Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
6995 05/02/2009 at 07:49:54 PM Self     Please do not allow government funding of embryonic stem cells.

Thank You

 
6996 05/02/2009 at 07:51:50 PM Self     There is no research which is ethically responsible that kills human embryos. Such research, whether deemed by some as scientifically worthy or not, should never be conducted with government funds.

Such research can be funded by private organizations whose motivation is profit, not by the government whose duty is the protection and safety of human life.

Funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose should not be killed in the interest of so-called science. Those embryos should be made available to the many infertile couples who are attempting to have children.

I unequivocally oppose using government funds to kill human embryos for any purpose whatever.

 
6997 05/02/2009 at 07:51:56 PM Self     Baby Stem cells should not be used unless they are taken from the ambilical cord. Adult stem cells has been very successful for many kinds of diseases. Baby stem cells can cause cancer. See Dr Oz on the Oprah TV show.

 
6998 05/02/2009 at 07:55:24 PM Self     My wife and I oppose the use of federal funds (my tax dollars) for the use in embryonic stem cell research!

 
6999 05/02/2009 at 07:55:36 PM Self     Morally, I am against these stem cells taken from human embryos. This downhill slide to moral decay will likely only be recognized by those that have spiritual understanding and not void of conscience. There are other means of research on adult stem cells that would keep researchers busy and Godfearing. The slippery slope will only get more slippery as the president and legislators fail to take into consideration God's Word and righteous acts.

 
7000 05/02/2009 at 07:55:50 PM Self     I object to my tax dollars being used to fund embryonic stem cell research that is ethically questionable. The ethical issues have not been settled yet. The NIH should not be involved before they are settled.

 
7001 05/02/2009 at 07:56:04 PM Self     I oppose the use of taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings.

Tax dollars should not be used for research on stem cells derived from embryos who are supposedly "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these tiny humans, the NIH guidelines would sentence them to death and at the same time encourage the creation of more embryos from in vitro fertilization. This is not the solution.

I do support the use of tax dollars for human stem cell research using adult stem cells since this is an ethical way to treat diseases and has already proven to do so.

 
7002 05/02/2009 at 07:56:39 PM Self     Mr. President,

This executive order you signed allowing human life (emryos) to be destroyed is terrible. God isn't happy with it and neither am I. As a woman I am totally against it and wish you would reverse your decision.

 
7003 05/02/2009 at 07:57:09 PM Self     I oppose stem cell research from embryos. Adult stem cells do not take away a form of life as does the stem cell research that president Obama has approved .

 
7004 05/02/2009 at 07:58:36 PM Self     This is murder. Do not do this. Do not use our money to fund this holocaust. God is merciful in HIs justice. I am praying for you.

 
7005 05/02/2009 at 07:59:46 PM Self     Our government should never give our tax dollars for this totally unnecessary procedure. The adult stem cell research is the most beneficial. Why would you want to destroy human lives, when the adult stem cells are giving proven results? Please investigate this matter. Respectfully,

 
7006 05/02/2009 at 08:00:34 PM Self     Dear Sir of Madam:

On March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued an executive order that overturned President Bush's policy and opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. President Obama designated the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to draft guidelines for distributing funds for this research. Last week, April 23, NIH officially posted draft guidelines to open federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. What these guidelines do is send my tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from invitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human babies (or embryos as they are so often called), these draft guidelines would require these baby's deaths.

I am a Mommy of one beautiful little girl. I am so thankful to have her in my life. Due to health problems, I am unable to have another child so this issue stays close to my heart. Eight of our friends are also in the process of adoption. As a mommy, my heart longs to love & be the advocate of these innocent babies, especially when adoption is such a vital part of so many young couples that are unable to have kids. Not only this, but to see innocent little ones suffer so much. I HAVE to stand up for them!! Who else will? Please, Please! Consider the views of those who see ALL of life as important!! Every part of it. There are to many of us who long to see them grow & plant their little hearts on those of us that love them....

Respectfully,

 
7007 05/02/2009 at 08:02:02 PM Self     I bide no accommodation for scientists work on genetic cures to sacrifice the lives of little people for their own advancement and satisfaction. Even excess embryos from in vitro fertilization procedures do not need to be sacrificed but should be rather left for adoption. They can't be relegated to anything less than living beings of the human species. Adult stem cells have much more promise without any moral obfuscation.

 
7008 05/02/2009 at 08:04:28 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
7009 05/02/2009 at 08:05:01 PM Self     I do not want my tax dollars used to federally (or on any other level) fund embryonic stem cell research.

