Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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44917 05/25/2009 at 05:06:59 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44918 05/25/2009 at 05:07:06 PM Self     As a conscientious American and as a biomedical research scientist, I am opposed to all research involving the manipulation and/or destruction of human embryos. I morally object to my taxes being used to support this unethical research. In addition to the current proposed guidelines which rightly prohibit somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and the creation of embryos for research, I support futher restrictions against the donation and destruction of IVF embryos. Whatever the circumstances of their beginnings, these embryos are human children, and their purposeful destruction is morally abhorrent and marks a tragic breach of civil liberties which cannot be condoned in the United States of America. An immoral act is never justified by any argument of potential advances.

 
44919 05/25/2009 at 05:08:51 PM Self     No useful effects have resulted from embryonic stem cell research; in fact, selected harmful effects have resulted. Other technologies HAVE been successful. Tax money should be used in the new technologies, and should be prohibited from embryonic stem cell research. Thank you for considering my belief.5915

 
44920 05/25/2009 at 05:09:26 PM Self     I strongly object to the implementation of Executive Order 13505, that pertains to "National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research," issued on March 9, 2009.

There is no "ethically responsible" or "scientifically worthy" justification for the destruction of human embryos in order to "further science."

To date, adult stem cell therapy (which is both "ethically responsible" and "scientifically worthy") is responsible for more than 70 proven treatments for serious and life-threatening diseases--and counting--including various cancers, spinal cord injuries, blood diseases, diabetes, bladder disease, parkinson's, liver diseases, ocular diseases, immunodeficiences, metabolic disorders, and more.

No innocent human lives are destroyed in the use of adult stem cell therapy.

On the other hand, in the decades of embryonic stem cell reasearch, the scientific community has killed countless innocent human beings and not produced one effective treatment against disease in animal or human trials. Rather, it has been shown time and again (and very recently in a recent tragic case in Russia), that embryonic stem cell therapy grows life-threatening tumors.

The private sector has all but turned away from funding embryonic stem cell research because it doesn't work and isn't profitable. Leave it to our amoral government and scientific community to fund it anyway.

And now that skin cells can be converted to "embryonic-like" stem cells, making such therapy even more flexible, I can only conclude that the scientific community's continuous drum-beat for access to human embryos is due to its voracious appetite to research on defenseless human beings without any regulation. We all know that that is the goal of this Executive Order.

Knowing that Kathleen Sebelius, the newly appointed, radically pro-abortion head of the Department of Health and Human Services, will insure that regulations are met to "establish safeguards" against any misuse of human stem cells is a travesty.

This is another arrogant move on the part of the scientific community and the federal government to force its pro-death agenda on what it believes is an ignorant and passive citizenry.

 
44921 05/25/2009 at 05:12:31 PM Self     We are against the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me as the taxpayer to subsidize research requiring destruction of innocent human life. Support should be aimed at research and treatments that do not destroy life. There should be no government support for human clining or creation of human embryos for research. Also, embryo-destructive stem cell research has been ineffective and dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and casuing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are more effective in treating patents and are not controversial. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Thank you.

 
44922 05/25/2009 at 05:12:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44923 05/25/2009 at 05:13:12 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44924 05/25/2009 at 05:14:03 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44925 05/25/2009 at 05:15:52 PM Self     Please vote against federal funding of stem cell research.

 
44926 05/25/2009 at 05:16:26 PM Self    

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44927 05/25/2009 at 05:18:10 PM Self     Dear Leaders and Fathers of our Nation,

In your consideration of developing guidelines for human stem cell research. Please keep in mind the individuals who’s stems cells will be used for research. Please consider how ethical it is to take the life and then the stem cells from those who have no voice or ability to defend themselves. Please consider whether it is ethical to take an innocent person’s life against their will for any reason. I say “against their will” because it is very reasonable to assume, that just as you or I, at every breath of air and every beat of our hearts declare that we want to live, so do these little ones by the very life within them declare to God their creator that “Life is good and I want to live!” Surely, Almighty God the Lord and giver of Life, who loves you and each and every person including these littlest ones, surely He hears their cry and having told us he is the “defender of orphans and widows” He will defend them. This injustice and others like it are the reason for natural disasters. Ever notice, we His children pretend not to need Him until things go bad for us. We need God because He is Love. Now is the time to open our eyes and our hearts, listen to Him who created us, and defend the week and defenseless. Is not the experimentation of fetal tissue comparable to the experimentation done on concentration camp victims by the Nazis? In both cases the strong and the powerful use the weak and defenseless as human guinea pigs. In the case of embryonic stem cell research their lives are snuffed out first. It is a grave evil to sanction, protect or otherwise promote the killing of innocent human beings though it may seam easy or even popular to do so. Please, I beg you, for the sake of human dignity and our nation, do all you can to prevent embryonic stem cell research! It is like a cancer that is eating at the heart of our nation.

