Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Climate Change and Health
Notice Number:
NOT-ES-22-006

Key Dates

Release Date:

June 1, 2022

First Available Due Date:
July 08, 2022
Expiration Date:
May 08, 2025

Related Announcements

PA-20-183– Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-185 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PA-20-184 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-187- NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-188- NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PA-20-189 - NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

PA-20-194- NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-195- NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PA-20-196 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

PA-20-200- NIH Small Research Grant Program (Parent R03 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) 

PA-20-205 - Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (Parent K23 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PA-20-206 - Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (Parent K23 Independent Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-248- Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Fellowship for Students at Institutions with NIH-Funded Institutional Predoctoral Dual-Degree Training Programs (Parent F30)

PA-20-251- Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (Parent F31-Diversity)

PA-21-048- Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship (Parent F32)

PA-21-051- Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31)

PA-21-221– NICHD Small Research Grant Program (R03 Clinical Trial Required) 

PAR-18-896 - NLM Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-19-374 - Complex Integrated Multi-Component Projects in Aging Research (U19 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-20-060 - NIDCR Prospective Observational or Biomarker Validation Study Cooperative Agreement (U01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR-20-150 - NIMHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 - Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-104 - International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01 - Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR-21-105 - International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01 - Independent Clinical Trial Required)

PAR-21-120 - Global Infectious Disease Research Training Program (D43 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-246- HIV-associated Non-Communicable Diseases Research at Low- and Middle-Income Country Institutions (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-251 - Emerging Global Leader Award (K43 Independent Clinical Trial Required)

PAR-21-252 - Emerging Global Leader Award (K43 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR-21-303 - Mobile Health: Technology and Outcomes in Low and Middle Income Countries (R21/R33 - Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-344- Interventions for Stigma Reduction to Improve HIV/AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care in Low- and Middle- Income Countries (R01 Clinical Trials Optional)

PAR-22-093 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-22-094 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-22-097- Global Brain and Nervous System Disorders Research Across the Lifespan (R01 Clinical Trials Optional)

PAR-22-098 - Global Brain and Nervous System Disorders Research Across the Lifespan (R21 Clinical Trials Optional)

PAR-22-104 - Chronic, Non-Communicable Diseases and Disorders Across the Lifespan: Fogarty International Research Training Award (NCD-LIFESPAN) (D43 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-22-362 NIA Renewal and Competing Revision Cooperative Agreements in Aging Research (U01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PA-22-119 - Limited Competition: Small Grant Program for NIAMS K01, K08, K23, and K25 Recipients (R03) (Clinical Trials Not Allowed)

NOT-TW-20-007 - Notice of NIH participation in the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Program

RFA-HG-20-037 - Advancing Genomic Medicine Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

RFA-HG-20-036 - Advancing Genomic Medicine Research (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Issued by

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Fogarty International Center (FIC)

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)

Purpose

The National Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS), in partnership with Fogarty International Center (FIC), National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), National Heart Blood and Lung Institute (NHBLI) and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) is leading an NIH-wide Climate Change and Health Initiative (CCHI) with the goals of: reducing the health threats posed by climate change across the lifespan; improving the health of people who are at increased risk from or disparately affected by climate change impacts; and building health resilience among individuals, communities, Tribal Nations, and nations around the world, thereby increasing health equity. As a part of this CCHI, this NOSI encourages applications that address the impact of climate change on health and well-being over the life course, including the health implications of climate change in the United States and globally.

Background
Climate change poses substantial threats to human health across the life span. These threats influence health concerns including communicable and non-communicable diseases, injuries, hazardous exposures, mental health, and death. Health outcomes can be affected directly by climate change through weather events such as extreme heat, wildfires, droughts, storm surges, and floods, and indirectly through a series of exposure pathways that include air and water quality, food quality, infectious diseases, and population displacement events. Exposure pathways are influenced by environmental contexts related to land use, geography, infrastructure, and agriculture, as well as social, behavioral, and economic contexts that create vulnerabilities associated with life stage, gender, poverty, discrimination, and access to care.

The elevated threats to human health from climate change occur across a wide range of illnesses and injuries, including: asthma, respiratory allergies and airway diseases, cancers, cardiovascular disease and stroke, foodborne diseases and decreased nutrition, heat-related illness and deaths, reproductive, birth outcome, and developmental effects, mental health and neurological disorders, vector borne and zoonotic diseases, waterborne diseases, and extreme weather-related morbidity and mortality. Understanding the health implications – including potential health benefits -- of actions to prevent, mitigate, and adapt to climate change offers opportunities to improve the social and environmental determinants of health, especially for at-risk communities.

As with many health outcomes, populations including children, older adults, women and pregnant women, and persons with disabilities, among others, may be disproportionally at risk. Strong evidence indicates that climate change disproportionately adversely affects communities that experience social , and environmental vulnerabilities. Such communities could include American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian Americans, Blacks/African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders, sexual and gender minorities, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, underserved rural populations, and those unduly burdened by exposure to environmental pollution. In the United States and globally, structural racism and discrimination contribute to the higher risk from health impacts of climate change.  

This list of influences, pathways, and health outcomes is not comprehensive, and the variability of these influences on health creates challenges for attribution to climate change. While the burden of disease attributable to climate change has not yet been reliably estimated, indicators point to a reversal of long-term U.S. and global trends of improvements in population health due to climate change. As the impact of climate change on human health increases, attribution becomes less important than intervention.  

