Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

Browse Comments Beginning With:
Record ID:
Entry Date:
On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



|First 100 Records   Back 1000 Records   Back 100 Records   Records 45116 - 45215 of 49015 Forward 100 Records   Forward 1000 Records   Last 100 Records|

ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
45116 05/25/2009 at 07:25:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45117 05/25/2009 at 07:25:17 PM Self     Stem cell research will become a commdity traded money maker ofr certain individuals and murder for the unborn. If we continue down this immoral path, the elderly, infrim and the mentally challlenged will be next to harvest from. What then will stop the use of anyone willing to sell body parts for a price. The slippery slope has a black pit of the bottom called hell.

 
45118 05/25/2009 at 07:25:46 PM Self     On March 9, 2009 President Obama issued an executive order that opened the floodgates for funding more human embryonic stem cell experiments. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has drafted guidelines for distributing these funds. These guidelines devote my tax dollars to experiments with embryonic stem cells, from destroyed human embryos. But the only successful treatments and cures come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed.

The new NIH guidelines would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

The information above was quoted from a commentary by Tony Perkins. I fully agree with his statement. Two years ago, my daughter told me of an individual who was suffering from a life threatening disease and was cured by using adult stem cells. Unfortunately, I do not have the individual's name and medical information. However, I'm sure I could acquire the information if necessary.

To date, I am not aware of any individual who has been cured by embryonic stem cells. Why not continue to use and implement research (adult stem cells) that has not only a proven "track" record but lives aren't destroyed in the process.

This is my second plea. Please do not destroy life in the name of research. If adult stem cells have proven successful, there is no need.

 
45119 05/25/2009 at 07:28:22 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45120 05/25/2009 at 07:29:10 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes. We have a daughter with type one diabetes. We are also practicing catholics.

 
45121 05/25/2009 at 07:29:26 PM Self     This is in reguard to Exutive Order 13505 Human Stem Cell Research. I beleive this is morally wrong and should not be used. We can't conduct "Waterboarding in this country but we can take unborn lives and play with them in a petrie dish.

 
45122 05/25/2009 at 07:29:41 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45123 05/25/2009 at 07:29:43 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45124 05/25/2009 at 07:29:52 PM Self     I oppose embryonic stem cell research. Adult stem cells clear hold much more promise in terms of treating disease and illnesses.

 
45125 05/25/2009 at 07:31:15 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45126 05/25/2009 at 07:31:20 PM Self     I want to go on record as supporting stem research.

 
45127 05/25/2009 at 07:32:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45128 05/25/2009 at 07:32:17 PM Self     To begin, I should mention that my husband has a degenerative disease. Expanding stem cell research for PD and other progressive disorders could provide answers for those with his diagnosis and the others who may develop these progressive diseases.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. As a member of the Parkinson’s community I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment.

 
45129 05/25/2009 at 07:33:35 PM Self     Broadening the exploration of potential therapeutic uses of stem cells and gaining understanding of their biology is very important and this relaxation of funding restrictions is overdue.

The consent guideline seems tortuous and overly concerned about the remote possibility of misunderstanding and should be simplified to achieve greater clarity and ease of application.

While cloning of humans is to be forbidden for a number of philosophical and biological reasons, it is not clear that if two informed and consenting adults wish to create an embryo(s) for therapeutic stem cell research this is morally problematic and should be forbidden. Needs re-examination in the near future.

 
45130 05/25/2009 at 07:35:11 PM Self     Please do not allow human embryos to be destroyed for the purposes of scientific research. Not only does this represent a tragic misuse and abuse of weaker individuals by stronger individuals, it involves state funding using tax dollars that come from many individuals who recognize the ethical unacceptability of this practice.

Research already completed in recent years has demonstrated that the promise of stem cell-mediated therapies lies with adult stem cells, not embryonic stem cells; this despite the large sums spent already in pursuit of this goal.

Thank you for your consideration of my comments.

