Department of Health and Human Services
Part 1. Overview Information
Participating Organization(s)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The policies, guidelines, terms, and conditions of the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated in this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) might differ from those used by the HHS National Institutes of Health (NIH). If written guidance for completing this application is not available on the CDC website, then CDC will direct applicants elsewhere for that information.

Components of Participating Organizations

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH

Funding Opportunity Title

Miner Safety and Health Training Program - Western United States (U60)

Activity Code

U60 Research Cooperative Agreement

Announcement Type

Reissue of RFA-OH-17-001

Related Notices
  • September 18, 2020 - Notice of Change to Key Dates for RFA-OH-20-001. See Notice NOT-OH-20-013.
Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number

RFA-OH-20-001

Companion Funding Opportunity

None

Number of Applications

Only one application per institution is allowed

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s)

93.262

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The purpose of this NOFO is to enhance the quality and complement the availability of health and safety training for mineworkers in the Western United States. As a result, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) invites applications for cooperative agreements to support the development and implementation of training and education programs.

Key Dates
Posted Date

November 4, 2019

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)

November 4, 2019

Letter of Intent Due Date(s)

December 20, 2019

Application Due Date(s)

January 31, 2020

Electronically submitted applications must be submitted no later than 5:00 p.m., ET.

Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.

AIDS Application Due Date(s)

Not applicable

Scientific Merit Review

May 2020

Advisory Council Review

June 2020

Earliest Start Date

 September 1, 2020

Expiration Date

January 30, 2022

Due Dates for E.O. 12372

Not Applicable

Required Application Instructions

It is critical that applicants follow the Research (R) Instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, except where instructed to do otherwise (in this NOFO or in a Notice from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts). Conformance to all requirements (both in the Application Guide and the NOFO) is required and strictly enforced. Applicants must read and follow all application instructions in the Application Guide as well as any program-specific instructions noted in Section IV. When the program-specific instructions deviate from those in the Application Guide, follow the program-specific instructions. Applications that do not comply with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.


There are several options available to submit your application through Grants.gov to NIH and Department of Health and Human Services partners. You must use one of these submission options to access the application forms for this opportunity.

  1. Use the NIH ASSIST system to prepare, submit and track your application online.
  2. Use an institutional system-to-system (S2S) solution to prepare and submit your application to Grants.gov and eRA Commons to track your application. Check with your institutional officials regarding availability.

  3. Use Grants.gov Workspace to prepare and submit your application and eRA Commons to track your application.


  4. Table of Contents

    Part 1. Overview Information
    Part 2. Full Text of the Announcement

    Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
    Section II. Award Information
    Section III. Eligibility Information
    Section IV. Application and Submission Information
    Section V. Application Review Information
    Section VI. Award Administration Information
    Section VII. Agency Contacts
    Section VIII. Other Information


    Part 2. Full Text of Announcement
    Section I. Funding Opportunity Description

    Despite many technological and work environment advances, mining remains one of the most challenging and demanding occupations in the United States. The fatality rate in mining is five times higher than the national average for other industries according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

    There were 223,380 workers in the Mining Sector in 2017, according to data reported to the Mining Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) by mine operators and independent contractors in 2017— about 0.14% of the workforce. In 2017, MSHA reported 13,080 mining operations in the US. The commodity breakdown was 1,216 coal, 296 metal, 915 nonmetal, 4,358 stone, and 6,295 sand & gravel mines. MSHA data for the same period shows 28 fatalities and 4,035 nonfatal lost-time injuries. These injuries occurred at an overall rate of 1.64 per 100 FTE workers. While there were fewer fatalities in 2018 (27) than in 2009 (34), the industry average over the last 10 years has been 37 annual fatalities. The 2017 nonfatal lost-time underground injury rate was greater than the surface injury rate (3.17 vs. 1.3 per 100 FTE workers). See data information from NIOSH Mining Program ; BLS; and MSHA.

    Sprains or strains were the most frequently reported type of injury, followed by fractures and chips; cuts, lacerations, and punctures; and contusions and bruises. Respiratory diseases, hearing loss, cumulative musculoskeletal injuries, and traumatic injuries are critical health concerns within the mining industry.

    Miners experience incidences of respiratory illness and disease that are much higher than the general population, and the standards for exposures to airborne hazards continue to be lowered based on new medical evidence. MSHA compliance data demonstrates overexposures to these airborne contaminants at rates as high as 24%. Overexposure to respirable coal dust can lead to coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP), and exposure to respirable silica dust can lead to silicosis—both are irreversible, disabling, and potentially fatal lung diseases.

    Mining has a higher prevalence of hearing loss than any other major industry. A NIOSH analysis of over 1 million audiograms from 2000 to 2008 showed that 27% of miners had a material hearing impairment versus 18% for all industries. Mining has the highest prevalence of noise overexposure (76%) according to a NIOSH analysis of the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

    Of all nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses reported to MSHA between 2009 and 2013, nearly one-third (29%) were musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The median number of days lost, which is the sum of days lost from work and the number of days with restricted work activity, was 21 for all reported MSD cases.

    Ground falls remain a leading cause of fatalities in underground coal mines. From 2006 through 2015, a total of 52 ground fall fatalities and 2,721 non-fatal days lost (NFDL) injuries were reported by MSHA. Of these ground fall-related incidents, 11 fatalities and 668 NFDL injuries were caused by rib falls. The injuries and fatalities attributable to ground control failures are distributed among causes ranging from pillar failures to rock outbursts to insufficient standing support. Coal rib stability will continue to become a greater challenge as mining operations move into deeper reserves and encounter more adverse multiple seam stress conditions. According to MSHA data  since 2000, sixty-four U.S. mine workers have been killed and 10 injured as a result of fires or explosions in underground workings. Float coal dust, generated during coal mining, serves as fuel that can propagate an explosion flame, and the explosibility of float coal dust is controlled by applying “rock dust”—i.e., ground limestone dust—on all mine surfaces as an inerting agent.

    From 2000 to 2015, roughly 700 methane ignitions occurred during coal mining, generally during longwall mining. Ventilation airflow is the primary means of controlling methane levels, but such controls are challenged by more rapid mine development that liberates greater methane quantities, larger mining areas that create greater exposed coal surfaces, and larger job areas under the influence of a single ventilation district. From 2000 to 2015, nearly 900 fires were reported that resulted in three fatalities. https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/researchprogram/burdenandneed.html

    Because of the many challenges in the mining industry, the focus areas for mining training must encompass a wide range of hazards and risks.

    In 1969, the Coal Mine Safety and Health Act provided funding for state health and safety training through grants by MSHA. The mining community in the Eastern United States is served by the MSHA Training Academy in Beckley, West Virginia. MSHA, under the Department of Labor, provides training to federal mine inspectors and mining professionals from other governmental agencies, the mining industries, and labor. MSHA also provides Part 46 Training Assistance for new employees, refresher training, new task training, and training on Site-specific Hazards. States use MSHA grant funds to provide federally mandated training to miners working at coal, metal, and nonmetal mines, both on the surface and underground. MSHA's State Grants Program distributes federal grants to 49 States and the Navajo Nation. Grants are made to the state agency program responsible for miners' health and safety. Most grant funds are used to support health and safety training courses and programs designed to reduce mining accidents, injuries, and illnesses. (http://arlweb.msha.gov/PROGRAMS/EPD4.HTM).

    Since 1999, when the authorities of the Bureau of Mines were transferred to NIOSH, NIOSH has supported the safety and health training of miners in the Western United States. NIOSH support for miner training has been provided through various projects, contracts, and grants, including the Western Mining Training Centers which have included the Colorado School of Mines (Mine Safety and Health Program), the Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly the University of Missouri at Rolla), The University of Utah, the University of Texas at Arlington (Health and Safety Training Center) and the University of Arizona (Western Mining Safety and Health Training Resource Center. These training centers provide a joint approach to reducing injuries to miners and other workers in mining operations. For more information, please visit the website of each training program.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this NOFO is to enhance the quality and complement the availability of health and safety training for miners in the Western United States. Availability includes the frequency, geographic considerations, channels or partners of dissemination, culturally and/or educational appropriate training material, and other characteristics of a successful training program.

    NIOSH invites applications that support the development and implementation of training and education programs with objectives that:

    • address the training needs of mining personnel in the Western United States,
    • develop and deliver health and safety training to miners (NOTE: this excludes training in emergency response and hazmat materials),
    • develop/offer and implement “train the trainer” courses,
    • provide qualified instructors and faculty to conduct the training, and increase the number of trainers,
    • evaluate the effectiveness and impact of the training program on reducing injuries and illnesses to miners, and
    • coordinate with existing training programs and partnerships with industry, miners, and agencies, such as those offered by MSHA.

    NIOSH intends that the training provided by this program will be consistent with recommendations and guidelines of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and MSHA, and that the training provided will not duplicate existing MSHA or OSHA training programs, or those developed by current NIOSH grantees. Applications duplicating training provided by MSHA or OSHA training programs, or those developed by current NIOSH grantees will be found non-responsive.

    Healthy People 2020 and other National Strategic Priorities
     

    The United States Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving nationwide improvements in health for a society in which all people live long, healthy lives. The vision, mission, and goals are found in Healthy People 2020. The objectives of Healthy People 2020 related to occupational safety and health (OSH) are primarily addressed through the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA). NORA, established by NIOSH and its partners to stimulate research and improve workplace practices, provides a framework to guide OSH research. The goal of NIOSH research programs is to support relevant, high quality, effective projects that demonstrate impact in reducing occupational disease and injury. Detailed information about the NORA Program Portfolio can be found on the NIOSH Program Portfolio website.

