Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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Comments Attachment
4497 05/01/2009 at 04:13:08 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to the use of embryoic stem cells for the purpose of research. Such a practice says that we do not value human life, even at the beginning stages. I feel there are other ways (and even science has said so) to cure diseases. We have got to stop killing innocent babies. thank you

 
4498 05/01/2009 at 04:13:15 PM Self     This letter is to oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. To do so would be an assault on the sanctity of human life. In this particular case, the ends simply do not justify the means.

 
4499 05/01/2009 at 04:13:37 PM Self     We do not want our tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death. We strongly oppose these new Human Stem Cell Guidelilnes.

 
4500 05/01/2009 at 04:13:41 PM Self     We think the old restricons should apply to stem search research.

 
4501 05/01/2009 at 04:14:30 PM Self     Our new president is pushing for more abortions which we consider murder. The umbilical cord can be used in the same way that other cells from a "baby" can be used. We are making less and less of the importance of life at any age, by killing off our very future. We are very much the executive order, and wonder why the president is so set on killing babies.

 
4502 05/01/2009 at 04:14:32 PM Self     I am against Federally funded embryonic stem cell research. I do not want my tax dollars going to this type of research. It has not been proven by any means that a human ebryo stem cell will produce any more of a cure for diseases than adult stem cells.

 
4503 05/01/2009 at 04:14:42 PM Self     I am greatly opposed to embryonic stem cell research. There has been great strides in using adult stem cells. Please do not kill babies for this monsterous research.

 
4504 05/01/2009 at 04:14:48 PM Self     Can you explain to me why we beat the dead horse of embryonic stem cell research? What has it accomplished? Adult stem cells have been used in treating successfully many illnesses and does not require the killing of embryos. In a time when economy is the buzz word why do you insist on throwing good money after bad?

 
4505 05/01/2009 at 04:15:00 PM Self     We are opposed to use of embryonic stem cells. We had a parent die of parkinsons as well as children who became pregnant using their implants from an infertility clinic. Those are real children as our twin granddaughters exemplify not to be used for scientific experimentation. We have seen both sides; however, life is sacred. Science should concentrate on adult stem cell research and umbilical cord use for breakthroughs.

 
4506 05/01/2009 at 04:15:13 PM Self     It has been found that stem cells obtained from cord blood is better than stem cells from embryos. Cord blood is easier to obtain and is already helping people with cancer and could help with the epidemic of diabetes. Many states and hospitals are not collecting this life giving blood to put in banks. The funding that is going to embryonic stem cell research could instead be going to cord blood collection and use as well as research in finding cures for diabetes. This woud also be more ethical as I believe that life begins from conception and therefore each embryo used for research is a human being that is killed. Please consider this and don't sign the bill to continue with ESCR.

 
4507 05/01/2009 at 04:15:36 PM Self     Outside of the fact that we believe life begins at conception, we pay our taxes faithfully every year. That is our money. We do NOT agree with our tax dollars being spent on killing living embryos to harvest their stem cells for research. These stem cells can be harvested in other ways that would not purposely cause the death of a human being that stands a chance at life. This would, in turn, cause the researchers to be more responsible with their supply if their supply is limited. What these new guidelines do is send MY tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

 
4508 05/01/2009 at 04:16:09 PM Self     I urge you to vote against the NIH Human Stem Cell law. There are many alternatives to developing stem cells without ending human life like adult stem cells. Ending one or more lives to try and help another life to be better is not a good plan and fails on many moral levels.

 
4509 05/01/2009 at 04:16:18 PM Self     My son and I are eager and hopeful that Stem Cells with be the cure for diabetes. My son is 13 and has had type 1 diabetes since he was 4 year old (9 years). He doesn't remember not being diabetic. He is in middle school and is constantly reminded that he is different and is not accepted by his peers. My heart aches for him not just in that respect but mostly because he has had 9 or 10 seizures due to low blood sugars, the mood swings, the highs (so high it affect school work and activities) and he and I worry about health issues constantly. Please Please Please assist in moving forward with Stem Cells. We believe in it and hopeful it is the cure. I just read and article on Reuter dated 4/14/09 and stem cells from their own bone marrow cured 20 out of 23 patients and 12 continuously for 4 years. It is within our grasp.

 
4510 05/01/2009 at 04:17:16 PM Self     I oppose embryonic stem cell research. It is never moral, nor ethical to destroy human life in such a way. It makes human life utilitarian and not sacred.

 
4511 05/01/2009 at 04:17:32 PM Self     All we have to say on the matter of the NIH Human Stem Cell Guidlines is that there has to be barriers that withhold the purposeful promoting of using embyo's created for the sole purpose of Human Stem Cell Research. The use of Human Stem Cells derived from already existing embryo's from natural causes (like the placenta or a natural miscarriage of a embryo) for research can be used. We are morally obligated to not "create" life for such purposes, and also obligated to save lives through the use of already existing cells drawn from sources that do not take the "LIFE" of a living embryo (child). We are praying for a final resolution to these Guidelines.

 
4512 05/01/2009 at 04:17:55 PM Self     On March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued an executive order that overturned President Bush's policy and opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, which is allowable by law and would give these children the chance to live, these draft guidelines would require their death. I am opposed to the use of tax dollars to fund research on and destruction of human life, no matter how small.

 
4513 05/01/2009 at 04:19:11 PM Self     Federal funding of embryonic stem cell research is both an act of gross disrespect of human life and a massive waste of money.