The NIH Climate Change and Health Initiative Strategic Framework summarizes the initial planning and development of an NIH-wide research initiative on the impacts of climate change on people’s health. The goal of the NIH-wide Climate Chance and Health Initiative is to support research and training that reduce health threats from climate change across the lifespan and build health resilience in individuals, communities, and nations around the world, especially among those at highest risk. High priority applications will focus on NIH-priority populations and propose transdisciplinary research that falls broadly into the Core Elements and Supporting Areas of Science outlined in the Strategic Framework.  

Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • Approaches to understanding health impacts posed by climate change as well as climate change mitigation and adaptation actions
  • Research developing a scientific evidence base of the effects of climate change on biological systems, including through animal models or data modeling
  • Leveraging existing cohort studies or other ongoing research studies across the lifespan to understand the health implications of climate change including natural experiments
  • Health-related exposures, risks and harms associated with climate change that disproportionately affect populations that experience health disparities, populations experiencing lower SES, under-resourcedcommunities, and/or other historically disadvantaged communities and other vulnerable groups (e.g., children, older adults, women, pregnant women, persons with disabilities, persons with preexisting health conditions) in the United States and internationally
  • Evaluation of policies, programs, and interventions aimed at behavior change to prevent climate change and reduce the negative effects of climate change on health
  • Solutions-based research on climate change and human health including biomedical, behavioral, and health intervention strategies (e.g., strategies to address malnutrition, food security, vaccine development, vector management, water treatment) that address climate induced changes in disease and community needs
  • Social and behavioral science research to understand individual or population level adaptation, including migration and displacement, to climate change related threats including biomedical, behavioral, and health intervention strategies that can help to strengthen individual and community-level resilience
  • Implementation science and health systems approaches to scale-up and spread the delivery of tools and health services to communities affected by climate change events
  • Approaches for the rapid assessment of existing health related intervention/mitigation/adaptation strategies for use in time sensitive situations (e.g., following extreme weather events)
  • Research on digital and non-digital solutions to prevent injury, illness, or toxicant exposures, enhance access to health services; ensure equitable access to health services; and build resilience
  • Research that collects, measures, organizes and analyzes diverse Big Data streams to improve the quality and harmonization of data on climate change and human health
  • Data infrastructure (e.g. standards, common data elements, repositories, platforms) that facilitates national and international data sharing in support of research
  • Research that leverages international collaborations to enhance public health surveillance and research in the U.S. or in Low and Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs)
  • Research that addresses environmental injustice and fosters resilience through the identification and engagement of key stakeholders and disciplines in health equity-related research on climate change
  • Approaches to develop community-based interventions and strategies that address structural racism and discrimination to build resilience to the impacts of climate change, including ethical issues and approaches to conducting research in and with communities impacted by climate change
  • Strategies for transparent, equitable, and timely dissemination of research findings on climate change and human health to policy makers, clinicians, and those communities most affected
  • Communication approaches to facilitate understanding and action on of the effects of climate change on human health across multiple sectors (e.g., health care, transportation, labor/occupational, education, energy)

NIH’s broad scientific expertise situates it in a unique position to tackle the complex set of factors that coalesce in the problem of climate change impacts on health. NIH is made up of 27 Institutes and Centers (ICs), each with a specific research mission and priorities. Listed below are IC specific CCH interest areas.

NIEHS

The mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to discover how the environment affects people to promote healthier lives. The NIEHS is interested in supporting research that addresses the impact of climate change on environmental health and innovative approaches to the development of prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the impacts of climate change on environmental health, particularly in communities most susceptible to these impacts Examples of environmental exposures relevant to the mission of the NIEHS include, but are not limited to, industrial chemicals or manufacturing byproducts, e-waste, metals, pesticides, herbicides, and inhaled toxicants, extreme weather, and the environmental impacts of natural and man-made disasters. NIEHS supports research on climate change and health that examines the interplay between environmental exposures and individual and structural-level (e.g., structural racism) social determinants of health.
Climate and health topics of particular interest to NIEHS include (but are not limited to):

  • Cumulative health risks of multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors across the lifespan (i.e., accumulating burden of climate-driven exposures during critical windows of susceptibility)
  • Mechanistic research using in vitro, in vivo, and new fundamental research methods particularly for understudied exposures (e.g., criteria air pollutants and air toxics other than ozone and particulate matter)
  • Community-engaged, solutions-focused climate justice research in communities experiencing a disproportionate burden of impact (i.e., prevention, adaptation, intervention, and implementation approaches to minimize the health impacts of climate change)
  • Natural disaster research (e.g., air pollution from wildfires, toxic chemicals in flood waters, changes in fungicide, pesticide or fertilizer use due to associated drought conditions or flooding events, or exposure to harmful conditions during post-disaster clean up).
  • Exposures of emerging concern (e.g., changes in the toxicity of micro/nanoplastics or harmful algal blooms in fresh and salt water in response to climate change conditions)
  • Intersection of the built, physical/chemical, and social environments (e.g., frequent flooding promotes mold in buildings, increases exposure to toxic chemicals in floodwaters and high poverty areas with fewer resources for safe clean up and improved flood water management).

