Untitled Document
Department of Health and Human Services

Part 1. Overview Information

Participating Organization(s)

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Components of Participating Organizations

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Eye Institute (NEI)

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR)

Funding Opportunity Title
Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN): Small Molecule Drug Discovery and Development for Disorders of the Nervous System (U44 Clinical Trial Optional)
Activity Code

U44 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Cooperative Agreements - Phase II

Announcement Type
Reissue of PAR-20-111
Related Notices
  • February 22, 2024 - Notice of NICHD Withdrawal from Participation in PAR-24-063 " Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN): Small Molecule Drug Discovery and Development for Disorders of the Nervous System (U44 Clinical Trial Optional). See Notice NOT-HD-24-006
  • November 14, 2023 - Clarification of Implementation of the NIH SBIR and STTR Foreign Disclosure Pre-award and Post-Award Requirements. See Notice NOT-OD-24-029
  • November 13, 2023 - Notice of Correction to Expiration Date for PAR-24-063. See NOT-NS-24-030.
  • June 12, 2023- Implementation of the NIH SBIR and STTR Foreign Disclosure Pre-award and Post-Award Requirements . See NOT-OD-23-139.
  • February 23, 2023- Notice of Change to Minimum Performance Standards for SBIR and STTR Applicants . See NOT-OD-23-092.
  • August 31, 2022- Implementation Changes for Genomic Data Sharing Plans Included with Applications Due on or after January 25, 2023. See Notice NOT-OD-22-198.
  • August 5, 2022- Implementation Details for the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy. See Notice NOT-OD-22-189.
Funding Opportunity Number (FON)
PAR-24-063
Companion Funding Opportunity
PAR-24-043 , UG3/ UH3 Phase 1 Exploratory/Developmental Cooperative Agreement/Exploratory/Developmental Cooperative Agreement Phase II
Assistance Listing Number
93.853, 93.867, 93.866, 93.279, 93.213, 93.121, 93.273, 93.242
Notice of Funding Opportunity Purpose

The Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) invites applications from neuroscience investigators seeking support to advance their small molecule drug discovery and development projects into the clinic. Participants in the BPN are responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools and receive funding for all activities to be conducted in their own laboratories. In addition, applicants will collaborate with NIH-funded consultants and can augment their project with NIH contract research organizations (CROs) that specialize in medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, formulations development, chemical synthesis including under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and Phase I clinical testing. Projects can enter either at the Discovery or the Development stage. In the Discovery phase the goal is to characterize and optimize promising hit compounds using medicinal chemistry to establish structure activity relationships (SAR) and structure property relationships (SPR) including in vitro and in vivo properties such as metabolism, selectivity, toxicity, etc. As projects enter or advance to the Development stage the goal is to advance a single development candidate through Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing. Projects can enter the program at the Development stage and progress in a shorter period to IND enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing. BPN recipient Institutions retain their assignment of intellectual property (IP) rights and gain assignment of IP rights from the BPN contractors and consultants (and thereby control the patent prosecution and licensing negotiations) for drug candidates developed in this program.

Key Dates

Posted Date
November 01, 2023
Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)
January 09, 2024
Letter of Intent Due Date(s)

30 days prior to the application due date

Application Due Dates Review and Award Cycles
New Renewal / Resubmission / Revision (as allowed) AIDS - New/Renewal/Resubmission/Revision, as allowed Scientific Merit Review Advisory Council Review Earliest Start Date
February 09, 2024 February 09, 2024 April 18, 2024 June 2024 October 2024 December 2024
July 15, 2024 July 15, 2024 August 19, 2024 November 2024 January 2025 April 2025
January 15, 2025 January 15, 2025 April 18, 2025 June 2025 October 2025 December 2025
July 15, 2025 July 15, 2025 August 18, 2025 November 2025 January 2026 April 2026
January 15, 2026 January 15, 2026 April 17, 2026 June 2026 October 2026 December 2026
July 15, 2026 July 15, 2026 August 18, 2026 November 2026 January 2027 April 2027

All applications are due by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization.

Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.

Expiration Date

New Date August 19, 2026 per issuance of NOT-NS-24-030. (Original Expiration Date: August 19, 2024)

Due Dates for E.O. 12372

Not Applicable

Required Application Instructions

It is critical that applicants follow the SBIR/STTR (B) Instructions in the How to Apply - Application Guide, except where instructed to do otherwise (in this NOFO or in a Notice from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts).

Conformance to all requirements (both in the Application Guide and the NOFO) is required and strictly enforced. Applicants must read and follow all application instructions in the Application Guide as well as any program-specific instructions noted in Section IV. When the program-specific instructions deviate from those in the Application Guide, follow the program-specific instructions.

Applications that do not comply with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.

There are several options available to submit your application through Grants.gov to NIH and Department of Health and Human Services partners. You must use one of these submission options to access the application forms for this opportunity.

  1. Use the NIH ASSIST system to prepare, submit and track your application online.
  2. Use an institutional system-to-system (S2S) solution to prepare and submit your application to Grants.gov and eRA Commons to track your application. Check with your institutional officials regarding availability.

  3. Use Grants.gov Workspace to prepare and submit your application and eRA Commons to track your application.


  4. Table of Contents

Part 2. Full Text of Announcement

Section I. Notice of Funding Opportunity Description

A. Overview

Recent advances in neuroscience offer unprecedented opportunities to discover new treatments for nervous system disorders. However, before a new chemical entity can be tested in a clinical setting, it must undergo a process of chemical optimization to improve potency, selectivity, and drug-like properties, followed by pre-clinical safety testing to meet the standards set by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical testing. All of the necessary expertise and resources are not commonly available to small companies as these activities are largely the domain of large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies and contract research organizations (CROs).

To facilitate drug discovery and development by the neuroscience community, the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research (https://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/) established the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN), which offers neuroscience researchers funding for drug discovery and development activities that can be conducted in their own laboratories. Researchers have the opportunity to collaborate with NIH-funded consultants and CROs that specialize in medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, formulations development, chemical synthesis under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and Phase I clinical testing. A current list of BPN contractors and consultants is available at https://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/bpdrugs/bpn_resources.htm. This Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) invites applications for new BPN projects.

The Principal Investigator (PI) will be responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools. A PI with- for example medicinal chemistry expertise and resources may additionally request funding to conduct structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies in their own lab but collaborate with BPN contractors on in vitro ADMET, in vivo PK, drug manufacturing and IND-enabling toxicology studies. By contrast, a PI with limited experience in drug discovery and development may opt to collaborate with all available BPN contractors. Applicants may propose to conduct all drug discovery and development activities themselves or collaborate with BPN contractors on activities of their choice.

For each project funded under this NOFO, the NIH will assemble a customized Lead Development Team (LDT). The LDT will be co-chaired by the PI and a BPN consultant and will include members of the PI's team, additional BPN consultants, and NIH staff. The LDT will establish an overall strategy for the project, including milestones proposals, outline estudies to be conducted by BPN contractors, and coordinate activities across different research sites.

Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to read the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the BPN website (http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/bpdrugs/faqs.htm) and contact NIH Scientific/Research staff and participating NIH Institutes/Centers (IC) prior to preparing an application to discuss how they may best utilize BPN resources and whether their application fits the mission of a particular NIH IC.

For this NOFO, Phase I clinical testing, studies or trials refer to the common phases of a clinical trial. U44 Phase I and II refer to the project phases of the SBIR program.

B. Scope

The BPN is dedicated to the discovery and development of small molecule compounds, of a size and structure that can be readily synthesized and chemically modified (if optimization is required). This program is not designed to support development of biologics or biotechnology products, including oligonucleotides and proteins, or devices - see BPN-Biologics NOFO PAR-21-233 (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-21-233.html) and Blueprint MedTech NOFO PAR-21-282 (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-21-282.html). Applicants should contact NIH Scientific/Research staff regarding small peptides (typically less than 6 amino acids) and other complex chemical structures, as well as combination therapies, to determine suitability for optimization and development within the BPN.

To be eligible for this NOFO, a project must focus on a nervous system condition that falls within the mission of one of the participating Institutes or Centers. Please see Section C below for more information on the interests and restrictions of the participating Institutes and Centers and alternative programs to consider.

Projects can enter either at the Discovery (Exploratory, Hit to Lead or Lead Optimization Stage (BPN milestone orientation)) or the Development stage (preclinical candidate chosen no medicinal chemistry optimization required, or the IND enabling Stage). In the Discovery phase the goal is to characterize and optimize promising hit compounds using medicinal chemistry to establish structure activity relationships (SAR) and structure property relationships (SPR) including in vitro and in vivo properties such as metabolism, selectivity, toxicity, etc. As projects enter or advance to the Development stage the goal is to advance a single development candidate through Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing. Projects can enter the program at the Development stage and progress in a shorter period to IND enabling toxicology studies and phase I clinical testing.

Typical Project Research Objectives by Stage (see also the BPN milestone orientation that shows typical project structure and resources available through BPN contractors to supplement your resources):

Exploratory Stage Goals:

  • Demonstrating primary and counterscreen assays are robust, reproducible and can support proposed SAR studies
  • Screening funnel is finalized with plans for all in vitro and in vivo assays in place for timely execution to move project to the clinical phase within the grant period
  • Target Product Profile refined and approved
  • Identification of at least one chemical series for future optimization where preliminary SAR and SPR is generated and demonstrates sufficient results to formulate a data driven strategy for multi-parameter optimization, improving physicochemical and ADMET properties in addition to potency

Hit to Lead Stage Goals:

  • SAR should meet perspective criteria for advancement with sufficient results; data should be compelling to formulate data-driven strategy to combine compound attributes into a single stereo- and enantiomerically-pure compound meeting clinical candidate selection in the Lead Optimization stage
  • Pharmacokinetics (PK) should support proposed pharmacodynamic (PD) studies achieving reasonable exposures and duration to achieve efficacy at a dose supportive of advancement to Lead Optimization stage

Lead Optimization Stage Goals:

  • Identify a preclinical candidate to advance to the development phase of the program that demonstrates a reasonable therapeutic index (comparing dose range finding data to PK/PD experiments)
  • Complete dose range finding study
  • Patent position established
  • Production of lead compound in sufficient quantity to enable large animal dose range studies

Predevelopment Stage Goals:

  • Complete Candidate characterization including dose range finding (DRF) toxicology studies not yet completed in prior stage (large animal DRF typically), compound characterization salt screen/polymorph, tractable and economical synthesis to enable Phase I, in vitro ADMET characterization to support IND (for example FDA's Guidance In Vitro Drug Interaction Studies Cytochrome P450 Enzyme- and Transporter-Mediated Drug Interactions )
  • Complete any efficacy studies under rigorous requirements to support clinical dose selections
  • Engage clinician support for TPP and clinical plans

IND Enabling Stage Goals:

  • Hold any pre-IND meetings as required
  • Produce materials to enable GLP toxicology studies
  • Complete all required studies for IND and produce reports suitable for IND filings. This includes GLP repeat dose toxicology studies in two species, safety pharmacology, genotoxicity evaluation, hERG as well as other studies that may be required for a particular target or route of administration
  • Manufacture GMP drug and demonstrate suitable drug product formulation for use in Phase I trial

Experience with BPN suggests that many otherwise excellent awarded projects often require additional proof of concept data or the generation of tools in order to meet the program's requirements for initiating medicinal chemistry or IND-enabling studies. For this reason, all BPN SBIR projects will begin with the U44 Phase I to conduct feasibility studies required to launch full scale medicinal chemistry (if entering at the Discovery stage) or IND-enabling studies (if entering at the Development stage). During the U44 Phase I award, the NIH will form the LDT, which will identify and oversee the studies necessary to meet the BPN requirements for initiating medicinal chemistry or IND-enabling studies. The LDT will also design plans and go/no-go milestones for all subsequent Discovery and/or Development work. Progression from U44 Phase I to Phase II will be based on administrative review (see Section D., Milestones). A project that completes all U44 Phase I and Phase II Discovery activities and advances into Development will conduct all Development work (including Development feasibility studies) under the U44 Phase II award. After successful completion of the U44 Phase I, a project may proceed either to the U44 Phase II in either hit-to-lead/lead optimization (SAR) (the discovery stage) or to IND-enabling studies (the development stage). A schematic of this project structure is available on the BPN website at: https://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/bpdrugs/bpn_resources.htm

The following sections describe the Discovery and Development stages in more detail, including the program entry criteria, the program requirements for initiating medicinal chemistry and IND-enabling studies, and examples of activities that can be conducted during the U44 Phase I award. Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NIH Scientific/Research staff prior to preparing an application to clarify which entry stage is most appropriate for their project and what to include in their plans for the U44 Phase I award.

Discovery

Projects that require medicinal chemistry to improve the potency and/or drug-like properties of promising bioactive compounds will enter the BPN at the Discovery stage. The process of understanding the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for desired drug properties typically requires dozens of rounds of compound synthesis and testing. Initially, medicinal chemistry will focus heavily on optimizing activity and potency of compounds in primary and secondary in vitro assays. Therefore, it is required to demonstrate robust SAR driving assays and tractable synthetic routes during the UG3 phase including blinded test-retest reliability and sufficient throughput with the primary and secondary screening assays (other standard reliability metrics are listed in the first year BPN milestones). Subsequently, SAR will increase emphasis on ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties of the compounds, with continued monitoring and optimization of bioactivity. The ultimate goal of the SAR effort is the selection of a single development candidate with sufficient bioactivity, therapeutic index, and drug-like properties to proceed to IND-directed pre-clinical safety assessment with reasonable projected human doses.