    Public Health Impact

    This training program will support the mission of NIOSH in protecting and promoting the health of mining workers in the United States.

    NIOSH Programs support 1) research that addresses worker safety, accident prevention, and health concerns across a wide spectrum of industries and occupations, and 2) approaches that include basic research though translation research. The latter approach takes research knowledge and works to put it to use by promoting engineering controls, new technologies, and communication products. Through this announcement, NIOSH encourages qualified applicants to submit applications that will eliminate, reduce or prevent occupational diseases, injuries, and fatalities from the mining workplace. The training will help improve work practices and safety programs, reduce work-related injury and illness, and advance the understanding of safety and health practices at Western mine worksites.

    Relevant Work

    NIOSH has an extensive history of conducting research to understand and to reduce hazards in the mining industry. Safety and health training for miners provides relevant knowledge regarding hazards encountered in the mining environment and practical tools for reducing risks for injuries and illness. NIOSH integrates a training function across the Mining Program to identify solutions that lend themselves to training and are needed to achieve specific health and safety goals. The Miner Safety and Health Training Program has taught trainers across all mining service sectors throughout the Western United States on how to improve safety training. To learn more about NIOSH's work in the mining safety and health, visit https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/researchprogram/index.html.

    Approach

    The Miner Safety and Health Training Program cooperative agreement will support research on improving the occupational safety in the Western United States, where MSHA’s programs may not be as accessible to Western miners, including, but not limited to:

    • complementing the availability and improving the quality of miner training
    • providing an opportunity to address gaps that exist in current training materials, particularly those related to Western mining operations
    • improving the transfer of best safety practices to the workplace
    • increasing the safety focus, total health awareness, and leadership competency of miners, frontline supervisors, superintendents, and managers representing operations throughout the United States, spanning all major commodity sectors in surface and underground mining

    An immediate goal of safety and health training for miners is to provide workers with relevant knowledge regarding hazards encountered in the mining environment, personal protective equipment for protection of health and safety in an emergency, along with practical tools for reducing risks for injuries and illness. The training program should assist workers in becoming active participants in determining and improving the health and safety conditions under which they work, and in establishing collaborative employer-employee relationships for creating safe workplaces.

    The training and education needs specific to miners in the Western United States must be defined in the application along with supporting data from industry, unions, and miners. These data are to be used to justify the proposed training and education of miners.

    Applicants should identify training needs (as noted above), and should also provide information on the frequency of the training, along with characteristics of the miner cohort if known (target or vulnerable workforce). The application must clearly identify the professional and experiential credentials of those performing the training. Ideally, training will be provided not only at centralized facilities, but will also occur at mining worksites. As evidenced by letters of support, the application should provide justification for the choice of location in terms of impact (e.g., number of miners trained, change in competencies/behavior relevant to health and safety improvements, reductions in incidents, etc.), accessibility, feasibility, and cost.

    NIOSH cooperative agreement awards made under this announcement are not intended to duplicate training currently available to Western miners. To maximize the impact of miner training, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with existing training programs provided by MSHA and OSHA, existing programs should be identified, summarized in the research and training plan, and considered for use. Further, the training provided by NIOSH-funded training program for miners should be consistent with current recommendations and guidelines of both OSHA https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3824.pdf and MSHA https://www.msha.gov/training-education.

    NIOSH organizes its research program under the framework of the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA). NORA is a partnership program to stimulate innovative research and improved workplace practices. Unveiled in 1996, NORA entered its third decade (2016-2026) with an enhanced structure. It now consists of ten industry sectors based on major areas of the U.S. economy, and seven health and safety cross-sectors organized according to the major health and safety issues affecting the U.S. working population. The national agenda is developed and implemented through the NORA Sector and Cross-Sector Councils. Each council develops and maintains an Agenda for its sector or cross-sector. The collection of agendas comprises the agenda for the nation for improvements in occupational safety and health. The agenda also provides a vehicle for stakeholders to describe the most relevant safety and health issues, research gaps, and needs.

    Protecting the health and safety of mine workers by preventing diseases, injuries, and fatalities is a NIOSH priority, along with making certain that workers are qualified, trained, and properly equipped. The NORA Mining Agenda was developed and implemented through NORA Sector Councils and is guidance for the nation as a whole, while the 2019-2023  Mining Program Strategic Plan is specific to NIOSH and its capabilities and resources.

    The NIOSH Mining Program has established three overarching strategic goals for this plan:

    • Strategic Goal 1: Reduce mine workers’ risk of occupational illness
    • Strategic Goal 2: Reduce mine workers’ risk of traumatic injuries and fatalities
    • Strategic Goal 3: Reduce the risk of mine disasters and improve post-disaster survivability of mine workers
    Intermediate Goals

    NIOSH has also identified intermediate goals. These are specific actions needed to achieve or help achieve the strategic goals. In addition, NIOSH has identified certain areas where extramural research is specifically encouraged to fill a gap or provide a capacity that NIOSH cannot. Descriptions and updates of the strategic and intermediate goals are on the NIOSH website.

    Note to Applicants

    Provide in the Project Description/Abstract the Intermediate Goals https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/about/strategicplan/researchgoals.html

    Applicants are strongly encouraged to review the language from the NORA Mining Agenda and the 2019-2023 Mining Program Strategic Plan.

    Data Resources

    Specific information about risks in the mining industry may be obtained at the NIOSH Mining Data & Statistics.

    In addition, NIOSH has a number of data resources available to researchers on the NIOSH Data and Statistics Gateway. This includes Worker Health Charts that use worker health data gathered by NIOSH from the Bureau of Labor Statistics  to create specialized charts to assess the rates, distribution, and trends in workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths.

    Objectives

    Clearly state your proposed goals and objectives, and directly link these to the occupational health and safety burdens you are addressing.

    Provide data to support your selection of the proposed work, such as morbidity or mortality rates and indicators of the size of the population at risk (including estimates of the target population’s potential risk of exposure to the hazard, frequency of exposure, or sociodemographic factors such as age, gender, and race/ethnicity). Similarly, provide qualitative data that describe exposures, the magnitude of the problem, and potential benefits and impacts of addressing the issue. Qualitative data may be necessary when the nature of the exposure or population at risk makes it difficult to collect large-scale, representative quantitative data.

    Outputs and Outcomes

    Governmental agencies and organizations have been faced with increasing demand to measure the effectiveness of their funded research in improving public health. Effectiveness can be measured by the products (outputs) of research activities and subsequent outcomes, that is, benefits or changes at an individual or population level. Outputs are the immediate products or direct result of research activities. Examples include publications, reports, conference proceedings, presentations/posters, investigator career development, databases, tools, methods, guidelines, recommendations, and education and training materials.

    The causes of work-related injuries and illnesses are complex, and determining the effect that specific research activities have on them can take years. Thus, outcomes can be measured over time as either intermediate or end outcomes.

    Intermediate outcomes are specific changes that occur as a result of research activities. Examples of intermediate outcomes include public or private policy changes, conduct of training or workshops based on project outputs, citations in the literature, inventions and patents, and adoption of technologies or methods developed by the researcher.

    End outcomes are the ultimate goal of the research and the result of what individuals or institutions do with the knowledge or products generated by the research. Examples of end outcomes include reduction in workplace illnesses, injuries, fatalities, and/or hazardous exposures.

    Note to Applicants

    In the Project Description/Abstract and Research Strategy (Significance) sections of your application, provide a brief statement about expected outputs and outcomes of your proposed research.

    Target Population
     

    The beneficiaries of these cooperative agreements are miners working in the Western United States. The training program may include a combination of trainee targets, including miners, frontline supervisors, superintendents, managers, among others. As appropriate, the training program might target vulnerable U.S. worker populations to address increased safety and health risks associated with occupational health disparities, changing worker demographics, and the changing nature of work.

    Collaborations/Partnerships

    Partnerships are important for the NIOSH Mining Safety and Health Program. They facilitate advances in the safety and health of U.S. mine workers. Input from customers and stakeholder groups, which have inherent knowledge and concern about the safety and health of miners, helps in setting research and training priorities. Partners often add expertise or specialized experience to the research/training team, which contributes to the success of the overall project.

    NIOSH broad base of stakeholders includes academia; equipment manufacturers; government; mine operators; mining industry trade associations; organized labor; regulatory agencies (on the local, state, and federal levels); research laboratories; and suppliers. NIOSH collaborates and communicates with the stakeholders on a regular basis to better inform their research and assess its direct contributions to safety and health.

    Applicants will institute collaborative partnerships with local and state organizations, universities, manufacturers, government agencies, professional organizations, engineering and safety training partner organizations, community organizations, health care institutions, business groups, and labor organizations to carry out research and training activities, conduct outreach programs, promote awareness, and disseminate information.

    Partnerships are also critical to translate research findings into effective training and work practices and are encouraged by the NIOSH Research-to-Practice Program (r2p). Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary collaborations that share expertise are essential to advancing occupational safety and health and promoting overall worker health in mining environments.

    Note to Applicants

    Include collaborations or partnerships that strengthen the proposed research in terms of OSH, or related, expertise and resources.