 
7010 05/02/2009 at 08:05:10 PM Self     Dear Sirs, I strongly oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
7011 05/02/2009 at 08:05:33 PM Self     please be advised that i am NOT in favor of stem cell research by removing anything from a baby. it is now quite well known that using one's own cells is working miracles and using adult stem cells works better than infants. i do not believe our Lord wants us to do this kind of work. thank you.

 
7012 05/02/2009 at 08:05:56 PM Self     We believe that using human embryos to conduct experiments is unethical, unholy, and an offense to God. We were put here on this earth to promote life, not death. An embryo is a person.

Additionally, there is no evidence whatsoever that embryonic stem cells can cure diseases. Rather, adult stem cell research has shown great promise, but this evil administration will not even consider this fact. Instead, it promotes death at every turn and seeks to reward companies that donated to the Usurper's campaign. Those who would work in the field of embryonic stem cell research are out for one thing: money.

 
7013 05/02/2009 at 08:06:01 PM Self     Please reconsider how you are using our tax dollars. Please check our the advances being made in adult stem cell research. It is totally unnecessary to use human embryos for research. You want to do the right thing. Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully submitted,

 
7014 05/02/2009 at 08:06:14 PM Self     THIS PROGRAM NEEDS TO BE CANCELED

 
7015 05/02/2009 at 08:07:12 PM Self     I oppose using tax dollars to destroy human embryos. I oppose using tax on stem cells derived from embryos who are supposedly "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. The NIH should promote the adoption of these little humans, rather than sentence them to death.

*****, a concerned U.S. citizen

 
7016 05/02/2009 at 08:08:37 PM Self     I am opposed to using embryonic stem cells for research. They have had much success with adult stem cells and this practice does not mean another life has to be taken. I do not want my tax money used to kill unborn babies for research.

 
7017 05/02/2009 at 08:09:52 PM Self     I oppose using tax dollars to destroy human embryos. I oppose using tax dollars to pay for research on stem cells derived from embryos who are supposedly "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. The NIH should promote the adoption of these little humans, rather than sentence them to death.

*****, a concerned U.S. citizen

 
7018 05/02/2009 at 08:10:29 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
7019 05/02/2009 at 08:12:18 PM Self     [Federal Register: April 23, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 77)] [Notices] [Page 18578-18580] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr23ap09-42]

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

National Institutes of Health

Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Notice

SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is requesting public comment on draft guidelines entitled ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (Guidelines). The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH- funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells. These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Specifically, these Guidelines describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would have been required during the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research using these cells to be funded by the NIH. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/ 09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. According to these Guidelines, there are some uses of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells that, although those cells may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding. For questions regarding ongoing NIH-funded research involving human embryonic stem cells, as well as pending applications and those submitted prior to the issuance of Final Guidelines, see the NIH Guide http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-085.html.

DATES: Written comments must be received by NIH on or before May 26, 2009.

ADDRESSES: The NIH welcomes public comment on the draft Guidelines set forth below. Comments may be entered at: http://nihoerextra.nih.gov/ stem_cells/add.htm. Comments may also be mailed to: NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892- 7997. Comments will be made publicly available, including any personally identifiable or confidential business information they contain.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 9, 2009, President Barack H. Obama issued Executive Order 13505: Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells. The Executive Order states that the Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH- funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells. Long-standing Department of Health and Human Services regulations for Protection of Human Subjects, 45 CFR part 46, establish safeguards for individuals who are the sources of many human tissues used in research, including non-embryonic human adult stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. When research involving human adult stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells constitutes human subject research, Institutional Review Board review may be required and informed consent may need to be obtained per the requirements detailed in 45 CFR part 46. Applicants should consult http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/ humansubjects/guidance/45cfr46.htm. As described in these draft Guidelines, human embryonic stem cells are cells that are derived from human embryos, are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos. Studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes could provide information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated somatic cells generated from human embryonic stem cells. Perhaps the most important potential use of human embryonic stem cells is the generation of cells and tissues that could be used for cell-based therapies. Today, donated tissues and organs are often used to replace ailing or destroyed tissue, but the need for transplantable tissues and organs far outweighs the available supply. Stem cells, directed to differentiate into specific cell types, offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis.