 
4514 05/01/2009 at 04:20:05 PM Self     Please give this matter your utmost heartfelt consideration and do not approve use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. I stand firm in opposition to this kind of research.

 
4515 05/01/2009 at 04:21:10 PM Self     We have no evidence that stem cells from embryos are of any real benefit. We do know they cause tumors. We do know we are killing human embryos - the first stages of human life. Why even bother when adult stem cells have already proven their value and skin cells can be made to act and be like embryos?

I am a recipient of adult stem cells which has so far enabled me to live almost four additional years and having just received tandem adult stem cell tansplants I expect many more years ahead.

 
4516 05/01/2009 at 04:21:13 PM Self     Please do not use the embryonic stem cells for research. They are a human life. Please continue to research on adult stem cells as they actually have produced cures and don't infringe on the rights of a person (i.e. the life of an embryo).

 
4517 05/01/2009 at 04:21:22 PM Self     Do not spend any of my tax money on this!!!!

 
4518 05/01/2009 at 04:21:32 PM Self     I am seriously opposed to funding for embryonic stem cell and/or embryos created for the purpose of stem cell research. God did not create us for use as laboratory rats. Human life is sacred to God and we will pay for the sin of taking human lives. I oppose my tax dollars paying for such astrocities...

 
4519 05/01/2009 at 04:21:33 PM Self     Just against every thing I believe.

 
4520 05/01/2009 at 04:21:34 PM Self     I strongly oppose using federal funds to conduct embryonic stem cell research. Other stem cells have produced exceptional results and should be exploited. Using human embryonic stem cells means we are going back to scientific experimentation conducted under totalitarian regimes.

Experimentation without accountability. Science without values or morals.

 
4521 05/01/2009 at 04:21:38 PM Organization First Baptist Church 301 NE 27th St, Moore, OK 73160 To whom it may concern: I am writing in behalf of our 3800-member church to express our desire to see embryonic stemcell research discouraged. To date, all of the hopeful signs for healing diseases and giving successful medical treatment have come from the use of existing adult stemcells. It seems a callous disregard for human life to create, experiment on, then destroy embryonic cells. The more we devalue life, the more we lose our civilized sophistication, and the less we respect one another. There are better ways, proven ways, using adult stemcells. Thank you,

 
4522 05/01/2009 at 04:21:46 PM Self     There have been numerous successes in using adult stem cells to produce improvements and cures but there are no proven benefits from embryonic stem cells. On the contrary, there have been horrible mutations.

There is no way to ignore the real possibility that an embryo is a true, tiny person that has its constitutional legal and human rights.

 
4523 05/01/2009 at 04:21:53 PM Self     Research and use of embryonic stem cells is neither necessary, ethical, nor economically prudent. With the safer and much more readily available adult stem cells which obviate the rejection problems and tumorigenic properties of embryonic stem cells, there is little need for embryonic stem cell research. And now with the development of pluripotent stem cells that can be derived safely from adult fibroblasts and other somatic cells, there is clearly no need to destroy human embryos for these purposes. From a biological perspective it is self evident that embryos are nascent human beings and as such deserve our protection and care. They are NOT commodities that should be used in a utilitarian fashion. Even if they were our only recourse, the destruction of human life to potentially help another is unethical. As noted above, however, this is now a moot point. In these economically difficult times, responsible stewardship of our nations resources should be spent on research using adult stem cells and/or pluripotent stem cells not derived from human embryos. Respectfully, ***** MD

 
4524 05/01/2009 at 04:21:55 PM Self     Please do not use taxpayers funds to support embyronic research. The majority of the voting public do no want it funded. Let the institutions furnish their own money.

 
4525 05/01/2009 at 04:22:22 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds for research of embryonic stem cell research. Embryos are human persons and it is a grave moral evil to use them for research. It is in direct violation of my faith as a true Catholic.

As a physician, and scientist, I also oppose wasting tax dollars on embryonic stem cells which have NOT been successful in treating even ONE person in the world. They cause teratomas and cause problems and more disease states to the recipient. Scientifically and fiscally, it makes no sense in pursuing embryonic stem cells when adult stem cells, cord blood and now skin cells have cured innumerable individuals.

 
4526 05/01/2009 at 04:22:32 PM       DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

National Institutes of Health

Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Notice

SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is requesting public comment on draft guidelines entitled ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (Guidelines). The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH- funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells. These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Specifically, these Guidelines describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would have been required during the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research using these cells to be funded by the NIH. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/ 09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. According to these Guidelines, there are some uses of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells that, although those cells may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding. For questions regarding ongoing NIH-funded research involving human embryonic stem cells, as well as pending applications and those submitted prior to the issuance of Final Guidelines, see the NIH Guide http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-085.html.

DATES: Written comments must be received by NIH on or before May 26, 2009.

