Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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47817 05/26/2009 at 07:29:37 PM Self     I am deeply troubled that the National Institutes of Health plans to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is inhumane that some members of Congress want an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos specifically to use for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities. Please oppose any use of my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead, please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47818 05/26/2009 at 07:29:58 PM Self University of Southern California Dept of PPSI, School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9121 As a person working for an academic research institution, I follow progress in the field of stem cell research with great interest and wish to compliment the National Institutes of Health on its comprehensive set of draft guidelines intended to govern federally funded human embryonic stem cell research. Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Universities that conduct biomedical research look forward to the increased opportunity to engage in stem cell research, accelerating science for the advancement of public health. Significant strides were made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am especially pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any of the current stem cell lines will meet the new criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

 
47819 05/26/2009 at 07:30:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47820 05/26/2009 at 07:30:17 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47821 05/26/2009 at 07:30:38 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47822 05/26/2009 at 07:31:13 PM Self     I am oppossed to the destruction of human embryos. They are human beings from the moment of their conception and have a God given right to life until their natural death. God has said " thou shall not kill"

 
47823 05/26/2009 at 07:32:59 PM Organization University of California, Los Angeles   To whom it may concern:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. However, I am worried that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing ethically created stem cell lines, create systemic redundancies that will waste scarce resources without added value, and unduly delay important scientific research. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration before finalizing federal rules:

1. HONOR EXISTING REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES Informed consent and independent regulatory oversight by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) represent the international standard used to measure the protection of tissue donors and research subjects. The NIH Guidelines should use the same standards when judging the acceptability of funding work on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from donated embryos rather than retroactively imposing new requirements based on ethical principles that are fully encompassed by existing federal regulations.

The federal regulations for the protection of human subjects at 45 CFR 46 are the gold standard for the protection of human research subjects, specifically, the informed consent and independent regulatory oversight of research tissue donors. The same standards should be used to judge the acceptability of funding research with cell lines derived from donated embryos, including the required elements of informed consent at 45 CFR 46.116 and 117. Most established hESC lines widely used in research today were created from embryos that were obtained in accordance with existing federal regulations and are consistent with the core principles outlined by The Belmont Report, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) regulations and the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Additionally, many of the hESC lines have to date been eligible for federal support and under the new rules such support will cease, making the proposed Guidelines more restrictive than those of the previous administration.

The established hESC lines serve as the scientific standard and were created in compliance with the existing regulations and guidelines requiring independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. To ensure continued scientific success and international collaborations, the principles and regulations used to ensure the ethical donation of human tissue should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines rather than creating new requirements that would be applied retroactively.

2. EXISTING SELF-REGULATORY PROCESS The NIH guidelines should support the strong existing federal regulatory framework provided by 45 CFR 46, rather than setting new and unique requirements for hESC research. The new guidelines should acknowledge that most existing domestic lines were derived in accordance with the core principles in the CIRM regulations and the ISSCR guidelines, and are consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving the protection of human subjects (donors) through IRB oversight and approval. The federal human research regulations support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy research by: o Requiring independent oversight by IRBs and the international equivalent that have extensive experience reviewing informed consent in the context of human tissue research; o Ensuring a process for voluntary informed consent including the review of consent procedures performed domestically and internationally; o Requiring no undue inducements to donors.

In some instances, oversight bodies called Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (ESCRO) committee, as recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) and required by CIRM, as well as other oversight methods in other countries, provide oversight of human pluripotent stem cell research. Established policies demonstrate that the self-regulatory structure provides a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines, the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

3. PROVENANCE BASED ON PREVAILING STANDARDS OF THE TIME The determination of the ethical and legal provenance of hESC lines should be based on the investigator’s documentation of IRB approval for the obtaining of the original tissue used for the derivation of the line. The IRB approval would be based on the usual determination that the embryos were collected in an ethically appropriate manner consistent with existing federal standards for informed consent.

For the purpose of determining eligibility for federal funding, the ethical provenance of existing domestic cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under applicable federal regulations. Many existing hESC lines, whether ineligible or eligible for federal funding during the Bush Administration, were derived from embryos donated by couples who were fully informed of their options and of the purposes of the research, and whose donations were overseen by an IRB. Nevertheless, many of those very same hESC lines will not be eligible for federal research support solely because the IRB approved consent forms donors signed do not comply with the specific new requirements promulgated in the draft Guidelines. As a result, there is serious risk that these lines, some of which are currently the gold standard for hESC research and that receive federal support, will be ruled ineligible for use in NIH-funded research under the proposed Guidelines.

The same risk applies to lines developed pursuant to the laws and regulations of various states and foreign countries, even if their requirements are substantially equivalent to those in the US. Non-US lines should be eligible for federal funding if the IRB and/or ESCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles.

In addition, new requirements that go beyond established US and international practice should only be applied prospectively and after a period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. The NIH should reconsider those aspects of the proposed guidelines that go beyond existing IRB, CIRM, NAS, and ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the establishment of the informed consent document as the sole source for ethical validation of the informed consent process. Such a standard is a new requirement not previously contemplated by CIRM rules, NAS or ISSCR guidelines and is not required by the federal regulations for the protection of human subjects in domestic or international research.