NCI

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research and training efforts to improve cancer prevention, reduce the risk, incidence, and deaths from cancer, and enhance the quality of life of cancer survivors. The NCI is interested in supporting research relevant to advancing the understanding of the effects of climate change on cancer risks, control, and survivorship, and ways to prevent or mitigate negative health effects. Given that the impacts of climate change vary by geographic region and social and economic circumstances, the NCI is particularly interested in supporting research with consideration for populations that experience cancer health disparities and are likely to experience a disproportionate burden of effects from a changing climate. Priority areas include, but are not limited to, observational and/or interventional research examining:

  • Physical, chemical, and biological exposures related to climate change and cancer etiology and outcomes.
  • Health equity and social determinants of disease related to climate change and climate change mitigation and adaptation.
  • The impact of climate change on cancer recurrence or potential latent effects that could occur in childhood cancer survivors.
  • Disruption of cancer care access and delivery due to climate change or public-health related emergencies with climate change implications.
  • Susceptibility of cancer patients and survivors to climate change effects, such as the spread of vector borne disease.
  • Management of symptoms due to cancer treatment-related toxicities that are exacerbated by the effects of climate change.
  • Research on behavioral change and health communication interventions linked to cancer control and climate change adaptation or mitigation such as adoption of plant-based diets and increased physical activity through use of active transportation.
  • Implementation science to enhance the adoption and integration of effective interventions, tools, programs, and policies to prevent or mitigate the health consequences of climate change, including disaster response interventions, forecasting systems, preparedness plans, or others.
  • Studies that leverage geospatial and health informatics data to investigate the effects of climate change on cancer-related risk factor behaviors (e.g., reduced physical activity, poor nutrition, increased UV exposure).

NIDCR

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) supports multidisciplinary research to understand the direct and/or indirect impact of climate change (i.e. climate-induced changes on human health and/or supplies of food, water, housing, and health care) on disparities and inequities of dental, oral, and craniofacial diseases, conditions, and care access. In addition, NIDCR has interests in research that examines strategies to enhance resilience of communities and/or populations disproportionately affected by dental, oral and craniofacial health disparities and inequities at the time of climate-induced public health emergencies.

NIMH

As the lead federal agency for research on mental disorders, NIMH is interested in the following areas:

  • Reliable models of the impact of climate change and specific extreme weather events on mental health
  • Establish guidelines for evidence-based practices related to climate events and associated disasters with support from global health authorities
  • Development of interventions (e.g., telehealth) to enable effective delivery of mental health services to communities during specific extreme weather events as well as in response to climate change more generally.
  • Development of surveillance systems to remotely assess mental health status, change in symptoms, or clinical function for psychiatric indications, in communities affected by climate change including extreme weather events.
  • Basic mechanistic neuroscience studies of persistent effects of the direct and indirect impacts of climate change on brain signaling, circuits, and proximal effects on functional processes such as cognition that are impaired in mental illnesses.
  • Research to illuminate the mechanisms by which climate change may lead to specific mental health conditions including but not limited to possible increase in suicide and self-harm risk during periods of high ambient temperatures and heat waves, potential increase in all-cause death for people with serious mental illness (SMI) especially those treated with anti-psychotics during periods of high ambient temperature and heat waves.
  • Research to understand the neurobiological basis of the impact of climate change on specific domains of functions relevant to mental health, as p pinformed by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach.
  • Research to decrease the burden of acute and chronic psychiatric complications due to climate change.
  • Research to Identify extra-individual level factors and/or social and structural determinants of health (e.g., interpersonal, community factors, and societal determinants) associated with resiliency during climate-induced humanitarian crises.
  • Identification of targets for intervention for those living with mental illness, particularly serious mental illness, during climate-induced humanitarian crises.
  • Develop surveillance systems for mobile populations to facilitate the development of mental health services with features (convenient location, open hours, etc.) conducive to use by mobile/migrating populations during climate-induced humanitarian crises.

NIMHD

The mission of the NIMHD is to lead scientific research to improve minority health and reduce health disparities. NIMHD focuses on all aspects of health and health care for racial and ethnic minority populations in the U.S. and the full continuum of health disparity causes as well as the interrelation of these causes. NIMHD projects must include a focus on one or more of the following populations that NIH-designates as experiencing health disparities in the United States and its territories: African Americans, Latinos/Hispanics, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, less privileged socioeconomic groups, underserved rural populations, and sexual and gender minorities. Comparison groups/populations may also be included as appropriate for the research questions posed. NIMHD encourages projects that use approaches encompassing multiple domains of influence (e.g., biological, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, physical environment, health system) and multiple levels of influence (e.g., individual, interpersonal, family, peer group, community, societal) to understand and address health disparities (see the NIMHD Research Framework, https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/about/overview/research-framework.html, for more information). Studies focusing on building resilience to reduce or deter the effects of climate change among populations who experience health disparities are encouraged. Studies using animal models or studies based outside the U.S. or its territories will not be supported by NIMHD under this NOSI.

NINDS

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) will accept applications that study the effect of Climate Change on the development, progression, and recovery of neurological disorders across the lifespan. This includes environmental effects of climate change that affect neurological disorders within the NINDS mission (see NINDS). Applications with a primary focus on climate change and health outside of the United States (U.S.) would be considered non-responsive to this funding announcement. Applications that propose research on toxins or other factors that are not related to climate change will also be considered non-responsive to this funding announcement. Applications that build on existing programs and cohorts involving at-risk groups and underserved populations in the U.S. are encouraged. We are accepting applications from the following announcements: PA-20-184 Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required), PA-20-185 NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed), PA-20-196 NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required), PA-20-195 NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed). Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NINDS Scientific/Research staff prior to their submission to discuss the responsiveness of their application.

