Department of Health and Human Services

Part 1. Overview Information
Participating Organization(s)

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Components of Participating Organizations

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Funding Opportunity Title

National Cooperative Drug Discovery/Development Groups (NCDDG) for the Treatment of Mental Disorders, Drug or Alcohol Addiction (U01)

Activity Code

U01 Research Project – Cooperative Agreement

Announcement Type

Re-issue PAR-13-087

Related Notices
  • June 4, 2014 - Notice NOT-14-074 supersedes instructions in Section III.3 regarding applications that are essentially the same.
Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number

PAR-14-184

Companion Funding Opportunity

PAR-14-234, U19 Research Program – Cooperative Agreements
PAR-13-086, U19 Research Program – Cooperative Agreements
PAR-14-107, U01 Research Project – Cooperative Agreements
RFA-MH-15-300, R21/R33 Phased Innovation Award
RFA-MH-15-310, R33 Exploratory/Developmental Grants Phase II

Number of Applications

See Section III. 3. Additional Information on Eligibility.

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s)

93.242, 93.273, 93.279 

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The purpose of the National Cooperative Drug Discovery/Development Group (NCDDG) Program is to create multidisciplinary research groups or partnerships for the discovery of pharmacological agents to treat and to study mental illness, drug or alcohol addiction. The objectives of this program are to: accelerate innovative drug discovery; develop pharmacologic tools for basic and clinical research on mental disorders, or drug or alcohol addiction; develop and validate tools in support of experimental therapeutic studies of innovative new candidates for mental disorders; and support early phase human clinical testing to rapidly assess the safety and efficacy of promising drug candidates and new indications for IND-ready agents for the treatment of mental disorders or alcohol addiction. This FOA encourages applications to advance the discovery, preclinical development, and proof of concept testing of new, rationally based candidate agents to treat mental disorders or drug or alcohol addiction, and to develop novel ligands as tools to further characterize existing or to validate new drug targets. Partnerships between academia and industry are strongly encouraged.  

Key Dates
Posted Date
Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)

May 23, 2014

Letter of Intent Due Date(s)

30 days before the application due date

Application Due Date(s)

June 23, 2014; October 23, 2014; February 23, 2015; June 23, 2015; October 23, 2015; February 23, 2016; June 23, 2016; October 24, 2016; February 23, 2017, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization.

Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.

AIDS Application Due Date(s)

Not Applicable

Scientific Merit Review

October 2014; February 2015; June 2015; October 2015; February, 2016; June 2016; October 2016; February 2017; June 2017

Advisory Council Review

January 2015; May 2015;  October 2015; January 2016; May 2016; October 2016; January 2017; May 2017;  October 2017  

Earliest Start Date

April, 2015;  July 2015; December, 2015;  April, 2016;  July 2016; December, 2016; April, 2017;  July 2017; December, 2017

Expiration Date

February 24, 2017

Due Dates for E.O. 12372

Not Applicable

Required Application Instructions

It is critical that applicants follow the instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, except where instructed to do otherwise (in this FOA or in a Notice from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts). Conformance to all requirements (both in the Application Guide and the FOA) is required and strictly enforced. Applicants must read and follow all application instructions in the Application Guide as well as any program-specific instructions noted in Section IV. When the program-specific instructions deviate from those in the Application Guide, follow the program-specific instructions. Applications that do not comply with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.


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Table of Contents

Part 1. Overview Information
Part 2. Full Text of the Announcement
Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Section II. Award Information
Section III. Eligibility Information
Section IV. Application and Submission Information
Section V. Application Review Information
Section VI. Award Administration Information
Section VII. Agency Contacts
Section VIII. Other Information

Part 2. Full Text of Announcement

Section I. Funding Opportunity Description

Purpose

The intent of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications from academic, biotechnology, or pharmaceutical industry investigators interested in participating with the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), or the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) in a National Cooperative Drug Discovery/Development Group (NCDDG) program. The objectives of this program are to advance the discovery, preclinical development, and proof of concept testing of new, rationally based candidate agents to treat mental disorders or drug or alcohol addiction and to develop novel ligands as tools to advance biological research on the function of genes, cells, and biochemical pathways implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction, and as potential new therapeutics. Partnerships between academia and industry are strongly encouraged.

Each NCDDG program should consist of a multi-disciplinary team of scientists with appropriate expertise to further the development and evaluation of novel compounds. Scientists from both academia and pharmaceutical industry are encouraged to participate within an NCDDG; scientists from foreign institutions and NIH Intramural laboratories may participate in some aspects. It is anticipated that the interaction of academic and non-profit research institutions with industry and NIH via the NCDDG model will: 1) accelerate the discovery and development of new therapeutics for mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction; 2) increase the availability of pharmacologic research tools (including imaging agents) for basic and clinical research; 3) facilitate the development and validation of models and pharmacodynamic (PD) measures to evaluate novel therapeutics for mental disorders; 4) increase the availability of new IND-ready compounds and agents suitable for testing in humans; and 5) facilitate the development and validation of new clinical measures or biomarkers suitable for use in human proof of concept trials of novel therapeutics for mental disorders or alcohol addiction.

The goal of the NCDDG program is not to duplicate or compete with the private sector but to complement and accelerate the development of research tools for new molecular targets implicated in mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction, and effective compounds and agents for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric and addictive disorders, as well as core features of these illnesses, especially in areas of unmet medical need.

Background and Research Objectives

Significant advances in neuroscience, genetics, and basic behavioral science, together with technological developments, have provided a rich knowledge base for understanding pathophysiology, identifying new molecular targets for drug discovery, and developing rational pharmacotherapies for the treatment of psychiatric and substance abuse disorders. With the wealth of potential new drug targets, the opportunity exists to accelerate the process of target validation and medication discovery to make great strides toward novel and effective treatments for mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction.

A U01 application can include no more than a single Research Project. Applications proposing two or more Research Projects along with Scientific and/or Administrative Core components should respond to the companion FOA utilizing the U19 mechanism (see PAR-13-086).