Entry Criteria for Discovery Stage

Projects must meet the following requirements prior to entering Discovery:

  • Rigorous data supporting the hypothesis that modulating the putative drug target/affected pathway will produce a desirable outcome for the intended disease indication (it is not necessary to know the precise drug target or mechanism of action). These data may be supporting literature; evidence of the translational relevance from human studies is also encouraged. It is not required nor is it expected that a project entering at the exploratory stage of discovery (BPN milestones) will have in vivo data with the proposed hit compounds. The preparatory phase (U44 Phase I) should be used to characterize the hits in order to develop appropriate tool compounds for in vivo testing in the Hit to Lead stage where in vivo efficacy may be a milestone if in vivo testing is proposed.
  • A bioactive compound, in hand, that will serve as a starting point for optimization with:
    • Proof of identity and purity (typically >95%, as determined by, e.g., NMR, melting point, or LC/MS, with no single impurity > 0.5%)
    • In vitro biological activity (typically < 1 M in biochemical assays and <10 M in cell-based assays relevant to the drug target), confirmed by repeat dose-response testing, with more than one batch of compound
    • Information on selectivity for the intended target over closely related targets, if desired (and when the target is known)
  • Primary and secondary in vitro bioactivity assays that can be used for driving SAR studies (may require further optimization for throughput during Preparatory stage)
  • Selectivity and counter-screening assays to address potential activity at related targets and other undesirable activities or artifacts (may require further optimization for throughput during Preparatory stage)
  • In vivo efficacy is not required at the entry to discovery stage. Availability of preclinical animal model(s) that can be used to assess in vivo efficacy and/or target engagement (measurement of target binding or proximal downstream effects) in the hit to lead or lead optimization stages should be available for the Hit to Lead stage where in vivo efficacy testing is included as a required milestone if animal model testing is proposed.
  • No obvious legal (e.g., intellectual property) constraints to pursuing the proposed chemical scaffold(s) and using the proposed assays and models for research purposes and/or commercial development

Preparatory Activities for Discovery Stage Projects (U44 Phase I)

All Discovery projects will begin with a U44 Phase I award of up to two years. The first 6-12 months should be used to prepare for SAR studies. The following are general expectations for a BPN project to initiate SAR studies:

  • Completion of an in vitro ADME and physicochemical profile for the starting compound that includes measures of aqueous solubility, microsome stability, CYP inhibition, and permeability (e.g., MDCK or Caco-2)
  • Demonstration that the primary assay meets the following validation criteria to reliably rank compounds with similar activities:
    • A statistical demonstration of reliability, e.g., a Z-factor (Z') =0.5 and a coefficient of variation (CV) =20%
    • Concentration response testing over at least 10 concentrations generates reproducible EC50 values within a 3-fold range for at least 4 compounds
    • Blinded test-retest reliability with R?2 of at least 0.75 on at least 8 compounds exhibiting EC50 values across a 100-fold range of potency
    • Throughput of at least 10 compounds per week, run with sufficient replicates to produce robust and reproducible 10-point dose-response curves
  • Demonstration that the proposed secondary bioactivity assays and counter-screening and selectivity assays have sufficient reliability and throughput for their proposed use in the project
  • Demonstration of a clear correlation between activity in the primary assay and activity in confirmatory assays and models, sufficient to justify advancement criteria in a testing funnel

Examples of activities that can be supported during the Discovery (U44 Phase I) preparatory phase include:

  • Establishment of a project milestone plan, including milestones that must be met to initiate SAR studies and desired compound profiles (including prospective criteria) at completion of lead optimization
  • Refinement of a compound testing funnel, including studies to correlate activity across different bioactivity assays to justify advancement criteria
  • In vivo pharmacology and, if applicable, studies using established biomarkers to demonstrate target engagement
  • Studies to develop or validate target engagement markers that will be used in critical-path experiments
  • Optimization and validation of bioactivity, selectivity, and counter-screening assays
  • Critical-path pharmacology studies to clarify the compound mechanism of action (e.g., agonist vs. positive allosteric modulator)
  • ADMET profiling of starting compound(s) to identify liabilities to address through medicinal chemistry
  • Limited exploratory medicinal chemistry (approximately 1-2 medicinal chemists for 8-10 months) to enable demonstration/confirmation of synthetic route, establishment of initial structure property relationships (SPR) for metabolism, selectivity and toxicity and bioactivity of proposed hit compounds
  • Procurement of commercially available analogs ("SAR by catalog")

The PI(s) will be responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools. Applicants may propose to use BPN contractors for chemical synthesis and ADMET profiling or request funds to conduct this work themselves.

U44 Phase II Activities for Discovery Phase Projects

The BPN typically supports a maximum of 3 years medicinal chemistry effort including 1 year exploratory, 1 year Hit to Lead and 1 year Lead Optimization. Therefore, projects can request a maximum of years support of medicinal chemistry in Phase II however it is expected that projects completing Hit to Lead in Phase I should request up to one additional year of medicinal chemistry in Phase II to complete the SAR studies to identify a development candidate that meets the entry criteria for Development (below). By the end of the Hit to Lead year, the PI is expected to demonstrate in vivo activity for a representative compound from the lead series, delivered by any route of administration if in vivo testing is proposed.

The Discovery U44 Phase II award typically supports the following activities:

  • Design and synthesis of analogs for SAR studies
  • Compound scale up for in vivo testing, dose ranging finding toxicity (DRF) evaluation
  • Testing of analogs in bioactivity assays and animal models
  • Testing of analogs in selectivity and counter-screening assays
  • Testing of analogs in ADMET assays (e.g., microsome stability, CYP induction and inhibition, solubility, permeability in MDCK or Caco-2 cells, plasma protein binding, brain/plasma ratio, pharmacokinetics [PK] in multiple species)

The PI will be responsible for conducting primary in vitro biological assessment of compounds on a one-to-two week schedule to inform the design of subsequent iterations of compound synthesis. In addition to a regular testing schedule in the primary assay, the PI will provide confirmation of the activity of select compounds in secondary and counter-screening assays and animal models relevant to the drug target and therapeutic indication.

BPN contractors can produce compound analogs for SAR testing, scale up compounds as needed for in vivo testing, and provide standard screening services to assess in vitro and in vivo ADMET characteristics of the compounds. Typically, BPN will assign up to four medicinal chemist FTEs to a project, generating approximately 4-8 compounds per week, plus additional staff to support computational chemistry modeling and ADMET studies as appropriate.

Compounds that meet the BPN's criteria for a development candidate can continue seamlessly on into Development.

Development

The Development stage includes IND-directed preclinical safety studies, GMP synthesis of clinical trial material, formulation development, and phase I clinical testing. Projects that have completed medicinal chemistry optimization and identified a development candidate may initiate Development activities within BPN. The BPN does not support SAR studies during Development.

Entry Criteria for Development Stage

Application for entry into the Development stage must have identified the candidate compound and cannot request additional medicinal chemistry resources. It may be acceptable to have 2 candidates that will be narrowed to a single candidate as part of the U44 Phase I activities (time and budget permitting).

Projects must meet the following requirements prior to entering the Development Stage:

  • A strong package of data linking the putative drug target/affected pathway to the proposed disease indication and supporting the hypothesis that altering the target activity as proposed will produce desirable outcomes for the disease.
  • Proposed compound must have in vitro and in vivo biological activity and ADMET properties appropriate for the intended clinical use (i.e., the disease indication, patient population, delivery mode, treatment duration, and treatment regimen) and outcomes.
  • Applicants should show that their proposed compounds are efficacious when delivered by the clinically intended route of administration, at exposure levels that can likely be achieved clinically with the proposed human dosing regimen.
  • Proposed compounds should give defensible results in tests for Ames mutagenicity, hERG activity, microsome stability, CYP inhibition, plasma protein binding, and aqueous solubility.
  • In cases where the molecular target of compound action is known, the applicant should demonstrate the degree of selectivity for the intended target over closely related targets.
  • Counter-screening to determine selectivity across a broad panel of unrelated pharmacological targets (e.g., G protein-coupled receptors, kinases, etc.) is also required.
  • Demonstration that the ability of the PI's institution to develop and commercialize the proposed compound for the proposed indication is unlikely to be blocked or impeded by legal (e.g., intellectual property) constraints and that there is support from the institution to file and maintain the patents estate and necessary regulatory documents along with associated cost.

Preparatory Activities for Development Stage Projects (U44 Phase I)

All applications proposing to enter at the Development stage will begin with a U44 Phase I award of up to two years, to prepare for IND-enabling studies, which will be supported under the U44 Phase II award. Projects that entered at the Discovery stage will conduct these activities during their U44 Phase II award. The following are general expectations for a project to initiate IND-enabling studies within BPN:

  • Dose-range finding (DRF) toxicology studies (rodent and non-rodent) show an acceptable safety margin (e.g., 5x if toxicity can be monitored, reversible, and has premonitory signs; 10x if toxicity is more severe but controllable/reversible; 30x if toxicity is unlikely to be easily monitored, controllable, reversible, or have premonitory signs). Formulation to enable exposure margins suitable for these toxicology studies may need to be explored.
  • Viable synthetic route for manufacturing (acceptable cost, number of steps and purification techniques needed) to enable GLP toxicology studies and Phase I testing
  • Viable API (active pharmaceutical ingredient; salt and polymorph selection complete, acceptable stability to support initial clinical trial)

Examples of activities that can be supported during the Development preparatory activities include:

  • Establishment of a preclinical development plan, including milestones for advancement into IND-enabling studies and the desired profile for a development candidate
  • Design and planning for the Phase I clinical trials (if applicable)
  • Validation of ADMET data
  • Replication/confirmation of key in vivo pharmacology data
  • Scale-up synthesis for toxicology studies and formulation (including required material amounts for DRF studies if not available at time of award)
  • Salt and polymorph screening
  • Compound stability studies
  • Pre-formulation/formulation work to enable toxicology studies
  • Multiple-dose rodent PK testing, with pharmacodynamic (PD) correlations if applicable
  • Dose-range finding toxicology studies
  • Metabolite identification

The PD(s)/PI(s) is responsible for conducting all studies that involve disease- or target-specific assays, models, and other research tools. BPN contractors can perform all other work.

U44 Phase II Activities for Development Stage Projects

The Development U44 Phase II award may include the following:

  • Manufacturing of material for toxicology studies (DRF & GLP) and/or GMP manufacturing of material for phase I clinical testing
  • IND-enabling toxicology studies
  • IND document preparation
  • Phase I clinical trial (a single and/or multiple ascending dose study to characterize safety, PK, and PD)

The PI's Institution will be responsible for assembly and submission of the IND application and scheduling meetings with the FDA and therefore should include support for this activity in their plan. NIH staff and consultants on the LDT must be included in all meetings with the FDA.

The development of the protocol and management of the phase I clinical trial will be performed by a Clinical Development Team (CDT), which will evolve from the LDT and include the PI, clinical consultants identified by the PI and NIH, and NIH staff. The protocol, selected supporting trial documents, and regulatory documents will be submitted to NIH for administrative review (including internal and external experts) prior to commencement of the clinical trial (defined as signing of first informed consent).

BPN contractors can conduct the preclinical safety studies, GMP synthesis, formulation and other activities required to prepare for human testing. BPN contractors will provide data and reports in a format suitable for inclusion in an IND application and will assist in the development of the application. The phase I clinical trial can also be conducted through BPN contractors.

Applications Not Responsive to this NOFO:

Non-responsive applications will not be reviewed.

The following activities are considered non-responsive to this NOFO:

  • Screening to identify hit compounds
  • Basic research and studies of disease mechanism
  • Animal model development
  • Development of risk, detection, diagnostic, prognostic, predictive, and prevention biomarkers as well as PET ligands
  • Development of diagnostics and diagnostic devices
  • Development of biologics and biotechnology products
  • Studies directed beyond Phase I clinical testing

C. NIH Institute and Center Interests and Guidance

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

NIA is interested in studies that will provide drug development expertise and infrastructure support to researchers interested in developing novel small molecules aimed at modifying the behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD), delaying the onset or slowing the progression of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), other dementias of aging and age-related cognitive decline. Ideally, this initiative is aimed at researchers who have promising small molecule compounds but lack the necessary outside expertise and infrastructure to advance these compounds to the clinic.

Researchers who may have the necessary drug development expertise and access to infrastructure to advance small molecules to the clinic should consider submitting an application to the Alzheimer's Drug Development Program (PAR 22-047) or its reissue. This program is also available to researchers who are interested in the preclinical development of small molecules and biologics.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

Alcohol interacts directly and indirectly with a wide spectrum of molecular targets in the brain, and alcohol-seeking behaviors and alcohol use disorders (AUD) involve multiple neurotransmitter systems, neuromodulators, hormones, signal transduction pathways, etc. These include signaling systems and signal transduction pathways of opioids, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), endocannabinoids, neuropeptides (e.g. corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neuropeptide Y, substance P), and protein kinases A and C. Numerous therapeutic agents targeting these and other molecular systems have been studied preclinically and in clinical trials. NIAAA is interested in research aimed to develop new pharmaceuticals to provide effective therapy for AUD. Studies involving novel targets previously un-recognized or understudied for the treatment of AUD are particularly encouraged. Specific genetic variants that may contribute to the risk for alcoholism and/or render alcohol dependent individuals responsive to specific therapeutic agent have been discovered. NIAAA is interested in supporting research to develop pharmaceuticals targeting individuals with identified genotypic and phenotypic characteristics to improve efficacy and safety.

National Eye Institute (NEI)

The National Eye Institute (NEI) interest in Blueprint Neurotherapeutics is to develop novel therapies to treat diseases and disorders of the visual system, especially blinding eye diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, ocular pain and other conditions. The NEI is also interested in other visual system disorders such as strabismus and amblyopia that could be treated with pharmacological interventions. Each project should have a well-defined endpoint, achievable within a five-year time frame, for developing a treatment for a specific disease or disorder of the visual system. The steps towards this goal should be clearly delineated in a series of milestones that support the development of a novel therapeutic that can then be tested in a clinical trial. If successful, a project funded under this program may lead to filing an IND-directed pharmacological and toxicological study, and Phase I clinical testing. Investigators are encouraged to contact NEI program staff to discuss potential research projects prior to application submission to determine alignment of the planned studies with priorities of the Institute.

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

NIDCR is interested in neurotherapeutics development for painful disorders of the orofacial region including but not limited to temporomandibular joint disorder, trigeminal neuropathies, burning mouth syndrome, oral cancer pain and other conditions. Recent advances in genomics and phenotyping of subjects with orofacial pain conditions have expanded the scope of potential targets to treat these conditions. Receptor systems, ion channels, and pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules have been implicated in chronic pain. NIDCR is interested in supporting research that will lead to highly efficacious and specific pharmacological treatments for individuals with orofacial pain disorders.

Investigators are encouraged to contact NIDCR program staff to discuss potential research projects prior to application submission to determine alignment of the planned studies with priorities of the Institute mission and strategic plan.

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

NIMH supports neuroscience research to discover the causes of mental illness and to develop more effective and safer treatments. The NIMH is interested in applications proposing development of therapies aimed at novel molecular and clinical targets for the treatment of mental disorders, especially treatment-resistant depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, PTSD, and autism spectrum disorder. Studies aimed at the development of new ligands for targets where a probe or therapeutic already exists are generally of lower priority.