ADDRESSES: The NIH welcomes public comment on the draft Guidelines set forth below. Comments may be entered at: http://nihoerextra.nih.gov/ stem_cells/add.htm. Comments may also be mailed to: NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892- 7997. Comments will be made publicly available, including any personally identifiable or confidential business information they contain.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 9, 2009, President Barack H. Obama issued Executive Order 13505: Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells. The Executive Order states that the Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH- funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells. Long-standing Department of Health and Human Services regulations for Protection of Human Subjects, 45 CFR part 46, establish safeguards for individuals who are the sources of many human tissues used in research, including non-embryonic human adult stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. When research involving human adult stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells constitutes human subject research, Institutional Review Board review may be required and informed consent may need to be obtained per the requirements detailed in 45 CFR part 46. Applicants should consult http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/ humansubjects/guidance/45cfr46.htm. As described in these draft Guidelines, human embryonic stem cells are cells that are derived from human embryos, are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos. Studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes could provide information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated somatic cells generated from human embryonic stem cells. Perhaps the most important potential use of human embryonic stem cells is the generation of cells and tissues that could be used for cell-based therapies. Today, donated tissues and organs are often used to replace ailing or destroyed tissue, but the need for transplantable tissues and organs far outweighs the available supply. Stem cells, directed to differentiate into specific cell types, offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis.

[[Page 18579]]

NIH currently funds ongoing research involving human embryonic stem cells as detailed under prior Presidential policy. Under that policy, Federal funds have been used for research on human embryonic stem cells where the derivation process was initiated prior to 9 p.m. EDT August 9, 2001, the embryo was created for reproductive purposes, the embryo was no longer needed for these purposes, informed consent was obtained for the donation of the embryo, and no financial inducements were provided for donation of the embryo. These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using only those human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Specifically, these Guidelines describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would have been required during the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research using these cells to be funded by the NIH. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines. Please note that, for NIH funded research using the permitted human embryonic stem cells, the requirements of the Department's protection of human subjects regulations, 45 CFR part 46, may or may not apply, depending on the nature of the research. For further information, see Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Germ Cells and Cell Derived Test Articles: OHRP Guidance for Investigators and Institutional Review Boards. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/ 09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. According to these Guidelines, there are some uses of human embryonic stem cells that, although those cells may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding. In developing these draft Guidelines, the NIH consulted its Guidelines issued in 2000, as well as the thoughtful guidelines developed by other national and international committees of scientists, bioethicists, patient advocates, physicians and other stakeholders, including the U.S. National Academies, the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and others. As directed by Executive Order 13505, the NIH shall review and update these Guidelines periodically, as appropriate. The Draft Guidelines Follow:

National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

I. Scope of Guidelines

These Guidelines describe the circumstances under which human embryonic stem cells are eligible for use in extramural NIH-funded research, and they also include a section on uses of human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells that are ineligible for NIH funding. For the purpose of these Guidelines, ``human embryonic stem cells'' are cells that are derived from human embryos, are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos.

II. Guidelines for Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Use in Research

A. The Executive Order: Executive Order 13505, Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, states that the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), through the Director of the NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. B. Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from Human Embryos: Human embryonic stem cells may be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes, were no longer needed for this purpose, were donated for research purposes, and for which documentation for all of the following can be assured: 1. All options pertaining to use of embryos no longer needed for reproductive purposes were explained to the potential donor(s). 2. No inducements were offered for the donation. 3. A policy was in place at the health care facility where the embryos were donated that neither consenting nor refusing to donate embryos for research would affect the quality of care provided to potential donor(s). 4. There was a clear separation between the prospective donor(s)'s decision to create human embryos for reproductive purposes and the prospective donor(s)'s decision to donate human embryos for research purposes. 5. At the time of donation, consent for that donation was obtained from the individual(s) who had sought reproductive services. That is, even if potential donor(s) had given prior indication of their intent to donate to research any embryos that remained after reproductive treatment, consent for the donation should have been given at the time of the donation. Donor(s) were informed that they retained the right to withdraw consent until the embryos were actually used for research. 6. Decisions related to the creation of human embryos for reproductive purposes were made free from the influence of researchers proposing to derive or utilize human embryonic stem cells in research. Whenever it was practicable, the attending physician responsible for reproductive clinical care and the researcher deriving and/or proposing to utilize human embryonic stem cells should not have been the same person. 7. Written informed consent was obtained from individual(s) who sought reproductive services and who elected to donate human embryos for research purposes. The following information, which is pertinent to making the decision of whether or not to donate human embryos for research purposes, was in the written consent form for donation and discussed with potential donor(s) in the informed consent process: a. A statement that donation of the embryos for research was voluntary; b. A statement that donor(s) understood alternative options pertaining to use of the embryos; c. A statement that the embryos would be used to derive human embryonic stem cells for research; d. Information about what would happen to the embryos in the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research; e. A statement that human embryonic stem cells derived from the embryos might be maintained for many years; f. A statement that the donation was made without any restriction or direction regarding the individual(s) who may receive medical benefit from the use of the stem cells; g. A statement that the research was not intended to provide direct medical benefit to the donor(s);

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h. A statement as to whether or not information that could identify the donor(s) would be retained prior to the derivation or the use of the human embryonic stem cells (relevant guidance from the DHHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) should be followed, as applicable; see OHRP's Guidance for Investigators and Institutional Review Boards Regarding Research Involving Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Germ Cells, and Stem Cell-Derived Test Articles and Guidance on Research Involving Coded Private Information or Biological Specimens, or successor guidances); and i. A statement that the results of research using the human embryonic stem cells may have commercial potential, and a statement that the donor(s) would not receive financial or any other benefits from any such commercial development. C. Prior to the use of NIH funds: Funding recipients must ensure that: (1) The human embryonic stem cells were derived consistent with sections II.A and B of these Guidelines; and (2) the grantee institution maintains appropriate documentation demonstrating such consistency in accordance with 45 CFR 74.53, which also details rights of access by NIH. The responsible grantee institutional official must provide assurances with respect to (1) and (2) when endorsing applications and progress reports submitted to NIH for projects that utilize these cells.