[[Page 18579]]

NIH currently funds ongoing research involving human embryonic stem cells as detailed under prior Presidential policy. Under that policy, Federal funds have been used for research on human embryonic stem cells where the derivation process was initiated prior to 9 p.m. EDT August 9, 2001, the embryo was created for reproductive purposes, the embryo was no longer needed for these purposes, informed consent was obtained for the donation of the embryo, and no financial inducements were provided for donation of the embryo. These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using only those human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Specifically, these Guidelines describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would have been required during the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research using these cells to be funded by the NIH. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines. Please note that, for NIH funded research using the permitted human embryonic stem cells, the requirements of the Department's protection of human subjects regulations, 45 CFR part 46, may or may not apply, depending on the nature of the research. For further information, see Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Germ Cells and Cell Derived Test Articles: OHRP Guidance for Investigators and Institutional Review Boards. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/ 09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. According to these Guidelines, there are some uses of human embryonic stem cells that, although those cells may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding. In developing these draft Guidelines, the NIH consulted its Guidelines issued in 2000, as well as the thoughtful guidelines developed by other national and international committees of scientists, bioethicists, patient advocates, physicians and other stakeholders, including the U.S. National Academies, the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and others. As directed by Executive Order 13505, the NIH shall review and update these Guidelines periodically, as appropriate. The Draft Guidelines Follow:

National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

I. Scope of Guidelines

These Guidelines describe the circumstances under which human embryonic stem cells are eligible for use in extramural NIH-funded research, and they also include a section on uses of human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells that are ineligible for NIH funding. For the purpose of these Guidelines, ``human embryonic stem cells'' are cells that are derived from human embryos, are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos.

II. Guidelines for Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Use in Research

A. The Executive Order: Executive Order 13505, Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, states that the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), through the Director of the NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. B. Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from Human Embryos: Human embryonic stem cells may be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes, were no longer needed for this purpose, were donated for research purposes, and for which documentation for all of the following can be assured: 1. All options pertaining to use of embryos no longer needed for reproductive purposes were explained to the potential donor(s). 2. No inducements were offered for the donation. 3. A policy was in place at the health care facility where the embryos were donated that neither consenting nor refusing to donate embryos for research would affect the quality of care provided to potential donor(s). 4. There was a clear separation between the prospective donor(s)'s decision to create human embryos for reproductive purposes and the prospective donor(s)'s decision to donate human embryos for research purposes. 5. At the time of donation, consent for that donation was obtained from the individual(s) who had sought reproductive services. That is, even if potential donor(s) had given prior indication of their intent to donate to research any embryos that remained after reproductive treatment, consent for the donation should have been given at the time of the donation. Donor(s) were informed that they retained the right to withdraw consent until the embryos were actually used for research. 6. Decisions related to the creation of human embryos for reproductive purposes were made free from the influence of researchers proposing to derive or utilize human embryonic stem cells in research. Whenever it was practicable, the attending physician responsible for reproductive clinical care and the researcher deriving and/or proposing to utilize human embryonic stem cells should not have been the same person. 7. Written informed consent was obtained from individual(s) who sought reproductive services and who elected to donate human embryos for research purposes. The following information, which is pertinent to making the decision of whether or not to donate human embryos for research purposes, was in the written consent form for donation and discussed with potential donor(s) in the informed consent process: a. A statement that donation of the embryos for research was voluntary; b. A statement that donor(s) understood alternative options pertaining to use of the embryos; c. A statement that the embryos would be used to derive human embryonic stem cells for research; d. Information about what would happen to the embryos in the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research; e. A statement that human embryonic stem cells derived from the embryos might be maintained for many years; f. A statement that the donation was made without any restriction or direction regarding the individual(s) who may receive medical benefit from the use of the stem cells; g. A statement that the research was not intended to provide direct medical benefit to the donor(s);

[[Page 18580]]

h. A statement as to whether or not information that could identify the donor(s) would be retained prior to the derivation or the use of the human embryonic stem cells (relevant guidance from the DHHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) should be followed, as applicable; see OHRP's Guidance for Investigators and Institutional Review Boards Regarding Research Involving Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Germ Cells, and Stem Cell-Derived Test Articles and Guidance on Research Involving Coded Private Information or Biological Specimens, or successor guidances); and i. A statement that the results of research using the human embryonic stem cells may have commercial potential, and a statement that the donor(s) would not receive financial or any other benefits from any such commercial development. C. Prior to the use of NIH funds: Funding recipients must ensure that: (1) The human embryonic stem cells were derived consistent with sections II.A and B of these Guidelines; and (2) the grantee institution maintains appropriate documentation demonstrating such consistency in accordance with 45 CFR 74.53, which also details rights of access by NIH. The responsible grantee institutional official must provide assurances with respect to (1) and (2) when endorsing applications and progress reports submitted to NIH for projects that utilize these cells.