NIMH will only support projects entering the BPN at the Discovery (optimization of validated small molecule hits and promising lead compounds through medicinal chemistry) stage. NIMH will not support projects entering the BPN at the Development (IND enabling/GMP synthesis or Phase I trials) stage. Projects at the Development stage should consider applying to the NIMH SBIR/STTR Programs. Projects at the early clinical trials phase should consider the NIMH SBIR/STTR Programs, or look at the NIMH Support for Clinical Trials web page. Investigators are strongly encouraged to discuss their research plans with NIMH Scientific/Research contact prior to submission to determine alignment of the planned studies with NIMH priorities and to assess whether this or other NIMH funding opportunities are most appropriate. Investigators are also encouraged to review the following NIMH drug discovery NOFOs: Drug Discovery for Nervous System Disorders PAR-22-031 (R01) and PAR-22-032 (R21), Assay Development and Screening for Discovery of Validated Chemical Hits for Brain Disorders PAR-23-168 (R01), Discovery of in vivo Chemical Probes for Novel Brain Targets PAR-21-029 (R01), Discovery of Cell-based Chemical Probes for Novel Brain Targets PAR-21-028 (R21), National Cooperative Drug Discovery/Development Groups (NCDDG) for the Treatment of Mental Disorders or Alcohol Addiction (U01) PAR-22-143 and PAR-22-144 (U19).

Consistent with NIMH's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative, research projects directed towards ameliorating pathophysiology that is potentially more proximal to specific functional deficits (domains) than DSM diagnostic entities are encouraged. Additional information about the RDoC approach can be found at the RDoC website. The testing of functional domains not included specifically in RDoC may also be considered, if well justified. In vivo preclinical screening assays in animals should be carefully selected based on proposed brain targets and mechanisms of therapeutic action (see NOT-MH-19-053).

High-quality and reproducible studies that are reported to the scientific community in a transparent manner are an essential cornerstone of the research enterprise. Attention to principles of study design and transparency are essential to enable reviewers, the scientific community, and NIH to assess the quality of scientific findings. In support of this important goal, investigators must follow instructions to address Rigor and Reproducibility (http://grants.nih.gov/reproducibility/index.htm).

Further information on NIMH research priorities can be found in the NIMH Strategic Plan and NIMH National Advisory Mental Health Council (NAMHC) web page.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to discuss applications with NIMH staff listed in Section VII - Agency Contact(s) Scientific/Research Contacts.

National Institute of Neurological Disorder sand Stroke (NINDS)

A list of diseases that is relevant to the research mission of the NINDS can be found at https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders ; applicants are encouraged to contact the NINDS to discuss disease areas of interest.

This NOFO serves as the primary support mechanism at NINDS for the discovery and development of small molecule drugs. This includes all medicinal chemistry optimization efforts requiring analog synthesis. Researchers focused on the development of biologics and biotechnology products should consider the BPN-Bio program (https://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/neurotherapeutics/bpn-biologics ). Applicants seeking support only to conduct early stage clinical trials should consider applying for an NINDS Exploratory Clinical Trials R01, through PAR-21-233, which provides additional flexibility in budget and time, as well as the option of including a phase II trial.

There is growing recognition that the quality and reproducibility of both preclinical and clinical research depend on the rigor with which researchers conduct studies, control for potential bias, and report essential methodological details. Examples of critical elements of a well-designed study are summarized on the NINDS website http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/transparency_in_reporting_guidance.pdf. NINDS urges applicants to this program to consider these elements when describing supporting data and proposed studies.

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

NCCIH supports neurotherapeutic research to discover and develop small molecules that fall within the definition of a secondary metabolite (i.e., natural products) inclusive of the array of chemical space derived from botanicals, microorganisms (e.g., commensal microbes), marine invertebrates, and venomous species. The NCCIH is interested in applications proposing development of interventions to modulate CNS-based symptoms with priority given to myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), pain and pain related symptoms including sleep, stress, and mood disorders. Investigators are strongly encouraged to discuss their research plans with the NCCIH Scientific/Research contact prior to submitting their applications.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Through participating in this NOFO, NIDA aims to provide drug development expertise and access to resources to support the drug addiction researchers interested in developing new molecular entities for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUD).


NIDA will only support the projects entering the BPN at the Discovery stage. Specifically, NIDA is interested in using the BPN mechanism to support projects in the "hit to lead optimization" stages with a well-justified proposal for the development stage as well.


NIDA applicants are strongly encouraged to take full advantage of the opportunities the BPN affords, including collaboration with BPN consultants and NIH-supported contract research organizations (CROs) that specialize in medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, formulations development, chemical synthesis under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). Researchers, who already possess the drug development expertise and access to the necessary R&D infrastructure in their home institutions, should consider submitting their applications to the specialized NIDA programs administered by the NIDA Division of Therapeutics and Medical Consequences (DTMC).
Investigators are strongly encouraged to discuss their research plans with NIDA program staff prior to submission to determine alignment of the planned studies with NIDA's interest and priorities. NIDA staff will also provide help in assessing whether this or other NIDA funding opportunities would be the most appropriate.

D. Milestones

Because drug discovery and development are inherently high risk, it is expected that there will be significant attrition as projects progress. Go/No-Go milestones (typically every six months but at least annually) will be established by the LDT at the start of each project and updated as needed.

An administrative review will be conducted by NIH program staff, with technical input from an External Oversight Committee (composed of senior non-federal scientists who are not directly involved in BPN projects), to decide which projects will advance from the U44 Phase I to the Phase II award and progress after each subsequent milestone based on:

  • Successful achievement of milestones
  • The overall feasibility of project advancement, considering data that may not have been captured in milestones
  • Competitive landscape for the disease indication and drug target
  • Program priorities
  • Availability of funds

Approval for commencement of a clinical trial (defined as signing of informed consent by first prospective subject) will include the following:

  • Successful achievement of the defined preclinical development milestones;
  • Submission of an IND with documentation for one of the following: 1) acceptance of clinical protocol by FDA; 2) elapse of the 30-day post filing waiting period without comment from the FDA; 3) completion of protocol changes or amendments requested by FDA.
  • Submission of the clinical protocol and supporting documents to NIH for administrative review and notification of NIH approval;
  • Agreement on updated timeline and milestones for the clinical trial.

Please Note: If a funded project does not make sufficient progress toward the agreed upon milestones at any stage, funding for the project and access to BPN contract resources may be discontinued (see section VI.2.).

E. Quality and Compliance Requirements

Since the goal of this program is to generate therapeutics which will be eligible for FDA approval, adherence to compliance and quality criteria is required.

  • It is expected that all IND enabling nonclinical studies will be performed in a manner consistent with Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and current FDA guidance.

All clinical trials must be performed following Good Clinical Practices (GCP) and in accord with NIH Policy for Data and Safety Monitoring (https://osp.od.nih.gov/clinical-research/nih-data-and-safety-monitoring-policies/).

Investigational products for use in clinical trials must be produced under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) practices.

F. Intellectual Property (IP)

Since the ultimate goal of this program is to bring new drugs to the market, the creation and protection of intellectual property (IP) that will make drug candidates attractive to potential licensing and commercialization partners are a significant consideration in designing research strategies and prioritizing projects for funding. This program is structured so that the small business concern retains their assignment of IP rights and gains assignment of IP rights from the BPN contractors (and thereby control the patent prosecution and licensing negotiations) for drug candidates developed through this program. It is expected that the small business concern will take responsibility for patent filings, maintenance and licensing efforts toward eventual commercialization. The PI is expected to work closely with technology transfer/business development officials at their institution to ensure that royalty agreements, patent filings, and all other necessary IP arrangements are completed in a timely manner and that commercialization plans are developed and updated over the course of the project. Award recipients will be encouraged to identify and foster relationships with potential licensing and commercialization partners early in the drug development process, consistent with the goals of the BPN.

G. Diversity

In addition to scientific diversity, applicants should strive to incorporate diversity in their team development plan. Research shows that diverse teams working together and capitalizing on innovative ideas and distinct perspectives outperform homogenous teams. Scientists and trainees from diverse backgrounds and life experiences bring different perspectives, creativity, and individual enterprise to address complex scientific problems. There are many benefits that flow from a diverse NIH-supported scientific workforce, including: fostering scientific innovation, enhancing global competitiveness, contributing to robust learning environments, improving the quality of the research, advancing the likelihood that underserved or health disparity populations participate in, and benefit from health research, and enhancing public trust. In spite of tremendous advancements in scientific research, information, educational and research opportunities are not equally available to all. NIH encourages institutions to diversify their student and faculty populations to enhance the participation of individuals from groups that are underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences. Please refer to Notice of NIH's Interest in Diversity NOT-OD-20-031 for more details.

See Section VIII. Other Information for award authorities and regulations.

Investigators proposing NIH-defined clinical trials may refer to the Research Methods Resources website for information about developing statistical methods and study designs.

Section II. Award Information

Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement: A support mechanism used when there will be substantial Federal scientific or programmatic involvement. Substantial involvement means that, after award, NIH scientific or program staff will assist, guide, coordinate, or participate in project activities. See Section VI.2 for additional information about the substantial involvement for this NOFO.

Application Types Allowed
New (Fast-Track)
Resubmission (Fast-Track)
Revision (Fast-Track)

The OER Glossary and the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide provide details on these application types. Only those application types listed here are allowed for the NOFO.

Clinical Trial?
Optional: Accepting applications that either propose or do not propose clinical trial(s)
Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards

The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.

Award Budget

Application budgets are not limited but must reflect the actual needs of the proposed project.

Applications should rarely exceed up to $500,000 total cost per year for Phase I and up to $1,500,000 total cost per year for the Phase II. In all cases, applicants should propose a budget that is reasonable and appropriate for completion of the research project. Application budgets should only cover the work that will be performed by the PI and their staff. The NIH will pay BPN contractors and consultants directly for their work; therefore, these expenses should not be included in the budget for this application.

Award Project Period

Durations up to 2 years for Phase I and up to 3 years for Phase II may be requested. Total combined years of support may not exceed 5.

NIH grants policies as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement will apply to the applications submitted and awards made from this NOFO.

Section III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

Eligible Organizations

Only United States small business concerns (SBCs) are eligible to submit applications for this opportunity. A small business concern is one that, at the time of award of Phase I and Phase II, meets all of the following criteria:

  1. Is organized for profit, with a place of business located in the United States, which operates primarily within the United States or which makes a significant contribution to the United States economy through payment of taxes or use of American products, materials or labor;
  2. Is in the legal form of an individual proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company, corporation, joint venture, association, trust or cooperative, except that where the form is a joint venture, there must be less than 50 percent participation by foreign business entities in the joint venture;
  3. SBIR and STTR. Be a concern which is more than 50% directly owned and controlled by one or more individuals (who are citizens or permanent resident aliens of the United States), other business concerns (each of which is more than 50% directly owned and controlled by individuals who are citizens or permanent resident aliens of the United States), an Indian tribe, ANC or NHO (or a wholly owned business entity of such tribe, ANC or NHO), or any combination of these; OR
  4. SBIR-only. Be a concern which is more than 50% owned by multiple venture capital operating companies, hedge funds, private equity firms, or any combination of these. No single venture capital operating company, hedge fund, or private equity firm may own more than 50% of the concern, unless that single venture capital operating company, hedge fund, or private equity firm qualifies as a small business concern that is more than 50% directly owned and controlled by individuals who are citizens or permanent resident aliens of the United States; OR
  5. SBIR and STTR. Be a joint venture in which each entity to the joint venture must meet the requirements set forth in paragraph 3 (i) or 3 (ii) of this section. A joint venture that includes one or more concerns that meet the requirements of paragraph (ii) of this section must comply with 121.705(b) concerning registration and proposal requirements.

4. Has, including its affiliates, not more than 500 employees.

If the concern is more than 50% owned by multiple venture capital operating companies, hedge funds, private equity firms, or any combination of these falls under 3 (ii) or 3 (iii) above, see Section IV. Application and Submission Information for additional instructions regarding required application certification.

If an Employee Stock Ownership Plan owns all or part of the concern, each stock trustee and plan member is considered an owner.

If a trust owns all or part of the concern, each trustee and trust beneficiary is considered an owner.

Definitions:

  • Hedge fund has the meaning given that term in section 13(h)(2) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1851(h)(2)). The hedge fund must have a place of business located in the United States and be created or organized in the United States, or under the law of the United States or of any State.
  • Portfolio company means any company that is owned in whole or part by a venture capital operating company, hedge fund, or private equity firm.
  • Private equity firm has the meaning given the term private equity fund in section 13(h)(2) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1851(h)(2)). The private equity firm must have a place of business located in the United States and be created or organized in the United States, or under the law of the United States or of any State.
  • Venture capital operating company means an entity described in 121.103(b)(5)(i), (v), or (vi). The venture capital operating company must have a place of business located in the United States and be created or organized in the United States, or under the law of the United States or of any State.
  • ANC means Alaska Native Corporation.
  • NHO means Native Hawaiian Organization.


SBCs must also meet the other regulatory requirements found in 13 C.F.R. Part 121. Business concerns, other than investment companies licensed, or state development companies qualifying under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, 15 U.S.C. 661, et seq., are affiliates of one another when either directly or indirectly, (a) one concern controls or has the power to control the other; or (b) a third-party/parties controls or has the power to control both. Business concerns include, but are not limited to, any individual (sole proprietorship) partnership, corporation, joint venture, association, or cooperative. The SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide should be referenced for detailed eligibility information.

Small business concerns that are more than 50% owned by multiple venture capital operating companies, hedge funds, private equity firms, or any combination of these are NOT eligible to apply to the NIH STTR program.

Performance Benchmark Requirements

Phase I to Phase II Transition Rate Benchmark: In accordance with guidance from the SBA, the HHS SBIR/STTR Program is implementing the Phase I to Phase II Transition Rate benchmark required by the SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011 and the SBIR and STTR Extension Act of 2022.The benchmark establishes a minimum number of Phase II awards the company must have received relative to a given number of Phase I awards received during the 5-fiscal year time period. The Transition Rate is calculated as the total number of SBIR and STTR Phase II awards a company received during the past 5 fiscal years divided by the total number of SBIR and STTR Phase I awards it received during the past 5 fiscal years excluding the most recently completed year. The Transition Rate requirement, agreed upon and established by all 11 SBIR agencies, was published for public comment in a Federal Register Notice on October 16, 2012 (77 FR 63410) and amended on May 23, 2013 (78 FR 30951).


For SBIR and STTR Phase I applicants that have received more than 20 Phase I awards over the past 5 fiscal years (excluding the most recently-completed fiscal year): Companies that do not meet or exceed the benchmark minimum Transition Rate of 0.25 will not be eligible to apply for a Phase I, Fast-Track, or Direct Phase II (if available) award for a period of one year from the date of the application submission. This requirement does not apply to companies that have received 20 or fewer Phase I awards over the prior 5-fiscal year period.

For application deadlines that fall on or after April 5, 2023: For SBIR and STTR Phase I applicants that have received more than 50 Phase I awards over the past 5 fiscal years (excluding the most recently-completed fiscal year): Companies that do not meet or exceed the benchmark minimum Transition Rate of 0.5 will not be eligible to receive more than 20 total Phase I and Phase II awards for a period of one year from the date on which such determination is made. This requirement does not apply to companies that have received 50 or fewer Phase I awards over the 5-fiscal year period.