4. FEDERAL hESC REGISTRY A central NIH registry should serve as a single point for verification of hESC lines eligible for federal funding. Such a registry will provide certainty to all parties that the identified lines were derived according to ethical and legal standards. The evaluation of hESC provenance represents a major resource commitment for oversight committees. It is common for multiple institutions to evaluate the provenance of the same lines resulting in the use of scarce resources in a duplication of a labor intensive effort. The NIH should support a more efficient use of scarce resources, reduction in errors, and ensure consistency and certainty of investigators and compliance committees, by supporting initiatives designed to establish and share the provenance of existing and to be created hESC lines. I, therefore, urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the CIRM and ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The CIRM, for example, has a registry mechanism to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Ultimately, such a registry will reduce uncertainty, redundancy of review, and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being established, it would be useful for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be eligible for federal funding based on IRB and ESCRO determinations. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
47824 05/26/2009 at 07:33:03 PM Organization American Society for Neural Therapy & Repair c/o Center of Excellence for Aging & Brain Repair; Dept. of Neurosurgery; University of South Florida; 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd.-MDC 78; Tampa FL 33612 The new NIH guidelines are most welcome, heartily endorsed, and viewed as a major step forward towards generating cures and therapies for a range of diseases that plague the American citizenry. These guidelines have the enthusiastic endorsement of our organization, comprised over >400 scientists and physicians. Such guidelines allow for the most economical and parsimonious use of our country's limited biomedical research dollars, particularly in these financially challenging times. However, in the process of adding new human embryonic stem cell lines for scientists to use, older lines should not be invalidated based on specious informed consent issues. While it is a well-meaning goal to insure that couples donating left-over IVF blastocysts are fully informed, to hold older hESC lines to the "letter" rather than the "spirit" of 2009 criteria will have the unintended consequences of actually impeding stem cell research -- wasting an enormous amount of data, money, and effort that have been devoted over the past decade -- while not providing substantively more information for couples. The older informed consent criteria, while differing from 2009 in their specific wording, were used by IVF practitioners in good faith in dealing with their patients. The spirit of insuring endorsement by patients of the use of these otherwise-to-be-discarded blastocysts to advance medical knowledge and therapies was always preserved. While going forward from this point on, the informed consent forms can be more elaborate in their degree of explanation, reflecting our growing knowledge of stem cell biology, the older lines should definitely be "grandfathered" to be eligible for federal funding. Furthermore, federal funding should be able to be used for generating new lines from left over frozen and abnormal fresh (based on PDG) blastocysts from IVF, from parthenogenesis, and from the creation of disease hESC lines in vitro (either by nuclear transfer or controlled union of a sperm and egg to achieve blastocyst stage). (Of course implantation of such blastocysts would never be permitted or condoned by the scientific community). In other words, the new guidelines should be identical to those recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) as well as the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). They should not be hampered by the outdated and inappropriately broad and misguided proscriptions of the Dickey-Wicker amendment.

 
47825 05/26/2009 at 07:33:08 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47826 05/26/2009 at 07:33:13 PM Self     Human life has many stages as we age, but the very first stage is the embryo. I am totally against embryonic stem cell research because it takes the life of a human being.

 
47827 05/26/2009 at 07:33:14 PM Self parkinsons action network   Stem Cell research is my last bit of hope for a cure for Parkinson's Disease. My family has and had too many members with PD. My family alone has cost the country millions in loss of work, disability, heartache to name a few. Its now my children's turn to come down with this horrible illness that robs you of LIFE, LIBERTY & the persuit of HAPPINESS !!! This hass to end! Stem Cell will do that !!

 
47828 05/26/2009 at 07:33:22 PM Self     To Whom it may Concern:

I support the position of the CIRM to improve the new federal stem cell research funding guidelines. We all know someone who suffers an incurable disease or disability, which stem cell research may alleviate or heal. For me it is two friends that have had skiing accidents. Please help make changes so we can enhance so many lives.

Thank You,

 
47829 05/26/2009 at 07:33:43 PM Self parkinsons action network   Stem Cell research is my last bit of hope for a cure for Parkinson's Disease. My family has and had too many members with PD. My family alone has cost the country millions in loss of work, disability, heartache to name a few. Its now my children's turn to come down with this horrible illness that robs you of LIFE, LIBERTY & the persuit of HAPPINESS !!! This hass to end! Stem Cell will do that !!

 
47830 05/26/2009 at 07:33:56 PM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

I am not a scientist but serve as a ***** on the Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (ESCRO) Committee at the University of California, Los Angeles and have been closely following the progress in this field. President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. However, I am worried that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing ethically created stem cell lines, create systemic redundancies, and delay important scientific research.

I am pleased that these guidelines appear to permit funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, they would retroactively apply new rules to existing hESC lines thus disallowing federal funding for approximately 90% of existing hESC lines.