III. Research Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and/or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells That, Although the Cells May Come From Allowable Sources, Is Nevertheless Ineligible for NIH Funding

This section governs research using human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., human cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. There are some uses of these cells that, although they may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding, as follows: A. Research in which human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells are introduced into non-human primate blastocysts. B. Research involving the breeding of animals where the introduction of human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells may have contributed to the germ line.

IV. Other Non-Allowable Research

A. NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110- 161, 3/11/09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. B. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines.

Dated: April 17, 2009. Raynard S. Kington, Acting Director, NIH. [FR Doc. E9-9313 Filed 4-22-09; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4140-01-P

 
4527 05/01/2009 at 04:23:12 PM Self     This creates a market for creating, selling, and killing embryos for the purposes of experimental research. This is nothing but an expansion of the abortion decision. Public policy needs to promote a culture of life, not of killing.

 
4528 05/01/2009 at 04:23:18 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
4529 05/01/2009 at 04:23:28 PM Self     On March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued an executive order that opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. President Obama designated the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to draft guidelines for distributing funds for this research. What this act along with the National Institutes of health guidelines do is send may tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

I strongly oppose the use of my tax dollars for this purpose and urge you to support me in this stand.

 
4530 05/01/2009 at 04:23:34 PM Self     I am very much against funding for creating and destroying human embryos. I believe we already have stem cell research that is working. I believe using embryonic stem cells for research is wrong.

 
4531 05/01/2009 at 04:24:13 PM Self     I do not want my tax dollars to fund the destruction of human embryos. I believe that is morally wrong. I am in the process of adopting an embryo due to infertility. The right response to "left over" embryos is adoption -- not destruction.

 
4532 05/01/2009 at 04:24:25 PM Self     Dear Sir: In my opinion, embryonic stem cells are obtained from human beings in their earliest stages of development, but human beings just the same. There are some lines already avail- able and for that reason I would prefer to not see further embryos being destroyed. The ends do not justify the means and we must respect life at ALL stages.

 
4533 05/01/2009 at 04:24:36 PM Self     As a citizen of this nation "UNDER GOD",I oppose the DRAFT NIH HUMAN STEM CELL GUIDELINES.

 
4534 05/01/2009 at 04:24:40 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research because I believe human life is destroyed in the process. A human embryo is just that – human, regardless of the stage of development. Additionally, reports are abundant in demonstrating that ESCs have not been used successfully to treat any disease or condition and, according to recent news reports, may have actually caused tumors to grow in a patient. Conversely, Adult Stem Cells are currently being used to treat more than 70 diseases and conditions, and remarkable stories are emerging about ASCs being used to grow new bone and cartilage, all without requiring the destruction of human life. America needs to embrace a culture of life and shun a culture of death.

 
4535 05/01/2009 at 04:24:44 PM Self NJ Chapter - American Parkinson Disease Association   Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
4536 05/01/2009 at 04:25:13 PM Self     It is my understanding that embryonic stem cell research has been going on for at least 25 years now, and has yet to produce ANY useful results. I know of NO compelling reason to believe that further TAX monies should be wasted on this or any other unproductive endeavor. The money should be being invested in refining and utilizing the life enhancing information already obtained through other research! And, I have a question regarding ethics: How can "informed consent" be obtained from a human embryo?

 
4537 05/01/2009 at 04:25:15 PM Self     Please be advised I am opposed to spending Federal Funds for Stem Cell Research.

 
4538 05/01/2009 at 04:25:38 PM Self     I am opposed to funding more embryonic stem cell research.

 
4539 05/01/2009 at 04:25:45 PM Self     On March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued an executive order that overturned President Bush's policy and opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. President Obama designated the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to draft guidelines for distributing funds for this research.

Last week, April 23, NIH officially posted draft guidelines to open federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. What these guidelines do is send our tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

As concerned, and voting citizens, we oppose the Obama agenda for expanding embryonic stem cell research. Look, instead to the successes already documented, form adult stem cell research.

 
4540 05/01/2009 at 04:25:46 PM Self     I wish you would take time to think through your actions that effect human life. It has become so commonplace in this country to negate the sanctity of human life in every stage.

I certainly opposed my tax dollars that I've worked so hard for to fund ANY PROGRAM THAT SUPPORTS EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH AND ABORTION. Too bad we can't decide for ourselves where our tax dollars go. You'd be out of a job.

 
4541 05/01/2009 at 04:26:02 PM Self     EMBRYOS ARE HUMAN BEINGS. THEY ARE THEY MOST INNOCENT AND DEFENSELESS OF ALL HUMAN BEINGS. PLEASE DO NOT ALLOW EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS TO BE TAKEN, IN ANY WAY, FOR ANY REASON. WE MUST STOP THESE ATTACKS AGAINST HUMAN LIVES. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE OPPOSE AND STOP THIS MOST HORRENDOUS ACT. WE DO NOT SUPPORT THE TAKING OR USE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS IN ANY WAY, EVER.

 
4542 05/01/2009 at 04:26:21 PM       I do not agree that our tax dollars be used to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

If there is any tax money to be spent it would be on ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH which has a proved track record.

 
4543 05/01/2009 at 04:26:22 PM Self     Stem cell research is a new and exciting frontier in medical science that is already providing tangible benefits to patients with a variety of diseases and afflictions. Stem cell research can be conducted within an ethical and moral framework, and at the same time provide treatments and cures for suffering patients.

