent life in order to keep doing failing experiments, and ignoring successful ones.

Murder is murder stop wasting life and OUR hard earned money.

 
20627 05/13/2009 at 08:00:04 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven succesfull. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroys human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20628 05/13/2009 at 08:01:59 PM Self     To whom it may concern---

I respectfully, yet totally and completely, oppose the use of taxpayer dollars to be used to fund stem cell research. The Susan B. Anthony List expresses my own personal views very well as follows:

"I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately".

I could not have said it better myself. It is time for me to be represented in government as well, and this matters to me enormously. Please give your urgent attention to this matter! Thank you.

 
20629 05/13/2009 at 08:02:29 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20630 05/13/2009 at 08:02:47 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidlines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research. Embryo destructive stem cell research has shown to ineffective and even dangerous due to rejection problems.

We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life. There are other options that do not destroy human life. Loopholes in these proposed regulations should be closed now so that there can be no future funding for embryonic stem cell research and there can be no creation of clones and human animal hybrids.

 
20631 05/13/2009 at 08:03:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20632 05/13/2009 at 08:04:14 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20633 05/13/2009 at 08:07:08 PM Organization Sisters of Saint Francis Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Commission 7665 Assisi Heights, Colorado Springs, CO 80919-3837 We are opposed to the draft guidelines from embryonic stem cell research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Research should be directed to stem cell research and treatment that does not destroy human life. You are aware of the Catholic Church's position of the dignity of human life being created in the image of the Maker. We feel that all research and treatment should be directed to enhancing human dignity.

 
20634 05/13/2009 at 08:07:10 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20635 05/13/2009 at 08:09:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20636 05/13/2009 at 08:09:30 PM Self     Adult Stem Cells work in most research projects consistantly. You can also use your own stem cells! Now why would anyone want to sacrifice little babies for research when we have something that works without killing human persons? Please note: When Embryonic Stem Cells are used Tumors result, not success. More Good News for serious researchers! A Jewish Group has isolated more than 10,000 stem cell varieties compatible with a huge percentage of the world's population and offer them to all in need! They are located in Boca Raton, Fl.(Jewish Journal,on front page, Deerfield Beach, Fl.) There is Hope!

 
20637 05/13/2009 at 08:10:04 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
20638 05/13/2009 at 08:13:18 PM Self     Please allow as much federal funding as possible for human embrionic stem cell research. This is one of the most important ways federal funds should be spent. I have watched friends and relatives suffer and die due to limited funding of ground-breaking medical research. Go for the gold! Keep religion in church and out of government decision-making. Fund ALL medical research to make ALL of our lives better and longer.

 
20639 05/13/2009 at 08:14:10 PM Self     President Obama, I am opposed to taxpayer dollars being spent to support embryonic stem cell research. Tax dollars should not be used to destroy human lives in the name of research. Further, studies on adult stem cells have been shown to be more promising while tumors and other adverse effects have come from embryonic stem cell experiments. Lets work on the more promising research-the usd of adult stem cells. Furthermore, the proposal does not prohibit work toward cloning or human-animal hybrids. Please hear my request as a concerned United States citizen. Respectfully,

 
20640 05/13/2009 at 08:15:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20641 05/13/2009 at 08:15:47 PM Self Hadassah 50 W. 58th St, New York, New York Gentlemen; As a member of Hadassah, I am aware of the outstanding research on the use of stem cell being done in Israel at our hospital at Ein Karen. As a professional in a rehabilitation field, I am aware of the tremendous potential of stem cells in the treatment and hopefully the cure of many diseases, from childhood diabetes, to muscular dystrophy, to Lou Gehrig's disease, to Parkinson's disease. Tremendous suffering, waste of human potential, and expense to the health system could be alieviated by the expected results of stem cell research. I know that in Israel tremendous strides are being made. Yes, there needs to be careful oversight, and legislation, to prevent abuse and commercialization. I am aware of the ethical issues-but as a reform Jew I know that G-d commands that potential to save life takes precidence over all. As a society we are capable of putting the safeguards in that will prevent abuse. Let us permit the saving of life. Thank you for your consideration.

 
20642 05/13/2009 at 08:17:12 PM Self     Members of my family have diabetes and a good friend is permanently in a wheelchair due to a spinal cord injury. I am almost sixty and I sincerely hope that a cure for these medical problems will be realized in my lifetime.

Section II B of the draft guidelines should be broadened to include research for any stem cell lines that are ethical now or in the future.

The final guidelines should also cover federal funding for stem cell lines coming from other sources such as SCNT. The draft guidelines appear not to specifically allow coverage of "other source" stem cell lines that are ethical. What is the government's interest in not allowing federal funding of stem cell research as long as it is ethical? I can think of none.

 
20643 05/13/2009 at 08:20:02 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. I am hoping that this will help to cure many cancers as I am a breast cancer survivor and worry about my daughters and granddaughters. Thank you.

 
20644 05/13/2009 at 08:20:39 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org. Thank you! JDRF Government Relations Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done! As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
20645 05/13/2009 at 08:20:42 PM Self     I am writing to ask President Obama to not fund stem cell research that destroys human life. It is my opinion that NIH-funded research in this area is unethical, irresponsible, and not scientifically worthy.

 
20646 05/13/2009 at 08:21:42 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20647 05/13/2009 at 08:22:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20648 05/13/2009 at 08:23:53 PM Self     All human lives, including yours and mine, start with stem cells. The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20649 05/13/2009 at 08:26:15 PM Self     1. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem research which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research which requires the destruction of a innocent human life.

2. Embryonic stem research has not proven to be effective, but has been shown to be dangerous.

3. There are no guidelines in place to prevent this research to be used in human cloning, which is clearly unethical

4. Adult stem cells are non-controversial and have been shown to be effective in treating patients. Our taxpaper dollars should be directed towards further research on this.

 
20650 05/13/2009 at 08:26:26 PM Self     I wish to register my disapproval of embryonic stem cell research. It is an endeavor that has so far proven unhelpful and the ethical implications are severe.

To begin, destroying life hardly fits in the definition of the word "Responsible" as used in the name of Executive Order 13505. It is irresponsible to engage in unethical behavior.

Second, I question your inclusion of the statement on Long-standing Department of Health and Human Services regulations for protection of Human Subjects, 45 CRF, part 46. Embryonic Human Subjects would not be able to receive informed consent. This research means certain termination of their lives.

I ask why more funding could not go towards adult stem cell research? It has been successful in curing numerous ailments and has proven safer than embryonic research. iPS research is also promising and may soon lead to miraculous cures. Isn't it more responsible, particularly in this economy, to put money into programs that work rather than in hoped-for outcomes? The qualifying statements in this Draft such as "may yield information..." and "perhaps the most important potential use..." clearly indicate that any promising result from embryonic stem cell research is long in manifesting itself.

Let us stop wasting tax payer dollars on unethical, unyielding programs and get down to the serious business of promoting the general welfare of the American people.

Thank you for your consideration.

 
20651 05/13/2009 at 08:26:59 PM Self     I am writing on behalf of my beautiful, talented, intelligent daughter who was diagnosed as a Type 1 diabetic 30 years ago. She has achieved much in her work (Columbia River salmon research)and athletic endeavors, and deserves the best research for a cure that you can provide.

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page