III. Research Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and/or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells That, Although the Cells May Come From Allowable Sources, Is Nevertheless Ineligible for NIH Funding

This section governs research using human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., human cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. There are some uses of these cells that, although they may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding, as follows: A. Research in which human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells are introduced into non-human primate blastocysts. B. Research involving the breeding of animals where the introduction of human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells may have contributed to the germ line.

IV. Other Non-Allowable Research

A. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110- 161, 3/11/09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. B. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines.

Dated: April 17, 2009. Raynard S. Kington, Acting Director, NIH. [FR Doc. E9-9313 Filed 4-22-09; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4140-01-P

 
7020 05/02/2009 at 08:14:31 PM Self     I oppose use of federal funds for research on embryonic stem cells because it is a waste of money. Research on embryonic stem cell has turned up nothing, while research on adult stem cells has turned up effective treatments for many diseases. Also, it is unethical to kill human beings for any reason, even to save somebody else.

 
7021 05/02/2009 at 08:16:29 PM Self     To Whom It May Concern,

We are in total opposition to the use of taxpayer funds for the purpose of embryonic stem cell research! The use of adult stem cells has proven successful in treating many diseases. Even after 25 years of research with embryonic stem cells there has not been any success in actual treatment of disease. We do not want our tax money to support something we are so completely opposed to.

Respectfully,

 
7022 05/02/2009 at 08:17:53 PM Self     There is no need for this bill. This is an example of over regulation. More government and the need for more tax monies which we already have more than we can afford!

 
7023 05/02/2009 at 08:18:23 PM Self     I oppose using tax dollars to pay for research on stem cells derived from human "embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose".

 
7024 05/02/2009 at 08:19:24 PM Self     I oppose the use of my tax dollars being used for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. Adult stem cell research has proven to be very productive. Embryonic stem cell research is only brutal and shown virtually no promise.

 
7025 05/02/2009 at 08:19:42 PM Self     I AM OPPOSED TO USING EMBRIONIC STEM CELLS IN ANY RESEARCH. DO NOT ALLOW ANY ADMINISTRATION TO PERMIT THIS USE. I WILL BE WATCHING THE OUTCOME REGARDING THIS ISSUE AND I VOTE!!!!

 
7026 05/02/2009 at 08:22:39 PM Self     I believe that life begins when the egg and the sperm join. Murdering innocent embryos can never be justified and I will not allow my money to pay for such practices.

 
7027 05/02/2009 at 08:22:55 PM Self     President Bush's policy was to allow funding for research that involved embryonic stem cells taken from human embryos so long as the cells were obtained on or prior to August 9, 2001. Since then, the government has funded research on over 22 stem cell lines. President Bush's policy erected a wall and did not encourage the further killing of human embryos for their cells.

However, on March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued an executive order that overturned President Bush's policy and opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. President Obama designated the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to draft guidelines for distributing funds for this research. Last week, April 23, NIH officially posted draft guidelines to open federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. What these guidelines do is send your tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

I am opposed to the new policy.

 
7028 05/02/2009 at 08:24:01 PM Self     Embyronic stem cell research has not demonstrated any possible results but adult stem cell research has. Why keep spending money on research that isn't producing results. "No" to the use of embryonic stem cell research.

 
7029 05/02/2009 at 08:25:19 PM Self     Just want to let you know how much I oppose the use of embroynic stem cells for research. It has not been proved that these stem cells are effective. Mature stem cells have shown some promise. Please do not kill babies to harvest stem cells.

 
7030 05/02/2009 at 08:25:40 PM Self     Please know that I am very much opposed to the use of US taxpayer's money for embryonic stem cell research. This is a very controversial issue. The practice is opposed by many americans. I think many americans mistakenly believe that stem cell research in general is currently prohibited when the reality is that the private sector is free to invest in this research. This truth begs one simple question; if there is so much potential in this research, why don't we leave it up to the private sector since they will reap the financial benefit of any major discoveries. It is obvious to me that the american people are expected to foot the bill for this research, assuming the risk in the event of failure. Stem cell research is betrayed by its proponents as a can't miss proposition. Noone knows if this research will produce any results.

 
7031 05/02/2009 at 08:28:55 PM Self     I do not want my tax dollars used to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that are left over from invitro fertilization. These embryos could be adopted by couples who are unable to have children. The Guidelines document states: "Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos." True, but human embryos will be destroyed in this process and that is the destruction of human life. These embryos have the potential, if implanted, to become unique human beings. They are should not be destroyed for the benefit of research-no matter how worthy it is. Research with adult stems cells has already yielded much positive results. Research in that area should continue, but not with embryos. It is unethical to destroy human life even at this very first stage.