NLM

The National Library of Medicine, the largest biomedical library in the world, is committed to meeting the evolving needs of the research and clinical communities and to serve the public at large. The NLM's research in information science, informatics, and data science is focused on meeting the challenges of this rapidly changing biomedical space. The NLM areas of research interest include: representation, organization and retrieval of biomedical and biological data and images; enhancement of human intellectual capacities through virtual reality, dynamic modeling, artificial intelligence, and machine learning; medical decision-making; linguistic analyses for natural language processing and understanding; informatics topics relevant to public health and informatics for disaster management. The NLM is dedicated to training the next generation of data scientists and informaticists while focusing on providing accurate knowledge and resources to communities and individuals, especially those with health disparities.

NIA

NIA is interested in understanding the behavioral, biological, and socioecological processes related to climate change and extreme weather that affect the health and wellbeing of older individuals, as examined in human and/or animals. Applicants are encouraged to consider innovative methods and research designs to facilitate studies within groups (e.g., racial/ethnic) as well as between groups, recognizing within-group heterogeneity in individuals’ access to resources and lived experiences. Applicants should reference the NIA Health Disparities Research Framework. Research topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The impacts of climate change and extreme weather on health and/or well-being, pace of aging, and aging-related physiological processes (e.g., immune function, circadian rhythm, etc.) across the life span.
  • Interactions or additive effects on rates of aging due to environmental exposures or changing environmental hazards (e.g., particulates endocrine disrupters, residuals from manufacturing or other toxins, or extreme weather) on molecular, cellular, and physiological perturbations that impact health and/or well-being across the lifespan.
  • Interactions or additive effects of environmental exposures or changing environmental hazards (e.g., heightened amounts of air pollutants, extreme heat or cold) on affective, social, and cognitive functions over the life course, as well as effects on brain health across the lifespan.
  • Midlife and older adult health promotion, adaptation, and resilience in the face of climate change and in the aftermath of extreme weather events.
  • Effects of extreme weather events or changing environmental hazards on older adults from diverse racial, ethnic, sexual and gender minority, physical disability, and socially disadvantaged backgrounds effectively managing health conditions (e.g., diabetes, cholesterol, weight management, various types of arthritis, etc.) and any untold financial burden that may be exacerbated by changes in the environment.
  • Functional abilities in midlife and older adult populations (e.g., day-to-day activities, physical limitations, sensory deficits, etc.) in the context of climate change or extreme weather conditions.
  • The impact of age-related change in affective, social, and cognitive factors on individual responses to climate change, and on how individuals initiate and maintain the behavior changes needed for preparedness and adaptation to extreme weather events.
  • The contribution of extreme weather events and related natural disasters, to social structure and social adversity, and their effects on aging processes across the life course, in studies of animals in their natural habitats.
  • Health services delivery and healthcare infrastructure preparedness in the context of climate change and extreme weather events.
  • Health care policies that may promote or sustain adopting preventive measures taken to mitigate overall rates of mortality or morbidity among older adults from diverse racial, ethnic, sexual and gender minority, physical disability, and socially disadvantaged backgrounds that are associated with or caused by extreme weather events or changing environmental hazards.
  • Cross-national analyses of nationally representative data, particularly analyses that include low- and middle-income countries, including data from the US Health and Retirement Study (HRS), International Family of HRS studies, and the Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) available in the HRS and several international studies to measure cognitive outcomes.
  • Studies on organizational policies and practices for reducing healthcare facilities’ and systems’ emission contribution to climate change.
  • Policy, economic, and systems analysis research towards system changes for preparedness or response to climate change and extreme weather events.
  • Studies that develop, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of communication or educational resources about health impacts of climate change for specific older adult populations or stakeholders, including individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and individuals and institutions that provide care for these individuals.

NIAID

The NIAID mission is to conduct and support basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. Climatic variations are known to be associated with changes in incidence, prevalence, and severity of multiple infectious and allergic diseases.  For this Notice, areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Research on populations affected by allergic and infectious diseases likely to change in incidence or prevalence due to climate change, including epidemiological studies to evaluate the likely effects of climate change on the burden of these diseases. 
  • Research to elucidate the effects of climate change-associated variations on the exposure of populations to allergens, especially aeroallergens, and on physiologic and pathologic responses to them.
  • Research on the impact of environmental and ecologic factors affected by climate change on the breeding, size, distribution, range and/or spread of populations of insect vectors of human disease or intermediate hosts of pathogens responsible for human disease.
  • Research on the impact of climate change on vector competence, e.g., the impact of changes in temperature on pathogen replication and/or transmissibility, and on human-vector contact.
  • Research on the impact of climate change-associated variations (e.g., in environmental and ecologic conditions) on the reproductive capacity, virulence, transmissibility and epidemiology of pathogenic microbes. 
  • Research to develop and evaluate models of the effects of climate adaptations in infrastructure on zoonotic, food-, water-, and vector-borne disease incidence and prevalence.
  • Research to improve understanding of the impacts of climate-associated changes in humidity, water temperature, salinity, on water-borne pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Entamoeba histolytica, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Giardia, Isospora, microsporidia, Naegleria, diarrhea-associated adenoviruses, rotavirus, caliciviruses, Salmonella, Shigella spp., and Vibrio spp.
  • Research to assess the interactions among climate drivers [such as ecosystem changes (e.g., flooding, severe weather, drought) and water quality] and enteric pathogens, and to prevent or reduce transmission of water-borne pathogens, e.g.,
    • Flooding associated with dispersion of enteric pathogens
    • Drought associated with concentration of enteric pathogens
    • Water safety at sites (environmental, recreational, or drinking waters) affected by climate drivers.
  • Research to increase understanding of the impacts of climate change on drinking water infrastructure and enhanced risks of waterborne diseases, e.g.,
    • Clean water shortages and changes in agriculture practices
    • Use of sewage contaminated water for irrigation and flooding of sewage systems caused by excessive rainfall, that alter the epidemiology of zoonoses and enteropathogenic disease.
  • Research on enteric pathogen burden in wastewaters to develop strategies for management of infectious disease outbreaks.