NIMH's objectives and interests for the NCDDG program

NIMH’s objective for the NCDDG program is to establish public-private partnerships to conduct innovative, high impact research focused on the discovery of pharmacological agents targeting novel molecular targets implicated in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, fragile x, autism, and other mental illnesses.

NIMH-relevant NCDDG research projects should focus on novel interventions that interrogate a molecular or clinical target that is linked to a biological mechanism or pathophysiology of the proposed mental disorder (see TR Insel, Next-Generation Treatments for Mental Disorders, Sci Transl Med 4, 1-9, 2012, http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/155/155ps19.full.pdf?sid=76964b41-811e-47a7-af12-369ffb476042). 

It is expected that the majority of NCDDG applications will be aimed at pharmacological treatment development for mental disorders. In recognition of the emerging therapeutic potential of neuroplasticity or neuromodulation approaches that directly engage brain circuits (e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), regional transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)), the NIMH welcomes innovative therapeutic development applications that are focused on targeting of specific circuits. The NIMH strongly encourages an experimental medicine approach to therapeutic development. This FOA will support up through first in human (FIH) to Phase Ia or Ib studies. For these trials, studies are expected to assess the agent for: 1) safety and tolerability, 2) target engagement, and 3) pharmacological effects on relevant circuits or systems. Data resulting from Phase I trials in healthy controls and in the target patient population are expected to determine optimal clinical dosing and to establish feasibility for further testing in proof of concept (PoC) and efficacy trials. Agents should be sufficiently potent and selective for critical evaluation of target engagement and brain exposure. The agent/indication (if successful) should have a major, not merely incremental, impact on unmet medical need in psychiatric disorders. In support of this effort, NIMH recognizes the need for the timely development of new PET tracers for targets that are of interest for assessing target engagement/dose selection for clinical trials of novel therapeutics and for studies of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders.

Research projects directed towards ameliorating pathophysiology that is potentially more proximal to specific functional deficits (domains) than DSM diagnostic entities are encouraged.  See the Research Domain Criteria (RDOC) webpage and proceedings of the RDoC domain workshops (working memory, negative valence systems (i.e., aversive motivational dimensions), positive valence systems, cognitive systems, social process systems, and arousal/regulatory systems) for more details.

NIMH encourages applications ranging from ligand discovery and testing in preclinical assays through human Phase I studies of novel agents. Examples include, but are not limited to:

NIDA's objectives and interests for the NCDDG program

NIDA's interests are in the discovery of ligands that constitute important research tools and/or medication candidates to advance the development of pharmacotherapies for drug addiction treatment. Over the past decade or so, there have been major advances in our understanding of the protein targets, neural circuitry, and behavioral phenomena associated with addiction, and in the effects of drugs of abuse on CNS processes associated with addictive behavior, such as synaptic plasticity. The initial targets for most drugs of abuse are known and have been shown to be predominantly either G-protein coupled receptors, such as the dopamine receptor, an indirect site of action for cocaine and amphetamine, or ligand gated ion channels, such as the nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs), a target for nicotine. Drug addiction also involves activation of intracellular signaling proteins that can affect the response to drugs of abuse, and there is clear evidence for the involvement of numerous, specific neurotransmitter systems in addiction. Genetic polymorphisms are likely to lead to variation in the biological activity in many of these protein targets, which may be relevant to individual variability in response to drugs of abuse and, ultimately, to vulnerability to addiction. Given that research has discovered some of the mechanisms through which addictive drugs act in the CNS, numerous potentially viable targets for medications are known and, for the most part, well characterized. Hence the opportunity exists for the development of new ligands for target validation studies and potentially for development as pharmacotherapies.

From NIDA's perspective, the NCDDG is a ligand discovery and translational initiative in which the objective is the development of molecules with a particular profile of action as prototypes for medications to treat addiction or as tools to advance research in the treatment development domain. A number of cellular and animal models are currently available for ligand discovery efforts relevant to drug addiction treatment research. It is therefore expected that groups will include a program to evaluate the efficacy of novel ligands in appropriate models. Components of NIDA-relevant NCDDG research projects could include, but are not limited to: (1) assessment of the behavioral profile of novel ligands in tests of reinforcement, relapse and withdrawal; (2) tests of the ability of novel ligands to modulate cellular processes of plasticity in reward-relevant regions of the brain; (3) assessment of ligand efficacy on G-protein coupled receptors and ligand gated ion channel activation; and 4) receptor activation effects on down-stream intracellular systems or in modulating the release of addiction-relevant neurotransmitters. Projects that propose integrating two or more of these approaches also are encouraged.

Two targets, the mu-opiate receptor and the dopamine transporter, have been extensively pursued in medication discovery efforts related to opiate and cocaine addiction, respectively. Given the clinical availability of mu-opiate agonists, partial agonists and antagonists and the large number of NIDA-supported grants already focusing on the dopamine transporter, NIDA is not interested in supporting NCDDG projects with a focus on these two targets. Applicants are encouraged to focus on the discovery of truly novel ligands through the pursuit of targets such as orexin (hypocretin) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A more extensive list of targets for consideration can be found below.

NIAAA's objectives and interests for the NCDDG program

NIAAA's interests for the NCDDG program are in the discovery of novel ligands that may lead to the development of medications for the treatment of alcohol dependence and addiction, and ligands to be used as tools to research biological processes contributing to compulsive drinking. The focus of proposed research projects should follow that described above by NIMH, but should be relevant to the mission of NIAAA.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to discuss applications involving toxicity, safety and pharmacokinetic as well as proof of concept studies of novel compounds with NIAAA staff listed in Section VII - Agency Contact(s) Scientific/Research Contacts.

Compounds currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating alcohol dependence have distinct mechanisms of action and target distinct behavioral aspects of problem alcohol consumption. Disulfiram (Antabuse), an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor leads to a systemic build up of acetaldehyde when alcohol is ingested. This is experienced as an unpleasant intoxication and creates an aversion to consuming alcohol. Naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, is thought to diminish alcohol's positive reinforcing effects, particularly in people with mu opiate receptor polymorphisms. Acamprosate's therapeutic mechanism of action is unclear, but it is thought that acamprosate attenuates the enhanced glutamatergic transmission during alcohol withdrawal and may work best at alleviating craving and relapse in abstinent patients. Each medication has been found to be highly effective in some patients, yet other patients fail to respond to them. Thus, there is a need for the development of medications that interact at additional targets, and that treat additional behavioral facets of alcoholism.