    Evaluation/Performance Measurement

    Evaluations provide information for management and improve program effectiveness. The following CDC document A Framework for Program Evaluation may be helpful. Effective program evaluation is a systematic way to improve and account for public health actions by involving procedures that are useful, feasible, ethical, and accurate. Understanding and applying the elements of this framework for research projects may enhance planning effective public health strategies, improving existing programs including evidence-based activities, and demonstrating beneficial results and impact of federal funding.

    Translation Plan

    Partnerships are critical to translate research into practice and are encouraged by the NIOSH Research-to-Practice (r2p) program. The r2p approach is an interactive process in which the occupational safety and health community – including researchers, communicators, decision-makers, and employer/employee groups – work collaboratively to:

    • Identify research needs;
    • Design, plan, and conduct studies;
    • Translate and disseminate existing knowledge, interventions, and technologies to relevant users for implementation in the workplace; and to
    • Evaluate results to determine the impact on occupational safety and health.

    The applicant will describe the anticipated strategies for translation and/or dissemination of research findings, including by audience segmentation and by the characteristics of the channels or modes of dissemination.

    See Section VIII. Other Information for award authorities and regulations.

    Section II. Award Information
    Funding Instrument

    Cooperative Agreement: A support mechanism used when there will be substantial Federal scientific or programmatic involvement. Substantial involvement means that, after award, CDC/NIOSH scientific or program staff will assist, guide, coordinate, or participate in project activities. See Section VI.2 for additional information about the substantial involvement for this NOFO.

    Application Types Allowed

    New - An application that is submitted for funding for the first time. Renewal - Previous years of funding for the project have elapsed. Competing for additional years of funding to continue original project. Revision (formerly Competing Supplement) - Request for additional funds for a current award to expand the scope of work. Applicants should contact the awarding agency or advice on submitting any revision/supplement application.

    The OER Glossary and the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide provide details on these application types. Only those application types listed here are allowed for this NOFO.

    Clinical Trial?

    Not Allowed: Only accepting applications that do not propose clinical trials.

    Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards

    Estimated Total Funding:

    $3 million total cost (direct and indirect costs)

    NIOSH intends to commit approximately $3 million in total costs (direct and indirect) over the entire project period (up to 3 years).  

    Anticipated number of awards per year: 2

    NIOSH anticipates to fund 2 awards through this announcement.

    Awards issued under this NOFO are contingent upon the availability of funds and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.

    Because the nature and scope of the proposed training topics, delivery types and locations will vary from application to application, it is also anticipated that costs and duration of each award may also vary.

    Award Budget

    $450,000 direct costs per budget period

    Award Ceiling: $486,000 Total costs (direct and indirect) per budget period

    Award Floor: $200,000 direct costs per budget period

    NIOSH intends to commit up to approximately $1 million in total costs (direct and indirect) to fund 2 cooperative agreements per budget period.

    It is anticipated that the maximum amount for each application/award will be $450,000 direct costs and $486,000 of total costs (direct and indirect) for each 12-month budget period.

    Indirect Costs (also known as Facilities & Administrative F&A Costs) are limited to 8% of modified total direct costs (exclusive of tuition, fees and equipment greater than $5,000 and subcontracts in excess of $25,000).

    Critical Budget Requirement: Total costs for all subaward/consortium budgets must be counted as Direct Costs. Not complying with this requirement may result in the requested budget exceeding the $450K direct cost cap and the application being considered nonresponsive.

    Award Project Period

    3 years

    The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity may not exceed 3 years.

    Throughout the project period, CDC's commitment to continuation of awards will depend on the availability of funds, evidence of satisfactory progress by the recipient (as documented in required reports), and CDC’s determination that continued funding is in the best interests of the federal government.  

    HHS/CDC grants policies as described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement will apply to the applications submitted and awards made in response to this NOFO.

    Section III. Eligibility Information
    1. Eligible Applicants
    Eligible Organizations

    Higher Education Institutions

    • Public/State Controlled Institutions of Higher Education
    • Private Institutions of Higher Education

    The following types of Higher Education Institutions are always encouraged to apply for NIH support as Public or Private Institutions of Higher Education:

    • Hispanic-serving Institutions
    • Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
    • Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs)
    • Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions
    • Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)
    Nonprofits Other Than Institutions of Higher Education
    • Nonprofits with 501(c)(3) IRS Status (Other than Institutions of Higher Education)
    • Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) IRS Status (Other than Institutions of Higher Education)

    For-Profit Organizations

    • Small Businesses
    • For-Profit Organizations (Other than Small Businesses)

    Governments

    • State Governments
    • County Governments
    • City or Township Governments
    • Special District Governments
    • Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Federally Recognized)
    • Indian/Native American Tribal Governments (Other than Federally Recognized)
    • U.S. Territory or Possession

    Other

    • Independent School Districts
    • Public Housing Authorities/Indian Housing Authorities
    • Native American Tribal Organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
    • Faith-based or Community-based Organizations
    • Regional Organizations
    • Bona Fide Agents: a Bona Fide Agent is an agency/organization identified by the state as eligible to submit an application under the state eligibility in lieu of a state application. If applying as a bona fide agent of a state or local government, a legal, binding agreement from the state or local government as documentation of the status is required. Attach with "Other Attachment Forms" when submitting via Grants.gov (https://www.grants.gov/ )
    • Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs): FFRDCs are operated, managed, and/or administered by a university or consortium of universities, other not-for-profit or nonprofit organization, or an industrial firm, as an autonomous organization or as an identifiable separate operating unit of a parent organization. A FFRDC meets some special long-term research or development need which cannot be met as effectively by an agency's existing in-house or contractor resources. FFRDC's enable agencies to use private sector resources to accomplish tasks that are integral to the mission and operation of the sponsoring agency. For more information on FFRDCs, go to ACQpedia website.
    Foreign Institutions

    Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply.
    Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply.
    Foreign components, as defined in the HHS Grants Policy Statement, are not allowed.

    For this announcement, applicants may include collaborators or consultants from foreign institutions. All applicable federal laws and policies apply.

     
    Special Eligibility Requirements
    Responsiveness

    Total costs for all subaward/consortium budgets must be counted as Direct Costs. Not complying with this requirement may result in the requested budget exceeding the $450K direct cost cap and the application being considered non-responsive.
    If an applicant requests a funding amount greater than the ceiling of the award ($486K), CDC/NIOSH will consider the application non-responsive, and it will not enter into the peer review process. CDC/NIOSH will notify the applicant that the application did not meet the submission requirements.

    Upon receipt, applications will be evaluated for completeness by NIH/CSR and CDC/NIOSH.  CDC/NIOSH will review all applications for responsiveness. Incomplete and/or non-responsive applications will not be reviewed.

    Note to Applicants

    Provide a statement about which NORA sector(s) and cross-sector(s) and which NIOSH strategic and intermediate goals are being addressed. Provide a rationale for how the proposed research will contribute to the specified priority area(s).Explain how the proposed research will contribute to the NIOSH Research to Practice (r2p) initiative and state the expected Outcomes and Outputs (see Approach).Place this information in both the Project Abstract and in the Research Strategy (Significance) sections of the application.

    Required Registrations

    Applicant Organizations

    Applicant organizations must complete and maintain the following registrations as described in the SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide to be eligible to apply for or receive an award. All registrations must be completed prior to the application being submitted. Registration can take 6 weeks or more, so applicants should begin the registration process as soon as possible. The NIH Policy on Late Submission of Grant Applications states that failure to complete registrations in advance of a due date is not a valid reason for a late submission.

    • Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) - All registrations require that applicants be issued a DUNS number. After obtaining a DUNS number, applicants can begin both SAM and eRA Commons registrations. The same DUNS number must be used for all registrations, as well as on the grant application.
    • System for Award Management (SAM)– Applicants must complete and maintain an active registration, which requires renewal at least annually. The renewal process may require as much time as the initial registration. SAM registration includes the assignment of a Commercial and Government Entity (CAGE) Code for domestic organizations which have not already been assigned a CAGE Code.
    • NATO Commercial and Government Entity (NCAGE) Code – Foreign organizations must obtain an NCAGE code (in lieu of a CAGE code) in order to register in SAM. 
    • eRA Commons - Applicants must have an active DUNS number to register in eRA Commons.  Organizations can register with the eRA Commons as they are working through their SAM or Grants.gov registration, but all registrations must be in place by time of submission. eRA Commons requires organizations to identify at least one Signing Official (SO) and at least one Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) account in order to submit an application.
    • Grants.gov – Applicants must have an active DUNS number and SAM registration in order to complete the Grants.gov registration.

    Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

    Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

    Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for CDC/NIOSH support.

    For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    2. Cost Sharing

    This NOFO does not require cost sharing as defined in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

    3. Number of Applications

    Only one application per institution (normally identified by having a unique DUNS number) is allowed

    NIOSH will not accept duplicate or highly overlapping applications under review at the same time. 

    The NOFO governs new, renewal, and Revision (formerly Competing Supplement) applications.

    If your application is incomplete or non-responsive to the eligibility criteria listed in this section, it will not enter into the review process.

    Note: Title 2 of the United States Code Section 1611 states that an organization described in Section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code that engages in lobbying activities is not eligible to receive Federal funds constituting an award, grant, or loan.