On June 1 of each year, SBA will identify the companies that fail to meet minimum performance requirements. SBA calculates individual company Phase I to Phase II Transition Rates using SBIR and STTR award information across all federal agencies will notify companies and the relevant officials at the participating agencies. More information on the Phase I to Phase II Transition Rate requirement is available at SBIR.gov.

Phase II to Commercialization Benchmark: In accordance with guidance from the SBA, the HHS SBIR/STTR Programs are implementing the Phase II to Commercialization Rate benchmark for Phase I applicants, as required by the SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011 and the SBIR and STTR Extension Act of 2022. The Commercialization Rate Benchmark was published in a Federal Register notice on August 8, 2013 (78 FR 48537), with a reopening of the comment period published on September 26, 2013 (78 FR 59410).

For companies that have received more than 15 Phase II awards from all agencies over the past 10 fiscal years (excluding the two most recently completed fiscal year): Companies that meet this criterion must show an average of at least $100,000 in revenues and/or investments per Phase II award or at least 0.15 (15%) patents per Phase II award resulting from these awards during the past 10- fiscal year period. Applicants that fail this benchmark will not be eligible to apply for New Phase I, Fast-track or Direct Phase II (if applicable) awards for a period of one year. This requirement does not apply to companies that have received 15 or fewer Phase II awards over the 10-fiscal year period, excluding the two most recently completed fiscal years.

For application deadlines that fall on or after April 5, 2023: For companies that have received more than 50 Phase II awards from all agencies over the past 10-fiscal years (excluding the two most recently completed Fiscal Year): Companies that meet this criterion must show an average of at least $250,000 of aggregated sales and investment per Phase II award over the past 10-fiscal year period. Applicants that fail this benchmark will not be eligible to receive more than 20 total Phase I and Phase II awards for a period of one year from the date on which such determination is made. This requirement does not apply to companies that have received 50 or fewer Phase II awards over the 10-fiscal year period, excluding the two most recently completed fiscal years.

For application deadlines that fall on or after April 5, 2023: For companies that have received more than 100 Phase II awards from all agencies over the past 10-fiscal years (excluding the two most recently completed Fiscal Year): Companies that meet this criterion must show an average of at least $450,000 of aggregated sales and investment per Phase II award over the past 10-fiscal year period. Applicants that fail this benchmark will not be eligible to receive more than 20 total Phase I and Phase II awards for a period of one year from the date on which such determination is made. This requirement does not apply to companies that have received 100 or fewer Phase II awards over the 10-fiscal year period, excluding the two most recently completed fiscal years.

Foreign Institutions

Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply.

Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply.

Foreign components, as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, may be allowed.

Required Registrations

Applicant Organizations

Applicant organizations must complete and maintain the following registrations as described in the SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide to be eligible to apply for or receive an award. All registrations must be completed prior to the application being submitted. Registration can take 6 weeks or more, so applicants should begin the registration process as soon as possible. The NIH Grants Policy Statement Section 2.3.9.2 Electronically Submitted Applications states that failure to complete registrations in advance of a due date is not a valid reason for a late submission.

  • System for Award Management (SAM) Applicants must complete and maintain an active registration, which requires renewal at least annually. The renewal process may require as much time as the initial registration. SAM registration includes the assignment of a Commercial and Government Entity (CAGE) Code for domestic organizations which have not already been assigned a CAGE Code.
    • Unique Entity Identifier (UEI)- A UEI is issued as part of the SAM.gov registration process. The same UEI must be used for all registrations, as well as on the grant application.
  • SBA Company Registry See How to Apply Application Guide for instructions on how to register and how to attach proof of registration to your application package. Applicants must have a UEI to complete this registration. SBA Company registration is NOT required before SAM, Grants.gov or eRA Commons registration.
  • eRA Commons - Once the unique organization identifier is established, organizations can register with eRA Commons in tandem with completing their Grants.gov registration; all registrations must be in place by time of submission. eRA Commons requires organizations to identify at least one Signing Official (SO) and at least one Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) account in order to submit an application.
  • Grants.gov Applicants must have an active SAM registration in order to complete the Grants.gov registration.


Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account. PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support. See, Reminder: Notice of NIH's Encouragement of Applications Supporting Individuals from Underrepresented Ethnic and Racial Groups as well as Individuals with Disabilities, NOT-OD-22-019.

For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

Under the SBIR program, for both Phase I and Phase II, the primary employment of the PD/PI must be with the small business concern at the time of award and during the conduct of the proposed project. For projects with multiple PDs/PIs, at least one must meet the primary employment requirement. Occasionally, deviations from this requirement may occur.

For the STTR program, the PD(s)/PI(s) may be employed with the SBC or the single, partnering non-profit research institution as long as s/he has a formal appointment with or commitment to the applicant SBC, which is characterized by an official relationship between the SBC and that individual. Such a relationship does not necessarily involve a salary or other form of remuneration The primary employment of the PD/PI must be with the SBC or the Research Institution (where they are PD/PI at) at the time of award and during the conduct of the proposed project. Each PD/PI must commit a minimum of 10% effort to the project.

The How to Apply Application Guide should be referenced for specific details on eligibility requirements. For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, see Multiple Principal Investigators section of the How to Apply Application Guide.

2. Cost Sharing

This NOFO does not require cost sharing as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

3. Additional Information on Eligibility

Number of Applications

Applicant organizations may submit more than one application, provided that each application is scientifically distinct.

NIH will not accept similar grant applications with essentially the same research focus from the same applicant organization. This includes derivative or multiple applications that propose to develop a single product, process, or service that, with non-substantive modifications, can be applied to a variety of purposes. Applicants may not simultaneously submit identical/essentially identical applications under both this funding opportunity and any other HHS funding opportunity, including the SBIR and STTR Parent announcements.

NIH will not accept duplicate or highly overlapping applications under review at the same time, per NIH Grants Policy Statement Section 2.3.7.4 Submission of Resubmission Application. This means that the NIH will not accept:

  • A new (A0) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of an overlapping new (A0) or resubmission (A1) application.
  • A resubmission (A1) application that is submitted before issuance of the summary statement from the review of the previous new (A0) application.
  • An application that has substantial overlap with another application pending appeal of initial peer review (see NIH Grants Policy Statement 2.3.9.4 Similar, Essentially Identical, or Identical Applications).

A Phase I awardee may submit a Phase II application either before or after expiration of the Phase I budget period, unless the awardee elects to submit a Phase I and Phase II application concurrently under the Fast-Track procedure. To maintain eligibility to seek Phase II or IIB support, a Phase I awardee should submit a Phase II application, and a Phase II awardee should submit a Phase IIB application, within the first six due dates following the expiration of the Phase I or II budget period, respectively.

Contractual/Consortium Arrangements

In Phase I, normally, a minimum of two-thirds or 67% of the research or analytical effort must be carried out by the small business concern. The total amount of all consultant and contractual arrangements to third parties for portions of the scientific and technical effort generally may not exceed 33% of the total amount requested (direct, F&A/indirect, and fee).

In Phase II, normally, a minimum of one-half or 50% of the research or analytical effort must be carried out by the small business concern. The total amount of consultant and contractual arrangements to third parties for portions of the scientific and technical effort generally may not exceed 50% of the total Phase II amount requested (direct, F&A/indirect, and fee).

A small business concern may subcontract a portion of its SBIR or STTR award to a Federal laboratory within the limits above. A Federal laboratory, as defined in 15 U.S.C. 3703, means any laboratory, any federally funded research and development center, or any center established under 15 U.S.C. 3705 & 3707 that is owned, leased, or otherwise used by a Federal agency and funded by the Federal Government, whether operated by the Government or by a contractor.

The basis for determining the percentage of work to be performed by each of the cooperative parties in Phase I or Phase II will be the total of the requested costs attributable to each party, unless otherwise described and justified in Consortium/Contractual Arrangements of the PHS 398 Research Plan component of SF424 (R&R) application forms.

Additional details are contained in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide.

Section IV. Application and Submission Information

1. Requesting an Application Package

The application forms package specific to this opportunity must be accessed through ASSIST, Grants.gov Workspace or an institutional system-to-system solution. Links to apply using ASSIST or Grants.gov Workspace are available in Part 1 of this NOFO. See your administrative office for instructions if you plan to use an institutional system-to-system solution.

2. Content and Form of Application Submission

It is critical that applicants follow the SBIR/STTR (B) Instructions in the How to Apply - Application Guide, except where instructed in this notice of funding opportunity to do otherwise. Conformance to the requirements in the Application Guide is required and strictly enforced. Applications that are out of compliance with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.

Letter of Intent

Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application, the information that it contains allows IC staff to estimate the potential review workload and plan the review.

By the date listed in Part 1. Overview Information, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent that includes the following information:

  • Descriptive title of proposed activity
  • Name(s), address(es), and telephone number(s) of the PI(s)
  • Names of other key personnel
  • Participating institution(s)
  • Number and title of this funding opportunity

The letter of intent should be sent to:

Charles Cywin, Ph.D.
Telephone: 301-496-1779
Email: charles.cywin@nih.gov

Page Limitations

All page limitations described in the How to Apply Application Guide and the Table of Page Limits must be followed.

Instructions for Application Submission

The following section supplements the instructions found in the How to Apply Application Guide and should be used for preparing an application to this NOFO.

SF424(R&R) Cover

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

SF424(R&R) Project/Performance Site Locations

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

SF424(R&R) Other Project Information

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed with the following additional instructions:

Other Attachments:

SBA Company registry

All applicants to the SBIR and STTR programs are required to register at the SBA Company Registry prior to application submission and attach proof of registration. Completed registrations will receive a unique SBC Control ID and .pdf file. If applicants have previously registered, you are still required to attach proof of registration. The SBA Company Registry recommends verification with SAM, but a SAM account is not required to complete the registration. In order to be verified with SAM, your email address must match one of the contacts in SAM. If you are unsure what is listed in SAM for your company, you may verify the information on the SAM site. Confirmation of your company's DUNS is necessary to verify your email address in SAM. Follow these steps listed below to register and attach proof of registration to your application.

a. Navigate to the SBA Company Registry.

b. If you are a previous SBIR/STTR recipient from any agency, search for your small business by Company Name, EIN/Tax ID, DUNS, or Existing SBIR/STTR Contract/Grant Number in the search fields provided. Identify your company and click "Proceed to Registration".

c. If you are a first time applicant, click the "New to the SBIR Program?" link on lower right of regist y screen.

d. Fill out the required information on the "Basic Information" and "Eligibility Statement" screens.

e. Press "Complete Registration" on the lower right of the "Eligibility Statement" screen and follow all instructions.

f. Download and save your SBA registry PDF locally. The name will be in the format of SBC_123456789.pdf, where SBC_123456789 (9 digit number) is your firm's SBC Control ID. DO NOT CHANGE OR ALTER THE FILE NAME. Changing the file name may cause delays in the processing of your application.

g. When you are completing the application package, attach this SBA registry PDF as a separate file by clicking "Add Attachments" located to the right of the Other Attachments field on the "Research and Related Other Project Information" form.

For questions and for technical assistance concerning the SBA Company Registry, please contact the SBA at http://sbir.gov/feedback?type=reg.

Other Attachments:

1. SBIR Application Certification for small business concerns majority-owned by multiple venture capital operating companies, hedge funds, or private equity firms

Applicant small business concerns that are majority-owned by multiple venture capital operating companies, hedge funds, or private equity firms (e.g. majority VCOC-owned) are required to submit a Certification at time of their application submission per the SBIR Policy Directive. Follow the instructions below.

Applicants small business concerns who are more than 50% directly owned and controlled by one or more individuals (who are citizens or permanent resident aliens of the United States), other business concerns (each of which is more than 50% directly owned and controlled by individuals who are citizens or permanent resident aliens of the United States), or any combination of these (i.e. NOT majority VCOC-owned) should NOT fill out this certification and should NOT attach it to their application package.

  1. Download the VCOC Certification.pdf at the NIH SBIR Forms webpage.
  1. Answer the 3 questions and check the certification boxes.
  1. The authorized business official must sign the certification.
  1. Save the certification using the original file name. The file must be named SBIR Application VCOC Certification.pdf . DO NOT CHANGE OR ALTER THE FILE NAME. Changing the file name may cause delays in the processing of your application.
  1. When you are completing the application package, attach this certification as a separate file by clicking "Add Attachments" located to the right of Other Attachments field on the Research and Related Other Project Information form.
SF424(R&R) Senior/Key Person Profile Expanded

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

R&R Budget

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed. The additional instructions apply:

This award is intended to support studies to be conducted by the PI(s) and associated personnel. The budget may not support drug development activities that the applicant proposes to conduct through BPN contracts. The NIH will pay BPN contractors and consultants directly for their work. Equipment requests are allowed but not encouraged. Equipment requests should be considered only if the equipment is absolutely necessary to the success of the project and cannot be supported by any other means. This is likely to be a subject of negotiation before an award is made. Some budget requests may be made for the PI's Institution to assemble and file the IND.

The U44 budget may include travel costs for one or two trips per year to attend meetings of the BPN External Oversight Committee or hold face-to-face meetings of the LDT/CDT.

It is expected that the contact (lead) PI will dedicate at least 20% level of effort (2.4 person months (for MPI other PI's effort should be appropriate for their proposed contributions) to managing a BPN project. It is strongly recommended that potential applicants consult NIH staff about their anticipated budget in the early stages of preparing an application.

R&R Subaward Budget

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

PHS 398 Cover Page Supplement

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

PHS 398 Research Plan

SBIR/STTR Information Form

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed. The additional instructions apply:

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed, with the following additional instructions:

Specific Aims: The Specific Aims section should include Aims delineated for the U44 Phase I and Phase II award. If a clinical study is proposed, define the aims of the clinical study.

Research Strategy: The Research Strategy section should include the following subsections:

  • Clearly indicate within a table what stage the project is entering (e.g. Exploratory, Hit to Lead, Lead Optimization, etc.) and which activities will be conducted by PI/co-investigators and associated personnel (i.e., funded by the U44 Phase I/II award) and which activities will be conducted by NIH contract research organizations and/or consultants. The table should provide the following information: Activity (medicinal chemistry, assays, PK, etc.), throughput (e.g. samples per month), source (PI lab, sub recipient , BPN Contractor), advancement criteria.
  • Include experimental designs and justification for all studies that will be conducted by the PI/co-investigators and associated personnel. Activities that will be conducted by NIH contractors need not be described in detail in the application since these will be planned after the award by the lead development team (LDT), but the overall goal of the activities should be provided.
  • Clinical Impact (Significance)
  • Biological Rationale and Compound Profile (Significance)
  • Testing strategy (Approach)
  • Innovation

Clinical Impact (Significance): Each application generally should focus on only one primary disorder or disease, even if the compound proposed for the project shows activity in models for more than one disorder. This is because the target patient population and intended use guide the design of the drug and of the preclinical studies, such as toxicology and formulation.