Current pharmaceutical strategies for treating alcohol use disorders are broadly designed towards developing agents that: a) modify alcohol intoxication, reduce the pleasurable effects of alcohol or increase the aversive effects, b) reduce craving or the urge to drink, c) reduce the signs and symptoms of acute and protracted withdrawal syndromes, and d) treat co-morbid psychiatric illnesses or reduce psychological distress which contributes to elevated alcohol consumption. Alcohol's multiple biological effects, and the many physical and behavioral alterations that occur following chronic alcohol use and abuse, offer opportunities for developing additional pharmacotherapies.

NCDDG is an opportunity to identify and develop compounds towards both existing and new molecular targets having the potential to treat alcohol use disorders, or to facilitate and enhance basic and clinical research on identifying the neurobiological and behavioral processes that contribute to the transition from voluntary to compulsive drinking. Aspects of alcohol consumption and alcohol-seeking are modulated through the actions of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters, ion channels, neuromodulators, hormones, and intracellular signaling networks. Thus, there are a number of potential target sites for which new pharmaceutical agents may be developed, such as effectors of neurotransmitter systems, neuroimmune pathways, and signal transduction pathways.

Cellular models may be used as initial screening tools to evaluate the molecular properties of candidate compounds. However, it is further expected that the more promising compounds will be tested and evaluated in established animal models of behavioral aspects of alcoholism, such as drinking, dependence, craving and reinstatement models. As no single compound is expected to address all of the behavioral aspects and consequences of alcoholism, projects that propose integrating two or more behavioral testing paradigms are sought.

The identification and pursuit of agents towards novel targets previously un-recognized or understudied for the treatment of alcohol abuse disorders are especially encouraged. In particular, NIAAA encourages applications focusing on agents that alleviate craving and dysphoria during protracted abstinence, and agents effective in patients who have co-morbid psychiatric illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder). Applications that essentially propose to further extend the testing of established or well-studied compounds and strategies are not appropriate for this FOA.

Summary

In summary, the NCDDG Program will support broad, innovative, multidisciplinary approaches to the discovery of new, rationally based treatments and research tools for mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction. Since the creative talents in the required scientific disciplines are rarely available in a single institution, a multi-institutional, group approach involving academic, nonprofit, commercial, and/or industrial institutions is envisioned. Academic and pharmaceutical scientists are strongly encouraged to form partnerships that take full advantage of their combined intellectual and material resources for drug discovery, lead optimization, model development, and clinical testing. Further, the interaction of academic and non-profit research institutions with pharmaceutical industry and NIH is expected to facilitate subsequent development and marketing of new pharmacologic treatments, although these latter activities are not within the scope of this FOA. Molecular targets for drug discovery, and the sources and types of chemical entities to be investigated, will be selected by the applying group. Both novel mechanism of action and disease-oriented approaches are of interest.

Research Scope

The objective of this FOA is to establish NCDDG Groups to conduct innovative, high impact research focused on the discovery and testing of chemical entities for novel molecular targets implicated in the pathophysiology of mental disorders, or drug or alcohol addiction. The NCDDG serves as a vehicle for pharmaceutical and academic scientists to pool intellectual and material resources for the translation of basic science findings into the conceptualization, discovery, and evaluation of new chemical entities. Groups are encouraged to select molecular targets for drug discovery based on recent findings in basic and clinical neuroscience, genetics, and proteomics relevant to the understanding of mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction.

Please contact program staff listed in Section VII - Agency Contact(s) Scientific/Research Contacts to determine program priorities and molecular targets of interest to the participating NIH Institutes.  Molecular targets that applicants may wish to consider include, but are not limited to, the following.

Potential ligands of interest to NIMH, NIDA and NIAAA might be identified by their receptor properties (e.g., positive or negative allosteric modulators, functionally selective ligands, partial agonists, agonists, or antagonists), solubility, pharmacokinetics, oral or CNS bioavailability, or other characteristics to support their use as research tools or candidates for drug development.

The identification of lead compounds and refining them for target validation and medication development are important goals of this initiative. Generally this can involve classical approaches of medicinal chemistry using structure-activity relationship (SAR) rationales. The use of chemical libraries, structural biology and computer modeling of molecular targets to screen for compounds with activity at selected targets are also examples of appropriate approaches. If applicants do choose to conduct library screening, they are encouraged to focus on targeted libraries rather than random structural screening. Screening of existing libraries (e.g., G-protein receptor-focused) that will not require significant synthetic resources is encouraged. Note that the pharmaceutical industry has reduced its reliance on combinatorial chemistry approaches due to general lack of success. Although NIDA, NIMH and NIAAA will not rule out the use of combinatorial chemistry in NCDDG projects, applicants proposing them should provide appropriate justification that this approach to compound synthesis is desirable.

It is anticipated that the interaction of academic and non-profit research institutions with NIH and pharmaceutical industry will facilitate timely evaluation and development of preclinical and clinical research tools, models, and novel therapeutics. Applicants should outline proposed plans for further development of promising compounds or clinical candidates that are generated and/or tested by the NCDDG program.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the relevant Scientific/Research Contact listed in Section VII of this FOA to determine if the proposed Research Project would be considered a priority for NIMH, NIDA or NIAAA.

For applicants seeking additional sources of support for preclinical development activities such as toxicology and safety pharmacology assessment, bulk synthesis, GMP manufacturing, or formulation development, the Bridging Interventional Development Gaps (BrIDGs) Program (http://www.ncats.nih.gov/bridgs.html), offers investigators access to preclinical development resources on a competitive basis. Applicants are encouraged to contact BrIDGs staff about ways in which they can apply for and access resources provided by the program prior to submitting an application to the NCDDG FOA.