 
7032 05/02/2009 at 08:29:12 PM Self     Due to the fact that (1): when human embryonic stems cells are obtained from a human embryo, the embryo is destroyed, and (2): the destruction of a human life in this contaxt is murder, and (3): murder is a crime punisable by law, then it is inexcusable to use any new human embryonic stem cells for research purposes.

Research using embryonic stem cells has been going on for many years, with NO POSITIVE RESULTS WHATSOEVER. However, research using adult stem cells has shown many positive results, INCLUDING ACTUAL CURES. If there is to be federal government funding for stem cell research (Note: why should the government fund any of this research at all? Private funding, which holds out the incentive of future sales and profits, is even now proceeding apace.), then it should be for studies of adult stem cells.

The guidelines state that the research must be "ethically responsible", which precludes the destruction of human life and, therefore precludes the destruction of an embryo. The guidelines also state that the research must be "scientifically worthy", which means that the past research with embryonic stem cells has shown no progrss and should be scrapped, while research with adult stem cells has shown many positive results and should be furthered.

In summation, I want to express my opposition to any destruction of human embryos for the purpose of stem cell research.

 
7033 05/02/2009 at 08:29:37 PM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding whenever NIH wants in the future. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other infertile couples.

 
7034 05/02/2009 at 08:30:20 PM Self     It is a wrong to promote the destruction of human embryos, no matter the source. These are tiny human beings, the only thing lacking is the time to grow. Please stop to think about this decision; why are we wasting time on research which has shown absolutely no benefits, while adult stem cells have provided many benefits.

 
7035 05/02/2009 at 08:33:06 PM Self     I do not approve of killing humans even those preborn, so I do not approve of financing research that requires the killing of human babies.

 
7036 05/02/2009 at 08:33:27 PM Self     I am in favor of research and funding for research for studies in this field.

 
7037 05/02/2009 at 08:34:16 PM Self     I oppose the use of American tax dollars to fund human embryonic stem cell research. In vitro fertilization is wrong because it deviates from natural procreation; creating human life only to destroy it. By destroying the lives of "leftover" embryos for the sake of scientific experiment, the initial wrongful act is supported instead of being denounced as it should rightly be. There are other sources of stem cells that do not cause the destruction of a human life. Research concerning those should be funded by NIH. To do otherwise is a violation of Catholic and other Americans' freedom of religion. It is not up to people to decide who gets to live and who must die.

 
7038 05/02/2009 at 08:34:23 PM Self     I object to experimentation on left over embryos.

 
7039 05/02/2009 at 08:35:39 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
7040 05/02/2009 at 08:36:37 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to doing any embryonic stem cell research. Please do not support or vote for it.

 
7041 05/02/2009 at 08:36:50 PM Self     I am strictly against the use of stem cells gotten from embryos to conduct medical research. An embryo is a human being and its rights are being violated by such a practice.

 
7042 05/02/2009 at 08:37:05 PM Self     As a citizen of the United States, I hereby pose the following objections to Executive order 13505:

1.) Embryonic stem cells, as the earliest stages of human life, are the beginning of human persons. Research using human embryos requires the destruction the embryo. Thus, the use of human embryos causes the death of human persons.

2.) Other alternative methods of stem cell research, using adult stem cells, have made significant progress than the use of embryonic stem cells. Although the use of embryos is the most popular form of stem cell research, the use of other stem cells, especially adult skin stem cells, have produced more success in medical research.

 
7043 05/02/2009 at 08:38:12 PM Self     I ask that you not use my tax dollars for killing and experimenting on embryotic stemcells. thank you

 
7044 05/02/2009 at 08:41:03 PM Self     I oppose the use of human embryos for research, because each embryo formed in the womb represents human life, and our culture's respect for life has diminished due to the frequency of the act of abortion.

God will judge arrogant souls who traffic in human lives.

 
7045 05/02/2009 at 08:41:48 PM Self     On the idea of being "Politically Correct" (a Marxist agenda!), we have become barbaric! It doesn't matter at what stage of life you "MURDER" a life.....its still MURDER! To say the Human Stem Cell is not a "human" is to deny the obvious. If you dig up an "acorn" and squash it.....did you kill a giant oak tree? Of Course you did!

 
7046 05/02/2009 at 08:44:03 PM Self     I am opposed to the use of my federal tax dollars for funding of any research involving the use of human embryos. I support federal funding of research using adult human stem cells. Please do not finalize guidelines that allow for federal funds to be used for embryonic stem cell research. Research to date has shown that adult human stem cells offer much more promise for medical cures than embryonic stem cell research. Funding of embryonic stem cell research using federal tax dollars will reduce the amount of federal funding available for adult stem cell research and other medical research that has shown greater promise than embryonic stem cell research.