It will be important for the final guidelines to permit federal funding of established hESC lines that were created in compliance with the existing regulations and guidelines requiring independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. The NIH should grandfather hESC lines ethically and legally created from embryos obtained under IRB (or equivalent) approval.

I also believe the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). This research has shown true promise in animal models and should be allowed to continue with appropriate federal oversight.

The NIH should create a federal hESC registry that will reduce redundancy, delays in compliance review, and ensure public access to a listing of hESC lines that comply with ethical and legal rules and are eligible for federal support.

The proposed rules must be modified. They should not be retroactive. Grants awarded previously should be continued and the Presidential lines should be eligible for funding.

Significant progress has been made in this field of research over the past decade and the new guidelines should not slow the pace of that progress.

I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the draft guidelines.

 
47831 05/26/2009 at 07:34:01 PM Self     I am 8 years old and have type 1 diabetes. Unless a cure is found, I will likely have a shortened life span and also face severe complications like kidney failure, blindness and heart disease. Please support stell cell research.

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
47832 05/26/2009 at 07:34:45 PM Self     I encourage expanding federal funding to all available stem cell lines.

 
47833 05/26/2009 at 07:34:50 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47834 05/26/2009 at 07:34:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47835 05/26/2009 at 07:35:36 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47836 05/26/2009 at 07:35:55 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47837 05/26/2009 at 07:36:52 PM       No! to the NIH guidelines for human ESCr. Our country's moral values would then be even further eroded. We need to preserve respect for every human being, even the littlest. America needs to reclaim its roots.

 
47838 05/26/2009 at 07:37:20 PM Self     The only successful treatments and cures come from adult stem cell, taken brom bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had improvement of their health and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells and more treatments are being developed.

Please help speed these needed cures by frnding adult stem research and stop the destruction of human embryos.

 
47839 05/26/2009 at 07:37:36 PM Self     I support the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine’s position on the new stem cell guidelines. It is terribly important that the guidelines allow genuine access to new stem cell lines -- we have lost so much research time already.

A close friend of a family member just returned from China where he underwent stem cell treatment for Muscular Dystrophy. The clinic was filled with patients from all over the world.

The U. S. can regain its position as a leader in medical research -- unnecessary legal restrictions are what is holding us back.

 
47840 05/26/2009 at 07:38:42 PM Self     The real problem is that these embryos, which will never be allowed to fully mature, are even created at all. But, with this order standing I feel that it will only further and encourage the degradation of the unborn. And this is because by allowing the option at all, we are giving a subtle nod of approval towards these destructive kinds of medical procedures. And I say all of this even with the regulations on the procedure, such II.B.1 and .2 on page 18579. It would be helpful also to elaborate on exactly what other options there are for the embryos.

 
47841 05/26/2009 at 07:38:42 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which use taxpayer money to fund research that destroys innocent human life. Research with adult stem cells has already produced successful treatments, while embryonic stem cell research has not resulted in treatments, but rather shows that their use can be dangerous(resulting in problems like tumors or rejection). Funding should be directed towards adult stem cell research which has much better potential for finding treatments.

Government support should not be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. The loopholes in the regulations which do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids must also be closed.

 
47842 05/26/2009 at 07:40:31 PM Self     The use of embrionic stem cells for research appears to be driven more by social arguments than scientific ones. There is no dispute that using adult stems cells has proven to be effective in medical research while using embrionic cells has not. Diverting funding from the proven to the unproven is fiscally irresponsible at any time, and given our present economic state it is even more so. Promise, hope and possibilities are good attributes for an individual; however, a governor cannot base decisions by promising possibilites that they hope will come true. It is a house of cards.

 
47843 05/26/2009 at 07:41:21 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson's community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow progress. It is important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived, and also that there should be federal funding when stem cell lines derived in other ways are used.

 
47844 05/26/2009 at 07:41:26 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions. As someone who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms of stem cell research. I am a first year medical student and it is frustrating to constantly meet patients with condiditions in which medicine cannot cure. Many of them, we are learning, would benefit greatly from research. Please consider the amazing possibilities of stem cell research and put forth funding to save lives of patients who are currently condemned to a short and painful end.

 
47845 05/26/2009 at 07:41:43 PM Self     Thank you for the opportunity to register comments on stem cell guidelines. I am a Parkinson's patient and, contrary to prevailing publicity, not all of us are in favor of embryonic stem cell research.

In fact, the opening statement in the guidelines, section II.A., specifies "scientifically worthy" and it is that term that I believe makes the entire debate unnecessary.

Because I am young and personally affected every minute of every day by a progressive disease I invest precious quality hours in researching research. Currently, techniques using dopamine-producing neurons from skin cells are proving to be highly recommended for three reasons: 1) no embryos have to be destroyed, thus eliminating any moral/ethical issues. 2) actual cells from a patient can be used, thus eliminating rejection by the patient's immune system. 3) potential cancer-causing genes can be removed to decrease the chance that newly grafted cells would turn into tumors. (New York Times 3/6,A14,Wade; Los Angeles Times 3/6,Kaplan; Boston Globe 3/6, Johnson)

I recently toured the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, MI, where they are studying therapies intended to stimulate the endogenous regenerative capacity of the brain and increase cell survival pathways in neurons. Studies such as these already meet the "ethically responsible, scientifically worthy and conducted in accordance with applicable law" criteria.