Section II. Award Information
Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement: A support mechanism used when there will be substantial Federal scientific or programmatic involvement. Substantial involvement means that, after award, NIH scientific or program staff will assist, guide, coordinate, or participate in project activities.

Application Types Allowed

New
Renewal
Resubmission
Revision

The OER Glossary and the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide provide details on these application types.

Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards

The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.

Award Budget

Application budgets are not limited but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project.

Award Project Period

The total project period may not exceed five years.   

NIH grants policies as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement will apply to the applications submitted and awards made in response to this FOA.

Section III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

Eligible Organizations

Higher Education Institutions

The following types of Higher Education Institutions are always encouraged to apply for NIH support as Public or Private Institutions of Higher Education:

Nonprofits Other Than Institutions of Higher Education

For-Profit Organizations

Governments

Other

Foreign Institutions

Non-domestic (non-U.S.) Entities (Foreign Institutions) are not eligible to apply.
Non-domestic (non-U.S.) components of U.S. Organizations are not eligible to apply.
Foreign components, as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, are  allowed.

Required Registrations

Applicant Organizations

Applicant organizations must complete and maintain the following registrations as described in the SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide to be eligible to apply for or receive an award. All registrations must be completed prior to the application being submitted. Registration can take 6 weeks or more, so applicants should begin the registration process as soon as possible. The NIH Policy on Late Submission of Grant Applications states that failure to complete registrations in advance of a due date is not a valid reason for a late submission.

Program Directors/Principal Investigators (PD(s)/PI(s))

All PD(s)/PI(s) must have an eRA Commons account.  PD(s)/PI(s) should work with their organizational officials to either create a new account or to affiliate their existing account with the applicant organization in eRA Commons. If the PD/PI is also the organizational Signing Official, they must have two distinct eRA Commons accounts, one for each role. Obtaining an eRA Commons account can take up to 2 weeks.

Eligible Individuals (Program Director/Principal Investigator)

Any individual(s) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director(s)/Principal Investigator(s) (PD(s)/PI(s)) is invited to work with his/her organization to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are always encouraged to apply for NIH support.

For institutions/organizations proposing multiple PDs/PIs, visit the Multiple Program Director/Principal Investigator Policy and submission details in the Senior/Key Person Profile (Expanded) Component of the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

An NIH intramural scientist may not serve as the PD/PI of an NCDDG but may participate as a research collaborator or consultant. However, an Intramural scientist may not receive salary, equipment, supplies, or other remuneration from this FOA. .

2. Cost Sharing

This FOA does not require cost sharing as defined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

3. Additional Information on Eligibility

Number of Applications

Applicant organizations may submit more than one application, provided that each application is scientifically distinct.

NIH will not accept any application that is essentially the same as one already reviewed within the past thirty-seven months (as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement), except for submission:

Section IV. Application and Submission Information

1. Requesting an Application Package

Applicants must download the SF424 (R&R) application package associated with this funding opportunity using the “Apply for Grant Electronically” button in this FOA or following the directions provided at Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application Submission

It is critical that applicants follow the instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, except where instructed in this funding opportunity announcement to do otherwise. Conformance to the requirements in the Application Guide is required and strictly enforced. Applications that are out of compliance with these instructions may be delayed or not accepted for review.

For information on Application Submission and Receipt, visit Frequently Asked Questions – Application Guide, Electronic Submission of Grant Applications.

Letter of Intent

Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application, the information that it contains allows IC staff to estimate the potential review workload and plan the review.

By the date listed in Part 1. Overview Information, prospective applicants are asked to submit a letter of intent that includes the following information:

The letter of intent should be sent to:

Linda Brady, Ph.D.
Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science
National Institute of Mental Health
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7204, MSC 965
Bethesda, MD 20892-9645
Rockville, MD 20852-9645 (for express/courier service)
Telephone: (301) 443-3563
Email: lbrady@mail.nih.gov

Page Limitations

All page limitations described in the SF424 Application Guide and the Table of Page Limits must be followed.

Required and Optional Components

The forms package associated with this FOA includes all applicable components, required and optional. Please note that some components marked optional in the application package are required for submission of applications for this FOA. Follow all instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide to ensure you complete all appropriate “optional” components.

Instructions for Application Submission

The following section supplements the instructions found in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide and should be used for preparing an application to this FOA.

SF424(R&R) Cover

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

SF424(R&R) Project/Performance Site Locations

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

SF424(R&R) Other Project Information

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

SF424(R&R) Senior/Key Person Profile

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed. 

It is anticipated that the NCDDG will include multi-disciplinary teams of scientists with appropriate expertise for the NCDDG project. Scientists from both academia and biotechnology or pharmaceutical industry are encouraged to participate in the project.

Biotechnology or pharmaceutical partners should include key personnel who have authority within the company to allocate resources to ensure successful completion of the proposed discovery and development efforts.

R&R or Modular Budget

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.

The PD/PI will be expected to devote at least 1.8 calendar months of effort to the NCDDG program.  The calendar month requirement also applies to any individual listed as PD/PI in a multiple PD/PI grant application. 

This program strongly encourages in-kind resource contributions of the partners within the NCDDG (e.g., biotechnology, pharmaceutical, or disease foundations).

PHS 398 Cover Page Supplement

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed.  

PHS 398 Research Plan

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide must be followed, with the following additional instructions:

Research Strategy: The Research Strategy should provide the following details:

Letters of Support: Include letters of commitment to the collaboration by private sector partners or collaborators. If the application involves collaboration with an NIH intramural scientist, the intramural scientist must obtain written approval of his/her NIH Institute Scientific Director for the amount of resources that may be allocated to the project; this amount must be specified in the letter, and cannot exceed $200,000 in direct costs of intramural resources. The approval must also specify that the conduct of the project will comply with the DHHS regulations for research involving human subjects (if applicable) and with the PHS policy on vertebrate animal research.