I support and encourages stem cell research using non-embryonic sources of stem cells, including umbilical cord blood, placenta, bone marrow and various adult tissues (skin, blood, brain, and body fat cells). No human lives are destroyed in harvesting stem cells from these sources. Therapies from these stem cells already provide beneficial treatments to patients (in contrast to the speculative study involving human embryonic stem cells) and such research should be a priority for both public and privately funded research.

I oppose stem cell research using human embryos. In order to isolate and culture embryonic stem cells, a living, human embryo must be killed. It is never morally or ethically justifiable to kill one human being in order to benefit another. By requiring the destruction of embryos — the tiniest human beings — embryonic stem cell research violates the medical ethic, “Do No Harm.”

It is also important to note that, to date, embryonic stem cell research has not treated or cured one patient. To my knowledge, there are no human clinical trials using human embryonic stem cells anywhere in the world.

I expect the NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines to be restructured to honor the sanctity of human life at it's earliest level.

Sincerely,

 
4544 05/01/2009 at 04:26:47 PM Self     We DO NOT want our tax money to be used for the destruction of human embryos. They are human beings with a soul, and the existing lines should be put up for adoption, if the parents no longer want them. There has been MUCH MUCH success in the research & application of Adult Stem Cell Research,and NO SUCCESS in any of the research on embryonic stem cells.We adamantly URGE this department to fund adult stem cell research only, and LEAVE THE PEOPLE IN LIMBO (frozen embryos) alive until they can be adopted.

 
4545 05/01/2009 at 04:26:50 PM Self     Tax payer money should not be used to do the unethical research that destroys human embryos. This goes against the consciences of many Americans. Instead, research should be conducted on adult stem cells, which has shown more promise than the questionable use of embryonic stem cells for research that always results in the loss of a person or potential person. Until it can be established when life begins, we should err on the side of life. The end does not justify the means in the name of "science".

 
4546 05/01/2009 at 04:26:59 PM Self     Dear President Obama, I did not vote for you because of your Liberal agenda. I can never vote for any policy that would harm our babies. This is our next generation, and when you choose to kill them off, their blood will be on your hands, their blood will be crying from the grave, I pray that you will not do anything to harm these little ones. Please have compassion on the young and helpless.

I pray for you and ask God to bless you and your family. I pray that you will have a touch from God and and change your extream beliefs. You can change for the good of all mankind. The people you are putting in high positions will be your downfall.

Sincerely,

 
4547 05/01/2009 at 04:27:00 PM Self     Please note that I am against funding this technology with public money. I do not want my taxes to go to the destruction of human life, and think adult stem cells should meet all research needs.

 
4548 05/01/2009 at 04:27:12 PM Self     I do believe that that embryo's should be created and destroyed for Stem Cell Research. It is wrong on every level, especially morally and ethically.

 
4549 05/01/2009 at 04:27:15 PM Self     Please utilize the funding to only study and use adult or post birth stem cells and not embryonic stem cells. Adult stem cells already show more promise than embryonic stem cells.

 
4550 05/01/2009 at 04:27:22 PM Organization Dubois Co. Leukemia Assoc. P. O. Box 75 Huntingburg, In. 47542 Although the national association (Leukemia & Lymphoma Society) help fund research using stem cells, our local group adamantly opposes this type of research. We base this conviction on the known facts that skin cell and adult stem cell are just as, or even a more effective method of research without killing a embryonic human being.

 
4551 05/01/2009 at 04:27:36 PM Self     I believe that embryonic stem cell research should be illegal, period.

 
4552 05/01/2009 at 04:27:51 PM Self     I would ask that stem cell research be confined to adults.

 
4553 05/01/2009 at 04:28:02 PM Self     I am opposed to the increase of embryonic stem cell research. I am opposed to creating babies to then be killed for research. It reminds me of early civilizations who sacrificed babies to idols for personal benefits. Adult stem cell research has proven to be more effective, not to mention that murdering little children is never right. How inhumane our society is becoming! I object to my tax dollars being used for immoral purposes.

 
4554 05/01/2009 at 04:28:16 PM Self     RE; Federal Register Notice, april 23, 2009 Please do not use Federal funds to pay for ESCR for which new embryos would have to be created in order to do the research. It is a terrible thing to create a life just to be destroyed for research purposes. Thank You

 
4555 05/01/2009 at 04:28:16 PM Self     Killing is not OK.

 
4556 05/01/2009 at 04:28:30 PM Self     I do not believe it is necessary to kill human embryos to do stem cell research, so federal funds should not be used for stem cell research in embryos. There is much research going on with adult stem cells, and this should be the focus of federal stem cell research.

 
4557 05/01/2009 at 04:28:32 PM Self     YOU DO NOT TAKE A LIFE TO SAVE A LIFE. MR OBAMA YOU ARE TO THE UNBORN WHAT HITLER WAS TO THE JEWS, GOD SAVE YOUR SOUL

 
4558 05/01/2009 at 04:28:33 PM Self     Since adult stem cell research has proven its efficacious nature and embryonic research has not, with the need in our present economy to prioritize all items, wise use of public funding should obviate embryonic for the proven potential of adult stem cell research.