Thank you for reading my comments.

 
47846 05/26/2009 at 07:41:52 PM Self     It is morally unacceptable to kill human embryos. They are human beings created in the image of God.

 
47847 05/26/2009 at 07:42:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47848 05/26/2009 at 07:43:06 PM Self     I wish to express my opposition to donation of embryonic cells for research and development, since I believe there is some element or degree of human status even at this primal stage.

Thanking you for your attention,

 
47849 05/26/2009 at 07:43:31 PM Self     Regarding Executive Order 13505 which will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells:

As a Catholic Christian first and an American citizen second, I must object to my tax dollars being used to destroy human beings (embryos) in the name of Science. A Christian nation cannot support the massacre of human embryos and the absurd consequence of human cloning which will inevitably follow. Since it has already been proven that adult stem cells show much greater promise, why would the U.S. Government want to waste money on the less fruitful research?

Please read the following statements from your document, "using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose" and "...elected to donate human embryos for research purposes." Substitute the word embryo with children and see if you can, with good conscience, support such research. Do you see the horror in the truth? You are talking about children as if they are a commodity. WE ARE SPEAKING ABOUT HUMAN LIFE HERE and I want no part of this mass homicide. In order to conduct research using embryonic stem cells, you must destroy the human person. What part of the Fifth Commandment do you people not understand?

Two very recent polls show that 51% of Americans identify themselves as pro-life; this percentage is up 7% from LAST year. It is my belief that if you put this up for a vote to the American people, you would get the same response - they would vote NO to funding the killing of INNOCENT children for scientific purposes.

 
47850 05/26/2009 at 07:43:33 PM Self     Oppose the funding of embryonic stem cell research. It is unethical to destroy human life,under the pretense of saving life. The real promise of stem cell research lies with adult stem cells.

 
47851 05/26/2009 at 07:43:45 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you,

 
47852 05/26/2009 at 07:44:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47853 05/26/2009 at 07:44:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47854 05/26/2009 at 07:44:40 PM Self     Please allow for the hope of us individuals living with type one diabetes, to one day be free of this affliction.

 
47855 05/26/2009 at 07:45:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47856 05/26/2009 at 07:45:22 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47857 05/26/2009 at 07:45:42 PM Self     I have a son who has lived with diabetes for more than 20 years. We are still waiting for a cure.

Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

Stem cell research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
47858 05/26/2009 at 07:46:04 PM Self     Please understand that those living with this potentially debilitating disease need and deserve a cure. As someone who personally works with these indivuals on a professional basis as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I see what they live with and how their lives are forever changed once they get this disease. Please, have compassion and allow for responsible stem research to help these individuals live a longer, more productive and better quality of life.

 
47859 05/26/2009 at 07:47:17 PM Self     Using Embryonic stem cells is taking a LIFE. We find this morally wrong and dishonest. Adult stem cells and cord blood cells have proven to have good results. Why use cells that take LIFE when other research has proven effective. Promoting the agenda that furthers devalues LIFE in our Nation brings us closer to the destruction of our culture and the end of our civilized society. We are saddened by the dishonest science presented.

 
47860 05/26/2009 at 07:49:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47861 05/26/2009 at 07:51:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47862 05/26/2009 at 07:51:36 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47863 05/26/2009 at 07:52:04 PM Self     I am opposed to creating life in a test tube for the purpose of destroying it. There has been success with cord stem cells and adult stem cells that do not destroy a life.

 
47864 05/26/2009 at 07:52:55 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47865 05/26/2009 at 07:53:10 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47866 05/26/2009 at 07:54:07 PM       No! to the NIH draft guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research. Our country's moral values would then be further eroded. We need to preserve respect for every human being, even the littlest.

 
47867 05/26/2009 at 07:54:12 PM Self     As a mother of a child with type 1 diabetes, psoriatic arthritis, asthma and Sjogren's Syndrome, I support the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine's position on the new stem cell guidelines. PLEASE do what you can to help my daughter. Without your help and stem cell research, she is doomed to live a life filled with pain and difficulty. thank you

 
47868 05/26/2009 at 07:54:37 PM Self     I believe that the use of Stem Cells, whether they are from old or new stem cell lines should be allowed. The NIH should be able to try and cure the diseases of the world and help the people that are counting on the research for their health. As long as the NIH uses the stem cells that have been ethically derived and are no longer being used in IVF procedures, they should be allowed to research as many cells as they can get their hands on. I believe that there should be stem cells allowed to join this program at any time, new or old, as long as the donator knows what they are going to be used in research. There are many medical breakthroughs waiting to be discovered, lets allow funding and research!