NINR

NINR identified five complementary and synergistic research lenses that leverage the strengths of nursing research and promote multilevel approaches, cross-disciplinary and -sectoral collaboration, and community engagement in research.  The research lenses are:

  • Health Equity: Reduce and Ultimately Eliminate the Systemic and Structural Inequities that Place Some at an Unfair, Unjust, and Avoidable Disadvantage in Attaining Their Full Health Potential.
  • Social Determinants of Health: Identify Effective Approaches to Improve Health and Quality of Life by Addressing the Conditions in Which People are Born, Live, Learn, Work, Play and Age.
  • Population and Community Health:  Address Critical Health Challenges at a Macro Level That Persistently Affect Groups of People With Shared Characteristics.
  • Prevention and Health Promotion: Prevent Disease and Promote Health Through the Continuum of Prevention – From Primordial to Tertiary.
  • Systems and Models of Care:  Address Clinical, Organizational, and Policy Challenges Through New Systems and Models of Care.

These lenses are perspectives through which to consider the full spectrum of nursing research topics that encompass health and illness within the context of people’s lived experiences.  Researchers can apply a single or a combination of lenses in their study designs and training programs.  For addressing the effects of climate change on health, the NINR encourages researchers to view the health equity and social determinants of health lenses as primary foci through which to consider the population and community health, prevention and health promotion, and systems and models of care lenses.  More details about NINR’s priorities can be found here.

NHLBI

NHLBI is restricting our interest in this NOSI to two funding announcements: PA-20-185- Research Project Grant (Parent R01Clinical Trial Not Allowed) and PA-20-183- Research Project Grant (Parent R01Clinical Trial Required). NHLBI only allows mechanistic clinical trials and fundamental and basic experimental studies involving humans (BESH) via the parent R01, Clinical Trial Required FOA (PA-20-183) or its reissue. Efficacy Clinical Trial applications in response to this NOSI submitted to NHLBI via the Parent R01, Clinical Trial Required FOA (PA-20-183) or its reissue will be withdrawn. Applicants interested in submitting an efficacy clinical trial to NHLBI should refer tothe NHLBI's suite of available Clinical Trial Funding Opportunity Announcements located at:https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/grants-and-training/clinical-trial-development-continuum.

Applicants who want to submit clinical trials are strongly encouraged to discuss potential applications with the NHLBI Scientific/Research Contact in the listed below prior to submission.

NHLBI Mission

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) provides global leadership for a research, training, and education program to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, and blood diseases and enhance the health of all individuals so that they can live longer and more fulfilling lives.

Priority Areas include but are not limited to these examples:

  • Research developing a scientific evidence base for HLBS disorders of the effects of climate change on biological systems, including through animal models or data modeling
  • Approaches to understanding impacts on heart, lung, blood and sleep (HLBS) disorders (e.g., hospitalizations from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and risk factors (e.g., extreme heat) for HLBS disorders posed by climate change as well as climate change mitigation and adaptation actions
  • Develop more accurate behavioral and biological models of the potential HLBS health risks from climate change
  • Leveraging existing individual or consortium of cohort studies or other ongoing human research studies across the lifespan to understand the implications on heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders from climate change including natural experiments. This may involve data integration of health data with geospatial CCH exposure data with social determinants of health
  • Developing climate change valid prediction models (e.g., school absenteeism) for the HLBS disorders (e.g., sickle cell crises or childhood asthma) and the predictions of the impact of interventions (e.g., tree planting) including policy changes (e.g., improved ventilation systems)
  • HLBS-related exposures, risks and harms (e.g., myocardial infarctions) associated with climate change that disproportionately affect minority health populations with health disparities, and/or other historically disadvantaged communities and other vulnerable groups (e.g.,, children, older adults, women, pregnant women, persons with disabilities, persons with preexisting health conditions) in the United States and internationally
  • Evaluation (e.g., barriers, facilitators and benefits) of personal, family and community interventions, programs and policies, aimed at behavior change to prevent climate change related HLBS disorder, increase reliance, reduce the negative effects of climate change on HLBS disorders thereby increasing health equity.
  • Characterize the variation in the state and regional policies in the United States to investigate the relationship between the variation in CCH mitigation or adaption practices or policies and the occurrence of adverse HLBS health outcomes
  • Intervention research on climate change and HLBS disorders or HLBS risk factors including biomedical, behavioral, and health intervention strategies (e.g., strategies to address malnutrition, food security,) that address climate induced changes in HLBS disease and community needs
  • Social and behavioral science research to understand individual or population level adaptation, including migration and displacement, to climate change related threats including biomedical, behavioral, and health intervention strategies that can help to strengthen individual and community-level resilience to HLBS disorders
  • Implementation science and health systems approaches to scale-up and spread the delivery of common health and evidence based tools related to the prevention of HLBS disorders and HLBS health services to communities affected by climate change events
  • Approaches for the rapid assessment of existing HLBS health related intervention/mitigation/adaptation strategies for use in time sensitive situations (e.g., following extreme weather events)
  • Research on digital and non-digital solutions to prevent HLBS disorders , enhance access to health services; ensure equitable access to health services; and build resilience
  • Research that collects, measures, organizes and analyzes Big Data streams to improve the quality and harmonization of data on climate change and HLBS disorders
  • Data infrastructure (e.g., standards, common data elements, repositories, platforms) that facilitates national and international data sharing in support of HLBS research
  • Strategies to develop HLBS community-based interventions and strategies that address structural racism and discrimination to build resilience to the impacts of climate change, including ethical issues and approaches to conducting research in and with communities impacted by climate change
  • Research that addresses environmental injustice and fosters resilience through the identification and engagement of key stakeholders and disciplines in HLBS equity-related research on climate change
  • Strategies for transparent, equitable, and timely dissemination of HLBS research findings on climate change and human health to policy makers, clinicians, and those communities most affected
  • Communication strategies to facilitate understanding and action on of the effects of climate change related HLBS disorders across multiple sectors (e.g.,, health care, transportation, labor/occupational, education, energy)
  • Strategies to develop or validate more accurate approaches to measuring CCH related exposures for use in HLBS observational studies and clinical trials.