 
45131 05/25/2009 at 07:36:09 PM Self     We oppose our tax dollars being used to experiment with embryonic stem cells from destroyed human embryos. There have been thousands of patients who have had their health improved and lives saved with adult stem cells. The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy. Many destroyed human embryos are lives that could have been spared. Those lives may have saved others in the future by doing research on diseases that will not have a cure. Thank you for your time and consideration in this matter! Sincerely,

 
45132 05/25/2009 at 07:36:11 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research, as it is unethical. It diverts funding away from the much more promising (and ethical) area of adult stem cell research.

Please do not do this! Thank you.

 
45133 05/25/2009 at 07:36:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45134 05/25/2009 at 07:36:43 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45135 05/25/2009 at 07:36:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45136 05/25/2009 at 07:37:06 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

We strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, we hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

We commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45137 05/25/2009 at 07:37:18 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45138 05/25/2009 at 07:37:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45139 05/25/2009 at 07:37:54 PM Self     Dear NIH, I am the mother of a beautiful, wonderful, women..age 40...who has had diabetes for way too long! I hope and pray a cure and/or better treatment is on the horizon. Please, find a cure NOW. It stem cell research is the answer...I ask that you push and pass any and all guidelines. Insulin in NOT the cure. It is only a mask! Thank you.

 
45140 05/25/2009 at 07:39:21 PM Self     We are members of the Center for Inquiry, a non-profit organization devoted to promoting science and reason as the basis of public policy. We have read the NIH guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research and urge the NIH to promote the widest range possible of research in this field because of its potential for improving health and curing diseases.

Your present guidelines are admirable in expanding the number of embryonic stem cell lines eligible for federal funding and maintaining research using adult stem cells. At a minimum, these guidelines should be maintained, especially because a large majority of Americans polled report that they support federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

The present guidelines, however, do not go far enough. We would like to see the guidelines expanded to allow federal funding of all avenues of stem cell research. Research on human embryonic stem cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and adult stem cells needs to continue in parallel. All are part of a research effort that seeks to expand our knowledge of how cells function, what fails in the disease process, and how the first stages of human development occur. It is this combined knowledge that will ultimately generate safe and effective therapies. This research should be funded with federal money in order to promote the development of innovative and potentially lifesaving medical treatments as quickly as possible.

While approving the present guidelines is an excellent first step, we urge you to continue to monitor developments in the field and update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for your attention.

 
45141 05/25/2009 at 07:39:25 PM Self     Each human individual can uniquely trace his or her continuous bodily development back to the embryonic stage. Even at such an early stage of development, each human embryo is both human (in species) and uniquely individuated. Thus each human embryo is a human individual. Human individuality does not come into being as bodily or mental development progresses, rather human individuality is fully present even in the embryo. Connected with human individuality is a fundamental and intrinsic dignity. Intentionally destroying or harming any human individual is inconsistent with the respect for human life that this intrinsic dignity demands. Intentional destruction of human embryos is therefore unethical. Research involving the intentional destruction of human embryos must not be pursued. Though research on human embryonic stem cells derived from human embryos is motivated by good intentions, the ends do not justify the means(intentionally destroying human life). The NIH should not fund research for which the destruction of human embryos is a prerequisite, even if federal funds are not directly used for that destruction of human life.

Though the NIH draft guidelines do not allow federal funds to be used specifically for the destruction of human embryos through the derivation of stem cells, the guidelines do give an implicit approval of the destruction of human embryos and provide a very strong motivation for such embryo destruction to continue to occur for research purposes. Federal funding opportunities for research on human embryonic stem cells derived from human embryos will create a great demand for more human embryonic stem cells, and meeting that demand would of course require more embryos to be destroyed in the process. For these reasons, it could easily be argued that though the guidelines are in accord with the letter of the law contained in the Dickey-Wicker amendment, they are indeed not in accord with the spirit of that law. If it is illegal to fund the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research, why should it not also be illegal to fund research that has such additional derivation as a prerequisite? That those embryos would have likely died or been discarded anyways, does not change the ethical incorrectness of intentionally and actively destroying them for research purposes. The surplus of embryos at reproductive clinics is an ethical problem in itself. The NIH draft guidelines would implicate the federal government and researchers in this ethical problem and further complicate it, rather than allowing that problem to at least remain contained where it began.