    Section IV. Application and Submission Information
    1. Requesting an Application Package

    The application forms package specific to this opportunity must be accessed through ASSIST, Grants.gov Workspace or an institutional system-to-system solution. Links to apply using ASSIST or Grants.gov Workspace are available in Part 1 of this NOFO. See your administrative office for instructions if you plan to use an institutional system-to-system solution.

    2. Content and Form of Application Submission

    It is critical that applicants follow the Research (R) Instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, except where instructed in this funding opportunity announcement to do otherwise. Conformance to the requirements in the Application Guide is required and strictly enforced. Applications that are out of compliance with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.

    Letter of Intent

    Due Date for Letter of Intent: 12/20/2019

    By the date listed in Part 1. Overview Information (and at least 30 days prior to the application receipt date), prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent that includes the following information:

    • Descriptive title of proposed activity
    • Name(s), address(es), and telephone number(s) of the PD(s)/PI(s)
    • Names of other key personnel
    • Participating institution(s)
    • Number and title of this funding opportunity

    The letter of intent should be sent to:

    Michael Goldcamp, PhD
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Telephone: 304-285-5951
    Email: MGoldcamp@cdc.gov

    Page Limitations

    All page limitations described in this individual NOFO must be followed. For this specific NOFO, the Research/Training Strategy component of the Research/Training Plan narrative is limited to 12 pages.

    Pages that exceed page limits described in this NOFO will be removed and not forwarded for peer review, potentially affecting an application's score.

    Supporting materials for the Research/Training Plan narrative included as appendices may not exceed 10 PDF files with a maximum of 100 pages for all appendices.

    Instructions for Application Submission

    The following section supplements the instructions found in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide and should be used for preparing an application to this NOFO.

    SF424(R&R)

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

    Project/Performance Site Locations

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

    Research and Related Other Project Information

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

    Research and Related Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded)

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed. 

    R&R Budget

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed. For this NOFO, CDC/NIOSH requires a detailed budget for the initial budget year and a budget for each consecutive year of support. Modular budgets are not allowed.

    R&R Subaward Budget Attachment(s) Form 5 YR 30 ATT

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

    PHS 398 Cover Page Supplement

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

    PHS 398 Research Plan

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed, with the following additional instructions: 

    Resource Sharing Plan: Individuals are required to comply with the instructions for the Resource Sharing Plans as provided in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, with the following modification:

    • All applications, regardless of the amount of direct costs requested for any one year, should address a Data Sharing Plan.

    Data Management Plan (DMP): CDC requires recipients for projects and programs that involve data collection or generation of data with federal funds to develop and submit a Data Management Plan (DMP) for each collection of public health data.

    If applicable, include a DMP in the Resource Sharing Plan section of the PHS 398 Research Plan Component of the application for each proposed collection of public health data. If the public health data to be collected or created are not appropriate for release, provided a concise rationale or justification in the DMP.

    The DMP may be outlined in a narrative format or as a checklist but, at a minimum, should include:

    • Descriptions of the data to be produced in the proposed project;
    • How access will be provided to the data (including provisions for protection of privacy, confidentiality, security, intellectual property, or other rights);
    • Use of data standards that ensure all released data have appropriate documentation that describes the method of collection, what the data represent, and potential limitations for use; and
    • Plans for archival and long-term preservation of the data, or explaining why long-term preservation and access cannot be justified.

    Examples of DMPs may be found at University of California or USGS.

    CDC Additional Requirement (AR)-25 outlines the components of a DMP and provides additional information for investigators about the requirements for data accessibility, storage, and preservation. The DMP should be developed during the project planning phase, prior to the initiation of collecting or generating public health data, and be submitted with the application.

    Applications that do not comply with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review. Applications submitted without a required DMP may be deemed ineligible for award unless it is clearly stated why a detailed DMP is deferred to a later date and when it will be provided. In these cases, funding restrictions may be imposed on an award until the DMP is submitted and evaluated.

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Packages must be followed along with any additional instructions provided in this NOFO.

    Appendix

    Only limited Appendix materials are allowed. Follow all instructions for the Appendix as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide. Do not use the appendix to circumvent page limits.

    PHS 398 Research Training Program Plan (optional)
    PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, with the following additional instructions:

    If you answered “Yes” to the question “Are Human Subjects Involved?” on the R&R Other Project Information form, you must include at least one human subjects study record using the Study Record: PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information form or Delayed Onset Study record.

    Study Record: PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

    Delayed Onset Study

    Note: Delayed onset does NOT apply to a study that can be described but will not start immediately (i.e., delayed start).

    All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

    Format for Attachments

    Designed to maximize system-conducted validations, multiple separate attachments are required for a complete application. When the application is received by the agency, all submitted forms and all separate attachments are combined into a single document that is used by peer reviewers and agency staff. Applicants should ensure that all attachments are uploaded to the system.

    CDC requires all text attachments to the Adobe application forms be submitted as PDFs and that all text attachments conform to the agency-specific formatting requirements noted in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide .

    Foreign Institutions

    For this NOFO, applications from foreign institutions are not allowed  

    3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)

    See Part 1. Section III.1 for information regarding the requirement for obtaining a unique entity identifier and for completing and maintaining active registrations in System for Award Management (SAM), NATO Commercial and Government Entity (NCAGE) Code (if applicable), eRA Commons, and Grants.gov

    4. Submission Dates and Times

    Part I. Overview Information contains information about Key Dates and times. Applicants are encouraged to submit applications before the due date to ensure they have time to make any application corrections that might be necessary for successful submission. When a submission date falls on a weekend or Federal holiday, the application deadline is automatically extended to the next business day.

    Organizations must submit applications to Grants.gov (the online portal to find and apply for grants across all Federal agencies). Applicants must then complete the submission process by tracking the status of the application in the eRA Commons, NIH’s electronic system for grants administration. NIH and Grants.gov systems check the application against many of the application instructions upon submission. Errors must be corrected and a changed/corrected application must be submitted to Grants.gov on or before the application due date and time.  If a Changed/Corrected application is submitted after the deadline, the application will be considered late. Applications that miss the due date and time are subjected to the NIH Policy on Late Application Submission.

    Applicants are responsible for viewing their application before the due date in the eRA Commons to ensure accurate and successful submission.

    Information on the submission process and a definition of on-time submission are provided in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    5. Intergovernmental Review (E.O. 12372)

    This initiative is not subject to intergovernmental review.

    6. Funding Restrictions

    All CDC/NIOSH awards are subject to the federal regulations, 45 CFR 75, terms and conditions, and other requirements described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

    Awards may be initially issued with restrictions until all information requested can be provided.

    In accordance with the United States Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance policy, all non-governmental organization (NGO) applicants acknowledge that foreign NGOs that receive funds provided through this award, either as a prime recipient or subrecipient, are strictly prohibited, regardless of the source of funds, from performing abortions as a method of family planning or engaging in any activity that promotes abortion as a method of family planning, or to provide financial support to any other foreign non-governmental organization that conducts such activities. See Additional Requirement (AR) 35 for applicability (https://www.cdc.gov/grants/additionalrequirements/ar-35.html).

    CDC requires that mechanisms for, and cost of, public health data sharing be included in grants, cooperative agreements, and contracts. The cost of sharing or archiving public health data may also be included as part of the total budget requested for first-time or continuation awards.

    Fulfilling the data-sharing requirement must be documented in a Data Management Plan (DMP) that is developed during the project planning phase prior to the initiation of generating or collecting public health data and must be included in the Resource Sharing Plan(s) section of the PHS398 Research Plan Component of the application. Applicants who contend that the public health data they collect or create are not appropriate for release must justify that contention in the DMP submitted with their application for CDC funds (for example, privacy and confidentiality considerations, and embargo issues).

    Recipients who fail to release public health data in a timely fashion will be subject to procedures normally used to address lack of compliance (for example, reduction in funding, restriction of funds, or award termination) consistent with 45 CFR 74.62 or other authorities as appropriate.

    For further information, please see: https://www.cdc.gov/grants/additionalrequirements/ar-25.html for revised AR-25.

    Pre-award costs are allowable only as described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

    7. Other Submission Requirements and Information

    Applications must be submitted electronically following the instructions described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.  Paper applications will not be accepted.

    Applicants must complete all required registrations before the application due date. Section III. Eligibility Information contains information about registration.

    For assistance with your electronic application or for more information on the electronic submission process, visit How to Apply – Application Guide. If you encounter a system issue beyond your control that threatens your ability to complete the submission process on-time, you must follow the Dealing with System Issues guidance. For assistance with application submission, contact the Application Submission Contacts in Section VII.

    Important reminders:

    All PD(s)/PI(s) must include their eRA Commons ID in the Credential field of the Senior/Key Person Profile Component of the SF424(R&R) Application Package. Failure to register in the Commons and to include a valid PD/PI Commons ID in the credential field will prevent the successful submission of an electronic application. See Section III of this NOFO for information on registration requirements.

    The applicant organization must ensure that the DUNS number it provides on the application is the same number used in the organization’s profile in the eRA Commons and for the System for Award Management. Additional information may be found in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

    See more tips for avoiding common errors.