NHGRI

NHGRI supports research in its three scientific mission areas:

  • Genomic Sciences with a focus on the quantitative sciences, bioinformatics, and technology development;
  • Genomic Medicine with a focus on using genomics to advance the science of medicine and incorporating genomics to improve the effectiveness of healthcare ; and
  • Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genetic and Genomic research with a focus on developing multi-disciplinary conceptual and methodological skills necessary to pursue independent careers as ELSI researchers.

NHGRI’s specific interests include the possible clinical and public health relevance of genomics in the health effects of climate change, climate effects on evolving biosystems, and ELSI-related issues. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NHGRI Program Staff to discuss potential applications prior to submission.”

NICHD

The NICHD mission is to lead research and training to understand human development, improve reproductive health, enhance the lives of children and adolescents, and optimize abilities for all. The NICHD's broad and diverse research portfolio includes research related to conception and pregnancy; typical and atypical development in childhood; childhood trauma, injury, and critical illness; the transition from adolescence to adulthood; reproductive health; rehabilitation; intellectual, developmental, and physical disabilities; and population dynamics across the lifespan.


In response to this NOSI, topics of interest to NICHD include, but are not limited to, research on:

  • Measurement and surveillance of the impact of climate change on health and NICHD priority populations, including pregnant women, children, and people with disabilities
  • Effects of climate change on population dynamics including fertility, mortality and morbidity, and population movement, distribution, and composition
  • Data collection on how climate change affects the health, development, and productivity of NICHD priority populations using population-based demographic or economic approaches and scientifically valid probability samples
  • Impact of climate change on reproductive health; infertility; and maternal, prenatal, pregnancy, and child health; child development; and disability.
  • Interactions between climate change and land use and their effects on population dynamics and the health of NICHD priority populations
  • The nexus of climate, food systems and health including the impact of climate change on sustainable and resilient food systems and the ability to meet public health goals, including dietary guidance, especially infant feeding practices.
  • The intersection of climate and vector-born disease (susceptibility to and treatment of) and their impacts on outcomes such as migration and nutrition status among NICHD priority populations
  • The impact of climate on pre-existing food insecurity and resulting intervention choices to address child or family malnutrition (over-/under nutrition) particularly in low-resource settings in the United States and globally, as well as reciprocity between food insecurity and climate

The following topic areas are NOT within scope for this NOSI:

  • The impact of climate change on the environment, natural resources, or the economy without a clear link to public health or health-related outcomes.
     

Potential applicants need to verify IC participation in specific funding announcements (see table below under "Application and Submission Information). Applicants are encouraged to contact Program staff at ICs to confirm scientific fit with IC priorities on climate change and health.

Data Harmonization

NIH is striving for consistency and high levels of rigor and reproducibility in all research. One way to accomplish this is to encourage investigators to use a common set of tools and resources to facilitate collection of common data elements (CDEs) or, in the case of existing data/records apply common constructs. NIH has worked with relevant communities to develop and provide access to tools and resources that can improve consistency of data collection. NIH strongly encourages investigators collecting data to use these resources as they select instruments for their proposed studies and devise programs to construct research data files.

NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Repository has been designed to provide access to structured human and machine-readable definitions of data elements that have been recommended or required by NIH Institutes and Centers and other organizations for use in research and for other purposes. The The PhenX Toolkit is a large collection of well-established and vetted phenotypic measurement protocols, including its newly released social determinants of health collections. The DR2 Program has curated a repository of data collection tools and related resources to empower human health research in response to disasters and public health emergencies. These protocols are suitable for inclusion in climate change-related studies, enabling data harmonization across studies.
 

Data Management and Sharing

Identifying and sharing data to support innovative climate change and health research is a goal of this NOSI. All applicants, whether collecting new data or using existing data as part of proposed research, must submit a Data Management and Sharing Plan.  