 
47869 05/26/2009 at 07:54:38 PM Self     I am in favor of the proposed guidelines. i believe that these will permit the responsible continuation and initiation of research that will generate important new treatments for a variety of diseases that currently allow little hope for cure or remediation.

 
47870 05/26/2009 at 07:54:42 PM Organization Society for Neuroscience 1121 14th Street NW, Suite 1010, Washington, DC 20005 The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) applauds President Obama and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for their commitment to develop Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research. This is a crucial step toward the careful use of stem cells to produce new treatments and to aid in the discovery of new drugs for a vast array of devastating diseases.

In neuroscience, stem cells hold great promise for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord damage. If the 50 million Americans affected annually by neurological illnesses could be aided through stem cell research, we would make tremendous progress in reducing human suffering.

With the knowledge gained in the past decade, stem cell research is more exciting and promising than ever and must continue, with all the proper ethical safeguards of medical research in place. The proposed NIH guidelines, as stated in the summary, “help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law.” SfN strongly supports NIH’s commitment to develop an ethically and scientifically responsible framework in which to conduct promising research.

 
47871 05/26/2009 at 07:55:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47872 05/26/2009 at 07:55:47 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
47873 05/26/2009 at 07:56:06 PM Self     I am asking the National Institutes of Health to rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research involving the expenditure of human embryos or cloning. It troubles me that the NIH is being urged to endorse a broad and reckless policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Broad policies are unable to recognize and adapt to human interests as they arise. The recklessness which ensues puts people just like us in jeopardy, likely seen only as commodities for some program objective.

Please don?t use my tax dollars to promote anything but the latest technology which today is iPS cell technology. Embryonic stem cell research and human cloning ignore sound ethics and are problematic on many levels. Even adult stem cell research awaits more funding to fully develop both the currently successful and the promising therapies on the horizon.

Please regain your scientific focus to make a place for us in history for good and not squander the opportunities awaiting those with open minds.

 
47874 05/26/2009 at 07:56:15 PM Self     President Obama's order is entirely correct; the opposition to stem cell research has no basis in either science or morality.

 
47875 05/26/2009 at 07:56:54 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great hope for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. My mother for instance would benefit greatly since she has Huntington's disease. She was diagnosed in ******.The disease has been causing her brain cells to die over the past few years and now she can't even drive, hardly walk, or think critically about anything. She and others like her would greatly benefit from stem cell transplants as treatment for a currently incurable disease. I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. However, I realize there are some ethical practices that should be put in place. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). This would allow research to move forward at a more rapid rate to study Huntington's, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and many more. Therefore, bring us closer to curing many of these devastating diseases. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. Next, I would like to see section II-F updated to reflect the ability for a family or friend to give their stem cells to another person, similar to the act of giving an organ. Currently the NIH guideline states that one must sign a statement that the donation was made without any restriction or direction regarding the individual(s) who may receive medical benefit from the use of the stem cells. This should be option should be available. It is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Lastly I would like to add that I strongly agree with section III on the basis of ethical and scientific grounds. I am leery of the consequences of using human eggs in another animal. Although the consequences are unclear at this time, it does not seem safe or ethical. Better results might occur with animal stem cells being used for and from specific animals. Thank you for your time.

 
47876 05/26/2009 at 07:57:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47877 05/26/2009 at 07:57:39 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47878 05/26/2009 at 07:57:54 PM Self     Please focus on adult stem cell research. It is promising and morally and ethically comfortable for the American population.

 
47879 05/26/2009 at 07:59:02 PM Self     "These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose." Allowing this kind of "research" on these poor babies is a shameful act. Not only is it not necessary, it glorifies man's desire to control the creating and destroying of human life. Research using adult stem cells are the only ones producing treatments and cures. Wouldn't our tax dollars be better spent with those having success?

 
47880 05/26/2009 at 07:59:34 PM Self     RE embryonic stem cell research/federal guidelines- I am a member of the Parkinson's community. I believe that the draft of NIH guidelines (sections IIB and IV) needs to permit federal funding using stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IV embryos(SCNT). Thank you for your attention.

 
47881 05/26/2009 at 07:59:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47882 05/26/2009 at 08:00:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47883 05/26/2009 at 08:01:58 PM Self     Please do not increase funding for embryonic stem cell research. This process creates life only to destroy it. I believe that adult stem cell research hold much more promise and is a much more ethical form of research.

 
47884 05/26/2009 at 08:02:06 PM Self     I do not believe that there should be any experimentation or research on tissue taken from human embryos created solely for that purpose. Put another way, I do not believe that human embryos should be created solely for the purpose of providing tissue for experimentation or research.

I also do not believe that experimentation or research should be performed on embryos that were created as a by-product of IVF activities on behalf of otherwise infertile parents.

However noble-sounding they may be, investigations into the activity of early-stage human tissue are neither morally not ethically proper.

Thanks for considering these views.