 
4559 05/01/2009 at 04:28:35 PM Self     Let's see now, the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of the draft, fourth paragraph, last sentence, states "Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos." Hmm, as an illustration I suppose I could say, "Although brain cells are derived from humans, such brain cells are not themselves human. Oh by the way, harvesting brain cells will destroy the brain. That's ok though, because the cells do not equate to a person." How absurd!! This is just another example of how far legalizing abortion as brought us. It’s not a baby they say; it’s just a glob of cells, a fetus, or an “embryo”. Now that those who want the right to take the life of the unborn has desensitized words like baby & unborn child to some sort of matter called an embryo, the possibilities are endless—in the name of science of course. Exactly when does an “embryo” become life; a baby? Is not the definition of a human embryo ‘the beginning stages of life, the early stage of development prior to birth’? Hasn’t the most hideous & blatant disregard for life (known as partial birth abortion) taught us that once we start down a path such as this that escalation is inevitable!?

 
4560 05/01/2009 at 04:28:35 PM Self     Please do not fund research that is using embryos created by in vitro fertilization stem cells. This is ethically irresponsible and I feel strongly as an American citizen about this use of my taxpayer money and as a Christian mother.

 
4561 05/01/2009 at 04:28:44 PM Self     I oppose federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. No tax dollars used to experiment on in vitro human embryos.

Life begins at conception.

 
4562 05/01/2009 at 04:28:55 PM Self     It is not necessary to kill babies to develop stem cell knowledge. It is already advancing with adult stem cells.

 
4563 05/01/2009 at 04:29:02 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. This is a moral and ethical issue and a majority of Americans are opposed to using federal money for this purpose. The US government should honor the wishes of the American people. Additionally, pursuing this procedure with federal funds will put the US on a slippery slope that will not be easy to reverse and will have unintended consequences that will hurt America.

Sincerely,

 
4564 05/01/2009 at 04:29:07 PM Self     May 1, 2009 Research has shown great strides in adult stem cell research. Embryonic stem cell research has not shown these strides and is potentially dangerous. I believe that it is also unethical to use embryos for this experimentation. This what Hitler and the Nazis would be doing if they had had the chance.

 
4565 05/01/2009 at 04:29:21 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
4566 05/01/2009 at 04:29:53 PM Self     I have had diabetes for 23 years. I have neuropathy in my hand and scar tissue all over my abdomen from wearing my insulin pump. I am ready for my cure, and I know that stem cell research is the key to finding it. My brother also has diabetes. He has had it for 26 years. He is 39 years old and has already had cataract surgery. We both deserve and need a cure. Please help us.

 
4567 05/01/2009 at 04:30:16 PM Self     ADULT stem cell research has shown great promise, aiding in the treatment of over 60 different human diseases and conditions. Embryonic stem cell research in contrast has been extremely disappointing, and has not resulted in aiding a single human disease or condition. In addition, there has now been developed a technique that allows human adult stem cells to behave exactly the same as embryonic stem cells without the necessity of killing human embryos. In addition, virtually all stem cell researchers, even the developer of Dolly, the cloned sheep, now say that the future of stem cell research definitely lies in ADULT cells. Virtually all serious researchers have given up on embryonic stem cells because they are just too uncontrollable. Therefore, embryonic stem cell research is just a political issue, not a practical one. It should be abandoned in total, let alone force the taxpayers to pay for the inane and completely unnecessary destruction of human embryos.

 
4568 05/01/2009 at 04:30:27 PM Self     Embryonic stem cells are taken from a developing embryo at the blastocyst stage, destroying the embryo, a developing human life. Adult stem cells, on the other hand, are found in all tissues of the growing human being and, according to latest reports, also have the potential to transform themselves into practically all other cell types, or revert to being stem cells with greater reproductive capacity. Embryonic stem cells have not yet been used for even one therapy, while adult stem cells have already been successfully used in numerous patients, including for cardiac infarction (death of some of the heart tissue).

In recent years, however, pluripotent stem cells were discovered in various human tissues–in the spinal cord, in the brain, in the mesenchyme (connective tissue) of various organs, and in the blood of the umbilical cord. These pluripotent stem cells are capable of forming several cell types–principally blood, muscle, and nerve cells. It has been possible to recognize, select, and develop them to the point that they form mature cell types with the help of growth factors and regulating proteins. This shows that in tissues of the body, adult stem cells possess a much greater potential for differentiation than previously assumed. This knowledge must be brought into the public consciousness with all possible emphasis. If stem cell research were really only meant for therapeutic uses, which it most obviously should be, adult stem cells would promise a very productive research field–and beyond that, a possibility, without moral objection, to discover fundamentals of the dynamics of tissue differentiation.

It has become clear from transplantation experiments with animals, that stem cells of a particular tissue can develop into cells of a completely different kind. Thus, bone marrow stem cells have been induced to become brain cells, but also liver cells.

Adult stem cells obviously have a universal program for division that is common to all the kinds of tissue stem cells, and makes them mutually interchangeable. This was discovered by Alexei Terskikh at Stanford University School of Medicine in California. He was able to prove that adult stem cells of blood-forming tissues, and of the brain, activate the same genes, in order to preserve their status as stem cells.

There are also reports of successful treatments with adult stem cells in cases of Crohn’s disease (a chronic infection of the gut), thalassemia (a blood disease), and a rare skin disease. And–despite the fact that basic research with adult stem cells is in its earliest beginnings and is in no way being promoted with urgency–there have been a growing number of reports lately of experiments with animals, from which it emerges that adult stem cells can successfully transform themselves into differentiated cells of organs of many kinds.