Resource Sharing Plan: Individuals are required to comply with the instructions for the Resource Sharing Plans (Data Sharing Plan, Sharing Model Organisms, and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS)) as provided in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide, with the following modification:

Appendix:  Do not use the Appendix to circumvent page limits. Follow all instructions for the Appendix as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

Planned Enrollment Report

When conducting clinical research, follow all instructions for completing Planned Enrollment Reports as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide. 

PHS 398 Cumulative Inclusion Enrollment Report

When conducting clinical research, follow all instructions for completing Cumulative Inclusion Enrollment Report as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide. 

3. Submission Dates and Times

Part I. Overview Information contains information about Key Dates. Applicants are encouraged to submit applications before the due date to ensure they have time to make any application corrections that might be necessary for successful submission.

Organizations must submit applications to Grants.gov (the online portal to find and apply for grants across all Federal agencies). Applicants must then complete the submission process by tracking the status of the application in the eRA Commons, NIH’s electronic system for grants administration. NIH and Grants.gov systems check the application against many of the application instructions upon submission. Errors must be corrected and a changed/corrected application must be submitted to Grants.gov on or before the application due date.  If a Changed/Corrected application is submitted after the deadline, the application will be considered late.

Applicants are responsible for viewing their application before the due date in the eRA Commons to ensure accurate and successful submission.

Information on the submission process and a definition of on-time submission are provided in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

4. Intergovernmental Review (E.O. 12372)

This initiative is not subject to intergovernmental review.

5. Funding Restrictions

All NIH awards are subject to the terms and conditions, cost principles, and other considerations described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

Pre-award costs are allowable only as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

6. Other Submission Requirements and Information

Applications must be submitted electronically following the instructions described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.  Paper applications will not be accepted.

Applicants must complete all required registrations before the application due date. Section III. Eligibility Information contains information about registration.

For assistance with your electronic application or for more information on the electronic submission process, visit Applying Electronically.

Important reminders:
All PD(s)/PI(s) must include their eRA Commons ID in the Credential field of the Senior/Key Person Profile Component of the SF424(R&R) Application Package. Failure to register in the Commons and to include a valid PD/PI Commons ID in the credential field will prevent the successful submission of an electronic application to NIH. See Section III of this FOA for information on registration requirements.

The applicant organization must ensure that the DUNS number it provides on the application is the same number used in the organization’s profile in the eRA Commons and for the System for Award Management. Additional information may be found in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

See more tips for avoiding common errors.

Upon receipt, applications will be evaluated for completeness by the Center for Scientific Review, NIH. Applications that are incomplete will not be reviewed.

In order to expedite review, applicants are requested to notify the MH Referral Office by email at NIMHReferral@mail.nih.gov when the application has been submitted. Please include the FOA number and title, PD/PI name, and title of the application.

Requests of $500,000 or more for direct costs in any year

Applicants requesting $500,000 or more in direct costs in any year (excluding consortium F&A) must contact NIH program staff at least 6 weeks before submitting the application and follow the Policy on the Acceptance for Review of Unsolicited Applications that Request $500,000 or More in Direct Costs as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

Applications Involving the NIH Intramural Research Program

For NCDDG applications that include NIH intramural components, the intramural resource level will be included in the total cost of the overall application. The requests by NIH intramural scientists will be limited to the incremental costs required for participation. As such, these requests will not include any salary and related fringe benefits for career, career conditional or other Federal employees (civilian or uniformed service) with permanent appointments under existing position ceilings or any costs related to administrative or facilities support (equivalent to Facilities and Administrative or F&A costs).  These costs may include salary for staff to be specifically hired under a temporary appointment for the project, consultant costs, equipment, supplies, travel, and other items typically listed under Other Expenses. Applicants should indicate the number of person-months devoted to the project, even if no funds are requested for salary and fringe benefits. 

If selected, appropriate funding will be provided by the NIH Intramural Program.  NIH intramural scientists will participate in this program as research collaborators or consultants in accord with the Terms and Conditions provided in this FOA.  Intellectual property will be managed in accord with established policy of the NIH in compliance with Executive Order 10096, as amended, 45 CFR Part 7; patent rights for inventions developed in NIH facilities are NIH property unless NIH waives its rights. 

Should an extramural application include the collaboration with an intramural scientist, no funds for the support of the intramural scientist may be requested in the application. The intramural scientist may submit a separate request for intramural funding as described above.  The involvement of Intramural scientists needs to be consistent with NIH Policy. http://www1.od.nih.gov/oir/sourcebook/ethic-conduct/ethical-conduct-toc.htm

The participation of an intramural scientist is independent of and unrelated to the role of the NIMH, NIDA and/or NIAAA Project Scientist as described in the Terms and Conditions of Award.

Post Submission Materials

Applicants are required to follow the instructions for post-submission materials, as described in NOT-OD-13-030.

Section V. Application Review Information

1. Criteria

Only the review criteria described below will be considered in the review process. As part of the NIH mission, all applications submitted to the NIH in support of biomedical and behavioral research are evaluated for scientific and technical merit through the NIH peer review system.

Overall Impact

Reviewers will provide an overall impact score to reflect their assessment of the likelihood for the project to exert a sustained, powerful influence on the research field(s) involved, in consideration of the following review criteria and additional review criteria (as applicable for the project proposed).

Scored Review Criteria

Reviewers will consider each of the review criteria below in the determination of scientific merit, and give a separate score for each. An application does not need to be strong in all categories to be judged likely to have major scientific impact. For example, a project that by its nature is not innovative may be essential to advance a field.

Significance: Does the NCDDG address an important problem or a critical barrier to progress in the field? If the aims of the NCDDG program are achieved, how will scientific knowledge, technical capability, and/or clinical practice be improved? How will successful completion of the aims change the concepts, methods, technologies, treatments, services, or preventative interventions that drive this field? To what degree does the proposed plan for discovery and testing of novel treatments, research tools, or clinical studies support the needs for the targeted disease? What is the likelihood that it will produce and significantly advance a new candidate therapeutic for development?   