 
7047 05/02/2009 at 08:45:04 PM Self     Please do not continue to promote the killing of human embryos for the purpose of stem cell experiments. Please investigate other ways to obtain stem cells besides by destroying babies.

 
7048 05/02/2009 at 08:46:50 PM Self     I oppose the use of taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. These stem cells have caused problems, including tumors in individuals, when they have been used. Success has been achieved when using adult stem cells, even autologous stem cells, and that's where the research should focus. It doesn't make sense to pursue something that has caused problems from the outset.

 
7049 05/02/2009 at 08:47:21 PM Self     I believe that life is sacred and not to be experimented with. Embryonic stem cell research has produced nothing of value, whereas adult stem cell research has been remarkably successful in many ways. Destroying life for no good reason is not a good use of our tax dollars; this industry is another prop for the abortion industry. Should our country be in the death business? NO!

 
7050 05/02/2009 at 08:50:28 PM Self     We oppose use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

These guidelines will use our tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death and we believe that this practice is morally wrong.

 
7051 05/02/2009 at 08:51:28 PM Self     Please do not open the door for Human Stem Cell guidelines to includes embryos collected for fertility purposes be turned over for medical research. These are the children of our future. This is not a world that I wish to be part of or a country that I would respect if we take this course of action.

 
7052 05/02/2009 at 08:53:51 PM Self     The April 23 NIH draft guidelines to open federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
7053 05/02/2009 at 08:54:10 PM Self     Comment Text (please copy and paste into Comments section)

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: Last month President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
7054 05/02/2009 at 08:54:41 PM Self     I strongly oppose the use of human embryos for stem cell reseach. There has been no evidence that human embryos have provided a cure for any genetic disease. Also, there has been much success with adult stem cells and by using these, there is no destruction of human life.

 
7055 05/02/2009 at 08:58:48 PM Self     I am 100% opposed to embryonic stem cell research! It sickens me that this administration can force me throught my taxes to support this. It will not be forgotten in the next election.

 
7056 05/02/2009 at 08:59:24 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
7057 05/02/2009 at 09:02:55 PM Self     Please continuie research in using stem cells other than embronic stem cells which actually kill a human and is morally WRONG! I do not want any of my tax money contibuting to embrionic stem cell reseach. My husbands Aunt ***** worked as a researcher before her death--I'm sure she would have been against it, but would approve of the other available stem cells that have known cures.

 
7058 05/02/2009 at 09:03:30 PM Self     Please President Obama & NIH: Please do not spend tax dollars on killing embryos for research. There are plenty of adult embryos to do research on. Thank you for taking my concerns into consideration. Please do not kill any more embryos in the name of research. thank you. President Obama, Sir; when you overturned the federal funding ban on embryonic stem cell (ESC) research, you opened the floodgates for the destruction of embryos at taxpayers' expense. Under these rules, my tax dollars would pay for research on stem cells derived from embryos who are supposedly "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. These tiny humans could be the best gift to someone who cannot have a baby: but your new NIH guidelines would sentence them to death! I beg you Mr. President & NIH not to use our taxes this way. We send you $ in good faith, to be used for good -- not for bad purposes. Please hear the babies cry, thank you for listening.

 
7059 05/02/2009 at 09:03:34 PM Self     We oppose these new regulations to experiment on human embryo stem cells from the executive order on March 9, 2009, from President Obama. Do not use federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
7060 05/02/2009 at 09:05:58 PM Self     Please oppose the use of embreyonic stem cells. Ido not want my tax money going to something that I don't believe in, and find offensive and wrong. Thankyou for your time.

 
7061 05/02/2009 at 09:06:28 PM Self     This is morally wrong. The embroyes are babies we have no right to experiment on them let alone use taxpayers money to do this. The adult cells are showing the promise for cures focus money on this.

 
7062 05/02/2009 at 09:07:23 PM Self     I am writing to express my opposition to tax-payer funding of embryonic stem cell research. Leftover embryos from in-vitro fertilization can be put to better and more moral use by offering them for adoption to the many couples in our country that are struggling with the heartache of infertility.

In addition, the success of adult stem cells has been profoundly greater. Our money should go where there is better promise.