In contrast, reports of successful conversions of embryonic stem cells are very infrequent and cautious. Thus, we find in Science of Dec. 1, 2000 (Vol. 290, pp. 1672-1674): "In contrast, the human embryonic stem cells and fetal germ cells that made headlines in November 1998 because they can, in theory, develop into any cell type have so far produced relatively modest results. Only a few papers and meeting reports have emerged from the handful of labs that work with human pluripotent cells. . . . The work suggests that it will not be simple to produce the pure populations of certain cell types that would be required for safe and reliable cell therapies. . . ."

This is the restrained language used by established science to describe a truly disastrous set of results.

There are, of course, still substantial problems to be overcome, even with adult stem cells: They are relatively rare, and are hard to find with the techniques used so far. They are also not very easy to culture outside of the body. It was therefore an important advance that Australian researchers of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research have now found a way to isolate nerve stem cells with "extreme purity" from the brains of mice. In Nature of August 16, 2001 (Vol. 412, pp. 736-739), they reported obtaining a culture of 80 percent purity, compared to a previous rate of 5 percent at best.

It is now urgently necessary to tackle the research in precisely this direction, in order to find out the exact conditions under which the differentiation of stem cells comes about and how, in detail, it proceeds. Only by this morally unassailable route will it be possible to develop new therapies for serious, heretofore incurable diseases, and beyond that, to improve our understanding of the development of life itself.

That is why I oppose any further funding of embryonic stem cell research and support vastly increasing funding and support of adult stem cell research.

Citation for all my facts: Wolfgang Lillge, M.D., in the magazine "21st Century"

 
4569 05/01/2009 at 04:30:27 PM Self     Dear Sirs:

Please oppose funding embryonic stem cell research with my tax-payer dollars. I find this morally reprehensible. Also I am convinced that adult stem cell research has produced far safer and more positive results.

Thank you.

*****, R.N.

 
4570 05/01/2009 at 04:30:33 PM Self     I am opposed to expanding embryonic stem cell research. Though we have yet to gain even one breakthrough in treatment of diseases/conditions in human beings, we already have several promising breakthroughs in the treatment of humans with adult stem cells. I believe that additional funding for adult stem cell research could result in many treatments, even cures, for human conditions. All Americans agree that adult stem cell research is useful and morally acceptable. Many Americans do not believe it is ethical to use human life for experimental research that would destroy human life.

 
4571 05/01/2009 at 04:31:23 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. Human embryos are babies, and should not be killed for any reason.

 
4572 05/01/2009 at 04:31:49 PM Self     Please discontinue the draft and proposal to use our tax dollars to experiment on human embroyos. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death. Is this what we really want on our concious. I do not! Please search you heart and don't crumble to pressure from any source that would promote this terrible proceedure.

 
4573 05/01/2009 at 04:32:27 PM Self     Please stop this culture of death. In the Ukraine there are women selling their babies for stem cell research....Its terrible. Open your eyes and quit messing with Gods work

 
4574 05/01/2009 at 04:32:28 PM Self     Why appropriate tax dollars for embryonic stem cell research when adult stem cell research has already proven effective?

Embryonic stem cell research creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos.

This is not only immoral, it is a waste of our tax money.

 
4575 05/01/2009 at 04:32:37 PM Self     I have a moral and scientific objection to Human Stem Cell research. Primarily when the stem cells are derived from fetuses who have not been aborted naturally.

President Obama and those who are taking advantage of his term should not overturn legislature put in place by former President Bush, as he was clearly acting on the will of the people. This type of underhanded alteration is evidence of a lack of integrity in the current administration.

As a tax payer, I demand that my money does not go to fund experimentation and research to which I have a deep objection. I will continue to voice my opinions and oppose further efforts to conduct Human Embryonic Stem Cell research.

 
4576 05/01/2009 at 04:32:39 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
4577 05/01/2009 at 04:33:06 PM Self     There has been no proof that embryonic stem cells work to benefit anybody. I have heard of nothing but problems with this, not to mention that it is morally wrong to do such research. It has been proven over and over again that adult stem cells do work to improve peoples lives. We need to put our research into something that is working, not trying to make something work that is not meant to.

 
4578 05/01/2009 at 04:33:21 PM Self     I believe that our God-given right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness applies to all persons from the moment of conception. As a tax-paying American citizen, I morally object to the allocation of my tax dollars to support ESCR in any and all of its forms. Further, I do not believe President Obama has the constitutional authority so to direct my taxes, thus entrapping me in this amoral scheme.

 
4579 05/01/2009 at 04:33:32 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
4580 05/01/2009 at 04:33:42 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. My money that I pay in taxes cannot be used to support something I know to be wrong.

 
4581 05/01/2009 at 04:33:49 PM Self     Destoying embyonic stem cells for research is morally wrong.

In addition, adult stem cells are readily available without any moral objections - and adult stem cells work. Many diseases have been successfully treated with adult stem cells; none have been sucessfully treated with embryonic stem cells.

Finally, the only reason people who know the above continue to push embryonic stem cells is because they are desperate to justify abortion.

Thank you for reading my input.

Respectfully,

 
4582 05/01/2009 at 04:34:04 PM Self     The President may have decided it was OK to use taxpayer money to fund embryonic stem cell research, but that still doesn't make it acceptable or right. Just because it's legal doesn't mean it's right. I don't want my tax dollars to be used to fund this kind of research.

 
4583 05/01/2009 at 04:34:16 PM Organization Christ's Church of Scottsdale N Hayden Dr, Scottsdale, AZ We have a moral and scientific objection to Human Stem Cell research. Primarily when the stem cells are derived from fetuses who have not been aborted naturally.