Lastly, though it may be inappropriate for the draft guidelines to explicitly affirm or deny specific ethical principles that could be controversial among the public, it does otherwise seem important to spell out precisely how these guidelines have been shaped by the public controversy over the destruction of human embryos, especially as these guidelines will determine how public funds are used. Beyond the Dickey-Wicker amendment, what is the basis for these guidelines? Transparency as to why the committee decided on these particular guidelines, and justification for these guidelines given the ethical controversy would be appreciated.

Thank you for attentively reading my comments on the draft guidelines.

 
45142 05/25/2009 at 07:39:32 PM Self     Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos BUT it calls for the destruction of the embryo to obtain these cells. As practicing Catholic physicians, we vehemently protest the inclusion of the human embryo as a source of stem cells and fervently pray that the humane side of you prevail. We cannot separate ourselves as Catholics on one hand and "scientists" on the other hand. We cannot "profess our faith" in church one Sunday and ignore it when we put on our labcoats on Monday. We are the totality of our faith, our upbringing and our life experiences. We cannot separate one from the other and to us, it is what it is, FAITH.

 
45143 05/25/2009 at 07:40:34 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45144 05/25/2009 at 07:41:19 PM Self     I object to the quidelines. They sound like careovers from the last eight years of the Bush Administration. If stem cell research is to prove itself, we need to let our research organizations get on with it. Wait a year or two and then issue quidelines, if necessary, to correct abuses.

 
45145 05/25/2009 at 07:43:26 PM Self     I oppose the killing of human embryos. The proposed regulations will force us taxpayers to fund research I believe is unethical and sinful because it requires the killing of human embryos.

 
45146 05/25/2009 at 07:43:27 PM Self     I am very much opposed to my tax dollars being used to support embryonic stem cell research, since I strongly believe that human life begins at conception. No government should force its citizens to spend their money in support of what they believe to be the equivalent of murder.

 
45147 05/25/2009 at 07:44:16 PM Self     Statement on NIH Human Stem Cell Research Guidelines–*****l

The development of the National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research must reflect the full commitment of the President, and the support of same on the part of Congress and the American people, to secure the development of stem cell research and treatment, with its remarkable potential benefits of reducing suffering and increasing the quality of human life, on an unimpeachably sound foundation of science rigorously and consistently conducted at the highest possible level. This effort to develop new Guidelines is being undertaken during a period of tremendous activity and progress in the stem cell field. In a period of such rapid activity the development of Guidelines for providing funding the best and most important endeavors becomes simultaneously more difficult and more necessary. The major problem at this time is that the existing Guidelines, Legislation, and the current draft for new Guidelines are inept and fully inadequate to effectively meet this challenge. Scientific advances in the stem cell field now find these processes and documents wanting. These previous efforts do not even embody language and terminology that can deal with some of the most recent and important developments. Correcting this lack should be of highest importance. One very important issue and a good example of the inability of the draft of new Guidelines to fully deal with and incorporate ongoing advances in research is in the area of human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) and especially with respect to derivation of new stem cell lines.

There has been much controvery about hESCs. Much of it has been irrational and uninformed but much of it has reflected legtitimate considerations of ethics and safety. Through all of the controversy, however, it has remained the case that hESCs may be the best hope for providing safe and effective stem cell treatments for a great number of human medical afflictions. The new Guidelines must promote determining as quickly as possible whether this is true.

Ancillary and necessary to this is a step which will greatly benefit positive developments in stem cell research and treatment, specifically, generating Guidelines which promote the development and availability of new stem cell lines. This is precisely where the new Guidelines must demonstrate the ability to fully incorporate the recent development of new procedures, methods, and processes and, as well, to incorporate the concepts and terminology attending these advances.