I humbly and respectfully ask this of you and may the God who Loves you, Bless You!

 
44928 05/25/2009 at 05:19:24 PM       The embryo destructive stem cell research has been not only ineffectual but dangerous. The rejection problems have been enormous with uncontrollable tumors errupting through the skin as well as internally. Why in the world would you want to kill a child when you already know it doesn't work and that adult stem cell which are ethical and working and not killing...oops I forgot. It's really all about the money....my money...and I do not want you using it to kill a child. I am outraged. STOP the KILLING...

 
44929 05/25/2009 at 05:19:40 PM Self     Dear Sirs, I been living with Type 1 Diabetes for the last 31 years and came dangerously close to falling into a fatal coma this past weekend if it weren't for a close friend to bail me out. It's time to put an end to living with this disease and I feel that the cure for this is within our reach.

Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44930 05/25/2009 at 05:20:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44931 05/25/2009 at 05:20:58 PM Self     Please do not continue the effort to make embryonic stem cell research a mandatory practice. This involves the taking of innocent lives as this embryo is a human being. Please continue to further the support for adult stem cell research. This is already a proven way of making progress in the advancement for a cure for many diseases. Iam opposed to the whole idea of research on embryos and am very opposed to the idea of the America taxpayers havng to pay for this research.

Thank you

 
44932 05/25/2009 at 05:21:35 PM Self     I BELIEVE THAT WE SHOULD CONTINUE WITH THE POLICY INTRODUCED BY FORMER PRESIDENT BUSH IN 2001. THAT RESTRICTS THE FUNDING FOR EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH. I BELIEVE THAT IT IS UNETHICAL TO REPRODUCE EMBRYOS THEN TO DESTROY THEM FOR RESEARCH. I'M NOT SURE FROM WHAT I HEAR THAT THERE ARE IN REAL RESULTS IN ADULT HUMAN STEM CELL RESARCH?

 
44933 05/25/2009 at 05:23:24 PM Self     The only successful treatments come from adult stem cells taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and other body tissues. Many diseases and injuries are currently being treated using adult stem cells; theses include cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. I know a man, a husband and a father of 2 girls, who is alive today because of adult stem cell treatments. We need to invest federal tax payer money into the actual treatments using adult stem cells.

 
44934 05/25/2009 at 05:23:45 PM Self     My dear friend has Parkinson's and my father also has ALS. Stem cell research is the only hope they and many, many other's have. It is vital that this research be continued and expanded for the future. Please listen. Sincerely,

 
44935 05/25/2009 at 05:24:26 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44936 05/25/2009 at 05:24:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44937 05/25/2009 at 05:25:01 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
44938 05/25/2009 at 05:25:31 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes

 
44939 05/25/2009 at 05:25:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44940 05/25/2009 at 05:26:20 PM Self     i do not believe we should use taxpayer dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research. Destroying human embryonic stem cells is killing. The parents of the human embyos should be notified by law as to what could happen to the human embryo--use non-embryonic adult stem cells for research and treatment.

 
44941 05/25/2009 at 05:26:30 PM Self     I definitely oppose the practice of stem cell research on human embryos. To me this is blatant case of the powerful (scientists, politicians and biotechnic business people) exercising authority over the weakest (living human embryos). Plus it reduces the value of a human embryo that may have been abandoned by its natural parents or, worse, artificially conceived by eggs sold by an unfortunate woman and the sperm "donated" by some anonymous male.