President Obama and those who are taking advantage of his term should not overturn legislature put in place by former President Bush, as he was clearly acting on the will of the people. This type of underhanded alteration is evidence of a lack of integrity in the current administration.

As tax payers, we demand that ourmoney does not go to fund experimentation and research to which we have a deep objection. We will continue to voice our opinions and oppose further efforts to conduct Human Embryonic Stem Cell research.

 
4584 05/01/2009 at 04:34:20 PM Self     Please do not support federal funding of ESC's. For best results, companies should invest their own money into ESC research. Currently, many people are being cured with cord and adult stem cells. Why would the government want to delay lifesaving procedures that are proven to work now in exchange for possibilities in the future? Thank you,

 
4585 05/01/2009 at 04:34:21 PM Self     Funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos totally unnecessary. Tests have been shown that stem cells from live adult prove to be more affective in research and application. The killing of innocent humans is a sin against God. Please stop.

 
4586 05/01/2009 at 04:34:38 PM Self     It is wrong to use human embryos from any purpose other than life. An embryo is the beginning of a human being and it is wrong and immoral to distroy it for any reason.

 
4587 05/01/2009 at 04:35:24 PM Self     Human Embryo's are not potential human beings. They are human beings with potential and should not be selected for indiscriminate death or experimentation, unless of course we stay the course and implement other forms of death dealing as was true of Nazi Germany aqnd other former empires that neglected to realize the santity of life.

 
4588 05/01/2009 at 04:35:25 PM Self     Whatever good that may come from your research will never outdo the sacrifice of the life these cells provided. Stop this murder!

 
4589 05/01/2009 at 04:35:58 PM Self     The funding of more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos is totally unnecessary. Tests have been shown that stem cells from live adults prove to be more affective in research and application. The killing of innocent humans is a sin against God. Please stop.

 
4590 05/01/2009 at 04:36:01 PM Self     Re: NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines: When the possibilities for embryonic stem cells were first proclaimed, there was great fanfare. But by now it has become clear to all but a few partisan zealots that adult stem cells have delivered better and have more promise. So even the pragmatic rationale for killing human embrios that might otherwise be put up for adoption no longer exists. Besides, modified adult stem cells can now be made to offer the versatility that was the major advantage of embrionic stem cells. Killing human embrios for research is a dangerous start toward the kind of experimentation that became popular in Germany durng the 1930's. Let's not go there!

 
4591 05/01/2009 at 04:36:15 PM Self     I oppose using federal funds for research of human embryonic stem cells.

 
4592 05/01/2009 at 04:36:22 PM Self     I understand that on March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issue an order that opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos (babies). I am strongly opposed to this. I do not understand why this is happening when we all know that there has been so much success with adult stem cell research. I do not want my tax dollars going for killing babies. Why not promote adoption of these human embryos, so people with infertility problems can have a family? These draft guidelines would require their death, why not give them life?

 
4593 05/01/2009 at 04:36:23 PM Self     Human Embryo's are not potential human beings. They are human beings with potential and should not be selected for indiscriminate death or experimentation, unless of course we stay the course and implement other forms of death dealing as was true of Nazi Germany aqnd other former empires that neglected to realize the santity of life.

 
4594 05/01/2009 at 04:36:43 PM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

In regards to: "On March 9, 2009, President Barack H. Obama issued Executive Order 13505: Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells. The Executive Order states that the Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law."

Using human embryos is nothing more than genocide. Your life and mine started as a group of living cells—the catch word, ‘living’. I find it hard to understand how anyone can think that just because an embryo is without arms and legs, or a face that smiles, a mouth that giggles, is not a life in process. If allowed an embryo will become a living breathing human being, a baby, that God willing will reach adulthood. Other methods have been tried and proven as more effective (umbilical cord). So why use that which is less effective?

Throwing our money into a process that hasn’t proved itself is foolish to say the least. More importantly is the fact that lives are being killed for the use of experimentation. Are monkeys more important than humans? Not that I approve of that process either. But human cells are worth far more than that of an animal.

Along with abortion, embryonic stem cell research is an abomination in the eyes of God and our nation will be judged for these atrocities.

Sincerely,

 
4595 05/01/2009 at 04:36:55 PM Self     It doesn't seem logical that something so simple escapes and eludes the most intelligent minds in our society. It's really simple Embryonic Stem Cell-NO! Adult Stem Cell-YES!!!!!

Embryonic Stem Cells create tumors....period!!! They have not now, or will they ever become the miracle component of curing diseases.....period.

Adult Stem Cells have eliminated or assisted in curing 70+ diseases, aided in the healing process of burn victims, have no side effects that could set back its progress.

You don't have to be an Einstein to acknowledge that Adult Stem Cells are the way to go, but you do have to have an open mind; the realization that embryos harvasted from abortions could be looked upon as murder, because now the goal is greed, corruption, power and egos.

Sadly enough, what goes around comes around. Fate, Karma, etc. never miss you when it's got you in its sights.

I shall pray for your blackened soul....you should pray too!

 
4596 05/01/2009 at 04:36:59 PM Self     I oppose the use of human embryonic stem cells for research and thus the use of my tax dollars to fund such research. There has been no evidence that the stem cells from embryo can help with the cure of diseases but there is a lot of evidence that Adult stem cells can. Please use money for research on the proven effective Adult Stem cells. Thank you.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page