Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
19886 05/13/2009 at 11:41:48 AM Organization Hadassah 50 West 58th Street, NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19887 05/13/2009 at 11:42:19 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19888 05/13/2009 at 11:42:33 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19889 05/13/2009 at 11:42:38 AM Organization Hadassah Hadassah.org Please support all stem cell research.

 
19890 05/13/2009 at 11:42:54 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19891 05/13/2009 at 11:43:04 AM Self     Efforts to save human life should always respect other human life, even at its very beginning. Please specify that cell research and treatments use only methods that hurt no other human life--even in the earliest stage--from whatever source--and whether considered wanted or unwanted.

The use only of adult stem cells is an ethical and effective alternative.

 
19892 05/13/2009 at 11:43:19 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19893 05/13/2009 at 11:43:29 AM Self     I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of=2 0type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19894 05/13/2009 at 11:43:41 AM Self     I completely dont understand how you and your administration can be so heartless against the unborn and babies.Yet,you do everything possible to protect and cuddle horrible terrorists that have nothing else in there minds but kill and torture innocent lives and our servicemen and women.Sounds to me like you all have your priorties mixed up and are completely horrorfying.I pray for you, Obama and your administration.I wish you well and success in your position even though I didnt vote for you.But,as President you are President to ALL American citizens,alive and unborn,regardless of there religious and party affliation,Not just to one group of people.That is why you have to serve from the middle for equality for all.

 
19895 05/13/2009 at 11:43:44 AM Self   I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research for the following reasons: 1) It forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. A position that is morally reprehensible to me and the majority of Americans. It is against my beliefs. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life. These are techniques and procedures that have already proven successful. 2) There is no case for which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Such research requires the extensive creation and destruction of human life and is against the religious precepts of the vast majority of Americans. 3) Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and dangerous. Results have led to uncontrollable tumors and rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not do so. 4) The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. Such research is an abomination to the vast majority of Americans. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19896 05/13/2009 at 11:44:51 AM Self     As a physician and a mother, I believe life begins at conception. I am disgusted that young human remains would be utilized for research purposes. Please know how strongly I oppose this Stem Cell Executive Order.

 
19897 05/13/2009 at 11:45:24 AM Self     As a former embryo, I oppose the destruction of these tiniest of our US Citizens. We must have LIFE before we can have liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Please do not support any bills or legislation that would support the intentional killing of human beings. This is worse than Nazi Germany and the concentration camps. People questioned why others didn't do anything when the Nazi's were killing Jewish people, Catholic people, and any people that they thought not worthy of life. How is this any different? It is worse.

Peace,

 
19898 05/13/2009 at 11:46:01 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19899 05/13/2009 at 11:46:07 AM Self     May 13, 2009 National Stem Cell Guidelines MSC7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20892

The NIH draft guidelines are a dramatic improvement over the restrictive 2001 funding policy for embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, but they could be even better. Instead of creating a new, parallel system of research governance using criteria that are both incomplete and overly rigid, NIH should focus on respecting and protecting donors by using the established, federal regulatory system for protecting human research subjects and tissue donors. This would result in a unitary system offering superior donor protection and simpler, more effective implementation. The federal Common Rule requires voluntary informed consent before an embryo can be donated for research with identifying information about its donors’ genetic or infectious disease risks. To give informed consent, donors must understand their options, be aware of any risks from participation, appreciate the purpose of the research, and know their decision will not affect their medical care. The Common Rule also requires oversight of every aspect of the donation, from initial approach to the donors to the final receipt of the embryo, in order to ensure that there are no misunderstandings or undue inducements. This oversight is provided by an independent body, the Institutional Review Board (IRB), which must by regulatory requirement include a representative of the public. IRBs are guided by peer-reviewed literature and professional society best practice recommendations, and they consider such issues as specificity of consent, donor confidentiality, compensation, and profit-sharing from commercialization (3). In addition, the regulatory regime provides a mechanism for auditing research sites and imposing sanctions on those who fail to abide by these rules. If NIH were to fund work with hESC lines only if the initial donation was done with voluntary informed consent, and this was assured by an IRB, then there would be confidence that the lines were the product of responsible research practices conforming to the highest standards of respect and protection for donors. 1. The informed consent process for deriving the lines as described in the guidelines is basically the same as that already used for the donation of human tissue under the Common Rule, which requires voluntary informed consent, an appreciation of alternatives, and information about any risks or benefits. The draft guidelines, however, risk creating confusion because they use slightly different words and procedures. We recommend that any line derived from materials originally donated in accordance with the Common Rule be acceptable for use in NIH-funded research. The same standard should be applied to existing lines and to lines that are derived in the future. Similarly, the same standard should apply to lines derived here and abroad.