 
47885 05/26/2009 at 08:03:58 PM Self     I am commenting in opposition to the funding of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. The basis of this opposition is grounded in the moral controversy surrounding embryonic stem cell research. Embryos are human life and should not be used and destroyed for research purposes. This use of human embryos is irresponsible and irreverent of human life. Also, there has been no indication that embryonic stem cells can be applied to curative medicine. On the other hand, Adult stem cells have been applied to numerous maladies and have been proven successful. Therefore, it would be both ethically and financially prudent to fund Adult Stem Cell research rather than Embryonic Stem Cell research.

 
47886 05/26/2009 at 08:04:50 PM Self     The new guidelines are more restrictive than those of Bush. they must be loosened to allow the needed research to flourish. Please don't take us backwards.

 
47887 05/26/2009 at 08:05:14 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47888 05/26/2009 at 08:05:48 PM Self     I fully support stem cell research.

 
47889 05/26/2009 at 08:06:07 PM Self     As a CHRISTIAN I do not want my tax dollars funding any embryonic stem cell research, which by the way has not shown any promise as other types have.Much HOPE but no results.

 
47890 05/26/2009 at 08:06:16 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons and diabetes. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
47891 05/26/2009 at 08:07:42 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47892 05/26/2009 at 08:08:03 PM Self     I oppose my tax dollars ever being used to fund embryonic stem cell....please do not include me in this barbaric activity.

 
47893 05/26/2009 at 08:08:37 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47894 05/26/2009 at 08:09:47 PM Self     “I urge the NIH to adopt alternative criteria for the acceptable derivation of stem cell lines that will allow federal money to be used with stem cell lines currently approved for NIH-funding. Eliminating federal support for use of these lines would seriously undermine current research programs. I recommend that the alternative criterion for acceptable derivation be oversight of embryo donation by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or its equivalent for stem cell lines created before 2009. The IRB should ensure that the informed consent process conformed to accepted regulations and guidelines at the time and place of donation. This alternative IRB criterion for informed consent continues support for current research programs and supports use of an expanded set of valuable stem cell lines. Also, I support the use of NIH-funds with stem cell lines derived through parthenogenesis as long as they meet standards for ethical derivation. These lines are a valuable research tool.

 
47895 05/26/2009 at 08:10:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47896 05/26/2009 at 08:10:13 PM Self     Guidelines II.B. Comment on, "no longer needed for that purpose" (reproduction). The purpose of an embryo lies far beyond providing a couple that wonderful feeling of having a baby. His/her (gender having already been determined at conception) purpose lies beyond the will of its parent couple. It's purpose is life itself. It's purpose is only fulfilled in its living until natural death. To reduce persons to means is a dangerous and oh so slippery slope. The bodies of Jews at Auschwitz were deemed fit for experimentation because they were going to die anyway. For scientific advancement Syphilis was left untreated in African Americans at Tuskegee because they were seen as an expendable race. It is never ethical to directly kill and innocent human life.

 
47897 05/26/2009 at 08:10:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47898 05/26/2009 at 08:10:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47899 05/26/2009 at 08:11:10 PM Self     I fully support stem cell research.

 
47900 05/26/2009 at 08:11:34 PM Organization Association of Independent Research Institutes (AIRI) 1341 G St, NW, Washington, DC 20005 The Association of Independent Research Institutes (AIRI) supports NIH in its effort to expand federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research. Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. IRIs conducting biomedical research look forward to the increased opportunity to engage in stem cell research, accelerating science for the advancement of public health.

AIRI is a national organization of 90 independent, non-profit research institutes that perform basic and clinical research in the biological and behavioral sciences. AIRI institutes vary in size, with budgets ranging from a few million to hundreds of millions of dollars. In addition, each AIRI member institution is governed by its own independent Board of Directors, which allows our members to focus on discovery based research while remaining structurally nimble and capable of adjusting their research programs to emerging areas of inquiry. Researchers at independent research institutes consistently exceed the success rates of the overall NIH grantee pool, and receive about 10 percent of NIH’s peer reviewed, competitively awarded extramural grants. On average, AIRI member institutes receive a total of $1.6 billion in extramural grants from NIH in any given year.

 
47901 05/26/2009 at 08:11:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47902 05/26/2009 at 08:12:16 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47903 05/26/2009 at 08:14:24 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47904 05/26/2009 at 08:14:49 PM Self     On behalf of our ***** grandson (who has type 1 diabetes) and our daughter, who is a medical researcher, we are asking NIH to NOT make grant rules retroactive. We strongly believe that current research projects should proceed as originally funded and approved by NIH. Many research participants and investigators have dedicated their time to seeking a greater understanding of stem cell research and to halt the projects mid-stream is a costly and unfair decision. Hundreds of thousands of people will be adversely affected by halting this research on stem cells that will be destroyed because of new requirements. It is a horrific blow to citizens, who through no fault of their own, have developed hideous diseases and have kept hope alive waiting for a future cure.

 
47905 05/26/2009 at 08:15:09 PM Self     I oppose the support of embryonic stem cell experiments.