    Duplication of Efforts

    Applicants are responsible for reporting if this application will result in programmatic, budgetary, or commitment overlap with another application or award (i.e. grant, cooperative agreement, or contract) submitted to another funding source in the same fiscal year. Programmatic overlap occurs when (1) substantially the same project is proposed in more than one application or is submitted to two or more funding sources for review and funding consideration or (2) a specific objective and the project design for accomplishing the objective are the same or closely related in two or more applications or awards, regardless of the funding source. Budgetary overlap occurs when duplicate or equivalent budgetary items (e.g., equipment, salaries) are requested in an application but already are provided by another source. Commitment overlap occurs when an individual’s time commitment exceeds 100 percent, whether or not salary support is requested in the application. Overlap, whether programmatic, budgetary, or commitment of an individual’s effort greater than 100 percent, is not permitted. Any overlap will be resolved by the CDC with the applicant and the PD/PI prior to award.
    Report Submission: The applicant must upload the report under “Other Attachment Forms.” The document should be labeled: "Report on Programmatic, Budgetary, and Commitment Overlap.

    Upon receipt, applications will be evaluated for completeness and compliance with application instructions by CDC/NIOSH. Applications that are incomplete or non-compliant will not be reviewed.

    Applications duplicating training provided by MSHA or OSHA training programs, or those developed by current NIOSH grantees will be found non-responsive.

    Section V. Application Review Information
    1. Criteria

    Only the review criteria described below will be considered in the review process. As part of the CDC/NIOSH mission, all applications submitted to the CDC in support of occupational safety and health research are evaluated for scientific and technical merit through the CDC/NIOSH peer review system.

    Overall Impact

    Reviewers will provide an overall impact score to reflect their assessment of the likelihood for the project to exert a sustained, powerful influence on the research field(s) involved, in consideration of the following review criteria and additional review criteria (as applicable for the project proposed).

    Scored Review Criteria

    Reviewers will consider each of the review criteria below in the determination of scientific merit, and give a separate score for each. An application does not need to be strong in all categories to be judged likely to have major scientific impact. For example, a project that by its nature is not innovative may be essential to advance a field.

    Significance

    Does the project address an important problem or a critical barrier to training miners in the Western United States? If the aims of the project are achieved, how will miner training be improved? How will successful completion of the aims change the concepts, methods, technologies, and services associated with miner training? Does the applicant institution have a record of related health and safety accomplishments for training development and delivery capacity? Is there a plan for interactions with other NIOSH-supported Miner Safety and Health Training Programs, organizations, and communities? Does the applicant describe the following?

    • Outcomes and impacts achieved
    • The institution’s capacity in mining safety and health or train-the-trainer programs
    • Effectiveness of its program delivery and dissemination.

    Does the project bring together the expertise of federal and non-federal researchers to accomplish public health efforts that would not otherwise occur, fulfilling the aim of a cooperative agreement? Is there a clear need for programmatic staff involvement from NIOSH during the performance of the proposed project? Is the cooperative agreement of sufficient priority to warrant the commitment of staff resources required for a collaborative effort during the term of the cooperative agreement award?

    For Renewal applications: In addition to the criteria above, is there sufficient information provided describing how the training program has achieved the goals of the previous funding period? Is there sufficient information on how the goals for future years build on the previous successes? Is there a plan for interactions with other NIOSH-supported Miner Safety and Health Training Programs, organizations, and communities? Does the applicant describe and provide evidence of the following?

    • Recent outcomes and impacts achieved
    • Adequate institutional capacity for and effectiveness in delivering programs in mining safety and health training or training the trainers.
    Investigator(s)

    Does the application provide sufficient evidence of the following features?

    • Experienced key personnel, with technical qualifications appropriate for this type of miner safety and health training
    • Expertise in educational and communication sciences and practice, supporting adult-based education techniques and delivery
    • An organizational structure providing adequate knowledge support to facilitate the program
    • Lines of responsibility and accountability, clearly delineated when two or more organizations are collaborating on an activity
    • Researchers/trainers with the skills and capacity to plan and execute a proactive training delivery subprogram, including new or existing channels of delivery and feedback (well beyond that of a passive, website-based delivery mechanism).

    For Renewal applications, does the past performance reflect successful recruitment and retention of qualified, motivated trainers? (Success may be determined by the number of successful trainees, training courses taught, presentations, training materials developed, and relevant publications.)

    Innovation

    Are there innovative, active training activities, channels, and partners that increase the likelihood of successful delivery, such as access to mines, community and training halls, and nontraditional training venues such as Tribal facilities? 

    Approach

    How adequate are the organization's or consortium's performance and effectiveness in planning, implementing, and operating appropriate miner safety and health training and education programs? Does the research/training plan describe use of appropriate, effective (and in various languages, if needed) adult education methods or techniques? Will these methods and techniques be used for identifying, describing, and accessing specific (target) worker populations? Are anticipated products and impact described, and are timeline or performance milestones measureable?

    Is the detailed program plan adequate for miner safety and health training, with regard to the following characteristics?

    • Adapting existing curricula
    • Training instructors
    • Distributing course materials
    • Directing worker training
    • Conducting program evaluations.

    Does the application describe and/or provide evidence of the following features?

    • Appropriate combinations of classroom or worksite instruction and hands-on    demonstration/instruction that simulates site activities and conditions
    • Train-the-trainer courses
    • Ability to immediately initiate direct miner safety and health training, program evaluation, and related support activities
    • Partnership agreements or procedures for assuring the long-term viability of the program as    provided in the letter of supports
    • Adequate plans for reaching underserved miner populations, especially those disadvantaged in      education, culture, language, literacy, and/or access to training.

    In addition, does the application define training and education needs that are specific to miners

    in the Western United States and provide supporting data from industry, unions, and miners?

    Does the applicant include a training evaluation plan that reflects appropriate evaluation questions, purposes, and methods for data collection, analysis, and reporting? Does the evaluation plan reflect the proposed project goals and objectives and utilize the most appropriate process and outcome measures to assess outputs and impacts? Does the application describe an evaluation plan to review and determine the quality, effectiveness, and short-term and long-term impacts of the training program? Will the plans for obtaining feedback from current and former trainees and for monitoring trainees’ career development and progression adequately measure the quality and effectiveness of the training program? Does the evaluation plan contain data related to tracking the productivity and effectiveness of training?

    If the project involves human subjects, do the plans address:1) the protection of human subjects from research risks, and 2) inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion or exclusion of children, justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed?

    Environment

    Will the project benefit from unique features in the training environment, types and experiences of miners, or collaborative arrangements? Are there appropriate facilities and equipment to support the described miner safety and health training and education activities, including hands-on instruction? Is there evidence that the operation of training facilities assures the protection of prospective trainees during program delivery? Are there appropriate policies and procedures for assuring fitness for training and medical clearance? Does the institution provide an adequate organization mission and adequate capacity for program evaluation?

    Additional Review Criteria

    As applicable for the project proposed, reviewers will evaluate the following additional items while determining scientific and technical merit, and in providing an overall impact score, but will not give separate scores for these items.

    Protections for Human Subjects

    For research that involves human subjects but does not involve one of the  categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate the justification for involvement of human subjects and the proposed protections from research risk relating to their participation according to the following five review criteria: 1) risk to subjects, 2) adequacy of protection against risks, 3) potential benefits to the subjects and others, 4) importance of the knowledge to be gained, and 5) data and safety monitoring for clinical trials.

    For research that involves human subjects and meets the criteria for one or more of the  categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate: 1) the justification for the exemption, 2) human subjects involvement and characteristics, and 3) sources of materials. For additional information on review of the Human Subjects section, please refer to the HHS/CDC Requirements under AR-1 Human Subjects Requirements.

    Inclusion of Women, Minorities, and Individuals Across the Lifespan 

    When the proposed project involves human subjects and/or NIH-defined clinical research, the committee will evaluate the proposed plans for the inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals of all ages (including children and older adults) to determine if it is justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed. For additional information on review of the Inclusion section, please refer to the policy on the Inclusion of Women and Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Research and the policy on the Inclusion of Persons Under 21 in Research.

    Vertebrate Animals

    The committee will evaluate the involvement of live vertebrate animals as part of the scientific assessment according to the following criteria: (1) description of proposed procedures involving animals, including species, strains, ages, sex, and total number to be used; (2) justifications for the use of animals versus alternative models and for the appropriateness of the species proposed; (3) interventions to minimize discomfort, distress, pain and injury; and (4) justification for euthanasia method if NOT consistent with the AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals. Reviewers will assess the use of chimpanzees as they would any other application proposing the use of vertebrate animals. For additional information on review of the Vertebrate Animals section, please refer to the Worksheet for Review of the Vertebrate Animal Section.

    Biohazards

    Reviewers will assess whether materials or procedures proposed are potentially hazardous to research personnel and/or the environment, and if needed, determine whether adequate protection is proposed.

    Renewals

    For Renewals, the committee will consider the progress made in the last funding period.

    Is there sufficient information provided describing how the training program has achieved the goals of the previous funding period? Is there sufficient information on how the goals for future years build on the previous successes? Is there a plan for interactions with other NIOSH-supported Miner Safety and Health Training Programs, organizations, and communities? Does the applicant describe and provide evidence of the following?

    • Recent outcomes and impacts achieved
    • Adequate institutional capacity for and effectiveness in delivering programs in mining safety and health training or training the trainers

    Does the past performance reflect successful recruitment and retention of qualified, motivated trainers? (Success may be determined by the number of successful trainees, training courses taught presentations, training materials developed, and relevant publications.)

    Revisions

    For Revisions, the committee will consider the appropriateness of the proposed expansion of the scope of the project. If the Revision application relates to a specific line of investigation presented in the original application that was not recommended for approval by the committee, then the committee will consider whether the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group are adequate and whether substantial changes are clearly evident.