 
7063 05/02/2009 at 09:09:13 PM Self     I am against the usage of embyonic stem cell and wish to express my opposition in using federal dollars to support this cause. Thank you

 
7064 05/02/2009 at 09:10:22 PM Self     Dear Sir or Ms.,

Please do not use human fetal stem cells for research. No scientific gains have resulted from fetal stem cell research. On the other adult stem cell researce has proven to be greatly successful. Save the unborn, save money and get great scientific gain by using adult stem cells for research. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure this one out.

In Christ Through His Blessed Mother Mary

 
7065 05/02/2009 at 09:10:59 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research. It has not produced any cures. It only produces tumors and death. I believe in adult stem cells, which have been used to cure people without the destruction of tiny unborn humans. Life begins at conception. God gives each of these small humans a soul at conception. I am saddened at the thought that one human life can be destroyed to attempt to save another. I don't believe any cures will be found using embryos. I call it murder. Thou shalt not kill. Taxpayers should not be required to pay for this when it goes against everything we believe.

 
7066 05/02/2009 at 09:13:25 PM Self     Current research using Human Stem Cells has shown many advances using Adult Stem Cells and NONE using embryonic stem cells. Commercial support is available for areas of research that show promise and not for areas that are a waste of time and money. The Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines are yet another waste of tax payers money. The guidelines should limit funding to areas that show progress, like Adult Stem Cell Research.

 
7067 05/02/2009 at 09:13:46 PM Self     I strongly oppose the use of our taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings.

 
7068 05/02/2009 at 09:13:49 PM Self     We are not in favor of President Obama's desire to have embryonic sem sell research funded by the government. Research done on stem cells from aborted babies has not proven to be successful or helpful. Adult stem cell research has been much more successful from living adults. We don't want our maoney to be used for embryonic stem cell research, and ask you to oppose the use of government money for those perposes. Thank you for your consideration in this matter.

 
7069 05/02/2009 at 09:14:41 PM Self     Please consider my deep concern about the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. I do not wish any of my tax money to be used for research experiments in which embyronic human beings are killed. This is my strong opposition to the draft.

 
7070 05/02/2009 at 09:15:46 PM Self     Dear Sir,

In light of the current administrations view concerning embryonic cell testing, I would think it necessary for them to prove the positive results conclusive to the imposing of our tax dollars funding this project. We would like to oppose the use of our taxes being disposed of in a way that attatches us to death. It takes our life effort to produce taxes, which we pay faithfully, and it seems right and just to us to have some say in whether we want to fund the killing of innocents. Let it be known that we do NOT AGREE neither give our consent for such research and separate our self and families from the consequences that will surely come as a result of the innocent blood demanding justice.

 
7071 05/02/2009 at 09:16:33 PM Self     I appose the use of my tax dollars to pay for research of human embryonic stem cells. It encourages and promotes taking the lives of thousands of innocent children under the guise of "health" for those who were given a chance to live at that age. Even those who cannot speak or defend themselves deserve the chance of life, and I stand against the lifted regulations banning this wrong and immoral practice.

 
7072 05/02/2009 at 09:16:57 PM Self     I oppose the use of Federal funds for human embryonic stem cell research. It is unethical and nonproductive. There is not one instance where embryonic stem cell has helped cure or treat an illnes or disease. However, human adult stem cell research has been responsible for many treatments.

 
7073 05/02/2009 at 09:17:40 PM Self     As a Christian I find the new guidelines for embryonic stem cell research reprehensible. Using embryonic stem cells and destroying them for research violates the basic tenets of the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal and are given the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More importantly, destroying human embryos violates the Ten Commandments, especially "You shall not murder." The laws of our nation are based on the Ten Commandments. This disregard for human life is especially intolerable, since adult stem cell research is leading to many breakthroughs in the medical world. Embryonic stem cell research has not shown any hope for cures in the near or distant future and has instead led to many complications and side effects. The fact that the government will be using my tax dollars to fund this research is equally appalling. We cannot let these guidelines drafted by the NIH become permanent. Embryonic stem cell research is wrong, and using federal funds paid with the nation's taxes is scandalous. Please reconsider these guidelines.

 
7074 05/02/2009 at 09:21:51 PM Self     Please do not use human stem cells for research, use fat cells and cells from placentas. Life doesn't have to be killed to do effective research.

 
7075 05/02/2009 at 09:22:30 PM Self     In reference to the "April 23, 2009 Federal Register Notice" I would like to voice my objections to research being done on embryonic stem cells and the use of federal dollars to do it. The research out there does not justify this murder of human life when stem cell research can be done on adult stem cells. It is inhumane and just plain wrong.