 
47906 05/26/2009 at 08:15:29 PM Organization Pro-Choice Alliance for Responsible Research   The Pro-Choice Alliance for Responsible Research welcomes the NIH draft guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research as an important step toward appropriate national oversight and reasonable regulation of human stem cell technologies that promote and encourage important medical research while also providing a framework for ensuring the highest ethical standards, safety, and the protection of patients and providers of research materials.

The Pro-Choice Alliance is a California non-profit organization representing activists in the reproductive rights and justice movement, bio-ethicists, advocates and community leaders working to promote accountability, safety and social justice in bio-medical research from a women’s health and rights perspective. We have actively participated in the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) public process since its inception, advancing public and consumer interests in advocacy for high ethical standards in stem cell research.

1. We support the decision to expand federal funding and oversight for research on stem cell lines derived from embryos that were created but are no longer needed for reproductive purposes. This decision carefully balances the important goals of advancing scientific investigations that may have the potential to relieve suffering with critical concerns about the health consequences of egg donation on young woman and unresolved societal concerns about human cloning and the uses of cloning technologies.

2. We support the provisions for fully informed? consent on the part of potential donors of embryos for stem cell? research. We urge the NIH to extend the informed consent requirements to the men and women who have provided their genetic material for the express purpose of assisting other people in having children. They must have the right to decide whether or not they want their genetic material given to research. A recent Duke University study found that the overwhelming percentage of people who have unused embryos would donate them to research if the appropriate mechanisms were in place. There is no need to violate the wishes of those donors who have not given consent, and allowing the use of genetic material without consent would set a dangerous precedent toward weakening important informed consent protections for medical research.

3. We support the guideline’s prohibition on inducements to provide embryos for research. These protections are important to ensure that donations are truly voluntary, and not coerced by economic need. These protections are especially necessary under the current difficult economic conditions. ? 4. We support the separation between the attending physician? responsible for reproductive clinical care and the researcher? deriving and/or proposing to utilize human embryonic stem cells, however, we suggest that the guidelines more clearly and definitively prohibit the donation of embryos when there is a financial or personal connection between the physician and the researcher. The exception “whenever practicable” is much too broad an exception, and does not sufficiently protect assisted reproduction patients from undue influence by researchers.

Thank you for attention to these comments.

 
47907 05/26/2009 at 08:15:41 PM Self     As a member of ASCB (American Society for Cell Biology), GSA (Genetics Society of America), and ISSCR, I do strongly support their comments on NIH stem cell guidelines. Setting appropriate guidelines is critical to promote research using human embryonic stem cells with such a promise of therapeutic usage. ***** Assistant Professor, University of *****

GSA: Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research. Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board. Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds." The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation. To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