    Additional Review Considerations

    As applicable for the project proposed, reviewers will consider each of the following items, but will not give scores for these items, and should not consider them in providing an overall impact score.

    Research to Practice. Reviewers will assess whether the applicant has demonstrated how their proposal addresses the research-to-practice (r2p https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/r2p/) initiative, particularly for training and education development and delivery to targeted miner groups.

    Outcomes and Outputs

    Reviewers will assess whether the applicant has provided sufficient information about the expected outcomes and outputs of the proposal and how this research and training will impact the field of occupational health and safety.

    Appendix materials

    Examples of materials that can be submitted as appendix materials may include syllabi for key courses, core courses and electives; including courses in Responsible Conduct of Research, retreat, seminar series, and other program activity agendas, and schedules, examples of forms used to document trainee progress and monitoring by the program, examples of materials used in recruitment and particularly recruitment to enhance diversity of the applicant pool, lists of meetings attended by students and their presentations and student biosketches.

    NORA Sectors and Health and Safety Cross-sectors: Does the applicant provide a statement about which NORA sector(s) and cross-sector(s) are being addressed and a rationale for how the proposal will contribute to the specified priority area?

    Applications from Foreign Organizations

    Not applicable.

    Select Agent Research

    Reviewers will assess the information provided in this section of the application, including 1) the Select Agent(s) to be used in the proposed research, 2) the registration status of all entities where Select Agent(s) will be used, 3) the procedures that will be used to monitor possession use and transfer of Select Agent(s), and 4) plans for appropriate biosafety, biocontainment, and security of the Select Agent(s).

    Resource Sharing Plans

    Reviewers will comment on whether the following Resource Sharing Plans, or the rationale for not sharing the following types of resources, are reasonable: (1) Data Sharing Plan; (2) Sharing Model Organisms; and (3)  Genomic Data Sharing Plan (GDS).

    CDC requires recipient for projects and programs that involve data collection or generation of data with federal funds to develop and submit a Data Management Plan (DMP) for each collection of public health data.

    Budget and Period of Support

    Reviewers will consider whether the budget and the requested period of support are fully justified and reasonable in relation to the proposed research.

    2. Review and Selection Process

    Applications will be evaluated for scientific and technical merit by (an) appropriate Scientific Review

    Group(s) convened by CDC/NIOSH, in accordance with NIOSH peer review and policy procedure using the stated review criteria. Assignment to a Scientific Review Group will be shown in the eRA Commons.

    As part of the scientific peer review, all applications:

    • May undergo a selection process in which only those applications deemed to have the highest scientific and technical merit (generally the top half of applications under review) will be discussed and assigned an overall impact score.

    Will receive a written critique.

    Applications will compete for available funds with all other recommended applications submitted in response to this NOFO. Following initial peer review, recommended applications will receive a second level of review. The following will be considered in making funding recommendations:

    • Geographic balance (training sites)
    • Degree to which vulnerable or underserved miner groups/workforces are addressed.
    • Proposed or current strength of partnerships (and delivery capacity potential) with NIOSH programs (commensurate with a cooperative agreement) and other agencies, in terms of likelihood of new synergy and impact
    • Commitment of the applicant institution to collaborative efforts
    • Availability of funds
    • Applications duplicating training provided by MSHA or OSHA training programs, or those developed by current NIOSH grantees will be found non-responsive.

    Appeals of initial peer review will not be accepted for applications submitted in response to this NOFO.

    3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

    After the peer review of the application is completed, the PD/PI will be able to access his or her Summary Statement (written critique) via the eRA Commons. Refer to Part 1 for dates for peer review, advisory council review, and earliest start date.

    Section VI. Award Administration Information
    1. Award Notices

    If the application is under consideration for funding, CDC/NIOSH will request "just-in-time" information from the applicant as described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

     A formal notification in the form of a Notice of Award (NoA) will be provided to the applicant organization for successful applications. The NoA signed by the grants management officer is the authorizing document and will be sent via email to the grantee’s business official.

    Recipients must comply with any funding restrictions described in Section IV.5. Funding Restrictions. Selection of an application for award is not an authorization to begin performance. Any costs incurred before receipt of the NoA are at the recipient's risk. Expanded authorities are authorized under this NOFO and will be specified in the recipient award notices issued under this NOFO.

    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

    All CDC/NIOSH cooperative agreement awards include the HHS Grants Policy Statement as part of the NoA.

    Overview of Terms and Conditions of Award and Requirements for Specific Types of Grants

    Administrative and National Policy Requirements, Additional Requirements (ARs) outline the

    administrative requirements found in 45 CFR Part 75 and the HHS Grants Policy Statement and

    other requirements as mandated by statute or CDC policy. Recipients must comply with

    administrative and national policy requirements as appropriate. For more information on the

    Code of Federal Regulations, visit the National Archives and Records Administration.

    Recipients of federal financial assistance (FFA) from HHS must administer their programs in compliance with federal civil rights law. This means that recipients of HHS funds must ensure equal access to their programs without regard to a person’s race, color, national origin, disability, age and, in some circumstances, sex and religion. This includes ensuring your programs are accessible to persons with limited English proficiency.  HHS recognizes that research projects are often limited in scope for many reasons that are nondiscriminatory, such as the principal investigator’s scientific interest, funding limitations, recruitment requirements, and other considerations. Thus, criteria in research protocols that target or exclude certain populations are warranted where nondiscriminatory justifications establish that such criteria are appropriate with respect to the health or safety of the subjects, the scientific study design, or the purpose of the research.

    Specific requirements that apply to this NOFO are the following:

    AR-1: Human Subjects Requirements

    AR-2: Inclusion of Women and Racial and Ethnic Minorities in Research

    AR-3: Animal Subjects Requirements

    AR-9: Paperwork Reduction Act Requirements

    AR-10: Smoke-Free Workplace Requirements

    AR-11: Healthy People 2020

    AR-12: Lobbying Restrictions

    AR-13: Prohibition on Use of CDC Funds for Certain Gun Control Activities

    AR-14: Accounting System Requirements

    AR-16: Security Clearance Requirement

    AR-21: Small, Minority, and Women-Owned Business

    AR-22: Research Integrity

    AR-24: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Requirements

    AR-25: Release and Sharing of Data

    AR-26: National Historic Preservation Act of 1966

    AR-28: Inclusion of Persons Under the Age of 21 in Research

    AR-29: Compliance with EO13513, “Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging while Driving,” October 1, 2009

    AR-30: Information Letter 10-006, Compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

    AR-31: Research Definition

    AR-32: FY 2012 Enacted General Provisions

    Organization Specific ARs:

    AR-8: Public Health System Reporting Requirements

    AR-15: Proof of Non-profit Status

    AR 23: Compliance with 45 C.F.R. Part 87

    To view brief descriptions of relevant CDC requirements visit: HHS/CDC Requirements.

    Additional Policy Requirements

    The following are additional policy requirements relevant to this NOFO:

    HHS Policy on Promoting Efficient Spending: Use of Appropriated Funds for Conferences and Meetings, Food, Promotional Items and Printing Publications This policy supports the Executive Order on Promoting Efficient Spending (EO 13589), the Executive Order on Delivering and Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government (EO 13576) and the Office of Management and Budget Memorandum on Eliminating Excess Conference Spending and Promoting Efficiency in Government (M-35-11). This policy apply to all new obligations and all funds appropriated by Congress. For more information, visit the HHS website .

    Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006. Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA), P.L. 109–282, as amended by section 6202 of P.L. 110–252, requires full disclosure of all entities and organizations receiving Federal funds including grants, contracts, loans and other assistance and payments through a single, publicly accessible website, USAspending.gov. For the full text of the requirements, please review the following website: Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act Subaward Reporting System.

    Plain Writing Act. The Plain Writing Act of 2010, Public Law 111-274 was signed into law on October 13, 2010. The law requires that federal agencies use "clear Government communication that the public can understand and use" and requires the federal government to write all new publications, forms, and publicly distributed documents in a "clear, concise, well-organized" manner. For more information on this law, go to: Law and Requirements.

    Pilot Program for Enhancement of Employee Whistleblower Protections. All applicants will be subject to a term and condition that applies the terms of 48 CFR section 3.908 to the award and requires that recipient inform their employees in writing (in the predominant native language of the workforce) of employee whistleblower rights and protections under 41 U.S.C. 4712.

    Copyright Interests Provision.This provision is intended to ensure that the public has access to the results and accomplishments of public health activities funded by CDC. Pursuant to applicable grant regulations and CDC’s Public Access Policy, Recipient agrees to submit into the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system an electronic version of the final, peer-reviewed manuscript of any such work developed under this award upon acceptance for publication, to be made publicly available no later than 12 months after the official date of publication. Also at the time of submission, Recipient and/or the Recipient’s submitting author must specify the date the final manuscript will be publicly accessible through PubMed Central (PMC). Recipient and/or Recipient’s submitting author must also post the manuscript through PMC within twelve (12) months of the publisher's official date of final publication; however the author is strongly encouraged to make the subject manuscript available as soon as possible. The recipient must obtain prior approval from the CDC for any exception to this provision.