Previous efforts and formulations provide a good example of the currently inherent barriers to an understanding adequately reflective of the current state of the science, one that would be able to take advantage of the heightened level of potential and promise as well as the more timely manner in which these advances might now be brought to fruition. The best example may be in the area of the current restrictions on procedures for developing new stem cell lines for research and for provision of cells for treatment. Current Legislation and Guidelines, and the draft of new Guidelines restrict the generation of new stem cell lines by understandably prohibiting funding for research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero and, as well, the use of cells derived through somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes.

The above restrictions are quite reasonable and understandable and, clearly, are based on a variety of sound and significant concerns. None of the above, however, reflects an understanding or even an awareness of an important advance in recent years in the stem cell field. Again, it is understandable that a major obstacle to the generation of new stem cell lines has been that the only available procedures would destroy or harm a viable human embryo in the process of utilizing it to generate new stem cell lines. In recent years, however, advances have made it possible to utilize a human embryo to generate new stem cell lines without destroying or harming the viable embryo. This advance should already have allowed for the funding and generation of new stem cell liines in a manner which would have invigorated ongoing research and promoted greater steps towards successful and safe treatment. The method did become embroiled in controversy. The criticisms of the method have, however, been remarkably non-specific and have provided no direct challenge to the successful demonstration of the procedure which has been fully documented in two separate studies.(1,2) The step in the procedure which seems to be of most concern for ctritics is the initial one, the extraction of a blastomere from a blastocyst (taking one cell from a multi-cell embryo) and then using that blastomere (cell) for to generate a new stem cell line and still maintaining a fully viable and unharmed embryo which can develop normally. This initial step, however, has been used in Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for over 30 years ago and is now in standard use in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics to assess the genetic health of preimplantation embryos. The use of PGD has never raised any significant ethical or medical concerns and there is no ethical, medical, or scientific basis for more concern about this initial step when used in the derivation of a stem cell line as opposed to a PGD procedure. It is clear that this methodology for creating new hESC stem cell lines would allow researchers to double or triple the number of stem cell lines available within a few months. This would add tremendously to the ability of researchers to move forward much more efficiently and quickly with the development of safe and effective stem cell treatments.

Those charged with drafting new Guidelines must do so in a way which will support the funding of this significant and potentially very productive advance. They must also demonstrate awareness of any other recent advances that may be similarly beneficial and deserving. They must, as well, build into the Guideline statement a reasonable openness, absent from previous efforts, reflecting and able to respond to the rapidity and great potential of ongoing development and direction of new methods and concepts in stem cell research.

References:

1. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Derived from Single Blastomeres, Nature, November 23, 2006.

2. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Generated without Embryo Destruction, Cell Stem Cell, January 10, 2008.

 
45148 05/25/2009 at 07:44:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45149 05/25/2009 at 07:45:08 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45150 05/25/2009 at 07:45:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45151 05/25/2009 at 07:45:36 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45152 05/25/2009 at 07:45:53 PM Self     I would like to ask that stem cell research be freed up from any political restrictions to receive federal money.

 
45153 05/25/2009 at 07:46:27 PM Self     Can we experiment on the brain tissue of politicians to see if we can cure the disease that casues them to agree that the taking of a human life no matter how young or how it got conceived is OK in the name of science.

Most politicians seem to be dead from the neck up anyway. So it would be more ethical than using stem cells from fetuses being killed in the name of science.

A human fetus still has the potential to do some good. Not so sure we can say that about some politicians.

 
45154 05/25/2009 at 07:47:37 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45155 05/25/2009 at 07:47:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45156 05/25/2009 at 07:48:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45157 05/25/2009 at 07:49:07 PM Organization FRC   I am strongly oppposed to funding for more human embryonic stem cell experiments. This will decrease funding for the the already proven successful treatment using adult stem cells. As so many have been successfully treated in this way, the NIH should make more funding available to them

 
45158 05/25/2009 at 07:49:37 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45159 05/25/2009 at 07:49:39 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45160 05/25/2009 at 07:50:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45161 05/25/2009 at 07:50:17 PM Self     I am simply opposed to embryonic stem cell research as part of my religious faith. It would involve the death of what could become a living human.