Projects collecting data should use best practices in data sharing to accelerate the scientific community’s ability to advance knowledge about the relationship between climate change and health. Researchers are encouraged to ensure that the data resources that they produce meet the standard for being FAIR—Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable, and further elaborated upon by FORCE 11. NIH strongly encourages use of NIH-supported, domain-specific data repositories as a first choice for storing data and making it accessible (see NLM Data Sharing Resources). In instances where captured/re-used data is not directly sharable by the applicant, plans for providing access protocols and programs to allow third-party researchers to replicate proposed research data files are necessary to meet data sharing requirements. Specifically, this includes information describing the data source and how any investigator can apply for data access, computer code used to convert data from the capture source into research data files, explanations of any variables constructed by the investigators, and other relevant information required to assist the use of data from the source for replication studies.  

Application and Submission Information

This notice applies to due dates on or after July 8, 2022 and subsequent receipt dates through May 8, 2025.

Applicants must select the IC and associated FOA to use for submission of an application in response to this NOSI (see table below). The selection must align with the IC requirements listed in order to be considered responsive to that FOA. Non-responsive applications will be withdrawn from consideration for this initiative. In addition, applicants using NIH Parent Announcements (listed below) will be assigned to those ICs on this NOSI that have indicated those FOAs are acceptable and based on usual application-IC assignment practices.

Submit applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

 

FOA Number

FOA Title

First Available Due Date

Participating ICs

       
PAR-22-093 Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) July 08, 2022 NIA
PAR-22-094 Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) July 08, 2022 NIA
PAR-22-104 Chronic, Non-Communicable Diseases and Disorders Across the Lifespan: Fogarty International Research Training Award (NCD-LIFESPAN) (D43 Clinical Trial Optional) July 13, 2022 ODP, NIA, NIDCR, FIC, NIMH
RFA-HG-20-037 Advancing Genomic Medicine Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) August 01, 2022 NHGRI
RFA-HG-20-036 Advancing Genomic Medicine Research (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) August 01, 2022 MHGRI
PAR-21-120 Global Infectious Disease Research Training Program (D43 Clinical Trial Optional) August 03, 2022 ODP, FIC
PA-21-048 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship (Parent F32) August 08, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NIAMS, NINR, NCI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-21-051 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31) August 08, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NIAMS, NINR, NCI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-248 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Fellowship for Students at Institutions with NIH-Funded Institutional Predoctoral Dual-Degree Training Programs (Parent F30) August 08, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NIAMS, NCI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-251 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (Parent F31-Diversity) August 08, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NIAMS, NINR, NCI, NICHD, NIMH
PAR-19-374 Complex Integrated Multi-Component Projects in Aging Research (U19 Clinical Trial Optional) September 25, 2022 NIA
PAR-22-362 NIA Renewal and Competing Revision Cooperative Agreements in Aging Research (U01 Clinical Trial Optional) October 03, 2022 NIA
PAR-18-896 NLM Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) October 05, 2022 NLM
PAR-20-060 NIDCR Prospective Observational or Biomarker Validation Study Cooperative Agreement (U01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) October 05, 2022 NIDCR
PA-20-183 Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required) October 05, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NINR, NIMHD, NHGRI, NHBLI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-184 Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required October 05, 2022 NIEHS, NINDS, NIA, NLM, NHGRI, NICHD
PA-20-185 Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) October 05, 2022 NIEHS, NINDS, NIA, NIAMS, NLM, NINR, NCI, NIMHD, NHGRI, NIDCR, NIAID, NHLBI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-187 NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Required) October 12, 2022 NIEHS, ODP, NIA, NINR, NCI, NIMHD, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-188 NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)   NIEHS, NIA, NIAMS, NLM, NINR, NCI, NIMHD, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-189 NIH Pathway to Independence Award (Parent K99/R00 Independent Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required) October 12, 2022 NIEHS, NIA, NINR, NCI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-205 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (Parent K23 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed) October 12, 2022 NIMHD
PA-20-206 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (Parent K23 Independent Clinical Trial Required) October 12, 2022 NIMHD
PAR-20-150 NIMHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 - Clinical Trial Optional) October 16, 2022 NIMHD
PA-20-194 NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required) October 16, 2022 NIEHS, NINDS, ODP, NIA, NINR, NHGRI, NICHD, NIMH
PA-20-195 NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) October 16, 2022 NIEHS, NINDS, NIA, NIAMS, NLM, NINR, NHGRI, NIDCR, NIAID, NICHD

PA-20-196

NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

October 16, 2022

NIEHS, NIA, NHGRI, NICHD

PA-20-200 NIH Small Research Grant Program (Parent R03 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) October 16, 2022 NIEHS, NIA, NHGRI, NIAID, NICHD, NIMH
PA-21-221 NICHD Small Research Grant Program (R03 Clinical Trial Required) October 16, 2022 NICHD, ODP
PAR-22-119 Limited Competition: Small Grant Program for NIAMS K01, K08, K23, and K25 Recipients (R03) (Clinical Trials Not Allowed) October 19, 2022 NIAMS
PAR-21-251 Emerging Global Leader Award (K43 Independent Clinical Trial Required) November 03, 2022 NIEHS, NIA, NCI, FIC, NIMH
PAR-21-252 Emerging Global Leader Award (K43 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed) November 03, 2022 NIEHS, NIA, NCI, FIC, NIMH

PAR-21-303

Mobile Health: Technology and Outcomes in Low and Middle Income Countries (R21/R33 - Clinical Trial Optional)

November 15, 2022

NIEHS, ODP, NCI, FIC, NIMH

PAR-22-097

Global Brain and Nervous System Disorders Research Across the Lifespan (R01 Clinical Trials Optional)

November 15, 2022

NIA, NIMH

PAR-22-098

Global Brain and Nervous System Disorders Research Across the Lifespan (R21 Clinical Trials Optional)