2. As a practical matter, the vast majority of lines already in existence were originally derived from embryos donated in accordance with the Common Rule. As is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that this occurred. And again, as is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that lines derived abroad come from materials originally donated in an acceptable manner.

3. The same considerations should apply to embryos already donated but from lines have not yet been derived, that is, the lines that are derived from them in the future should be usable in NIH-funded work provided the original donation was done in accordance with the Common Rule.

4. ESCROs and SCROs will be optional, with some institutions choosing to eliminate them entirely, and others maintaining them as a source of advice.

5. The advantage to this proposal is that it takes advantage of the fact that IRBs are already required to assure that cell lines and tissues have been obtained in an appropriate manner. This proposal avoids the redundancy and confusion inherent in the draft guidelines' approach.

Sincerely,

***** Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation 614 Walnut Street, 13th Floor Madison, WI 53726

 
19900 05/13/2009 at 11:46:19 AM Self     Why are we even considering the harvesting of human embryos... which is where this legislation will lead? It is just another step to devalue human life...to kill an innocent, growing life merely to lengthen the life of others. If you have children or if you are even alive...don't pass this legislation. Surely, we will answer to our Creator someday for attempting to do this. Even if you do not believe that there is a God, think about the ramifications of sacrificing the innocent. Someday, as we all age and become useless in society's eyes, we will surely be harvested for others. Does anyone remember the movie, Soylent Green? Please oppose this legilation.

Sincerely,

 
19901 05/13/2009 at 11:46:29 AM Self   I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research for the following reasons: 1) It forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. A position that is morally reprehensible to me and the majority of Americans. It is against my beliefs. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life. These are techniques and procedures that have already proven successful. 2) There is no case for which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Such research requires the extensive creation and destruction of human life and is against the religious precepts of the vast majority of Americans. 3) Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and dangerous. Results have led to uncontrollable tumors and rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not do so. 4) The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. Such research is an abomination to the vast majority of Americans. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19902 05/13/2009 at 11:46:43 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19903 05/13/2009 at 11:47:21 AM Organization Hadassah WZOA 50 West 58th Street, NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19904 05/13/2009 at 11:47:54 AM Self Hadassah 50 West 58th St, New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19905 05/13/2009 at 11:47:58 AM Self     I strongly oppose your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I do not want my tax money to be used to subsidize research that requires the destruction of innocent human life. Rather, if any support is given it should be provided to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy a human life and are already proven successful. Under no case should government support be given to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
19906 05/13/2009 at 11:49:08 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern,

As a U.S. citizen and a Roman Catholic I am writing to tell you that I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force ME as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is NO case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be INEFFECTIVE and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, EFFECTIVE in treating patients. We SHOULD NOT fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations DO NOT prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids!! THIS LOOPHOLE MUST BE CLOSED IMMEDIATELY!

 
19907 05/13/2009 at 11:49:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19908 05/13/2009 at 11:49:39 AM Self     We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19909 05/13/2009 at 11:50:57 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19910 05/13/2009 at 11:50:58 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me as a taxpayer and a Catholic to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and have already been proven successful. I do not believe in embryonic stem cell research and abortion. It is not right for ordinary people to decide when someone lives or dies. If you put yourself in the place of an unborn baby from conception until natural death, I can guarantee that you would not want any ordinary, uncompassionate person making that decision. Thank you for reading this and considering what I had to say. God Bless You.

 
19911 05/13/2009 at 11:51:31 AM Self     We strongly believe in the sanctity of life. We strongly oppose the creation of life, embryos, for scientific research. We strongly oppose the destruction of life, embryos, for scientific research. We strongly believe science has given us other viable options for stem cell research without the use of human embryos. We will always vote against any politician or policy that supports human embryonic stem cell research!