 
44942 05/25/2009 at 05:26:43 PM Self     As a patient with congestive heart failure and an aortic heart valve replacement, I will need a repeat valve replacement about every ten years. In the meantime I take massive amounts of expensive medications and still have occasional cardiac problems. Stem cells can provide a possibility of a cure for conditions like mine, rather than just a way to live with a chronic condition.

I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).  Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding.  Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

Thank you.

 
44943 05/25/2009 at 05:27:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44944 05/25/2009 at 05:29:43 PM Self     As a person affected by the impact that Type 1 Diabetes and being a quadriplegic can have on the lives of young people, I am a firm believer in Stem Cell Research. Stem Cell Research is what holds the promise in the search for a cure for Type 1 Diabetes and those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research allows scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for Type 1 Diabetes and it could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes, not to mention curing Spinal Cord Injuries.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as Diabetes and spinal cord injuries, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for Diabetes and Spinal Cord Injuries!

 
44945 05/25/2009 at 05:30:01 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44946 05/25/2009 at 05:31:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44947 05/25/2009 at 05:32:21 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me as a tzxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Adult stem cells have been shown to be more effective. Destruction of human life is not necessary.

As proposed, the regulations do not prevent future funding for research that would lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Respectfully

 
44948 05/25/2009 at 05:33:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44949 05/25/2009 at 05:33:36 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44950 05/25/2009 at 05:33:43 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44951 05/25/2009 at 05:34:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44952 05/25/2009 at 05:35:19 PM Self     I oppose all research involving the manipulation and/or destruction of human embryos outside of the wombs of their mothers. I am pleased that the proposed guidelines prohibit somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and the creation of embryos for research purposes. However, informed consent for the donation of "leftover" IVF embryos does not make the destruction of those embryos ethical. Please stop using my taxes to support this research.

 
44953 05/25/2009 at 05:35:32 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44954 05/25/2009 at 05:35:52 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
44955 05/25/2009 at 05:36:48 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44956 05/25/2009 at 05:37:48 PM Organization Put the Boots to ALS   On behalf of many others, and especially my friend *****, who has started Pt the Boots to ALS, I ask the federal government for a 30% increase of the NIH budget to Stem Cell/ Gene Therapies. If we increase the funding, we can put America ahead of Europe and other World Markets and cure 211 diseases while providing, at least, $1.9 trillion dollars in tax revenue.

 
44957 05/25/2009 at 05:38:39 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44958 05/25/2009 at 05:38:49 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44959 05/25/2009 at 05:40:17 PM Self     It is ridiculous to make decisions based on politics and not science. Adult stem cells hold the most promise for therapies and embryonic cells are "wild" cards. Do not allow human life to be destroyed.

 
44960 05/25/2009 at 05:42:12 PM Self     I believe that we are all born with a life to be lead as God intended and we should remember "In God we Trust!" and let life be lived as it is given to us. Stem cell research is not the way God intended our life to be. Pro Life

 
44961 05/25/2009 at 05:43:17 PM Self     Since there have been some stem cells available for research for a few years has there been any progress? I googled stem cell research and found a pro and con article:

Others argue against such research on medical grounds. Mice treated for Parkinson's with embryonic stem cells have died from brain tumors in as much as 20% of cases.1 Embryonic stem cells stored over time have been shown to create the type of chromosomal anomalies that create cancer cells.2 Looking at it from a more pragmatic standpoint, funds devoted to embryonic stem cell research are funds being taken away from the other two more promising and less controversial types of stem cell research mentioned above.

Learn More Now!

Footnotes 1 The Real Promise of Stem Cell Research Dr. David Prentice, HealthNewsDigest.com 2 Derivation of Human Stem-Cell Lines from Human Blastocysts, C. A. Cowan and others. March 25, 2004, New England Journal of Medicine, p.1355 with secondary reference to footnotes 13-17 p.1356. http://www.allaboutpopularissues.org/pros-and-cons-of-stem-cell-research.htm

My advice: try person's own adult cells.