  • Briefly describe the current state of knowledge of the etiology, clinical characteristics, and current and projected prevalence of the proposed disease indication.
  • Briefly discuss available treatments, including all treatment modalities, and their limitations.
  • Discuss how the proposed project relates to therapeutics development efforts underway in academia and industry.
  • Provide a Target Product Profile (TPP), a table based on an FDA template that summarizes the minimal/ideal profile of the final marketed product and shows the ultimate goals of the proposed drug development effort, such as disease indication, patient population, delivery mode, treatment duration, treatment regimen, and standards for clinical efficacy (see guidance and example at http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/resources/target-product-profile.htm). Explain why the minimally acceptable and ideal parameters offer advantages over currently available treatments and how they relate to other therapeutics under development.
  • Briefly comment on the feasibility of conducting clinical trials toward the goals in the TPP (e.g., availability of patients for clinical trials).
  • Describe the clinical expertise used to determine the goals of the drug development program and the clinical trial.

Biological Rationale and Compound Profile (Significance): Justify the choice of drug target/pathway and proposed strategy to alter the target/pathway activity.

  • Describe the intended biological target/pathway when known or phenotype when target/pathway is unknown.
  • Provide the evidence that links this target or phenotype, when target/pathway is unknown, to the proposed disease indication.
  • Provide the evidence that altering target activity or phenotype as proposed will give desirable outcomes for the proposed disease indication.
  • Present the chemical structure of the compound(s) proposed for optimization or as the development candidate.
  • Describe how the compound(s) were identified. For Discovery projects, present structure-activity relationship (SAR) data, if available.
  • Provide a Compound Profile Table (see guidance and example suggested format at http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/resources/example_compound_profile_table.htm) that summarizes the pharmacological and ADMET activities of the compound(s) proposed for optimization or as the development candidate. Note any potential liabilities.
  • For Discovery projects, show that the compound proposed as the starting point for optimization alters the activity of the putative target as intended and/or produces desired outcomes in disease models, with sufficient detail to allow reviewers to evaluate the rigor of the experimental design. Explain the choice of models, assays, and endpoints for these studies.
  • For Development projects, show that the proposed development candidate has clinically relevant in vivo activity, when delivered by the clinically intended route of administration, at exposure levels that can likely be achieved clinically with the proposed human dosing regimen.
  • Describe the supporting in vivo biology study design in detail, including the power analysis and associated assumptions for the determination of sample size, statistical handling of the data (such as criteria for data inclusion or exclusion), procedures used for blinding and randomization, and whether studies were replicated.
  • Discuss the clinical relevance of the preclinical outcome measures and observed effect size.
  • Show the data that demonstrate the relationship between compound exposure and activity and explain how these data support the clinical dosing regimen proposed in the TPP.

Testing Strategy (Approach): Specify whether the project is proposed for entry at the Discovery or Development stage. Clearly indicate within a table which activities will be conducted by the PI and associated personnel (i.e., funded by the U44 award) and which activities will be conducted by BPN contractors. Include experimental designs and justification for all studies that will be conducted by the PI and associated personnel. Activities that will be conducted by BPN contractors need not be described in detail in the application, since these will be planned after award by the LDT.

For Discovery-stage projects:

  • Present a table that lists all the in vitro and in vivo assays that will be run by the PI/co-investigators and associated personnel. The table should include descriptive names of the assays, the assay throughput, and the proposed advancement criteria for each assay.
  • Explain the rationale for the choice of assays, assay design, and advancement criteria, and clarify how these relate to the desired drug properties presented in the Target Product Profile.
  • Show assay validation data or present plans to optimize and validate assays.
  • If requesting funding to conduct all the assays for SAR studies, including ADMET, provide a testing funnel that shows how these assays will be ordered and grouped into testing tiers.
  • If requesting funding for medicinal chemistry within the PI's/co-investigators laboratory, describe the SAR strategy that will be used.
  • For the in vivo bioactivity study required to declare a development candidate, provide details on the study design, including power analysis and associated assumptions for sample size estimation, the process for blinding and randomization, and data handling rules, such as criteria for inclusion and exclusion of data. Describe plans for data analysis and interpretation, including what effect size would be considered minimally acceptable and clinically relevant (i.e., what constitutes a go/no-go decision for advancement into Development).
  • Indicate how target engagement and/or pharmacodynamic markers will be used to detect activity at the putative target in preclinical models and in patients, if available or proposed for development.

For the Development-stage of projects:

  • If requesting funding to conduct preclinical Development activities, include a Gantt chart that lays out each step (e.g., GMP synthesis, formulations development, and IND-enabling studies).
  • For projects entering at the Development phase, present a synthetic scheme and experimental details (yields, conditions, reagents) for the development candidate. If requesting funding for process development, describe the strategy for adapting the synthesis for scale up to levels sufficient to run a Phase I trial.
  • Provide a brief description of the clinical trial strategy. We anticipate that details of the trial are likely to change during therapeutic development. As appropriate, applicants are encouraged to make use of NIH resources for clinical research (https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Current-Research/Research-Funded-NINDS/Clinical-Research).

Innovation: Explain how the project offers a novel approach to treating the proposed disease indication.

  • If therapeutics that target the same molecule, pathway, or cellular process have been tested in clinical trials for the proposed disease indication, explain why the proposed approach would be expected to provide a benefit over those therapeutics.
  • If drugs with similar structures have been tested in clinical trials for the proposed disease indication, explain why the proposed drug would be expected to give significantly better clinical outcomes.
  • Comment on the novelty of proposed approach, target, pathway, assays or models.

Letters of Support: If research will be performed at more than one institution, include a letter of support from each institution clarifying how intellectual property (IP) will be shared or otherwise managed across the institutions, to ensure that the IP remains unencumbered, consistent with achieving the goals of the program.

Resource Sharing Plans:

Individuals are required to comply with the instructions for the Resource Sharing Plans as provided in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

Other Plan(s)

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed, with the following additional instructions:

  • All applicants planning research (funded or conducted in whole or in part by NIH) that results in the generation of scientific data are required to comply with the instructions for the Data Management and Sharing Plan. All Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) applicants are required to address a Data Management and Sharing Plan, regardless of the amount of direct costs requested for any one year. However, SBIR and STTR recipients may retain the rights to data generated during the performance of an SBIR or STTR award for up to 20 years after the award date, per the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directive. An acceptable Data Management and Sharing plan can reference and incorporate these data rights. Further information about SBIR and STTR data rights are enumerated in the NIH GPS.
  • If patent protection is being sought, investigators should explain how data will be shared after filing for patent protection to allow for both further research and the development of commercial products to advance forward, consistent with achieving the goals of the program.

Appendix:

Note that Phase I SBIR/STTR Appendix materials are not permitted. Only limited items are allowed in the Appendix of other small business applications. The instructions for the Appendix of the Research Plan are described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide; any instructions provided here are in addition to the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide Instructions.

SBIR Information

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR Application Guide must be followed, with the following additional instructions:

Commercialization Plan: All applicants are expected to describe a realistic plan (extending beyond the U44 Phase II), which outlines how and when full commercialization can be accomplished. The full commercialization of the product/technology should be carried out with non-SBIR funds.

The following subsections with the headings must be included within the Commercialization Plan, in addition to the requirements listed in the SF424 Application Guide:

1) Statement of Need

  • Applicants must provide a concise "Statement of Need". This statement is expected to provide answers to the questions listed below:
  • What is the perceived "Valley of Death" for the product/technology under development?
  • To what extent would a possible award under this NOFO advance the product or technology far enough to attract sufficient, independent third-party financing and/or strategic partnerships to carry out full commercialization?

2) SBIR Commercialization History

  • Applicants should provide an SBIR Commercialization History that addresses the questions listed below. The following questions should be addressed for all SBIR awards received from any Federal agency:
  • Has the company gone through any name changes within the past five years? If so, then all previous company names should be listed in the application.
  • Is the company a subsidiary or a spin-off? If so, then the name of the parent company should be provided.
  • What percentage of the company's revenue was derived from SBIR funding during each of the past 5 years, including both Phase I and Phase II awards? Applicants should report a percentage value for each year individually.
  • What is the total number of SBIR Phase II awards that the company has received from the Federal government? For each award, companies should provide the award number, the award amount, project duration, and the name of the awarding agency.
  • What are the total revenues that have been generated to date as a result of the commercialization of the SBIR projects funded within the past 5 years?

3) Intellectual Property (IP) Strategy

  • Applicants are encouraged to prepare this section in consultation with their institutions' technology transfer officials.
  • For Discovery stage projects, applicants should describe any constraints of which they are aware that could impede their use of compounds, assays, or models for research purposes and/or commercial development (e.g., certain restrictions under transfer or sharing agreements, applicants' previous or present intellectual property filings and publications, compounds with similar structures that are under patent and/or on the market, etc.) and how these issues would be addressed. If the applicant's institution has filed pertinent patents, the applicant should indicate filing dates, the type of patent, and application status.
  • For Development stage projects, applicants should describe their efforts to confirm that there are unlikely to be IP or other legal constraints that could block or impede development or commercialization of the proposed compounds. If the applicant's institution has filed pertinent patents, the applicant should indicate filing dates, the type of patent, and application status.
  • All applicants should describe their institutions' existing or planned infrastructure for bringing the compounds to practical application (e.g., licensing for further drug development, managing IP, commercializing discoveries) consistent with achieving the program goals. For a multiple-PI, multiple-institution application, applicants should describe the infrastructure of each institution for bringing the technologies to practical application and for coordinating these efforts (e.g., licensing, managing intellectual property) among the institutions consistent with achieving the goals of the program. Applicants should clarify how IP will be shared or otherwise managed if there are multiple PIs and institutions involved in the U44-supported work, to ensure that IP remains unencumbered.
PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information

When involving human subjects research, clinical research, and/or NIH-defined clinical trials follow all instructions for the PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information form in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, with the following additional instructions:

If you answered Yes to the question Are Human Subjects Involved? on the R&R Other Project Information form, you must include at least one human subjects study record using the Study Record: PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information form or Delayed Onset Study record.

Study Record: PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

Section 4 - Protocol Synopsis

4.1. Study Design

4.1.a. Detailed Description

Include determination of dose levels.

4.1.c. Interventions

For "Intervention Description", include route of administration.

4.2. Outcome Measures

At least one outcome measure should include PK assessments, with attention to demonstration of CNS penetration (if appropriate) and target engagement or modulation (if possible).

Delayed Onset Study

Note: Delayed onset does NOT apply to a study that can be described but will not start immediately (i.e., delayed start). All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

PHS Assignment Request Form

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide must be followed.

3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)

See Part 1. Section III.1 for information regarding the requirement for obtaining a unique entity identifier and for completing and maintaining active registrations in System for Award Management (SAM), eRA Commons, and Grants.gov

4. Submission Dates and Times

Part I. Overview Information contains information about Key Dates and time. Applicants are encouraged to submit applications before the due date to ensure they have time to make any application corrections that might be necessary for successful submission. When a submission date falls on a weekend or Federal holiday, the application deadline is automatically extended to the next business day.

Organizations must submit applications to Grants.gov (the online portal to find and apply for grants across all Federal agencies). Applicants must then complete the submission process by tracking the status of the application in the eRA Commons, NIH's electronic system for grants administration. NIH and Grants.gov systems check the application against many of the application instructions upon submission. Errors must be corrected and a changed/corrected application must be submitted to Grants.gov on or before the application due date and time. If a Changed/Corrected application is submitted after the deadline, the application will be considered late. Applications that miss the due date and time are subjected to the NIH Grants Policy Statement Section 2.3.9.2 Electronically Submitted Applications.

Applicants are responsible for viewing their application before the due date in the eRA Commons to ensure accurate and successful submission.

Information on the submission process and a definition of on-time submission are provided in the the How to Apply Application Guide.

5. Intergovernmental Review (E.O. 12372)

This initiative is not subject to intergovernmental review.

6. Funding Restrictions

All NIH awards are subject to the terms and conditions, cost principles, and other considerations described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

Pre-award costs are allowable only as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

7. Other Submission Requirements and Information

Applications must be submitted electronically following the instructions described in the SF424 (R&R) SBIR/STTR Application Guide. Paper applications will not be accepted.

Applicants must complete all required registrations before the application due date. Section III. Eligibility Information contains information about registration.

For assistance with your electronic application or for more information on the electronic submission process, visit How to Apply Application Guide. If you encounter a system issue beyond your control that threatens your ability to complete the submission process on-time, you must follow the Dealing with System Issues guidance. For assistance with application submission, contact the Application Submission Contacts in Section VII.

Important reminders:

All PD(s)/PI(s) must include their eRA Commons ID in the Credential field of the Senior/Key Person Profile form. Failure to register in the Commons and to include a valid PD/PI Commons ID in the credential field will prevent the successful submission of an electronic application to NIH.

The applicant organization must ensure that the unique entity identifier provided on the application is the same identifier used in the organization's profile in the eRA Commons and for the System for Award Management. Additional information may be found in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

See more tips for avoiding common errors.

Upon receipt, applications will be evaluated for completeness and compliance with application instructions by the Center for Scientific Review and responsiveness by components of participating organizations, NIH. Applications that are incomplete or non-compliant will not be reviewed.

Post Submission Materials

Applicants are required to follow the instructions for post-submission materials, as described in the policy.

Section V. Application Review Information

1. Criteria

Only the review criteria described below will be considered in the review process. Applications submitted to the NIH in support of the NIH mission are evaluated for scientific and technical merit through the NIH peer review system.

For this particular announcement, note the following:

  • Higher risks are inherent to earlier stage projects, which have less data and more unknowns. Those additional risks while expected are managed by close interactions with NIH staff and the Lead Discovery Teams (LDTs) under this cooperative agreement mechanism. Therefore, risks should be evaluated in a stage appropriate fashion with the understanding that the BPN will establish milestones pre- and post-award to mitigate risks. Projects should be evaluated relative to expectations for their proposed entry stage with higher levels of risk being more acceptable for early versus late-stage projects and recognizing costs increase substantially in the development phase. Continuation of funding is dependent on progress against these milestones and are evaluated every year of the grant.
  • Projects should not be penalized if the mechanism of action of the compound is unknown. Phenotypic projects are acceptable provided throughput of assays are sufficient for the optimization of the chemical starting point. While this may add to the risk, the increased risk may be counterbalanced by increased novelty.
  • Evaluation of the approach should focus on the biological rationale, the potential for identifying a compound with drug-like properties, potential patient benefit, competitive landscape (novelty), and strengths/weaknesses of studies to be conducted by the PI. Work to be conducted by BPN contractors will be designed by NIH-provided consultants and contractors after award. Note: PIs asking for BPN medicinal chemistry support are not expected to have full SAR plans as that will be the responsibility of the NIH consultant assigned and the NIH-CRO. In all cases, NIH consultants are assigned to help the team refine and improve their plans according to industry standard expectations.
  • Applications that propose entry at the Development stage, but that reviewers consider better suited for the Discovery stage or vice versa, should nevertheless be evaluated and scored based on the entry criteria and expectations for the proposed entry stage.