    The author's final, peer-reviewed manuscript is defined as the final version accepted for journal publication, and includes all modifications from the publishing peer review process, and all graphics and supplemental material associated with the article. Recipient and its submitting authors working under this award are responsible for ensuring that any publishing or copyright agreements concerning submitted articles reserve adequate right to fully comply with this provision and the license reserved by CDC. The manuscript will be hosted in both PMC and the CDC Stacks institutional repository system. In progress reports for this award, recipient must identify publications subject to the CDC Public Access Policy by using the applicable NIHMS identification number for up to three (3) months after the publication date and the PubMed Central identification number (PMCID) thereafter.

    Language Access for Persons with Limited English Proficiency. Recipients of federal financial assistance from HHS must administer their programs in compliance with federal civil rights law. This means that recipients of HHS funds must ensure equal access to their programs without regard to a person’s race, color, national origin, disability, age and, in some circumstances, sex and religion. This includes ensuring your programs are accessible to persons with limited English proficiency. Recipients of federal financial assistance must take the reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to their programs by persons with limited English proficiency.

    Dual Use Research of Concern. On September 24, 2014, the US Government (USG) Policy for the Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern was released. Recipients (foreign and domestic) receiving CDC funding on or after September 24, 2015 are subject to this policy. Research funded by CDC involving the agents or toxins named in the policy, must be reviewed to determine if it involves one or more of the listed experimental effects and if so, whether it meets the definition of DURC. This review must be completed by an Institutional Review Entity (IRE) identified by the funded institution.

    Recipients also must establish an Institutional Contact for Dual Use Research (ICDUR). The award recipient must maintain records of institutional DURC reviews and completed risk mitigation plans for the term of the research grant, cooperative agreement or contract plus three years after its completion, but no less than eight years, unless a shorter period is required by law or regulation.

    If a project is determined to be DURC, a risk/benefit analysis must be completed. CDC will work collaboratively with the award recipient to develop a risk mitigation plan that the CDC must approve. The USG policy can be found at Dual Use Research of Concern.

    Non-compliance with this Policy may result in suspension, limitation, restriction or termination of USG funding, or loss of future USG funding opportunities for the non-compliant USG-funded research project and of USG funds for other life sciences research at the institution, consistent with research project and of USG funds for other life sciences research at the institution, consistent with existing regulations and policies governing USG funded research, and may subject the institution to other potential penalties under applicable laws and regulations.

    Data Management Plan(s)

    CDC requires that all new collections of public health data include a Data Management Plan (DMP). For purposes of this announcement, “public health data” means digitally recorded factual material commonly accepted in the scientific community as a basis for public health findings, conclusions, and implementation.

    This new requirement ensures that CDC is in compliance with the following; Office of Management and Budget (OMB) memorandum titled “Open Data Policy–Managing Information as an Asset” (OMB M-13-13); Executive Order 13642 titled “Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information”; and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum titled “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research” (OSTP Memo).

    The AR-25  outlines the components of a DMP and provides additional information for investigators regarding the requirements for data accessibility, storage, and preservation.

    Certificates of Confidentiality: Institutions and investigators are responsible for determining whether research they conduct is subject to Section 301(d) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act. Section 301(d), as amended by Section 2012 of the 21st Century Cures Act, P.L. 114-255 (42 U.S.C. 241(d)), states that the Secretary shall issue Certificates of Confidentiality (Certificates) to persons engaged in biomedical, behavioral, clinical, or other research activities in which identifiable, sensitive information is collected. In furtherance of this provision, CDC supported research commenced or ongoing after December 13, 2016 in which identifiable, sensitive information is collected, as defined by Section 301(d), is deemed issued a Certificate and therefore required to protect the privacy of individuals who are subjects of such research. Certificates issued in this manner will not be issued as a separate document, but are issued by application of this term and condition to this award. See Additional Requirement 36 to ensure compliance with this term and condition. The link to the full text is at: https://www.cdc.gov/grants/additionalrequirements/ar-36.html

    Cooperative Agreement Terms and Conditions of Award

    Principal Investigator (PI)

    The PDs/PIs (recipients) will have primary responsibility for the following elements:

    • Establish or enhance a Western Miner Safety and Health Training Program to promote a comprehensive training program that educates miners to reduce work-related health risk, promote health, and prevent disease and injury in the workplace
    • Define objectives and approaches; collect and analyze data; and publish results, interpretations, and conclusions of the trainings and studies conducted under the terms and conditions of the program award
    • Propose evaluation measures for activities conducted in support of all parts of this program, including process evaluation and outcome measures where feasible
    • Interface with NIOSH programmatic staff to insure the required collaborative effort during the term of the cooperative agreement award
    • Starting in Year 2, report annually the results of a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness and impact of the training program, with regard to changes in the following:
    • safety and health–relevant behavior
    • operational practices that reduce miner risks and reduce incidents
    • frequency and severity of injuries and illnesses
    • productivity and effectiveness of training and other indicators of performance
    • Retain custody of and have primary rights to the data and software developed under these awards, subject to Government rights of access consistent with current DHHS, PHS, and CDC policies
    • Develop the details of the research/training plan, which will be required to describe the technical approaches, target population, access and recruitment, curricula modification, training methodology, and program evaluation
    • Prepare written yearly progress reports and participate in regularly scheduled and/or ad hoc conference calls with NIOSH to review progress to date, review planned activities, and exchange ideas for future activities
    • Facilitate collaboration with investigators, partners, and institutions to share existing expertise and engage in joint interventions to advance the scientific evidence related to the Miner Safety and Health Training Program
    • Meet with NIOSH Scientific Program Official, NIOSH Project Scientist and other staff of the NIOSH Mining Program to review progress, share information, and coordinate training activities. The meeting will be a coordinated effort and should be held on an annual or bi-annual basis depending on the needs. For budget preparation, assume a full 1-day meeting and two nights lodging in either Atlanta, GA, Pittsburgh, PA or where the centers are located
    • Submit draft copies of training manuals, instructor guides, course curricula, and other materials developed for use in training activities supported by NIOSH to the Scientific Program Official for technical comments and suggestions regarding the adequacy, technical accuracy, and suitability of materials for miner training and education
    • Send to NIOSH, in approved electronic format, the final copies of all materials developed with support from NIOSH and made available to the public, subject to any specific legal caveats on use or copyright protection. Report is to be Federal Law 508 compliant for public use
    • Assign an individual the responsibility for information technology transfer and dissemination, to ensure effective communication and transfer of important training and administrative information to NIOSH Project Scientist. Such information may include trainee-related data, computation and submittal of training data, coordination of special meetings or conferences, submittal of training materials, and other training activities conducted by the program.

    NIOSH Scientific Program Official

    The assigned HHS/CDC/NIOSH Scientific Program Official will be responsible for the normal scientific and programmatic stewardship of the award and will be named in the Notice of Award.

    The NIOSH Scientific Program Official will have the primary responsibility for the following:

    • Grant management, programmatic, scientific, and stewardship responsibilities will be provided by the assigned NIOSH Scientific Program Official named in the notice of grant award. These responsibilities are inherently governmental and are separate from any substantial involvement with scientific and technical matters. This helps ensure that the sponsoring agency is appropriately managing the research and related activities of the recipient institution funded under a cooperative agreement as a federal assistance funding mechanism
    • Monitor and evaluate the activities, performance, and accomplishments of the recipient through conference calls, site visits, and review of project reports
    • Receive, review, and comment on draft materials and plans consistent with the section description immediately below, such as training materials, evaluation plan, and tools
    • Carry out administrative, scientific, and technical related duties such as grant cycle or funding information; programmatic approvals and recommendations; and consultation or technical assistance pertaining to administration requirement of award. Monitor and process Just-In-Time (JIT) information for research projects; approve final reports before release and distribution; communicate guidance and policy; facilitate budget recommendations; and disseminate recipient information such as the Annual Report and research reports
    • Provide guidance or information for addressing recipient inquiries.
    • Jointly convene a 1-day workshop meeting annually with recipients in cooperation with the NIOSH Project Scientist to review and share recipient information and products, discuss technical and coordination plans or issues, build partnership among the funded institutions, and coordinate partnership and/or training activities.

    NIOSH staff will have substantial programmatic involvement that is above and beyond the normal stewardship role in awards, as described below.

    NIOSH Project Scientist (Mining)

    A NIOSH Intramural Scientist will serve as a Project Scientist to provide substantial scientific involvement and subject matter expertise for health protection with policies, programs, and practices that promote safety and health, prevent disease, and advance health and safety training for miners in the Western United States. Specific responsibilities, in coordination with the NIOSH Scientific Program Official, may include the following:

    • Upon request of the award recipient, provide expert consultation in the area of occupational health protection with policies, programs, and practices that promote safety and health, prevent disease, and provide other occupational health– related functions and activities as needed
    • Serve as a subject matter expert for NIOSH
    • Provide technical assistance to recipients in support of their leadership and responsibility for Western mine workers’ health
    • Coordinate collaboration between NIOSH and the recipients in the creation of miner safety and health programs
    • Scientifically collaborate, upon request
    • With the Scientific Program Official, facilitate coordination and collaboration among recipients on meeting agendas, prevention activities, and opportunities as needed
    • Attend and actively participate in the planning and implementation of recipient meetings as needed
    • Help ensure consistent use and delivery of existing miner safety and health training materials
    • Facilitate collaborative efforts with NIOSH and others to compile and disseminate program results through presentations, publications, and other relevant channels
    • Review educational and training materials developed by the recipients for consistency, appropriateness, and technical accuracy
    • Provide technical assistance to recipients for evaluating the impact of the training on improving work practices, reducing work-related injury and illness, and increasing the understanding of safety and health practices in mining environments
    • Engage in quarterly communications with the recipients and the NIOSH Scientific Program Official
    • Assist NIOSH Scientific Program Official with convening a 1-day workshop meeting annually with recipients, to review and share recipient information and products, discuss technical and coordination plans or issues, build partnership among the funded institutions and between the funded institutions and NIOSH, and coordinate partnership and/or training activities.