 
45162 05/25/2009 at 07:50:52 PM   JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45163 05/25/2009 at 07:52:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45164 05/25/2009 at 07:53:36 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45165 05/25/2009 at 07:54:07 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45166 05/25/2009 at 07:54:46 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. As both a scientist and a member of the Parkinson’s community, I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

 
45167 05/25/2009 at 07:55:17 PM Self     I strongly oppose any use of embryonic Stem cells for research or scientific use, because it destrys human life. I am fully supportive of adult stem-cell research, which is proven to be more effective and is not the least bit contreversial.

 
45168 05/25/2009 at 07:55:57 PM Self     I HAVE SUFFERED WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES FOR 26 YEARS. I HAVE HOPE DRAFT NIH HUMAN STEM CELL PASSAGE WILL HELP ME IN THE FUTURE.

 
45169 05/25/2009 at 07:58:24 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45170 05/25/2009 at 07:58:29 PM Self     I oppose all killing of labratory created Human Stem Cells. We need to value human life not to create it to be destroyed!

It is known that the developing cells can be problematic to the donor receiving any effective help so this form is not warranted.

Gaining the stem cells from donors upon death is fine or skin grafts.

 
45171 05/25/2009 at 07:58:32 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45172 05/25/2009 at 07:58:52 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45173 05/25/2009 at 08:00:06 PM Self     I oppose ALL embryonic stem-cell research due to the fact that human life begins at conception...thus, the destruction of the human embryo for scientific purposes, however noble those purposes may be, is morally reprehensible and unnaceptable. The ends NEVER justify the means. I do not want my taxes to fund the killing of innocent life...the lives of our fellow citizens who should be protected by our constitution.

 
45174 05/25/2009 at 08:00:31 PM Self     I oppose am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45175 05/25/2009 at 08:01:04 PM       I vote no to killing baby embryos to use as medicine.

 
45176 05/25/2009 at 08:01:38 PM Self     A total repeal of the Dickey-Wicker amendment is desirable.Stem cell reserch is the best hope for the cure of Diabetes

 
45177 05/25/2009 at 08:02:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45178 05/25/2009 at 08:02:55 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45179 05/25/2009 at 08:03:06 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45180 05/25/2009 at 08:03:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45181 05/25/2009 at 08:03:45 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45182 05/25/2009 at 08:03:50 PM Self     I wish to express support FOR the draft NIH human stem cell guidelines. The draft guidelines will make available new human embryonic cell lines derived from cells of the inner cell mass of embryoes discarded from in-vitro fertilization. This will allow researchers access to an important resource that at present is going to waste. In order to understand fundamental questions of human development at the molecular and cellular level and to turn those discoveries into therapeutics for presently incurable diseases, it is imperative that American scientists be able to utilize human embryonic cells that have been derived by modern culture techniques and not co-cultured with non-human cells. It is extremely important that scientists be able to use their federal grant money for the study of these new cells to avoid the present necessity of segregating federally permissible research from non-permissible research. While the draft guidelines do not provide everything necessary for unimpeded research into the clinical potential of human embryonic stem cells, they are an important second step, and are imperative for this research to yield benefits.

 
45183 05/25/2009 at 08:04:31 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45184 05/25/2009 at 08:05:04 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45185 05/25/2009 at 08:05:46 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45186 05/25/2009 at 08:06:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45187 05/25/2009 at 08:06:35 PM Self     Why is government pushing this embryonic stem cell research? It has produced no successful results. Also, the private money is on adult stem cell research -- where cures are being found. Private industry is profit-oriented. It won't invest in something that will be a failure, i.e., embryonic stem cell research.