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials:

  • The BPN supports up to Phase I trials (primarily focused on human PK and tolerability). It is not expected the applicants will provide Phase II study designs in this application.

A proposed Clinical Trial application may include study design, methods, and intervention that are not by themselves innovative but address important questions or unmet needs. Additionally, the results of the clinical trial may indicate that further clinical development of the intervention is unwarranted or lead to new avenues of scientific investigation.

Overall Impact

Reviewers will provide an overall impact score to reflect their assessment of the likelihood for the project to exert a sustained, powerful influence on the research field(s) involved, in consideration of the following review criteria and additional review criteria (as applicable for the project proposed).

Scored Review Criteria

Reviewers will consider each of the review criteria below in the determination of scientific merit, and give a separate score for each. An application does not need to be strong in all categories to be judged likely to have major scientific impact. For example, a project that by its nature is not innovative may be essential to advance a field.

Significance

Does the project and proposed product or service address an important problem, a critical barrier to progress, or unmet need in the field? Is the prior research that serves as the key support for the proposed project rigorous? If the aims of the project are achieved, how will scientific knowledge, technical capability, and/or clinical practice be improved? How will successful completion of the aims and commercialization of the resulting product or service change the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field? Does the proposed project have commercial potential to lead to a marketable product, process or service? In the case of Phase II, Fast-Track, and Phase II Competing Renewals, does the Commercialization Plan demonstrate a high probability of commercialization? How strong is the described market opportunity in the Commercialization Plan including: (i) the product or service being developed; (ii) target customers; and (iii) how the product will solve a demonstrated customer need?

Specific to this NOFO :

  • How significant an advantage does the proposed new drug offer over the standard of care or other treatments under development (in any therapeutic class)?
  • How does the applicants Target Product Profile (TPP) align with clinical practice and the expected goals of the BPN drug development effort for the intended disease indication?
  • What is the likelihood that completion of the research objectives will lead to a therapy for the intended disease (i.e., is there a clear path into the clinic)?
  • How strong are the data supporting the choice of drug target and compound for the proposed disease indication?
  • For projects entering at the Discovery stage, are the proposed hit compounds sufficiently active in assays that are relevant to the proposed disease indication?
  • For projects entering at the Development stage, does the applicant have a well-profiled and fully optimized compound with in vitro and in vivo biological activity and ADMET properties appropriate for the intended clinical use? Has the applicant provided convincing data that the compound is efficacious when delivered by the intended route of administration, at exposure levels that can likely be achieved clinically with the proposed human dosing regimen?

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials

Are the scientific rationale and need for a clinical trial to test the proposed hypothesis or intervention well supported by preliminary data, clinical and/or preclinical studies, or information in the literature or knowledge of biological mechanisms? For trials focusing on clinical or public health endpoints, is this clinical trial necessary for testing the safety, efficacy or effectiveness of an intervention that could lead to a change in clinical practice, community behaviors or health care policy? For trials focusing on mechanistic, behavioral, physiological, biochemical, or other biomedical endpoints, is this trial needed to advance scientific understanding?

Investigator(s)

Are the PD(s)/PI(s), collaborators, and other researchers well suited to the project and will they devote sufficient effort to successfully complete the proposed aims? Do the PD(s)/PI(s) have appropriate experience and training to lead this project? If so, have they demonstrated an ongoing record of accomplishments in their field(s)? If the project is collaborative or multi-PD/PI, do the investigators have complementary and integrated expertise; are their leadership approach, governance and organizational structure appropriate for the project? For projects in later stages, does the team have expertise to commercialize the technology/service/product?

Specific to this NOFO :

  • ?If the PI's are proposing to perform work that could be performed by the BPN Contract Support Network, are the proposed expertise of the PI(s), collaborators, and other proposed researchers appropriate for the work they propose to conduct themselves, including chemistry and clinical trials? Note the work performed by the BPN contractors is assumed to be industry standard and not subject to review. It is appropriate to suggest BPN contractors/consultants be considered if expertise is needed.
  • Does the PI have sufficient leadership experience to manage the aspects of the project funded through the grant budget in collaboration with the NIH provided BPN Lead Development Team's consultants?

In addition, for applications proposing clinical trials

  • With regard to the proposed leadership for the project, do the PD/PI(s) and key personnel have the expertise, experience, and ability to organize, manage and implement the proposed clinical trial and meet milestones and timelines? Do they have appropriate expertise in study coordination, data management and statistics? For a multicenter trial, is the organizational structure appropriate and does the application identify a core of potential center investigators and staffing for a coordinating center?

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials

With regard to the proposed leadership for the project, do the PD/PI(s) and key personnel have the expertise, experience, and ability to organize, manage and implement the proposed clinical trial and meet milestones and timelines? Do they have appropriate expertise in study coordination, data management and statistics? For a multicenter trial, is the organizational structure appropriate and does the application identify a core of potential center investigators and staffing for a coordinating center?

Innovation

Does the proposed product or service represent an innovative approach to addressing an important problem, barrier to progress, or unmet need in research or clinical practice? Does the end product or service proposed in application challenge and seek to shift current research or clinical practice paradigms? Will the end product or service proposed have significant advantages over existing approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions or those in development?

In the case of Phase II, Fast-Track, and Phase II Competing Renewals, does the small business present a reasonable plan to create a temporal barrier against other companies aiming to provide a similar solution, including protecting the intellectual property relevant to the product and technology(ies) being studied or used during the project?

Specific to this NOFO :

  • How would the proposed drug be expected to give significantly better clinical outcomes than have been observed in previous efforts focused on the same target?

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials

Does the design/research plan include innovative elements, as appropriate, that enhance its sensitivity, potential for information or potential to advance scientific knowledge or clinical practice?

Approach

Are the research aims appropriate for the current stage of development? Do the aims represent the necessary steps to further advance the development of the product or service? Are the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses well-reasoned and appropriate to accomplish the specific aims of the project? Have the investigators included plans to address weaknesses in the rigor of prior research that serves as the key support for the proposed project? Have the investigators presented strategies to ensure a robust and unbiased approach, as appropriate for the work proposed? Are potential problems, alternative strategies, and benchmarks for success presented? If the project is in the early stages of development, will the strategy establish feasibility, and will particularly risky aspects be managed? For a Phase I application, are there clear, appropriate, measurable goals (milestones) that should be achieved prior to initiating Phase II? Have the investigators presented adequate plans to address relevant biological variables, such as sex, for studies in vertebrate animals or human subjects?

For a Phase I, will the strategy establish feasibility, and will particularly risky aspects be managed? Are there clear, appropriate, measurable goals (milestones) that should be achieved prior to initiating Phase II?

For a Fast-Track, are there clear, appropriate, measurable goals (milestones) that should be achieved prior to initiating Phase II? Will successful completion of the research aims significantly advance development of the proposed product or service toward eventual commercialization?

For a Phase II, will successful completion of the research aims significantly advance development of the proposed product or service toward eventual commercialization? How well did the applicant demonstrate progress toward meeting the Phase I objectives, demonstrating feasibility, and providing a solid foundation for the proposed Phase II activity?

Specific to this NOFO :

For projects entering at the Discovery stage:

  • How strong is the rationale for the choice of assays, assay design, and advancement criteria for driving SAR studies, and how does this relate to the desired drug properties presented in the Target Product Profile?
  • How strong is the assay validation data or plans to optimize and validate assays?
  • How suitable are the proposed compounds for SAR studies and optimization into a drug candidate?
  • For applicants proposing to direct the medicinal chemistry in their own labs or through their own contractors outside the BPN contractors, how strong is the medicinal chemistry strategy?
  • For animal models, is the design rigorous (powered, blinded etc.) and relevant to the indication proposed in the TPP? What is the likelihood the PI and collaborators will successfully establish the model in a timely fashion?
  • For the in vivo bioactivity study required to declare a development candidate, is the study design, including power analysis and associated assumptions for sample size estimation, the process for blinding and randomization, and data handling rules, such as criteria for inclusion and exclusion of data appropriate? Are the plans for data analysis and interpretation, including what effect size considered minimally acceptable and clinically relevant? Are go/no-go criteria appropriate for declaring a development candidate?

For projects entering at the Development stage:

  • Does the data package for the proposed compound support the declaration of a development preclinical candidate? Does the proposed preparatory stage address the remaining deficiencies in a rigorous and complete way to enter IND-enabling studies?
  • How feasible is it to scale up the proposed development candidate to levels required for IND-enabling studies and clinical trials?
  • For applicants that propose to conduct Development work themselves, does their Development plan include all the appropriate studies for obtaining an IND? Are the timelines realistic?

If the project involves human subjects and/or NIH-defined clinical research, are the plans to address:

1) the protection of human subjects from research risks, and

2) inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion or exclusion of individuals of all ages (including children and older adults), justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed?

Specific to this NOFO :

If the PI is proposing a clinical trial, are the general quality and appropriateness of the proposed study design, including the study population, number of subjects, duration of the clinical study, and safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic endpoints appropriate?

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials

Does the application adequately address the following, if applicable

Study Design

Is the study design justified and appropriate to address primary and secondary outcome variable(s)/endpoints that will be clear, informative and relevant to the hypothesis being tested? Is the scientific rationale/premise of the study based on previously well-designed preclinical and/or clinical research? Given the methods used to assign participants and deliver interventions, is the study design adequately powered to answer the research question(s), test the proposed hypothesis/hypotheses, and provide interpretable results? Is the trial appropriately designed to conduct the research efficiently? Are the study populations (size, gender, age, demographic group), proposed intervention arms/dose, and duration of the trial, appropriate and well justified?

Are potential ethical issues adequately addressed? Is the process for obtaining informed consent or assent appropriate? Is the eligible population available? Are the plans for recruitment outreach, enrollment, retention, handling dropouts, missed visits, and losses to follow-up appropriate to ensure robust data collection? Are the planned recruitment timelines feasible and is the plan to monitor accrual adequate? Has the need for randomization (or not), masking (if appropriate), controls, and inclusion/exclusion criteria been addressed? Are differences addressed, if applicable, in the intervention effect due to sex/gender and race/ethnicity?

Are the plans to standardize, assure quality of, and monitor adherence to, the trial protocol and data collection or distribution guidelines appropriate? Is there a plan to obtain required study agent(s)? Does the application propose to use existing available resources, as applicable?

Data Management and Statistical Analysis

Are planned analyses and statistical approach appropriate for the proposed study design and methods used to assign participants and deliver interventions? Are the procedures for data management and quality control of data adequate at clinical site(s) or at center laboratories, as applicable? Have the methods for standardization of procedures for data management to assess the effect of the intervention and quality control been addressed? Is there a plan to complete data analysis within the proposed period of the award?

Environment

Will the scientific and business environment in which the work will be done contribute to the probability of success and eventual commercialization? Are the small business support, equipment and other physical resources available to the investigators adequate for the project proposed? Will the project benefit from unique features of the scientific environment, subject populations, or collaborative arrangement?

For a Phase I, does the company have appropriate business expertise and resources, or have they identified appropriate business resources, to accomplish the aims of this project and support commercialization of the proposed product or service?

For a Phase II or Fast-Track, does the applicant have access to the business experts and resources needed to accomplish the aims of this project and to commercialize the proposed product or service?

In addition, for applications involving clinical trials

If proposed, are the administrative, data coordinating, enrollment and laboratory/testing centers, appropriate for the trial proposed?

Does the application adequately address the capability and ability to conduct the trial at the proposed site(s) or centers? Are the plans to add or drop enrollment centers, as needed, appropriate?

If international site(s) is/are proposed, does the application adequately address the complexity of executing the clinical trial?

If multi-sites/centers, is there evidence of the ability of the individual site or center to: (1) enroll the proposed numbers; (2) adhere to the protocol; (3) collect and transmit data in an accurate and timely fashion; and, (4) operate within the proposed organizational structure?

Additional Review Criteria

Study Timeline

Specific to applications involving clinical trials

Is the study timeline described in detail, taking into account start-up activities, the anticipated rate of enrollment, and planned follow-up assessment? Is the projected timeline feasible and well justified? Does the project incorporate efficiencies and utilize existing resources (e.g., CTSAs, practice-based research networks, electronic medical records, administrative database, or patient registries) to increase the efficiency of participant enrollment and data collection, as appropriate?

Are potential challenges and corresponding solutions discussed (e.g., strategies that can be implemented in the event of enrollment shortfalls)?

Market, Customer, and Competition

  • How compelling is the value proposition, and to what extent does the application demonstrate a substantial market-pull for the technology under development?
  • How well has the applicant described the market niche(s) for the product/ technology, and how urgent is the unmet need(s) being addressed?
  • To what extent has the applicant identified realistic, market-based milestones that can be achieved over the next five years?
  • How well has the applicant demonstrated an understanding of the competitive environment in which they plan to sell their product?
  • To what extent has the applicant identified their customers and demonstrated a clear understanding of their needs?
  • How well has the company addressed potential hurdles that may delay or prevent acceptance of their product?
  • How reasonable are the applicant's plans for generating a revenue stream, and how realistic are the revenue projections?
  • To what extent do the prior experience and qualifications of the project team members lend confidence that the team will be successful in commercializing the proposed product/technology? For example, how successful have the PI(s) been in commercializing other SBIR/STTR supported technologies and discoveries in the past?
  • If the SBC has received previous SBIR/STTR funding from ANY Federal agency, then how successful is the company's track record in commercializing prior SBIR/STTR projects?

Company

  • How well can the applicant SBC sustain itself and grow as a business?
  • To what extent will the applicant's business alliances and/or corporate partnerships help in facilitating commercialization? For example, will third-party investors play an active role in facilitating the commercialization of the product/technology, and if so to what extent?