 
44962 05/25/2009 at 05:43:28 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes. I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule. Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research. I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44963 05/25/2009 at 05:44:53 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44964 05/25/2009 at 05:46:06 PM Self     Here are my comments regarding the proposed Human Stem Cell Guidelines. As written, these guidelines will motivate the in-vitro fertilization clinics to create excess number of embryos to enhance the clinic's profitability. This poses a clear danger to the women seeking the IVF; their ovaries will be hyper-stimulated to release too many human eggs. The hyper-stimulation of the ovaries has caused grave injury and, in some cases, death to the woman. It is a sad time when the U.S. government promotes the exploitation of the tiniest of human beings for "science" that has been over-hyped by unethical researchers and the media. Regrettably, that decision has already been made and history will condemn the people of this era. But in the meantime, the government should not compound this exploitation of the weakest and most vulnerable by also putting in place policies that reward unethical IVF clinics and also exploit those desperate women who are seeking a child, not an opportunity to provide medical research material.

 
44965 05/25/2009 at 05:46:23 PM Self     The Catechism of the Catholic Church says:

“Human life must be respected and protected absolutely from the moment of conception. From the first moment of his existence, a human being must be recognized as having the rights of a person -- among which is the inviolable right of every innocent being to life.” (CCC, 2270)

Why does the Church use the moment of conception, that is, when the sperm and egg unite, instead of some later time? Because unless the embryo is killed, or dies a natural death for some reason, it will grow into a fully developed human person. In fact, the Church speaks of embryonic persons. There is no time prior to some intervening event that the fetus will become a hamster, or a dog, or a Buick. It will always and everywhere become a human being, whose life must be respected. That is why it is always and everywhere wrong to kill human embryonic life by “harvesting” its stem cells in its earliest days. It is simply murder of a completely innocent child. The Church condemns the use of embryonic stem cells because it always requires that a human embryo be killed to produce the cells. The entire medical establishment would be corrupted by creating children to be killed for research in the “hope” of discovering something that could be useful clinically.

Despite research dating to the 1980’s, and despite the oft-touted potential of embryonic stem cells, scientists have thus far been completely unable to produce any useful clinical treatments. Serious problems exist with embryonic stem cells: they tend to spontaneously mutate to form tumors. This can happen while they are being grown, or after they are transplanted into the patient. Thus far a purity of only 80% has been achieved in the laboratory; meaning that one out of five cells grown in the lab is a tumor cell, obviously not a safe and reliable therapy. Another problem is immune rejection, where the body sees the cells as foreign invaders and destroys them, sickening or killing the patient in the process.

As you well know, there is another type of stem cell, however, called adult stem cells. These are immature, undifferentiated cells that occur not in the embryo but in the tissues of all adult humans. These cells, which can be harvested from the patient (without killing him!), have been found in many tissues, are renewable, and can grow into the cell types of the tissue in which they are found. In fact, some research suggests the they may be at least multipotent, capable of forming cells from more than one tissue type.

Adult stem cells have been used successfully for nearly 40 years, primarily hematopoietic stem cells used to treat patients with diseases of the blood and immune systems. Adult stem cells are harvested from the patient himself, overcoming the immune rejection problem. Recently it has become clear that adult stem cells have much more potential for differentiation into other tissue types than previously assumed. Transplantation experiments have caused adult stem cells to form tissues totally different than those from which they were harvested, and cells are being reprogrammed to an embryonic, pluripotent state where they behave like embryonic stem cells.

The Catholic Church welcomes adult stem cell research, because it requires no killing of an innocent human person. Since the beginning of the 21st Century, the positive results from research using adult stem cells has increased at an astonishing rate. This research has already produced miracle cures, such as a patient in Spain, who lost her windpipe due to a particularly virulent form of TB, for whom scientists grew a new one using her stem cells. Why wouldn’t the NIH pursue this promising research with all its potential?

 
44966 05/25/2009 at 05:47:04 PM Self     I oppose the use of my taxpayer funds for the study and experimentation of research using human stem cells. There are many more productive and viable forms of stem cell research using other forms of cells.

 
44967 05/25/2009 at 05:47:13 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44968 05/25/2009 at 05:49:33 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes. I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule. Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research. I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44969 05/25/2009 at 05:49:48 PM Self    

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS: “Do not use my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already producing treatments.”

MESSAGE TO NIH: “I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.”

 
44970 05/25/2009 at 05:49:51 PM Self     As a diabetic and a US citizen, I feel that cures for diabetes and other chrinic illness's has been held up for 8 years. Please set the record straight and let the scientists do their job to find the cures for diabetes and other illness.