Another reason to go with adult stem cell research, besides the facts that is successful in finding cures and gives a return on one's R+D money, is that it does not kill babies. No one is harmed by it, as with embryos (we were all embryos at one time) being destroyed.

Please do the right thing, morally and ethically. Stop this bill on embryo experimentation.

 
45188 05/25/2009 at 08:07:01 PM Organization Catholics for the Common Good Institute   I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45189 05/25/2009 at 08:09:18 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45190 05/25/2009 at 08:10:03 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45191 05/25/2009 at 08:10:09 PM Self     The Human Stem Cell Research is the cure for diabetes I have been a diabetic for 38 years and need this to live my life. I have to skip meals at times when I'm hungry because my sugars are out of control. I take my shots regularly and on time I do not eat any foods with sugar in them. I would like to live a normal life like other people do. My kidneys are stressed and I have glaucoma in both eyes which is taking my vision. When I get hurt it takes along time for me to heal. When I catch the flu or even a cold it throws my sugars into turmoil. I have high sugars when I get sick then after I start to heal my sugars will drop to a very dangerous low. I am limited on outdoor activities due to the heat lowering my sugars. So if this passes I can live a normal and happy, healthy life also I won't have to worry about my grandkids having to deal with the problems I have. Please consider this for all of us Diabetics out there suffering from this condition.

 
45192 05/25/2009 at 08:10:25 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45193 05/25/2009 at 08:10:28 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
45194 05/25/2009 at 08:11:03 PM Self     I do not want to fund the killing of human embryes. It also takes away from non-embryonic stem cell treatment.

Thank you.

 
45195 05/25/2009 at 08:11:53 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45196 05/25/2009 at 08:12:11 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45197 05/25/2009 at 08:12:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45198 05/25/2009 at 08:13:02 PM Self     I think that more money need's to be put into the Stem Cell, study,

 
45199 05/25/2009 at 08:13:47 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45200 05/25/2009 at 08:14:07 PM Self     I think human embryonic stem cells should be used for scientific research as long as there is no financial gain from donation. These embryos would be destroyed anyway, and it would be such a waste not to use them for their full potential. As adults, we support donating our organs after we perish. Why would we not want someone to benefit from a new liver, heart, lungs, etc? It should be the same for these embryos. There is so much we can learn and benefit from these stem cells, I don't understand why we would want this to all go to waste.

I SUPPORT HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH!

 
45201 05/25/2009 at 08:15:04 PM Self     I think human embryonic stem cells should be used for scientific research as long as there is no financial gain from donation. These embryos would be destroyed anyway, and it would be such a waste not to use them for their full potential. As adults, we support donating our organs after we perish. Why would we not want someone to benefit from a new liver, heart, lungs, etc? It should be the same for these embryos. There is so much we can learn and benefit from these stem cells, I don't understand why we would want this to all go to waste.

I SUPPORT HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH!

 
45202 05/25/2009 at 08:16:43 PM       Destruction of [a] human [being's] life for research purposes is not ethical, no matter what the perceived benefit may be. The basic tenets of ethical principles state that, "One must never do evil so that good may come from it." Destroying one human being to benefit another violates every moral principle known outside the third world and violates the moral and religious sensibilities of millions of taxpayers. How can one consider any research to be ethical if it only benefits those who are not morally offended? Hundreds of thousands of Americans are refusing to use vaccines produced from aborted fetal cell lines. Shouldn't public tax dollars be used in a manner that benefits ALL Americans?

 
45203 05/25/2009 at 08:16:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45204 05/25/2009 at 08:17:22 PM Self     Destruction of [a] human [being's] life for research purposes is not ethical, no matter what the perceived benefit may be. The basic tenets of ethical principles state that, "One must never do evil so that good may come from it." Destroying one human being to benefit another violates every moral principle known outside the third world and violates the moral and religious sensibilities of millions of taxpayers. How can one consider any research to be ethical if it only benefits those who are not morally offended? Hundreds of thousands of Americans are refusing to use vaccines produced from aborted fetal cell lines. Shouldn't public tax dollars be used in a manner that benefits ALL Americans?