 
19912 05/13/2009 at 11:51:45 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
19913 05/13/2009 at 11:53:07 AM Self     I do not support the destruction of human embryos for YOUR radical and dangerous research simply because I have some morals. However, since the new administration has, in my belief, abused his power to pass this law then I have an idea. Instead of using my tax dollars for something I and millions of other tax payers do not support, just use the tax dollars of the people that are pro-choice or are in favor of the Freedom of Choice Act. I am sure they wouldn't mind "ponying up the dough" for your immoral precious research. Perhaps you can get enough funds from those celeberities in Hollywood who support and voted for the new administration. I don't support the views for this cause so don't use my money.

 
19914 05/13/2009 at 11:53:28 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life, particularly when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19915 05/13/2009 at 11:53:33 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19916 05/13/2009 at 11:53:42 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19917 05/13/2009 at 11:53:44 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19918 05/13/2009 at 11:54:50 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19919 05/13/2009 at 11:55:04 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for your serious and thoughtful consideration of this important matter.

 
19920 05/13/2009 at 11:55:19 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19921 05/13/2009 at 11:55:34 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19922 05/13/2009 at 11:56:47 AM Self     In as much as stem cells from embryos have proved to be ineffective for curing disease while adult stem cells have shown promise for curing several diseases, please discontinue using tax dollars to continue research with embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, aside from the problems which have arisen in using embryonic stem cells, the use of these stem cells requires the killing of an innocent human being, which I oppose.

 
19923 05/13/2009 at 11:56:51 AM Organization Hadassah 50 West 58th Street, NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19924 05/13/2009 at 11:56:56 AM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
19925 05/13/2009 at 11:57:21 AM Organization Greater Atlanta Hadassah 47 Perimeter Center East, Ste. 210, Atlanta, GA 30346 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19926 05/13/2009 at 11:57:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19927 05/13/2009 at 11:59:15 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19928 05/13/2009 at 11:59:20 AM Self     We must not delay drafting sensible and workable guidelines for this vital research. Other countries are already free to advance the understanding and application of this exciting tool, and each day we fall behind them. Our families are suffering and dying while we debate and split hairs. Everyone is ready, labs are equipped, scientists have testing plans, sick and frightened people are hoping, and we finally have government support. No more delays. People are suffering pain and dying while others talk endlessly. Get on with it, lead, follow or get out of the way.

 
19929 05/13/2009 at 11:59:26 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am both a scientist and a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

It is critical that the door be opened to stem cell research and that a minority, albeit vociferous, not be allowed to block such a promising avenue of research.

 
19930 05/13/2009 at 12:00:36 PM Self     I am heart broken that I am not able to do with *****, my Grandchild, the things I do with the rest of my Grandchildren. I can take each Grandchild on a trip. I can not take my yougest Grandchild any where with out supervision of one of his parents. I don't know if I will live long enough to make up for that later in life.We need to find a cure. For the sake of all children that suffer so much.

 
19931 05/13/2009 at 12:01:32 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19932 05/13/2009 at 12:01:46 PM Self     I am opposed to government funding of embryonic stem cell research. It is a highly questionable form of research and I feel unethical. It is unconscionable to force tax payers who are morally opposed to this kind of disregard for human life to pay for it.

Furthermore, it has been proven that embryonic stem cells are not necessary. Adult stem cells have produced great results in tests and have numerous successes in patients around the world. It would be far more productive for research dollars to be spent in adult stem cell research.

Also, the regulations do not set limits to even more questionable research methods such as human cloning and animal/human hybrids. Once you take this step, then the next is that much easier.

Please follow where the results have been in adult stem cell research and avoid the moral dilemmas of embryo-destructive research. It is a more productive use of funds and takes the moral high ground, valuing human life instead of making it a commodity.

 
19933 05/13/2009 at 12:02:04 PM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19934 05/13/2009 at 12:02:08 PM Self     Please, please do not fund "embryonic" stem cell research. It requires the destruction of human life, has met with no success and has caused many health problems in its use. I don't want my tax dollars used in such a destructive way.

Respectfully,

 
19935 05/13/2009 at 12:02:14 PM Self     Embryonic stem-cell research is against God's law. It destroys human life, it devalues and degrades human dignity. So far it never produced any cure just a growth of tumors. We do not need human-animal hybrids on this planet. Stop this nonsense before God will act. We will all have to pay for sins of scientists and all politicians who support this destructive evil. You did not create life and you have no right to take it for your advantage. Adult stem-cells cure diseases so continue research here.