November 15, 2022

NIA, NIMH

NOT-TW-20-007 Notice of NIH participation in the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Program November 16, 2022 FIC

PAR-21-246

HIV-associated Non-Communicable Diseases Research at Low- and Middle-Income Country Institutions (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

December 08, 2022

ODP, NCI, FIC, NIMH

PAR-21-344 Interventions for Stigma Reduction to Improve HIV/AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care in Low- and Middle- Income Countries (R01 Clinical Trials Optional) December 20, 2022 ODP, NCI, FIC, NIMH
PAR-21-104 International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01 - Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed) March 08, 2023 NCI, FIC
PAR-21-105 International Research Scientist Development Award (IRSDA) (K01 - Independent Clinical Trial Required) March 08, 2023 ODP, NCI, FIC

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide and the funding opportunity announcement used for submission must be followed, with the following additions:

  • For funding consideration, applicants must include “NOT-ES-22-006” (without quotation marks) in the Agency Routing Identifier field (box 4B) of the SF424 R&R form. Applications without this information in box 4B will not be considered for this initiative.

 

Although an NIH Institute is not listed as a Participating Organization in all the FOAs listed above, applications for this initiative will be accepted.

Applications nonresponsive to terms of this NOSI will not be considered for the NOSI initiative.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to the contacts in Section VII of the listed funding opportunity announcements with the following additions/substitutions:

Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Claudia L. Thompson
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Phone: 984-287-3330
E-mail: thompso1@niehs.nih.gov

Flora N Katz
Fogarty International Center (FIC)
Phone: 301-402-9591
E-mail: katzf@mail.nih.gov

Curt DellaValle, Ph.D.
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240-276-7225
Email: curt.dellavalle@nih.gov

Dave J Kaufman
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Phone: 301 594-6907
E-mail: dave.kaufman@nih.gov

Adam Felsenfeld
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Phone: 301.480.2269
E-mail: felsenfa@exchange.nih.gov

Larry Fine
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Phone: 301-435-0305
E-mail: lf128x@nih.gov

Emerald T. Nguyen, Ph.D. 
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Phone: 301-555-1212
E-mail: emerald.nguyen@nih.gov

Adriana Costero-Saint Denis, Ph.D.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Telephone: 301-496-2544
E-mail: acostero@niaid.nih.gov 

Stephanie M George, PhD, MPH, MA
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Phone: none
E-mail: stephanie.george@nih.gov

Regina Bures, PhD
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Telephone: 301-496-9485
Email: regina.bures@nih.gov

Hiroko Iida, DDS, MPH
National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Phone: 301-594-7404
E-mail: hiroko.iida@nih.gov

Adam Haim, Ph.D. (For SBIR/STTR Applications)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-435-3593
Email: Haima@mail.nih.gov

Megan Kinnane, Ph.D. (For non-SBIR/STTR Applications)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-443-3679
Email: megan.kinnane@nih.gov

Arielle S. Gillman, Ph.D., M.P.H.
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-402-1366
E-mail: arielle.gillman@nih.gov

David A. Jett, Ph.D.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Phone: 301-496-6035
E-mail: jettd@nih.gov

Stacey D. Chambers, M.S.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Phone: 301-496-0690
E-mail: chambers@ninds.nih.gov

Liz Perruccio, MS, PhD
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Telephone: 301-402-8084
Email: liz.perruccio@nih.gov

Lynda R Hardy
National Library of Medicine (NLM)
Phone: 301-594-5976
E-mail: lynda.hardy@nih.gov

Elizabeth L. Neilson, PhD, MPH, MSN
Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)
Phone: 301-827-5578
Email: Elizabeth.Neilson@nih.gov 

Peer Review Contact(s)

Examine your eRA Commons account for review assignment and contact information (information appears two weeks after the submission due date).

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Jenny L. Greer
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Phone: 984-287-3332
E-mail: jenny.greer@nih.gov

Bruce R Butrum
Fogarty International Center (FIC)
Phone: 301-451-6830
E-mail: butrumb@mail.nih.gov

Dawn M. Mitchum, MPH, CRA
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240-276-5699
Email: dmitchum@mail.nih.gov

Deanna L Ingersoll
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Phone: 301-435-7858
E-mail: deanna.ingersoll@nih.gov

Alyse Burton
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Phone: none
E-mail: burtonam@mail.nih.gov

Ryan Blakeney
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Phone: 301-451-9802
E-mail: blakeneyr@mail.nih.gov

Vandhana Khurana,M.B.A.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Phone: 240-669-2966
E-mail: khuranav@mail.nih.gov

Erik Edgerton
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Phone: 301-594-7760
E-mail: erik.edgerton@nih.gov

Margaret Young

Eunice Kennedy SMargaret Young
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Telephone: 301-642-4552
Email: margaret.young@nih.gov

Diana Rutberg, MBA
National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Phone: (301) 594-4798
E-mail: dr258t@nih.gov

Maggie Paolini
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Phone: 301-443-2746
Email: maggie.paolini@nih.gov

Priscilla Grant. JD
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-594-8412
E-mail: pg38h@nih.gov

Chief Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Email: ChiefGrantsManagementOfficer@ninds.nih.gov

Ron Wertz
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Telephone: 301-594-2807
Email: wertzr@mail.nih.gov

Samantha J Tempchin
National Library of Medicine (NLM)
Phone: 301-496-4222
E-mail: tempchins@mail.nih.gov