ISSCR We welcome and applaud the leadership that the NIH proposes to assume for the oversight of human embryonic stem cell research in the United States. The draft guidelines represent an important step towards accelerating critical medical research by giving scientists access to more embryonic stem cell lines that better reflect the diversity in our society, make it possible to model inherited human diseases, and have favorable properties such as reduced contamination with animal products. Given the importance of human embryonic stem cell research to future medical progress, access to an increased range of lines will accelerate efforts to understand and treat major public health problems.??The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has already endorsed research on pluripotent stem cell lines derived via in vitro fertilization (IVF), somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), parthenogenesis, or gene-based reprogramming. The ISSCR supports such stem cell research globally, where performed under rigorous standards of research ethics described in the 2006 ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. We reaffirm this position and encourage NIH to review its Guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research as the science in this area evolves. In the interest of improving world health we urge the NIH to open discussions on funding research carried out with human pluripotent stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess reproductive IVF embryos, including SCNT embryos, if they become available and are derived under rigorous ethical standards.??The NIH draft guidelines represent an important advance beyond the Bush administration policy, but could be significantly improved by addressing two key issues. If these issues are not addressed, the guidelines may have the unintended effect of delaying and hampering ethical stem cell research.??1) The new informed consent standards set forth in the draft NIH policy would establish comprehensive scientific and ethical standards for the derivation of lines in the future, after the institution of this policy. However, retroactive application of these standards to existing lines will exclude from federal funding many, perhaps most, lines that have been in routine use for the past ten years, and about which substantial and essential information is already available. It is critical that a mechanism be developed to ensure that the past ten years of scientific progress with these lines not be lost to federally-funded research, and to ensure that researchers do not have to start from scratch to characterize new lines for studies that began with the older lines. If the NIH does not reconsider how existing human embryonic stem cell lines can be evaluated for eligibility for federal funding, we will find ourselves in the untenable position of excluding many lines that were derived under terms that were judged appropriate in the past by institutional oversight boards. ? To remedy these potential problems, the ISSCR recommends that instead of providing specific criteria using very detailed language for informed consent, the NIH define a deliberative review process to establish eligibility for federal funding of human embryonic stem cell lines derived prior to July 2009. These pre-existing lines would be considered ethically derived and eligible for federal funding if they were derived according to each of the following core principles:??A. Voluntary informed consent: That those persons who donated embryos or other human materials for the derivation of human embryonic stem cell lines were empowered to make a voluntary and informed decision to participate or to refuse to participate in the research; ?B. No undue inducement: That the voluntary nature of the informed consent process was not undermined by undue inducements or other undue influences to participate in the research; and ?C. Independent review and oversight: That the derivation process and informed consent documents were reviewed and approved by an independent oversight committee such as an Institutional Review Board (IRB; or the equivalent in other countries).??The ISSCR believes a deliberative review process upholding these three core principles would be much more desirable and practical for all human embryonic stem cell lines, rather than relying on a set of specifically-worded eligibility requirements, as currently articulated in the draft NIH guidelines document. Such a vetting process would allow the grandfathering of existing stem cell lines that were derived according to the ethical standards prevailing at the time and place of derivation. This would also confer greater flexibility in the implementation of the constantly evolving standards for best practices in donor consent and international nuances of language. Under the review process, the use of existing lines could be evaluated on the basis of the regulations and ethical expectations at the time and place of embryo donation, so long as there is evidence that each of the three core principles was upheld. By stipulating a review process founded on core principles rather than specific language in informed consent documents, the NIH would provide oversight of stem cell research according to current standards of the Common Rule and existing IRB mechanisms for tissue research oversight. ??2) We urge the NIH to itself develop a list of human embryonic stem cell lines that are eligible for federal funding. Having the NIH maintain such a list would avoid the potential problem of different organizations and institutions in different regions of the U.S. arriving at differing opinions about the eligibility of cell lines for federal funding. Clearly, such a list would have to be curated and updated regularly, and the NIH would need to develop a process whereby newly-derived cell lines could be considered for eligibility for federal funding. While such a centralized process might engender opposition by some, we note that such a system was previously used in the form of the RAC for certification of safety and eligibility of new vectors for recombinant DNA research. This system clearly worked in the past and was critical to the regularization of this important research.??Alternatively, we urge the NIH (i) to accept as definitive an institutional assurance that already existing lines are ethical under the standards that prevailed at the time and place of derivation, provided that assurance is backed by the review and determination of an IRB or stem cell research oversight process (SCRO; as defined in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research); and (ii) to post-on a new website a listing of the cell lines so accepted for funding, together with the name of the institution providing the assurance, the name of the institution from which the lines are available, and the IRB or SCRO that approved the protocol under which the lines were derived. This would provide an investigator-accessible registry of NIH-funded lines, while promoting the accessibility of lines, and directing investigators and their institutions towards the source of ethically pertinent materials. The ISSCR itself has a registry of human embryonic stem cell line provenance under development which in due course, it is hoped, will provide much of this information and more. However, in the short term, funding should proceed based on the sound structure for derivation review through IRBs and SCROs as existing in the U.S.??The ISSCR welcomes further discussion during the deliberations of the NIH and offers their assistance at all stages of the process. ??As you know, the ISSCR has exerted enormous effort to provide professional standards for the ethical derivation and use of human embryonic stem cell lines. In 2006, the ISSCR released its Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, which seeks to ensure that human stem cell research is carried out according to rigorous standards of research ethics and to encourage uniform practices globally. The ISSCR built into these international guidelines high standards of informed consent to facilitate the translation of these standards into practice moving forward, and provided template documents for the donation of materials for human embryonic stem cell line derivation. We remain enthusiastic to work with the NIH to ensure that this research is appropriately regulated and able to fulfill its remarkable promise for enhancing human health.

 
47908 05/26/2009 at 08:17:01 PM Organization National Primate Research Centers   The National Primate Research Centers (NPRCs) support NIH in its effort to expand federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research. Non-human primate stem cell research has been taking place in many forms at all of the NPRCs and has proved invaluable for the advancement of cutting edge translational research, the understanding of human health and disease, and the assessment of new therapies. Given what was learned using non-human primate models, it is of the utmost importance to continue this research with human embryonic stem cells.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders.

 
47909 05/26/2009 at 08:17:29 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses

 
47910 05/26/2009 at 08:17:34 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons, and diabets. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
47911 05/26/2009 at 08:18:09 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47912 05/26/2009 at 08:20:42 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47913 05/26/2009 at 08:23:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars MUST NOT be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47914 05/26/2009 at 08:24:06 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research has been active for several years. So far, it has proven not to be successful.

Adult stem cell research has been proven to be successful in approximately seventy-five health problems.

Why is NIH wasting time and dollars researching unsucessful embryonic stem cells?

 
47915 05/26/2009 at 08:24:33 PM Self     I am concerned about the proposal to waste taxpayer money on embryonic stem cell research, which has been a failure. Adult stem cells and cord blood stem cells are already healing people and curing diseases. It only makes sense to fund research which has a proven outcome and can continue to help cure diseaes.

 
47916 05/26/2009 at 08:24:41 PM Self     I do not have the time to write out a lengthy comment, just hearing about this today, so close to the deadline. I did want to quickly say that tax money should not be used for this purpose. Embryonic stem cell research is very controversial. Many people would be forced to pay for sonething that was against their beliefs. Such controversial reseach should be paid for by those wishing to support it, not the general public.

 



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