 
19936 05/13/2009 at 12:02:21 PM Self     Taking stem cells from embryonic humans is murder. Stop using my tax dollars to commit this crime!

I have no doubt the next step will be to "breed" these embryos for experimentation then destruction.

 
19937 05/13/2009 at 12:02:21 PM Self     Dear President,

There is NO need to even consider embryonic stem cell research when you have the alternative stem cell research producing the necessary stem cells for medical advancements proposed. I am very much against the use of embroyonic stem cell for research. Our tax dollars should not be used to support the destruction of human life in anyway. I am also against being taxed to pay for abortions.

Respectfully.

 
19938 05/13/2009 at 12:03:46 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19939 05/13/2009 at 12:03:48 PM Self     Stem cells are available from human embryos, from adults, or placenta cords which are discarded after birth.

The use of stem cells from human embryos destroys the life of that human while the stem cells from adults and cord blood does not in any way harm an individual.

The stem cells from embryos have not produced any advances but have caused tumors and rejection by the person implanted with the embryonic stem cells while a person's own stem cells obtained from their own skin or fat reserves are not rejected and have produced cures on numerous occasions.

It is not acceptable to kill even one human for research. Funding for adult stem cell research should be the only research funded by taxpayers.

 
19940 05/13/2009 at 12:03:52 PM Self     I am very hurt and disappointed that our President does not respect and honor life. He continues to show over and over his lack of support of life. He of anyone you would think would understand, since he is so focused on equality and justice. This is not only a religious issue this is an issue of humanity. Our Declaration of Independence states...."We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Life endowed by our Creator. Life is created. Even in its smallest form it is creation by a Creator. Creating an environment where life can grow and thrive should be a basic principle, a foundation for all of our laws and principles. It was for our Forefathers. This country has always been known for its compassion, civility and liberty. Of all things that are being stripped away every day, disagreements on both sides of the aisle on determining the standards and principles we should uphold, the one thing we should never argue is on the issue of life. This is the basic principle that with out it no other issue will able to stand. This President will yield to everything, because he has no regard for life. I am deeply saddened once again by this administration and their lack of conscious.

 
19941 05/13/2009 at 12:04:15 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
19942 05/13/2009 at 12:05:25 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19943 05/13/2009 at 12:05:58 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19944 05/13/2009 at 12:06:04 PM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19945 05/13/2009 at 12:06:41 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19946 05/13/2009 at 12:07:39 PM Organization Hadassah, The Women's Zionist Organization of America 50 West 58th Street, New York, NY 10019 Hadassah is America's largest women's organization. Our work emphasizes the importance of medical research in developing new health care technology. We believe that we can build bridges to peace through healing. And stem cell research holds the promise to treat and perhaps even cure a myriad of devastating diseases including diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Lou Gehrig's, spinal cord injuries, sickle cell anemia and multiple sclerosis... debilitating over 100 million Americans. Hadassah's Hospital in Israel is a world leader in stem cell research through its Institute of Gene Therapy; and here in the US, we are lead advocates of stem cell research. Hadassah members have a unique interest in seeing that these Stem Cell Guidelines are precise and accurate. Specifically, we believe it is imperative to include wording that states that cell lines are derived via prevailing ethical standards and thus eligible for federal funds. We also ask that the language in the Executive Order states all stem cell lines from somatic cell nuclear transfer are likewise eligible for federal funding. We need specific clear guidelines in order to hasten development of new therapies and cures for the brave patients awaiting such treatment. Thank you for hearing our voice! -

 
19947 05/13/2009 at 12:07:54 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. This is in keeping with the wellness of the blessed planet earth. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. The generation to come will benefit from the essence of protecting the intricate web of life. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
19948 05/13/2009 at 12:08:39 PM Self     PLEASE LISTEN AND UNDERSTAND THAT I BELIEVE WITH FAITH IN OUR COUNTRY THAT IT WAS CREATED TO PROTECT ME AND ALL PEOPLE AS GOD IS OUR CREATOR AND GIVER OF LIFE.

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19949 05/13/2009 at 12:08:48 PM Self     I am really hoping soon there can be a cure for Type 1 diabetis. I have read and studied so much information on this, that there is a number of things that are possibilities could and might happen. It is so sad not to be able to have a good quality of life without a disease to have to change that. I just hope and pray there will be something soon.