Investigator(s)     

Are the PD(s)/PI(s), collaborators, and other researchers well suited to the project? If Early Stage Investigators or New Investigators, or in the early stages of independent careers, do they have appropriate experience and training? If established, have they demonstrated an ongoing record of accomplishments that have advanced their field(s)? If the project is collaborative or multi-PD/PI, do the investigators have complementary and integrated expertise; are their leadership approach, governance and organizational structure appropriate for the project? Has the PD/PI demonstrated leadership in development, implementation, and management of comprehensive research programs? Are the staffing, governance, and organizational structure appropriate for conducting the study as proposed and within specified timelines?  If private sector collaborators or consultants are identified, is there evidence that they will contribute expertise to advance the project?  

Innovation

Does the application challenge and seek to shift current research or clinical practice paradigms by utilizing novel theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions? Are the concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions novel to one field of research or novel in a broad sense? Is a refinement, improvement, or new application of theoretical concepts, approaches or methodologies, instrumentation, or interventions proposed? Are the biological targets, mechanisms, or measures considered to be novel?   

Approach

Are the overall strategy, methodology, and analyses well-reasoned and appropriate to accomplish the specific aims of the project? Are potential problems, alternative strategies, and benchmarks for success presented? If the project is in the early stages of development, will the strategy establish feasibility and will particularly risky aspects be managed? 

If the project involves human subjects and/or NIH-defined clinical research, are the plans to address 1) the protection of human subjects from research risks, and 2) inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion or exclusion of children, justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed?  If preclinical testing is proposed, are the designs sufficiently detailed and rationalized and are such studies relevant to the development path? Are the scientific disciplines represented in the Research Project adequate to achieve the NCDDG objectives? Is there a sound scientific rationale for the proposed molecular or clinical targets? Are targets, screens, and preclinical models relevant to therapeutic discovery for mental disorders and/or drug or alcohol addiction? Are the proposed Phase I clinical studies for mental disorders designed to assess target engagement, optimal dosing, safety, and tolerability? Are the proposed Phase I studies for mental disorders designed to establish the relationship between the magnitude and duration of target modulation and potential for clinical efficacy in the proposed study population? Are the proposed PD biomarkers to assess functional pharmacological activity of the novel agent or the use of pharmacogenetic or other biomarkers appropriate to the proposed clinical studies of mental disorders?  If PET ligand development is included, is the target novel and is evidence provided to suggest the strategy is likely to succeed?

Is there evidence of feasibility that the target can be detected in the brain region(s) of interest with a radiotracer? Are the desired properties for the radiotracer clearly stated and reasonable for the proposed target?

If pharmaceutical partnerships are proposed, how will they facilitate the development and evaluation of candidate drugs or therapeutics, tools for clinical research, and model validation for testing therapeutics? 

Environment

Will the scientific environment in which the work will be done contribute to the probability of success? Are the institutional support, equipment and other physical resources available to the investigators adequate for the project proposed? Will the project benefit from unique features of the scientific environment, subject populations, or collaborative arrangements? If the proposed research plan includes a chemical series that was developed by a biotechnology or pharmaceutical industry, is there evidence of involvement of industry chemists as collaborators or advisors in the project? Does the clinical research team demonstrate a track record in successfully recruiting subjects into clinical trials and research studies and completing proposed studies within projected timelines?       

Additional Review Criteria

As applicable for the project proposed, reviewers will evaluate the following additional items while determining scientific and technical merit, and in providing an overall impact score, but will not give separate scores for these items.

Timelines and Milestones

Are appropriate, evaluative go/no go decision-making points and quantitative milestones provided and clearly defined? Are the milestones feasible and quantifiable?  Are the timelines appropriate? Are definitive go/no-go milestone studies appropriately powered and are statistical analyses clearly described? Are the recruitment goals appropriate if clinical studies are proposed?

Protections for Human Subjects

For research that involves human subjects but does not involve one of the six categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate the justification for involvement of human subjects and the proposed protections from research risk relating to their participation according to the following five review criteria: 1) risk to subjects, 2) adequacy of protection against risks, 3) potential benefits to the subjects and others, 4) importance of the knowledge to be gained, and 5) data and safety monitoring for clinical trials.

For research that involves human subjects and meets the criteria for one or more of the six categories of research that are exempt under 45 CFR Part 46, the committee will evaluate: 1) the justification for the exemption, 2) human subjects involvement and characteristics, and 3) sources of materials. For additional information on review of the Human Subjects section, please refer to the Guidelines for the Review of Human Subjects.

Inclusion of Women, Minorities, and Children 

When the proposed project involves human subjects and/or NIH-defined clinical research, the committee will evaluate the proposed plans for the inclusion (or exclusion) of individuals on the basis of sex/gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the inclusion (or exclusion) of children to determine if it is justified in terms of the scientific goals and research strategy proposed. For additional information on review of the Inclusion section, please refer to the Guidelines for the Review of Inclusion in Clinical Research.

Vertebrate Animals

The committee will evaluate the involvement of live vertebrate animals as part of the scientific assessment according to the following five points: 1) proposed use of the animals, and species, strains, ages, sex, and numbers to be used; 2) justifications for the use of animals and for the appropriateness of the species and numbers proposed; 3) adequacy of veterinary care; 4) procedures for limiting discomfort, distress, pain and injury to that which is unavoidable in the conduct of scientifically sound research including the use of analgesic, anesthetic, and tranquilizing drugs and/or comfortable restraining devices; and 5) methods of euthanasia and reason for selection if not consistent with the AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia. For additional information on review of the Vertebrate Animals section, please refer to the Worksheet for Review of the Vertebrate Animal Section.

Biohazards

Reviewers will assess whether materials or procedures proposed are potentially hazardous to research personnel and/or the environment, and if needed, determine whether adequate protection is proposed.

Resubmissions

For Resubmissions, the committee will evaluate the application as now presented, taking into consideration the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group and changes made to the project.

Renewals

For Renewals, the committee will consider the progress made in the last funding period.

Revisions

For Revisions, the committee will consider the appropriateness of the proposed expansion of the scope of the project. If the Revision application relates to a specific line of investigation presented in the original application that was not recommended for approval by the committee, then the committee will consider whether the responses to comments from the previous scientific review group are adequate and whether substantial changes are clearly evident.