    Areas of Joint Responsibility

    Joint responsibilities include participating in a conference or meeting to be held in conjunction with NIOSH and Partners to disseminate research findings and outcomes to the public health community and stakeholders.

    Business and Other Non-Programmatic Management

    The assigned CDC Grants Management Officer and Grants Management Specialist are responsible for managing the business, financial, other non-programmatic, and fiscal aspects of a cooperative agreement funded under this announcement. This includes compliance with statutes, regulations, guidelines, and policies for federal assistance awards and certain terms and conditions in the notice of grant award.

    Coordination, Communication, and Cooperation

    Federal agency personnel involved with all awards made under this announcement will work together cooperatively as a team to help ensure 1) proper stewardship of the funds awarded, 2) accurate and clear communications with the recipient(s), and 3) regular evaluation of recipient progress and performance toward completing the project on time and within budget.

    3. Reporting

    When multiple years are involved, recipients will be required to submit the Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) annually and financial statements as required in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

    A final RPPR, invention statement, and the expenditure data portion of the Federal Financial Report are required for closeout of an award, as described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

    Although the financial plans of the HHS/CDC CIO(s) provide support for this program, awards pursuant to this funding opportunity depend upon the availability of funds, evidence of satisfactory progress by the recipient (as documented in required reports) and the determination that continued funding is in the best interest of the Federal government.

    The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (Transparency Act), includes a requirement for recipients of Federal grants to report information about first-tier subawards and executive compensation under Federal assistance awards issued in FY2011 or later.

    Compliance with this law is primarily the responsibility of the Federal agency. However, two elements of the law require information to be collected and reported by recipients:

    1) Information on executive compensation when not already reported through the SAM Registration; and

    2) Similar information on all sub-awards/ subcontracts/ consortiums over $25,000. It is a requirement for recipients of Federal grants to report information about first-tier subawards and executive compensation under Federal assistance awards issued in FY2011 or later.

    All recipients of applicable CDC grants and cooperative agreements are required to report to the Federal Subaward Reporting System (FSRS) available at www.fsrs.gov on all subawards over

    $25,000. See the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

    In accordance with the regulatory requirements provided at 45 CFR 75.113 and Appendix XII to 45 CFR Part 75, recipients that have currently active Federal grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from all Federal awarding agencies with a cumulative total value greater than $10,000,000 for any period of time during the period of performance of a Federal award, must report and maintain the currency of information reported in the System for Award Management (SAM) about civil, criminal, and administrative proceedings in connection with the award or performance of a  Federal award that reached final disposition within the most recent five-year period.  The recipient must also make semiannual disclosures regarding such proceedings. Proceedings information will be made publicly available in the designated integrity and performance system (currently FAPIIS).  This is a statutory requirement under section 872 of Public Law 110-417, as amended (41 U.S.C. 2313).  As required by section 3010 of Public Law 111-212, all information posted in the designated integrity and performance system on or after April 15, 2011, except past performance reviews required for Federal procurement contracts, will be publicly available.  Full reporting requirements and procedures are found in Appendix XII to 45 CFR Part 75 – Award Term and Conditions for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters.


    Submission of Reports

    The Recipient Organization must provide CDC/NIOSH the following reports:

    Yearly Non-Competing Grant Progress Report is due 90 to 120 days before the end of the current budget period. The RPPR (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/rppr/index.htm;

    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/rppr/rppr_instruction_guide.pdf) is to be completed on the eRA Commons website. The progress report will serve as the non-competing continuation application. Although the financial plans of the HHS/CDC CIO(s) provide support for this program, awards pursuant to this funding opportunity are contingent upon the availability of funds, evidence of satisfactory progress by the recipient (as documented in required reports) and the determination that continued funding is in the best interest of the Federal government.

    Annual Federal Financial Report (FFR) SF 425 is required and must be submitted through eRA Commons within 90 days after the end of the calendar quarter in which the budget period ends. The FFR should only include those funds authorized and disbursed during the timeframe covered by the report. The final FFR must indicate the exact balance of unobligated funds and may not reflect any unliquidated obligations. There must be no discrepancies between the final FFR expenditure data and the Payment Management System's (PMS) cash transaction data.
    Failure to submit the required information in a timely manner may adversely affect the future funding of this project. If the information cannot be provided by the due date, you are required to submit a letter explaining the reason and date by which the Grants Officer will receive the information.

    Recipients must submit closeout reports in a timely manner. Unless the Grants Management Officer (GMO) of the awarding Institute or Center approves an extension, recipients must submit a final FFR, final progress report, and Final Invention Statement and Certification within 90 days of the end of grant period. Failure to submit timely and accurate final reports may affect future funding to the organization or awards under the direction of the same Project Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI).

    FFR (SF 425) instructions for CDC recipients are now available

    at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms/report_on_grant/federal_financial_report_ffr.htm. For further information, contact GrantsInfo@nih.gov. Additional resources concerning the eFSR/FFR system, including a User Guide and an on-line demonstration, can be found on the eRA Commons Support Page: https://grants.nih.gov/support/index.html.

    Annual Report
    Each recipient is required to submit an Annual Report to the NIOSH Program Official and the NIOSH Project Scientist. The report is submitted by October of each year. This should include the number, location, and nature of all training activities and the characteristics of the trainees reached during a particular budget period. Results and findings from training program evaluations will be summarized by each recipient and submitted on an annual basis. To the extent feasible, the program evaluation reports shall quantitatively describe the current status of instructor effectiveness, trainee retention of knowledge and skills, and positive impacts of training activities on work practices, workplace safety and health conditions, and overall worker protection from on-the-job hazards. The annual report should also include narrative descriptions of high-impact outcomes of individual programs that are noteworthy. Specific guidance on report content will be provided by NIOSH.

    Final Report

    The final progress report, invention statement, equipment/inventory report, and final FFR are required 90 days after the end of the project period.

    Final reports should provide sufficient detail for CDC to determine if the stated outcomes for the funded research have been achieved and if the research findings resulted in public health impact based on the investment.

    Specific guidance for the final report and annual outcome update is available on the NIOSH OEP website (https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/oep/grants.html ) under Grant Closeout.

    Additional Reporting Requirements

    Table of annual trainings: A table detailing statistics about the training. The description should include information about the type of course, number of courses, number of participants, training hours among others.

    Successes: A description of progress on completing activities outlined in the work plan and any additional successes achieved in the past year (identified through evaluation results or lessons learned, for instance).

    Challenges: A description of any challenges that might affect the ability to achieve annual and project-period outcomes, conduct performance measures, or complete the activities in the work plan, plus additional challenges encountered in the past year (identified through evaluation results or lessons learned, for instance).

    Outputs, Outcomes, and Research to Practice (r2p): Provide in the purpose section of each progress report a brief statement about expected outputs, outcomes, and/or r2p of the project.

    Section VII. Agency Contacts

    We encourage inquiries concerning this funding opportunity and welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants.

    Application Submission Contacts

    eRA Service Desk (Questions regarding ASSIST, eRA Commons, application errors and warnings, documenting system problems that threaten submission by the due date, and post-submission issues)

    Finding Help Online: http://grants.nih.gov/support/ (preferred method of contact)
    Telephone: 301-402-7469 or 866-504-9552 (Toll Free)

    General Grants Information (Questions regarding application instructions, application processes, and NIH grant resources)
    Email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov (preferred method of contact)
    Telephone: 301-945-7573

    Grants.gov Customer Support (Questions regarding Grants.gov registration and Workspace)
    Contact Center Telephone: 800-518-4726
    Email: support@grants.gov

    Scientific/Research Contact(s)

    Maria Lioce, MD
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Telephone: 404-498-2575
    Email: MLioce@cdc.gov

    Peer Review Contact(s)

    Michael Goldcamp, PhD
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Telephone: 304-285-5951
    Email: MGoldcamp@cdc.gov

    Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

    Ferrinnia (Toni) Augustus-High, MSA, CGMS
    Grants Management Specialist/Officer (GMS/GMO)
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Office of the Chief Operating Officer (OCOO)
    Office of Financial Resources (OFR)
    Office of Grants Services (OGS) - Branch II – Research
    Telephone: (770) 488-2703
    Email: FAugustusHigh@cdc.gov

    Section VIII. Other Information
    Authority and Regulations

    Awards are made under the authorization of Sections of the Public Health Service Act as amended and under the Code Federal Regulations.

    This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance and is not subject to the intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems Agency Review. Awards are made under the authorization of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Section 20(a) and 21(a) (29 USC 669(a) and 29 USC 670); Federal Mine Safety and Health Act, Section 501(a), 30 USC 1 (Note), and 30 USC 951(a); and Section 301 of the Public Health Service Act as amended (42 USC 241) and under Federal Regulations 42 CFR Part 52. All awards are subject to 45 CFR Part 75, the terms and conditions, cost principles, and other considerations described in the HHS Grants Policy Statement.

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