 
44971 05/25/2009 at 05:49:57 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44972 05/25/2009 at 05:50:27 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44973 05/25/2009 at 05:52:02 PM Self     I know that embryonic stem cell research is legal now by Pres. Obama's proclamation, but I ask as a citizen of this great country that you limit it as much as possible. It is a barbaric thing to do and totally unneccessary. No one should profit from selling embryos, eggs, or sperm for that purpose. With the great results in adult stem cell cures and treatments, why even do this. The unwanted embryos should be released for adoption. We know that is a successful option for them-Operation Snowflake.

 
44974 05/25/2009 at 05:52:26 PM Self     Please do not not fund embryo stem cell research. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. Sincerely, Former Embryo

 
44975 05/25/2009 at 05:53:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44976 05/25/2009 at 05:53:25 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44977 05/25/2009 at 05:53:59 PM Self     I am writin to request that the NIH protect human embryos from destruction. Adult stem-cell research has proven many times to be superior to embryo stem-cell research by its results. Many treatments have already been discovered through adult stem-cell research, while embryo research has provided little such treatments or medical help. Thank you.

 
44978 05/25/2009 at 05:54:48 PM Self     I am against uses human embryos for stem cell research. Killing innocent embryos for science is wrong and I don't want my hard earned money to pay for something that I believe and know is wrong to do.

 
44979 05/25/2009 at 05:55:36 PM       I am not in favor of expanding funding for embryonic stem cell research. From recent studies, embryonic cells are not the best cells to use for research in finding cures for certain conditions. The studies have found that these cells cannot be conrtolled as well as others cells and that often these cells will actually become cancerous. So lets not continue in this destructive research and turn to other means to find cures.

 
44980 05/25/2009 at 05:56:02 PM Self     We do not meed to further study with the embryo stem cell as it has been proven that using adult stem cells is more effective.The money should be directed in that direction. Also,if there were any profit (which there would be if embryo stem cell had any worhty degree of efficacy) private enterprise would long ago been involved.

 
44981 05/25/2009 at 05:56:03 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44982 05/25/2009 at 05:56:09 PM Self     Adult stem cell research has proven extremely positive results. Infant or fetal tissue stem cell experiments have ALL BEEN DISASTERS. Please refer to research done by Dr.David Steenblock in *****. Http://www.strokedoctor.com/ Adult stem cells obtained from the patient's own body have the correct DNA to work properly. Use of any other stem cells are like using Chevy parts on a Ford. PLEASE STOP ALL FUNDING OF FETAL TISSUE RESEARCH AS IT LEADS ONLY TO FURTHER DISASTER. Please consider realigning all funds presently allocated to stem cell research to ONLY ADULT STEM CELL APPLICATION.

 
44983 05/25/2009 at 05:56:25 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44984 05/25/2009 at 05:56:45 PM Self     Adult stem cell research shows more promise than embryonic stem cells. Research money should go to the most promising avenue.

 
44985 05/25/2009 at 05:57:18 PM       I am not in favor of expanding funding for embryonic stem cell research. From recent studies, embryonic cells are not the best cells to use for research in finding cures for certain conditions. The studies have found that these cells cannot be controlled as well as others cells and that often these cells will actually become cancerous. So lets not continue in this destructive research and turn to other means to find cures.

 
44986 05/25/2009 at 05:57:53 PM Self     It is time that we get down to the business of curying all of the diseases we all face in this world.We must allow stem cells to be used for the sience of medicine.

All of these right wing who say it is against the laws of GOD are so wrong. Good gave man a brain to discover the medicines that are needed to cure millions of people. The past eight years has been wasted It is time to move in the right direction.

 
44987 05/25/2009 at 05:58:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44988 05/25/2009 at 05:59:09 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44989 05/25/2009 at 05:59:16 PM Self     It is very important that Stem Cell Research be supported. We in the health care field have been waiting for this bill to be passed and we beleive the government has an obligation to assist the people who have been waiting for the cures for chronic diseases.

 
44990 05/25/2009 at 05:59:53 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44991 05/25/2009 at 06:00:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44992 05/25/2009 at 06:01:23 PM Self     In the best interest of scientific success using stem cells is much higher than in using embryonic stem cells.