Intellectual Property (IP)

  • How strong is the applicant's intellectual property (IP) portfolio/position (pertinent to the proposed project), and to what extent does the company have a reasonable strategy to protect its IP going forward? No obvious legal (e.g.,intellectual property) prior art or constraints to pursuing the proposed chemical scaffold(s) and using the proposed assays and models for research purposes and/or commercial development.
  • For Discovery stage projects, are there any constraints of which that could impede their use of compounds, assays, or models for research purposes and/or commercial development (e.g., certain restrictions under transfer or sharing agreements, applicants' previous or present intellectual property filings and publications, compounds with similar structures that are under patent and/or on the market, etc.)? Is it expected the proposed efforts will alleviate these constraints if successful?
  • For Development-stage projects, has the applicant demonstrated that the ability of their institution to develop and commercialize the proposed development candidate is unlikely to be blocked or impeded by intellectual property constraints?
  • If multiple institutions are proposed, is it clear how intellectual property will be shared or otherwise managed to avoid encumbering the IP, consistent with achieving the goals of the program? Are these plans acceptable?

Phase II Applications

For Phase II Applications, how well did the applicant demonstrate progress toward meeting the Phase I (or Phase I-like) objectives, demonstrating feasibility, and providing a solid foundation for the proposed Phase II activity?

Not Applicable

Phase I/Phase II Fast-Track Applications

For Phase I/Phase II Fast-Track Applications, reviewers will consider the following:

1. Does the Phase I application specify clear, appropriate, measurable goals (milestones) that should be achieved prior to initiating Phase II?

2. To what extent was the applicant able to obtain letters of interest, additional funding commitments, and/or resources from the private sector or non-SBIR/STTR funding sources that would enhance the likelihood for commercialization?

Commercialization (Phase II and Fast-Track Only)

For Phase II and Phase I/Phase II Fast-Track Applications, reviewers will consider the following:

How well does the applicant present the market opportunity, including market segments, that its product or technology will address? Does the applicant understand the barriers to commercialization of its product or service (e.g., regulatory approval, insurance reimbursement, competitive products, customer preferences)? Does the applicant have appropriate strategies to address these barriers?

Does the applicant provide appropriate post-SBIR product development and commercialization milestones and explain how it will achieve these milestones? Does the applicant present a plan for funding the development and commercialization of the product or service? If applicable, did the applicant obtain letters of interest or commitment for such funding and/or resources?

Are the small business executives, management team, and business experts well suited to advance the development and commercialization of the proposed product or service? If not, is there a plan in place to add the necessary expertise as the product advances towards commercialization?

Is there a sound strategy for driving product adoption and generating revenue from the product or service (e.g., product sales, licensing, partnerships)?

Protections for Human Subjects

For research that involves human subjects but does not involve one of the categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate the justification for involvement of human subjects and the proposed protections from research risk relating to their participation according to the following five review criteria: 1) risk to subjects, 2) adequacy of protection against risks, 3) potential benefits to the subjects and others, 4) importance of the knowledge to be gained, and 5) data and safety monitoring for clinical trials.

For research that involves human subjects and meets the criteria for one or more of the categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate: 1) the justification for the exemption, 2) human subjects involvement and characteristics, and 3) sources of materials. For additional information on review of the Human Subjects section, please refer to the Guidelines for the Review of Human Subjects.

Inclusion of Women, Minorities, and Individuals Across the Lifespan

When the proposed project involves human subjects and/or NIH-defined clinical research, the committee will evaluate the proposed plans for the inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals of all ages (including children and older adults) to determine if it is justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed. For additional information on review of the Inclusion section, please refer to the Guidelines for the Review of Inclusion in Clinical Research.

Vertebrate Animals

The committee will evaluate the involvement of live vertebrate animals as part of the scientific assessment according to the following criteria: (1) description of proposed procedures involving animals, including species, strains, ages, sex, and total number to be used; (2) justifications for the use of animals versus alternative models and for the appropriateness of the species proposed; (3) interventions to minimize discomfort, distress, pain and injury; and (4) justification for euthanasia method if NOT consistent with the AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals. Reviewers will assess the use of chimpanzees as they would any other application proposing the use of vertebrate animals. For additional information on review of the Vertebrate Animals section, please refer to the Worksheet for Review of the Vertebrate Animals Section.

Biohazards

Reviewers will assess whether materials or procedures proposed are potentially hazardous to research personnel and/or the environment, and if needed, determine whether adequate protection is proposed.

Resubmissions

For Resubmissions, the committee will evaluate the application as now presented, taking into consideration the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group and changes made to the project.

Phase IIB Competing Renewals

Not Applicable

Revisions

For Revisions, the committee will consider the appropriateness of the proposed expansion of the scope of the project. If the Revision application relates to a specific line of investigation presented in the original application that was not recommended for approval by the committee, then the committee will consider whether the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group are adequate and whether substantial changes are clearly evident.

Additional Review Considerations

As applicable for the project proposed, reviewers will consider each of the following items, but will not give scores for these items, and should not consider them in providing an overall impact score.

Applications with Foreign Components

Reviewers will consider whether work to be performed outside of the United States is thoroughly justified, based on a rare and unique circumstance, and necessary to the overall completion of the project.

Select Agent Research

Reviewers will assess the information provided in this section of the application, including 1) the Select Agent(s) to be used in the proposed research, 2) the registration status of all entities where Select Agent(s) will be used, 3) the procedures that will be used to monitor possession use and transfer of Select Agent(s), and 4) plans for appropriate biosafety, biocontainment, and security of the Select Agent(s).

Resource Sharing Plans

Reviewers will comment on whether the Resource Sharing Plan(s) (e.g., Sharing Model Organisms) or the rationale for not sharing the resources, is reasonable.

Authentication of Key Biological and/or Chemical Resources:

For projects involving key biological and/or chemical resources, reviewers will comment on the brief plans proposed for identifying and ensuring the validity of those resources.

Budget and Period of Support

Reviewers will consider whether the budget and the requested period of support are fully justified and reasonable in relation to the proposed research.

2. Review and Selection Process

Applications will be evaluated for scientific and technical merit by (an) appropriate Scientific Review Group(s) convened by the NINDS in accordance with NIH peer review policy and procedures, using the stated review criteria. Assignment to a Scientific Review Group will be shown in the eRA Commons.

As part of the scientific peer review, all applications will receive a written critique.

  • May undergo a committee process in which only those applications deemed to have the highest scientific and technical merit (generally the top half of applications under review) will be discussed and assigned an overall impact score.

Applications will be assigned on the basis of established PHS referral guidelines to the appropriate NIH Institute or Center. Applications will compete for available funds with all other recommended applications . Following initial peer review, recommended applications will receive a second level of review by the appropriate national Advisory Council or Board. The following will be considered in making funding decisions:

  • Scientific and technical merit of the proposed project as determined by scientific peer review.
  • Availability of funds.
  • Relevance of the proposed project to program priorities.
  • Feasibility of developing a strong intellectual property position for the project, consistent with achieving the goals of the program. The NIH will work with applicants to determine if intellectual property concerns raised by reviewers or by NIH staff can be addressed prior to program entry or within the program.
  • Feasibility of conducting the work proposed within the BPN structure.
  • Security risk as assessed by the HHS Due Diligence Program

Disclosure Requirements Regarding Ties to Foreign Countries

Upon request applicants are required to disclose all funded and unfunded relationships with foreign countries, using the Required Disclosures of Foreign Affiliations or Relationships to Foreign Countries form (referred to as the Disclosure Form hereafter), for all owners and covered individuals. A covered individual is defined as all senior key personnel identified by the SBC in the application (i.e., individuals who contribute to the scientific development or execution of a project in a substantive, measurable way).

Upon request, applicants must submit the completed Disclosure Form and any additional agency-specific information electronically in eRA Commons via the Just-In-Time (JIT) process as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement (GPS) Section 2.5.1 Just-in-Time Procedures. Applicants must continue to comply with NIH Other Support disclosure requirements as provided in NIH GPS Section 2.5.1 and may be required to provide similar information on the Disclosure Form for covered individuals identified in the application. If participating in this NOFO, SBC applicants applying to CDC and FDA will follow each agency's policies for submitting additional documents during the pre-award process. Applicants that do not submit the completed Disclosure Form during the JIT process will be deemed noncompliant and not be considered for funding.

Denial of Awards

Applicants are encouraged to consider whether their entity's relationships with foreign countries of concern will pose a security risk. Prior to issuing an award, NIH (and, CDC or, FDA, as applicable) will determine whether the SBC submitting the application:

  • has an owner or covered individual that is party to a malign foreign talent recruitment program;
  • has a business entity, parent company, or subsidiary located in the People's Republic of China or another foreign country of concern; or
  • has an owner or covered individual that has a foreign affiliation with a research institution located in the People's Republic of China or another foreign country of concern.

A finding of foreign involvement with countries of concern will not necessarily disqualify an applicant. Final award determinations will be based on the above finding of foreign involvement and whether the applicant's involvement falls within any of the following risk criteria, per the Act:

  • interfere with the capacity for activities supported by NIH, CDC, or FDA to be carried out;
  • create duplication with activities supported by NIH, CDC, or FDA;
  • present concerns about conflicts of interest;
  • were not appropriately disclosed to NIH, CDC, or FDA;
  • violate Federal law or terms and conditions of NIH, CDC, or FDA; or
  • pose a risk to national security.

Generally, NIH, CDC, and FDA will not provide SBC applicants the opportunity to address any identified security risks prior to award. NIH, CDC, and FDA will not issue an award under the SBIR/STTR program if the covered relationship with a foreign country of concern identified in this guidance is determined to fall under any of the criteria provided .

3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

After the peer review of the application is completed, the PD/PI will be able to access his or her Summary Statement (written critique) via the eRA Commons. Refer to Part 1 for dates for peer review, advisory council review, and earliest start date.

Information regarding the disposition of applications is available in the NIH Grants Policy Statement Section 2.4.4 Disposition of Applications.

Section VI. Award Administration Information

1. Award Notices

If the application is under consideration for funding, NIH will request "just-in-time" (JIT) information from the applicant as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement. SBIR and STTR applicants under consideration for award will be required to submit the SBA U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) issued the Required Disclosures of Foreign Affiliations or Relationships to Foreign Countries form during the JIT process. Applicants that fail to submit a Disclosure Form will not be considered for funding.

A formal notification in the form of a Notice of Award (NoA) will be provided to the applicant organization for successful applications. The NoA signed by the grants management officer is the authorizing document and will be sent via email to the recipient's business official.

Recipients must comply with any funding restrictions described in Section IV.6. Funding Restrictions. Selection of an application for award is not an authorization to begin performance. Any costs incurred before receipt of the NoA are at the recipient's risk. These costs may be reimbursed only to the extent considered allowable pre-award costs.

Any application awarded in response to this NOFO will be subject to terms and conditions found on the Award Conditions and Information for NIH Grants website. This includes any recent legislation and policy applicable to awards that is highlighted on this website.

Individual awards are based on the application submitted to, and as approved by, the NIH and are subject to the IC-specific terms and conditions identified in the NoA.

ClinicalTrials.gov: If an award provides for one or more clinical trials. By law (Title VIII, Section 801 of Public Law 110-85), the "responsible party" must register and submit results information for certain applicable clinical trials on the ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration and Results System Information Website (https://register.clinicaltrials.gov). NIH expects registration and results reporting of all trials whether required under the law or not. For more information, see https://grants.nih.gov/policy/clinical-trials/reporting/index.htm

Institutional Review Board or Independent Ethics Committee Approval: Recipient institutions must ensure that all protocols are reviewed by their IRB or IEC. To help ensure the safety of participants enrolled in NIH-funded studies, the recipient must provide NIH copies of documents related to all major changes in the status of ongoing protocols.

Data and Safety Monitoring Requirements: The NIH policy for data and safety monitoring requires oversight and monitoring of all NIH-conducted or -supported human biomedical and behavioral intervention studies (clinical trials) to ensure the safety of participants and the validity and integrity of the data. Further information concerning these requirements is found at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/hs/data_safety.htm and in the application instructions (SF424 (R&R) and PHS 398).

Investigational New Drug or Investigational Device Exemption Requirements: Consistent with federal regulations, clinical research projects involving the use of investigational therapeutics, vaccines, or other medical interventions (including licensed products and devices for a purpose other than that for which they were licensed) in humans under a research protocol must be performed under a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigational new drug (IND) or investigational device exemption (IDE).

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

All NIH grant and cooperative agreement awards include the NIH Grants Policy Statement as part of the NoA. For these terms of award, see the NIH Grants Policy Statement Part II: Terms and Conditions of NIH Grant Awards, Subpart A: General and Part II: Terms and Conditions of NIH Grant Awards, Subpart B: Terms and Conditions for Specific Types of Grants, Recipients, and Activities, including of note, but not limited to:

If a recipient is successful and receives a Notice of Award, in accepting the award, the recipient agrees that any activities under the award are subject to all provisions currently in effect or implemented during the period of the award, other Department regulations and policies in effect at the time of the award, and applicable statutory provisions.

Should the applicant organization successfully compete for an award, recipients of federal financial assistance (FFA) from HHS will be required to complete an HHS Assurance of Compliance form (HHS Assurance of Compliance form (HHS 690)) in which the recipient agrees, as a condition of receiving the grant, to administer programs in compliance with federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex and disability, and agreeing to comply with federal conscience laws, where applicable. This includes ensuring that entities take meaningful steps to provide meaningful access to persons with limited English proficiency; and ensuring effective communication with persons with disabilities. Where applicable, Title XI and Section 1557 prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and gender identity, The HHS Office for Civil Rights provides guidance on complying with civil rights laws enforced by HHS. See https://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-providers/provider-obligations/index.html and https://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-individuals/nondiscrimination/index.html.

HHS recognizes that research projects are often limited in scope for many reasons that are nondiscriminatory, such as the principal investigator's scientific interest, funding limitations, recruitment requirements, and other considerations. Thus, criteria in research protocols that target or exclude certain populations are warranted where nondiscriminatory justifications establish that such criteria are appropriate with respect to the health or safety of the subjects, the scientific study design, or the purpose of the research. For additional guidance regarding how the provisions apply to NIH grant programs, please contact the Scientific/Research Contact that is identified in Section VII under Agency Contacts of this NOFO.

Please contact the HHS Office for Civil Rights for more information about obligations and prohibitions under federal civil rights laws at https://www.hhs.gov/ocr/about-us/contact-us/index.html or call 1-800-368-1019 or TDD 1-800-537-7697.

In accordance with the statutory provisions contained in Section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), NIH awards will be subject to the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) requirements. FAPIIS requires Federal award making officials to review and consider information about an applicant in the designated integrity and performance system (currently FAPIIS) prior to making an award. An applicant, at its option, may review information in the designated integrity and performance systems accessible through FAPIIS and comment on any information about itself that a federal agency previously entered and is currently in FAPIIS. The Federal awarding agency will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgement about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR Part 200.206 Federal awarding agency review of risk posed by applicants. This provision will apply to all NIH grants and cooperative agreements except fellowships.