 
19950 05/13/2009 at 12:08:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19951 05/13/2009 at 12:08:58 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to your guidelines recommended for embryonic stem cell research. I am morally opposed this type of research, and I do not want to fund it in any way! Adult stem cell research has shown much more promise and I do not see a need to destroy these embryos for research purposes.

 
19952 05/13/2009 at 12:09:18 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19953 05/13/2009 at 12:09:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately

 
19954 05/13/2009 at 12:10:06 PM Self     It is morally, ethically & economically WRONG to use taxpayer monies to promote embryonic stem cell research (murdering the most-defenseless Life) - especially when there are NO scientific studies indicating promising results; instead, we need to be funding ADULT STEM CELL research which already has a proven track record. This nation needs to grope it's way through the darkness and horror of immorality towards sterling ethics & integrity; otherwise, we will have lost our way as a Christian nation and will be plummeted into the chaos engendered by the lack of principle and morality.

 
19955 05/13/2009 at 12:10:58 PM Self     It is a good news for patient community, and medical community. However, this is only a first step. As the iPS cell technology has reached the first major milestone: i.e. establishing iPS cells without transgene integration in their genome. Focus will be place how we can differentiate them to a lineage/cell-type of interest. Massive comparative studies with fresh human ES cells are needed. As long as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment is effective, however, NIH-funding is not usable for establishing a new embryonic stem cell line. This means that the fresh human ES cells have to come from overseas. Dickey-Wicker Amendment should be lifted too.

 
19956 05/13/2009 at 12:11:29 PM Self     -I am vehemently opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. These guidelines force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is absolutely no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19957 05/13/2009 at 12:12:09 PM Self     Dear Mr. President,

You must immedietly cease and dissist with implementing your embryonic stem cell initiatives. If you do not then you are commiting murder. It is plain and simple. If severley punch a pregnant women's belly then the embryo or baby will die which means the baby/embyro was alive. This type of act will have created death. Your legalazation of embyronic stem cell research creates death to embryo's and is an act of murder.

I will hold you accountable for your actions and pursue life in prisonment and even the death penalty for you.

Truthfully Yours,

 
19958 05/13/2009 at 12:12:26 PM Self     Anthony Atala of Wake Forest confirms that embryonic stem cell research only gives information on the embryonic stem cell BUT the embryonic stem cells are useless for helping anyone. People's skin, organs and bones provide stem cells.

 
19959 05/13/2009 at 12:13:00 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19960 05/13/2009 at 12:13:44 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
19961 05/13/2009 at 12:14:40 PM Self     Embryonic Stem Cell Research is not a science motivated program, but a politically motivated one. Embryonic Stem Cell research has resulted in nothing but problems. Since embryonic cells are so universal, they can grow into anything, and that is exactly what they do. Their growth is in fact uncontrollable The most recent example of their out of control growth was the surgical removal of a number of tumors in an Israeli Student, caused by injection of Embryonic Stem Cells in a Russian Hospital to cure a so far incurable nerve disease. Contrast this to the many successes of Adult and Umbilical Blood stem cell research, with success stories numbering in the dozens, if not hundreds by now. This new legislation not only allows for public funding of so far utterly failed Embryonic stem cell research, but at the same time cuts public funding for the research that has shown increasing progress, Adult Stem Cell research. This legislation is the attempt by the Obama to justify his utter disregard for the unborn human life in two ways: 1, By ending public financing of Adult Stem Cell research, he diminishes the success rate of this so far very promising research. 2, Should there be some progress, however slow and expensive and however many human lives have been sacrificed in the process of this "Success", he will use the power of the Washington Press Corps to amplify even the smallest of progress as success of his policies. This policy simply is to implement the same policies he tried to implement as a state senator: Obama's total disregard for any human life within the first 30 days after birth. In the interest of political goals, proven medical research progress is blocked or slowed down for some "pie in the sky" promise. The man and his policies are monstrous.

 
19962 05/13/2009 at 12:14:50 PM Organization Hadassah 50 West 58th St. New York, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19963 05/13/2009 at 12:14:54 PM Self     I am opposed to the drafted guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. It would force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I support stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and have already been proven successful. .

Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, have been effective in treating certain diseases. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The end never justifies the means.

Also, the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Under no circumstances do I want my tax money to fund destruction of human life in any form from conception to a natural death.

 
19964 05/13/2009 at 12:14:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19965 05/13/2009 at 12:15:11 PM Self     I am a retired dental hygenist, and am concerned about stem cell research getting out of hand or in the wrong hands. Just today in the news (Fox News) a story ran about labs in "garages" and the threat of the wrong viris being created by the "Back Yard" lab. Also things washing up on the shoreline of this country that are unidentifiable, cloning perhaps. I don't like the scary things. All this is scary and leads to the unknown. Be careful with what God made with his hands and don"t distroy or kill it. So please read the Guidlines carfully and compleatly, with God our maker in mind. Quilter,

 
19966 05/13/2009 at 12:15:52 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19967 05/13/2009 at 12:15:56 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19968 05/13/2009 at 12:16:23 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19969 05/13/2009 at 12:17:10 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19970 05/13/2009 at 12:17:41 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Adult stem cells have already been proven to treat diseases. That is where private, not government funds should be provided.

 
19971 05/13/2009 at 12:17:50 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
19972 05/13/2009 at 12:18:07 PM Self     As everyone knows or should by now that the use of embryonic stem cells is not the way to go. They cause many problems rather than help in all cases. Adult stem cells have shown great success in over 70 cases---why then dose one continue to destroy human life for these tests??? Is the government getting kick backs to forward this ineffective science? Please tell us why you continue to go forward with a worthless procedure when more can be achieved with adult stem cells!

 
19973 05/13/2009 at 12:18:10 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19974 05/13/2009 at 12:18:25 PM Self     Adult stem cells are fine with me, but embriotic cells are linked to abortion. Abortion is murder and not acceptable. About 4500 babies are terminated each day. Makes 6 years in Iraq or 9-11 look like child's play by comparison. I am against stem cell research using embriotic stem cells. Please let them know this is wrong.

 
19975 05/13/2009 at 12:18:36 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you

 
19976 05/13/2009 at 12:20:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19977 05/13/2009 at 12:21:39 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19978 05/13/2009 at 12:21:54 PM Self     Adult stem cells are fine with me, but embriotic cells are linked to abortion. Abortion is murder and not acceptable. About 4500 babies are terminated each day. Makes 6 years in Iraq or 9-11 look like child's play by comparison. I am against stem cell research using embriotic stem cells. Please let them know this is wrong.

 
19979 05/13/2009 at 12:22:16 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19980 05/13/2009 at 12:22:42 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19981 05/13/2009 at 12:22:49 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19982 05/13/2009 at 12:24:38 PM Self     To Whom It May Concern: We oppose the use of tax payer funds to perform research on embryonic stem cells. John and I find this research unethical in that the blastocysts that are used are a unique human life. We find that it's arrogant of the U.S. government to force Americans to pay for this research during our country's financial crisis. The biotech industry should be funded privately for this research and not be given tax payer funds.

 
19983 05/13/2009 at 12:24:51 PM Self     Please explain to me why the success and efficacy of adult stem cell research is being ignored and attention, time, money and effort continue to be misspent on embryonic stem cell research. Adult stem cells cause no ethical delima and, importantly, adult stem cell research has had very positive results.

I am so opposed to being forced to fund embryonic stem cell research which destroys human life and to which I am morally opposed. I consider it a violation of my rights. Please do all that you can to stop embryonic stem cell research.

 
19984 05/13/2009 at 12:25:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19985 05/13/2009 at 12:25:28 PM Self     I cannot sit idly by and watch as my federal tax dollars are used to subsidize such an abomination as human embryonic stem cell research. I am opposed to any research that requires the destruction of innocent human life. I believe support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and have already been proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, EFFECTIVE in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations DO NOT PREVENT FUTURE FUNDING FOR EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH THAT COULD LEAD TO THE CREATION OF CLONES AND HUMAN-ANIMAL HYBRIDS. THIS LOOPHOLE MUST BE CLOSED IMMEDIATELY. PLEASE DO NOT ENACT THESE NEW REGULATIONS!! WE ARE HEADED FOR A MOST DANGEROUS SLIPPERY SLOPE IF YOU DO.

 



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