Unsuccessful research on embryonic stem cells is a waste of time and money, plus the useless harvesting and destruction of human embryos

 
44993 05/25/2009 at 06:02:28 PM Self     I believe embryonic stem cell research is not only immoral; it is now unnecessary.

Adult stem cells & placental and birth cord stem cells are perfectly viable for any level of research and will prove enough to research any type of disease and disorder.

Why push the embryonic stem cell research when these are so easily and readily available to you with no taint of poor bioethics or immorality?

The only reason to do so is to continue to make some folks in the reproductive 'industry' very very rich.

 
44994 05/25/2009 at 06:02:48 PM Self     I AM AGAINST EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH BECAUSE IT PROMOTES THE DESTRUCTION OF HUMAN LIFE. ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH, PLACENTA HARVESTING, AND CORD BLOOD HARVESTING ARE ETHICAL AND ACCEPTABLE

 
44995 05/25/2009 at 06:03:43 PM Self     I watched as my husband of 27 years, a brilliant cardiologist, lost his health to Parkinsons in 2007. How we wished that stem cell research been fully supported in the decade before his death. With new guidelines there is finally a chance for others.

We both fully believed that stem cell research should be guided by the needs of the one million people currently with Parkinsons and those to come who will suffer this disease. Federal funds for research should include using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. Thank you.

 
44996 05/25/2009 at 06:04:17 PM Self     I think this practice should definitely be allowed. This is material is being thrown away anyway in landfills, when it could be saving lives in more ways than curing just diabetes.

 
44997 05/25/2009 at 06:05:05 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Thank you.

 
44998 05/25/2009 at 06:05:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44999 05/25/2009 at 06:05:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45000 05/25/2009 at 06:05:49 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45001 05/25/2009 at 06:05:55 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45002 05/25/2009 at 06:07:28 PM Self     As an individual and as an obtetrician/gynecologist, I appose the use of embryos for the purpose of stem cell research. Stem cells may be obtained from adult individuals without the destruction of life. Cord blood may also be used as a source of stem cells without harming the newborn. Please respect life at any stage, from conception to natural death at 110.

Thank you.

 
45003 05/25/2009 at 06:07:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45004 05/25/2009 at 06:08:26 PM Self     I am morally opposed to using human fetus stem cells for research, but beyond that, I see this as another devisive issue for our country at a time when we should be seeking unity rather than one more issue to tear us apart.

Since science cannot give us answers to questions of morality, it seems to me wiser to err on the side of a conservative approach to utilizing human embryos.

 
45005 05/25/2009 at 06:08:45 PM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
45006 05/25/2009 at 06:09:02 PM Self     I really would like for this to pass, since it would benefit my son who now is 17 yrs old. He acquired type 1 diabetes at the age of 2 1/2 years old. He is now on a insulin pump since the age of 14 which is still not regulated on doses using the pump. I believe he would benefit from this stem cell transplant a great deal and it would make his life alot better in the long run.

 
45007 05/25/2009 at 06:09:11 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45008 05/25/2009 at 06:09:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45009 05/25/2009 at 06:11:33 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45010 05/25/2009 at 06:11:42 PM Self     NIH: I have been a Type 1 diabetic since early 1965 and have gone through all the types of care a diabetic can receive since 1965. I have been on an insulin pump for about 15 years now and despite the fervent efforts of my doctors, my family and myself, my condition has worsened to include gastroparesis, serious neuropathy in all extremities, a growing cataract in one eye, hypotension, angina, and a double stent in one of my main heart arteries all of which has resulted in me taking over 20 pills a day plus my insulin via my pump.

Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes. Sincerely,

 
45011 05/25/2009 at 06:12:00 PM Self     I do not believe that another human should be made to involuntarily give up his or her life to be experimented on for my benefit. That is what I believe fetal stem cell work means. There are adequate strides being made in adult stem cell work that destroying fetal human life is totally unnecessary. It brings to mind the experimental work done on the Jews by the Nazi doctors during World War II.

 
45012 05/25/2009 at 06:12:22 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45013 05/25/2009 at 06:13:04 PM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos.

 
45014 05/25/2009 at 06:13:53 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes. I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule. Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research. I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45015 05/25/2009 at 06:13:58 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45016 05/25/2009 at 06:14:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page