Report fraud, waste and abuse

The Office of Inspector General Hotline accepts tips from all sources about potential fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement in Department of Health & Human Services programs. The reporting individual should indicate that the fraud, waste and/or abuse concerns an SBIR/STTR grant or contract, if relevant. Report Fraud.

Cooperative Agreement Terms and Conditions of Award

The following special terms of award are in addition to, and not in lieu of, otherwise applicable U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) administrative guidelines, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) grant administration regulations at 2 CFR Part 200, and other HHS, PHS, and NIH grant administration policies.

The administrative and funding instrument used for this program will be the cooperative agreement, an "assistance" mechanism (rather than an "acquisition" mechanism), in which substantial NIH programmatic involvement with the recipients is anticipated during the performance of the activities. Under the cooperative agreement, the NIH purpose is to support and stimulate the recipients' activities by involvement in and otherwise working jointly with the recipients in a partnership role; it is not to assume direction, prime responsibility, or a dominant role in the activities. Consistent with this concept, the dominant role and prime responsibility resides with the recipients for the project as a whole, although specific tasks and activities may be shared among the recipients and NIH as defined below.

The PD(s)/PI(s) will have the primary responsibility for:

  • Recipients will retain custody of and have primary rights to the data and software developed under these awards, subject to Government rights of access consistent with current HHS, PHS, and NIH policies.
  • Determining experimental approaches, designing protocols, conducting experiments, and analyzing and interpreting research data for studies funded through this U44.
  • Serving as co-chair of the project Lead/Clinical Development Team (LDT/CDT),
  • Presenting project updates (including raw data, when requested) in conference calls and annual face-to-face meetings of the BPN External Oversight Committee in the Washington, DC area.
  • With the LDT/CDT, assisting in the development of a project milestone plan at the outset of the project.
  • Coordinating and participating with NIH staff and NIH-contracted consultants in all aspects of scientific and technical management of the project.
  • Collaborating and communicating effectively with NIH service contractors to achieve project goals.
  • Providing goals and strategies for assay validation, screening throughput, and quality control, to NIH Program staff as requested.
  • Ensuring that primary and secondary screening data and assay protocols developed as a part of this project are deposited in a centralized BPN database according to the timeline agreed upon by the LDT/CDT and the NIH Program Official and according to BPN policies.
  • Adhering to BPN policies, including those regarding data release, intellectual property, and publications.
  • Implementing all scientific and policy decisions approved by the LDT/CDT and the BPN program.
  • Submitting periodic milestone progress reports in a standard format, as agreed upon by the LDT/CDT and BPN program.
  • Preparing for annual administrative site visits by NIH Program staff and consultants.
  • Working closely with their institution's technology transfer officials to ensure that royalty agreements, patent filings, and all other necessary intellectual property arrangements are completed in a timely manner
  • Submission of the IND application and scheduling meetings with the FDA.
  • Ensuring NIH staff and consultants on the LDT are included in all meetings with the FDA.
  • Providing protocol, supporting clinical documents and regulatory documents required for administrative review prior to clinical trial
  • Production of publication for clinical trial

All data or materials generated under this U44 award and through collaborations of the PI with other components of the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network will be owned by the respective recipient and the data will be considered to be confidential and business privileged information of the recipient , which nevertheless does not affect its obligations to share or deliver the material or data with the government as set forth elsewhere in the grant agreement or regulations.

NIH staff have substantial programmatic involvement that is above and beyond the normal stewardship role in awards, as described below:

An NIH Project Collaborator will be assigned to the project, with substantial scientific and programmatic involvement that is above and beyond the normal stewardship role in awards:

  • Providing the LDT/CDT with BPN consultants who can provide strategic and technical guidance.
  • Coordinating and participating in LDT/CDT meetings to discuss project status, planning, and implementation.
  • With the LDT/CDT, assisting in the development of a project milestone plan at the outset of the project.
  • Approving the final milestone language for incorporation into the award notice.
  • Providing a perspective on the priorities of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research and BPN.
  • Facilitating collaboration and data exchange among the recipient , NIH-contracted consultants, and service providers.
  • Enhancing the project progress by providing access to various NIH resources when appropriate.
  • Providing technical assistance, advice, and coordination to the project, although the dominant role and responsibilities for the activities funded by the U44 reside with the recipient .
  • Coordinating reports and presentations of project progress to the BPN External Oversight Committee.
  • Coordinating review of clinical trial by internal NIH clinical and safety experts.
  • Serving as scientific liaison among the recipient and other NIH program staff.
  • Reporting periodically on the progress of the project to NIH leadership.

In addition, a program official(s) or IC program director(s) will be responsible for the normal scientific and programmatic stewardship of the award and will be named in the award notice .

Leadership of the Institute/Center funding the project will make decisions on project continuation, with input from NIH staff and the External Oversight Committee, based on:

  • Successful achievement of milestones
  • The overall feasibility of project advancement, considering data that may not have been captured in milestones
  • Competitive landscape for the disease indication and drug target
  • Program priorities
  • Availability of funds

Areas of Joint Responsibility include:

Project Lead Development Team (LDT): The LDT typically will be co-chaired by the PI and an NIH-contracted drug development consultant and will include additional members from the PI's group, consultants and NIH staff. This team will collaboratively set strategic direction and guide the work flow for the project on an ongoing basis. The LDT will meet approximately every two weeks via teleconference to analyze and interpret data from the PI and contracted laboratories and to formulate the subsequent experimental plan. The LDT will propose milestones and produce progress reports for evaluation by the BPN External Oversight Committee and program staff as needed.

If a clinical trial is performed, the LDT will be replaced by a Clinical Development Team (CDT), which will include the PI, clinical consultants and NIH staff. The role and activities of the CDT during clinical development will be comparable to that of the LDT in earlier stages of the project.

The members of this collaborative effort are all made aware of the requirement for confidentiality due to the intent of the recipient to pursue commercialization of any qualified outcomes. Contractors and consultants of NIH will be made aware of the confidential nature of work done under this collaborative effort. The handling and disposition of this confidential data and business privileged information may be covered by the Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. Section 1905.

Dispute Resolution:

Any disagreements that may arise in scientific or programmatic matters (within the scope of the award) between recipients and NIH may be brought to Dispute Resolution. A Dispute Resolution Panel composed of three members will be convened: a designee of the Steering Committee chosen without NIH staff voting, one NIH designee, and a third designee with expertise in the relevant area who is chosen by the other two; in the case of individual disagreement, the first member may be chosen by the individual recipient. This special dispute resolution procedure does not alter the recipient's right to appeal an adverse action that is otherwise appealable in accordance with PHS regulation 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D and HHS regulation 45 CFR Part 16.

3. Data Management and Sharing

Note: The NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing is effective for due dates on or after January 25, 2023.

  • Consistent with the NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing, when data management and sharing is applicable to the award, recipients will be required to adhere to the Data Management and Sharing requirements as outlined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement. Upon the approval of a Data Management and Sharing Plan, it is required for recipients to implement the plan as described. SBIR and STTR recipients may retain the rights to data generated during the performance of an SBIR or STTR award for up to 20 years after the award date, per the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directive. An acceptable Data Management and Sharing plan can reference and incorporate these data rights. Further information about SBIR and STTR data rights are enumerated in the NIH GPS.

4. Reporting

When multiple years are involved, recipients will be required to submit the Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) annually and financial statements as required in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

NIH requires that SBIR/STTR recipients submit the following reports within 120 days of the end of the grant budget period unless the recipient is under an extension.

Failure to submit timely final reports may affect future funding to the organization or awards with the same PD/PI. NIH NOFOs outline intended research goals and objectives. Post award, NIH will review and measure performance based on the details and outcomes that are shared within the RPPR, as described at 2 CFR 200.301.

The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (Transparency Act), includes a requirement for recipients of Federal grants to report information about first-tier subawards and executive compensation under Federal assistance awards issued in FY2011 or later. All recipients of applicable NIH grants and cooperative agreements are required to report to the Federal Subaward Reporting System (FSRS) available at www.fsrs.gov on all subawards over the threshold. See the NIH Grants Policy Statement for additional information on this reporting requirement.

In accordance with the regulatory requirements provided at 2 CFR Part 200, recipients that have currently active Federal grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from all Federal awarding agencies with a cumulative total value greater than $10,000,000 for any period of time during the period of performance of a Federal award, must report and maintain the currency of information reported in the System for Award Management (SAM) about civil, criminal, and administrative proceedings in connection with the award or performance of a Federal award that reached final disposition within the most recent five-year period. The recipient must also make semiannual disclosures regarding such proceedings. Proceedings information will be made publicly available in the designated integrity and performance system (currently FAPIIS). This is a statutory requirement under section 872 of Public Law 110-417, as amended (41 U.S.C. 2313). As required by section 3010 of Public Law 111-212, all information posted in the designated integrity and performance system on or after April 15, 2011, except past performance reviews required for Federal procurement contracts, will be publicly available. Full reporting requirements and procedures are found in 2 CFR Part 200 Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters.

Disclosure of Foreign Relationships Reporting Requirements

Recipients are responsible for monitoring their relationships with foreign countries of concern post-award, for any changes that may impact previous disclosures. SBCs receiving an award under the SBIR/STTR program are required to submit an updated Disclosure Form to report any of the following changes to NIH (and, CDC or, FDA, as applicable) throughout the duration of the award:

  • any change to a disclosure on the Disclosure Form;
  • any material misstatement that poses a risk to national security; and
  • any change of ownership, change to entity structure, or other substantial change in circumstances of the SBC that NIH, CDC, and FDA determine poses a risk to national security.

Regular, annual updates are required at the time of all SBIR/STTR annual, interim, and final Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPRs). For changes that occur between RPPR submissions, updated Disclosure Forms are required within 30 days of any change in ownership, entity structure, covered individual, or other substantive changes in circumstance, as described above. Recipients are required to upload these updated disclosures using the Additional Materials (AM) tool in eRA Commons.

If the recipient reports a covered foreign relationship that meets any of the risk criteria prohibiting funding described in this NOFO, NIH, CDC, and FDA may deem it necessary to terminate the award for material failure to comply with the federal statutes, regulations, or terms and conditions of the federal award. Refer to NIH GPS Section 8.5.2 Remedies for Noncompliance or Enforcement Actions: Suspension, Termination, and Withholding of Support for more information. Recipients are encouraged to monitor their covered foreign relationships post-award and avoid entering into relationships, both funded and unfunded, that may pose a security risk and jeopardize their ability to retain their award.

Agency Recovery Authority and Repayment of Funds

An SBC will be required to repay all amounts received from NIH under the award if either of the following determinations are made upon assessment of a change to their disclosure:

  • the SBC makes a material misstatement that NIH determine poses a risk to national security; or
  • there is a change in ownership, change in entity structure, or other substantial change in circumstances of the SBC that NIH determine poses a risk to national security.

The repayment requirements and procedures provided in Section 8.5.4 Recovery of Funds of the NIH GPS apply and may also be subject to additional noncompliance and enforcement actions as described in Section 8.5.2 of the GPS. Recipients are required to follow the repayment procedures provided in the Guidance for Repayment of Grant Funds to the NIH.

Section VII. Agency Contacts

We encourage inquiries concerning this funding opportunity and welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants.

Application Submission Contacts

eRA Service Desk (Questions regarding ASSIST, eRA Commons, application errors and warnings, documenting system problems that threaten submission by the due date, and post-submission issues)

Finding Help Online: https://www.era.nih.gov/need-help (preferred method of contact)
Telephone: 301-402-7469 or 866-504-9552 (Toll Free)

General Grants Information (Questions regarding application instructions, application processes, and NIH grant resources)
Email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov (preferred method of contact)
Telephone: 301-637-3015

Grants.gov Customer Support (Questions regarding Grants.gov registration and Workspace)
Contact Center Telephone: 800-518-4726
Email: support@grants.gov

SBA Company Registry (Questions regarding required registration at the SBA Company Registry and for technical questions or issues)
Website to Email: http://sbir.gov/feedback?type=reg

Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Paek Lee, Ph.D.
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Telephone: 301-529-7370
Email: paek.lee@nih.gov

Patrick C. Still, Ph.D.
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
Phone: 301-682-1895
Email: patrick.still@nih.gov

Charles Cywin, PhD
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Telephone: 301-496-1779
Email: charles.cywin@nih.gov

Enrique Michelotti, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-443-5415
Email: michelottiel@mail.nih.gov

Zhaoxia Ren, PhD
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Telephone: 301-402-9340
Email: zren@mail.nih.gov

Elena Koustova, PhD, MBA
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Telephone: 301-496-8768
Email: koustovae@mail.nih.gov

Lorenzo M. Refolo, PhD
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Telephone: (301) 594-7576
Email: refolol@mail.nih.gov

Qiying Liu
NIAAA - NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM
Phone: 301-443-2678
E-mail: liuqiy@mail.nih.gov




Melissa Ghim, PhD
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Telephone: 301-529-6570
Email: melissa.ghim@nih.gov




Peer Review Contact(s)

Eric Tucker, Scientific Review Officer
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Telephone: 301-496-9223
Email: eric.tucker@nih.gov

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Shellie Wilburn, M.B.A.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Telephone: 301-496-1974
Email: shellie.wilburn@nih.gov

Section VIII. Other Information

Recently issued trans-NIH policy notices may affect your application submission. A full list of policy notices published by NIH is provided in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. All awards are subject to the terms and conditions, cost principles, and other considerations described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

Authority and Regulations

Awards are made under the authorization of Sections 301 and 405 of the Public Health Service Act as amended (42 USC 241 and 284) and under Federal Regulations 2 CFR Part 200.

The SBIR Program is mandated by the Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-219), reauthorizing legislation (P.L. 99-443) P.L. 102-564, P.L. 112-81 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011), as reauthorized and extended under P.L. 114-328, Section 1834, P.L. 115-232, and P.L. 117-183. The basic design of the NIH SBIR Program is in accordance with the Small Business Administration (SBA) SBIR Policy Directive.

The STTR Program is mandated by the Small Business Reauthorization Act of 1997 (P.L. 105-135), and reauthorizing legislation, P.L. 107-50, P.L. 112-81 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011), as reauthorized and extended under P.L. 114-328, Section 1834, P.L. 115-232, and P.L. 117-183. The basic design of the NIH STTR Program is in accordance with the Small Business Administration (SBA)STTR Policy Directive.

NIH Office of Extramural Research Logo
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) - Home Page
Department of Health
and Human Services (HHS)
USA.gov - Government Made Easy
NIH... Turning Discovery Into Health®


Note: For help accessing PDF, RTF, MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Audio or Video files, see Help Downloading Files.