 
45205 05/25/2009 at 08:17:25 PM Self     It would be an absolute travesty not to use these embryos for research as "these draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using only those human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose."

 
45206 05/25/2009 at 08:17:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45207 05/25/2009 at 08:19:25 PM Self     Non-embryonic stem cells have shown to be far more successful than embryonic stem cells in treating disease. I strongly oppose the use of taxpayer money to destroy innocent human life for the purpose of research and treatment. Thank you.

 
45208 05/25/2009 at 08:20:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45209 05/25/2009 at 08:22:12 PM       To whom it may concern (and this should concern us all):

Thank you for reading my comments regarding the draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. I would like to focus on the following words/phrases of the draft guidelines: "allow," “responsible,” and “ethically responsible.”

It seems that, pursuant to the President's recent Executive Order, the NIH is "allowed" to expand the use our federal tax dollars to fund research on cell lines derived from illicit biological material (i.e. destroyed nascent human life) that has occurred after 2001 and on illicit biological material that may occur in the future. Given that our current President’s new policy seems to “allow” NIH to use our tax dollars to promote the ongoing destruction (albeit, not explicitly fund the actual destruction) of nascent human life, I ask the NIH to consider exercising prudence in the distribution of our taxpayer funds. Specifically, I ask the NIH to choose NOT to fund any further embryonic stem cell research or any research using illicitly derived biological material. I believe that those at the NIH have full knowledge that stem cell research using LICIT biological material (i.e. adult stem cells) has and continues to show far more promise for the treatment and cure of many diseases and ailments than embryonic stem cell research ever has or likely will show. Since this is to pertain to the draft guidelines, I simply desire to emphasize the word “allow,” and to remind the NIH that it does, indeed, have discretion here, and that it can and should choose to place science above politics and fund those stem cell research projects that show much promise and benefit to the taxpayer: namely, stem cell research using licit biological material (adult stem cells, and the like), which are NOT derived through the destruction of nascent human life.

This plea now addresses the use of the word “responsible” and the phrase “ethically responsible” in the draft guidelines as they pertain to human stem cell research. It may seem overly simplistic, but I must object to the use of this word and phrase in these draft guidelines. At no time is it ever “responsible,” let alone “ethically responsible” to destroy human life explicitly for scientific research. The Nazi’s did this, and we all called it reprehensible. Now some are doing this here in the US and elsewhere in the world, and it is being lauded as scientific progress. Where have we lost our sense of the dignity of humanity? It is neither “responsible,” “ethically responsible,” nor particularly dignified to suggest that we should kill our young (or the promote the killing thereof by proposing to fund the research to follow) for some perceived and ill conceived “benefit of humankind.” Additionally, it’s illogical. Therefore, as I stated above, I object to the use of the word “responsible” and to the phrase “ethically responsible” as they pertain to scientific research performed on human life that has been destroyed for that purpose. Furthermore, I implore the NIH to do the most “responsible” and the most “ethically responsible” thing. Namely, I ask that the NIH use our scarce taxpayer resources to fund stem cell research using adult stem cells or other similar research that has shown the most promise and benefit to humankind, and that which does not implicitly or explicitly condone, promote, or include the destruction of nascent human life.

Thank you very much for your attention and consideration.

 
45210 05/25/2009 at 08:23:07 PM Self     As a diabetic I feel that given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

 
45211 05/25/2009 at 08:24:32 PM Self     Please protect embryos. Adult stem cell research has proven to work and many cases. Focus on this please instead of taking emryos to do embryonic stem cell research. We believe that this threatens humans of all ages.

 
45212 05/25/2009 at 08:24:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45213 05/25/2009 at 08:24:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45214 05/25/2009 at 08:24:52 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45215 05/25/2009 at 08:25:10 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page