Additional Review Considerations

As applicable for the project proposed, reviewers will consider each of the following items, but will not give scores for these items, and should not consider them in providing an overall impact score.  

Applications from Foreign Organizations

Not Applicable

Select Agent Research

Reviewers will assess the information provided in this section of the application, including 1) the Select Agent(s) to be used in the proposed research, 2) the registration status of all entities where Select Agent(s) will be used, 3) the procedures that will be used to monitor possession use and transfer of Select Agent(s), and 4) plans for appropriate biosafety, biocontainment, and security of the Select Agent(s).

Resource Sharing Plans

Reviewers will comment on whether the following Resource Sharing Plans, or the rationale for not sharing the following types of resources, are reasonable: 1) Data Sharing Plan; 2) Sharing Model Organisms; and 3) Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Budget and Period of Support

Reviewers will consider whether the budget and the requested period of support are fully justified and reasonable in relation to the proposed research.

2. Review and Selection Process

Applications will be evaluated for scientific and technical merit by (an) appropriate Scientific Review Group(s) convened by the NIMH, in accordance with NIH peer review policy and procedures, using the stated review criteria. Assignment to a Scientific Review Group will be shown in the eRA Commons.

As part of the scientific peer review, all applications:

Applications will be assigned on the basis of established PHS referral guidelines to the appropriate NIH Institute or Center. Applications will compete for available funds with all other recommended applications convened by NIMH. Following initial peer review, recommended applications will receive a second level of review by the appropriate national Advisory Council or Board. The following will be considered in making funding decisions:

3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

After the peer review of the application is completed, the PD/PI will be able to access his or her Summary Statement (written critique) via the eRA Commons

Information regarding the disposition of applications is available in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

Section VI. Award Administration Information

1. Award Notices

If the application is under consideration for funding, NIH will request "just-in-time" information from the applicant as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

A formal notification in the form of a Notice of Award (NoA) will be provided to the applicant organization for successful applications. The NoA signed by the grants management officer is the authorizing document and will be sent via email to the grantee’s business official.

Awardees must comply with any funding restrictions described in Section IV.5. Funding Restrictions. Selection of an application for award is not an authorization to begin performance. Any costs incurred before receipt of the NoA are at the recipient's risk. These costs may be reimbursed only to the extent considered allowable pre-award costs.      

Any application awarded in response to this FOA will be subject to the DUNS, SAM Registration, and Transparency Act requirements as noted on the Award Conditions and Information for NIH Grants website.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

All NIH grant and cooperative agreement awards include the NIH Grants Policy Statement as part of the NoA. For these terms of award, see the NIH Grants Policy Statement Part II: Terms and Conditions of NIH Grant Awards, Subpart A: General  and Part II: Terms and Conditions of NIH Grant Awards, Subpart B: Terms and Conditions for Specific Types of Grants, Grantees, and Activities. More information is provided at Award Conditions and Information for NIH Grants.

Cooperative Agreement Terms and Conditions of Award

The following special terms of award are in addition to, and not in lieu of, otherwise applicable U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) administrative guidelines, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) grant administration regulations at 45 CFR Parts 74 and 92 (Part 92 is applicable when State and local Governments are eligible to apply), and other HHS, PHS, and NIH grant administration policies.

The administrative and funding instrument used for this program will be the cooperative agreement, an "assistance" mechanism (rather than an "acquisition" mechanism), in which substantial NIH programmatic involvement with the awardees is anticipated during the performance of the activities. Under the cooperative agreement, the NIH purpose is to support and stimulate the recipients' activities by involvement in and otherwise working jointly with the award recipients in a partnership role; it is not to assume direction, prime responsibility, or a dominant role in the activities. Consistent with this concept, the dominant role and prime responsibility resides with the awardees for the project as a whole, although specific tasks and activities may be shared among the awardees and the NIH as defined below.

The PD(s)/PI(s) will have the primary responsibility for:

NIH staff members will have substantial programmatic involvement that is above and beyond the normal stewardship role in awards, as described below:

The Project Scientist(s) interacts scientifically with the Group and may provide appropriate assistance, including assisting in research planning, suggesting studies within the scope of the Group's objectives and research activities, presenting experimental findings to the Group from published sources or from relevant contract projects, participating in the design of experiments agreed to by the Group, participating in the analysis of results, and advising in management and technical performance. The Project Scientist(s) will be a member(s) of the Steering Committee (defined below). However, the total membership by NIH staff will not exceed one-third (1/3) of the membership of the Steering Committee. In all cases, the role of NIMH, NIDA, or NIAAA will be to assist and facilitate and not to direct activities.

The NIMH, NIDA, or NIAAA Project Scientist(s) can recommend to their Institutes to utilize their drug development resources (e.g., CNS receptor screening, chemical synthesis, and toxicology services) in support of the NCDDG Group research activities if such resources are required on an occasional basis. The following is a list of resources that are readily available and may be supplied if they become desirable during performance. It is not anticipated that requests of services will be considered as a continuing need.

FIH and Phase I studies may be reviewed by the appropriate NIH Institute's Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) to ensure the safety of participants and the validity and integrity of the data.  The study protocol(s) and consent form(s) will be reviewed by the DSMB prior to initiation of the project.  The DSMB will review study reports from the NCDDG group on a regular basis to monitor subject enrollment and retention, safety, quality of data collection, and integrity of the study.  Based on its review, the DSMB has the authority to stop the study after it has started.

Additionally, an NIMH, NIDA, or NIAAA Program Official will be responsible for the normal scientific and programmatic stewardship of the award, including monitoring implementation of the data and research resource sharing plans and will be named in the award notice.