 
7076 05/02/2009 at 09:22:40 PM Self     we oppose federal funding of stem cell research

 
7077 05/02/2009 at 09:23:36 PM Self     By using taxpayer dollars to fund the use of human embryos from invitro fertilization human life is devalued as something that can be taken and used if it might benefit other human life.

Secondly if fertility clinics can make money over "left over embryos," they will certainly want to fertilize more of a woman's eggs than they do now which also creates in the mind of the public that not just humans in the embryo stage of life, but also women can be used as "embryo cows" to produce embryos in the largest possible amount. Would they be paid for this service or would the tax money go to the IVF clinics?

This will result in a hardening of American's toward the value of fellow American's lives -- DEHUMANIZATION OF AMERICA - WHO WANTS THAT!

 
7078 05/02/2009 at 09:24:12 PM Self     I consider the pursuit of embryonic stem cell research to be an assault on tradational American morality, fully consistent with other values shown to date by the Obama administration, but unnecessary given the recent discoveries in the non-embryonic stem cell field.

 
7079 05/02/2009 at 09:26:07 PM Self     I oppose embr stem cell research/ enough said.

 
7080 05/02/2009 at 09:26:11 PM Self     I oppose the use of our taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. Science has proven that adult stem cells are successfully working, why not put our tax dollars into furthering that study.

 
7081 05/02/2009 at 09:27:11 PM Self     I oppose lifting the ban on federal funding for embryonic research, as proposed in the draft NIH human stem cell guidelines, because it necessarily involved destroying human life. I believe that life begins at conception and that all human life has dignity that must be protected, not destroyed. Additionally, it is becoming more evident that the future of embryonic stem cells leading to cures for diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and diabetes, is dismal at best. Adult stem cell research has proven to be a much more promising, viable and ethical alternative.

 
7082 05/02/2009 at 09:27:30 PM Self     I oppose the use of tax dollars or federal funds for the research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
7083 05/02/2009 at 09:27:48 PM Self     Stop funding of stem cell research of embryonic cells. Science has proven that adult stem cells work just as well.

 
7084 05/02/2009 at 09:27:49 PM Self     As a Catholic American, I find it highly offensive and a terrible tragedy that the US Government would be sanctioning the destruction of and subsequent research on human embryos. It is my belief, as taught by the Catholic Church, that at conception and creation of that embryo God creates and imparts the soul of that individual. In sanctioning ESCR the US Government is now sanctioning the murder of a human soul. Please take the right step in your development of these "guidelines" and prevent this research. You know the data and the facts. ESCR is not nearly as viable as adult stem cell research.

 
7085 05/02/2009 at 09:29:41 PM Self     please do not use taxpayer money to experiment on viable human (people)embryos in research.

 
7086 05/02/2009 at 09:30:15 PM Self     It has proven to be non productive where as adult cells have.

 
7087 05/02/2009 at 09:30:39 PM Self     Use the abundant resource of adult stem cells for medical research, but don't touch human embryonic stem cell because that is taking a human life. The moment of each person's creation is that moment of conception. Before that moment the individual with his unique DNA did not exist, from that moment he does exist.

 
7088 05/02/2009 at 09:30:51 PM Self     I am opposed to executive order 13505: Removing Barriers to Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells. I do not want my tax dollars used in what I believe to be an imoral practice of destroying human life. Please reconsider this order.

Thank you

 
7089 05/02/2009 at 09:31:26 PM Self     I am opposed to executive order 13505: Removing Barriers to Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells. I do not want my tax dollars used in what I believe to be an imoral practice of destroying human life. Please reconsider this order.

Thank you

 
7090 05/02/2009 at 09:33:51 PM Self     I Oppose the use of taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. Embryonic stem cells are unproven and require the destruction of a human being.

Adult stem cells are proven and do not require the death of someone to be used. Please STOP funding embryonic stem cell research using our tax payer dollars.

Thank you,

 
7091 05/02/2009 at 09:34:31 PM Self     Please be advised that I oppose the use of my federal tax funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
7092 05/02/2009 at 09:34:38 PM Self     NIH, Please do not use our tax dollars to fund the slaughter of human embryos for stem cell research. There are new studies showing promise with adult stem cells and it is not right to use our money when we oppose the killing of human beings. Please reconsider this position and look into adult stem cell research. Thank you for your time.

 
7093 05/02/2009 at 09:36:20 PM Self     I strongly oppose the use of federal funds for research where they destroy human embryos.

 
7094 05/02/2009 at 09:36:20 PM Self     We do not believe in the embro stem cell reearch. We believe it is wrong according to Gods word. We need to get back to the word. It is not out of time as some have said. It is right on time.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page