Participation of NIH Intramural Scientists. An NIH intramural scientist may not serve as the PD/PI of an NCDDG but may participate in a Group as collaborator, or consultant. However, an Intramural scientist may not receive salary, equipment, supplies, or other remuneration from awards resulting from this FOA. The Intramural scientist must obtain written approval of his/her NIH Institute Scientific Director for the amount of resources that may be allocated to the project. The approval must also specify that the conduct of the project will comply with the DHHS regulations for research involving human subjects (if applicable) and with the PHS policy on vertebrate animal research. The participation of an intramural scientist is independent of and unrelated to the role of the NIMH, NIDA and/or NIAAA Project Scientist. For NCDDG applications that include NIH intramural components, the intramural resource level will be included in the total cost of the overall application. The involvement of Intramural scientists needs to be consistent with NIH Policy, http://www1.od.nih.gov/oir/sourcebook/ethic-conduct/ethical-conduct-toc.htm.

Areas of Joint Responsibility include:

Steering Committee: A governing Steering Committee composed of the PD/PI(s), key research scientists, collaborators or consultants, outside expert9s), the NIH Project Scientist(s), and the NIH Program Official (as a non-voting member) will be established in each NCDDG to assist in monitoring and developing the scientific content and direction of the program.  When included in the Steering Committee, outside experts are chosen by the PD/PI(s) in consultation with the NIH Project Scientist and Program Official. Each named member of the Steering Committee will have one vote, except the NIH Program Official, as noted above.

The Steering Committee members will meet periodically to review and monitor progress, plan and design research activities, and establish priorities. The frequency of meetings, not fewer than two per year, will be determined by the PD/PI, who will be responsible for scheduling the time and place (in person or by video or audio teleconference) and for preparing concise proceedings or minutes (two or three pages) which will be delivered to the members of the Group within 2 weeks of the meeting.

a. The principal end products of NCDDG activities for NIMH and NIAAA are expected to include: 1) the discovery and testing of new chemical entities, optimization of lead compounds, IND-directed toxicology, safety pharmacology to support phase I studies and identification of clinical candidates for subsequent PoC studies for the treatment of mental disorders or alcohol addiction; 2) research tools; and 3) models and pharmacodynamic measures to evaluate novel therapeutics. Cost-sharing is encouraged for IND-directed toxicity and safety studies of drug candidates, GMP synthesis, formulation, and IND filing costs.

b. The principal end products of NCDDG activities for NIDA are expected to include: 1) the discovery of ligands for target validation studies and potentially for development as pharmacotherapies for drug addiction, 2) research tools to advance research in the treatment development domain, and 3) preclinical models to evaluate novel therapeutics. Studies required for IND-targeted preclinical development (GMP synthesis, formulation, toxicology) are generally beyond the scope of this FOA for NIDA. Such development through the NIH BRiDGS program or private venture capital is encouraged.

c. NIMH and/or NIAAA will retain the option to cross-file or independently file an application for an investigational clinical trial (e.g., an IND application to the United States Food and Drug Administration) of any clinical research tool or invention resulting from these NIH supported cooperative agreements. Reports of data generated by the Group or any of its members required for inclusion in IND applications and for cross-filing purposes shall be submitted promptly by the Principal Investigator to the NIH Institute Project Scientist upon request. Such reports shall include background information, methods, results, and conclusions.

Dispute Resolution:

Any disagreements that may arise in scientific or programmatic matters (within the scope of the award) between award recipients and the NIH may be brought to Dispute Resolution. A Dispute Resolution Panel composed of three members will be convened. It will have three members: a designee of the Steering Committee chosen without NIH staff voting, one NIH designee, and a third designee with expertise in the relevant area who is chosen by the other two; in the case of individual disagreement, the first member may be chosen by the individual awardee. This special dispute resolution procedure does not alter the awardee's right to appeal an adverse action that is otherwise appealable in accordance with PHS regulation 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D and DHHS regulation 45 CFR Part 16.

Intellectual Property and Patent Rights for New Chemical Entities:

Since the discovery of new pharmacological treatments for mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction is a major objective of this effort and active involvement by pharmaceutical laboratories is encouraged and may be facilitated by the existence of appropriate patent coverage, it is essential that applicants provide plans to address the handling of intellectual property for new chemical entities for the treatment of mental disorders, drug or alcohol addiction under this FOA.

Successful applicants are required to supply the following confidential materials to the NIMH, NIDA and/or NIAAA Program Officials listed under Section VII. Agency Contacts.

1. Each applicant Group must provide a detailed description of the approach to be used for handling intellectual property and for licensing where appropriate, in particular where the invention may involve investigators from more than one institution. Procedures must be described for resolution of legal problems should they arise. Your attention is drawn to the NIH Extramural Technology Transfer Policies and Documents [http://grants.nih.gov/grants/intell-property.htm].

2. A formal statement of Intellectual Property among all Group members and their institutions as well as a detailed description of procedures to be followed for resolution of legal problems which may develop, must be signed and dated by the organizational official authorized to enter into intellectual property arrangements for each Group member and member institution. The signed agreement must be submitted prior to award to the appropriate NIMH, NIDA and/or NIAAA staff at the addresses provided under Section VII. Agency Contacts.

3. A plan must be developed for disposition of combinatorial and compound libraries generated in Research Projects focused on discovery of new chemical entities as clinical candidates for drug development in conformance with Section VI.2.A - Cooperative Agreement Terms and Conditions of Award and consistent with achieving the goals of the program.  The signed document must be submitted prior to award to the appropriate NIMH, NIDA and/or NIAAA staff at the addresses provided under Section VII. Agency Contacts.

4. Prior to the award, the PD/PI must provide a signed statement of acceptance of the participation of NIMH, NIDA or NIAAA staff during performance of the award as outlined under "NIH Staff Responsibilities" in Section VI.2.A - Cooperative Agreement Terms and Conditions of Award.

Note: Do NOT submit documents 1-4 above with the application.  However, awards will not be made until these documents are received and approved by NIMH, NIDA or NIAAA.

3. Reporting

When multiple years are involved, awardees will be required to submit the annual Non-Competing Progress Report (PHS 2590 or RPPR) and financial statements as required in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

A final progress report, invention statement, and the expenditure data portion of the Federal Financial Report are required for closeout of an award, as described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (Transparency Act), includes a requirement for awardees of Federal grants to report information about first-tier subawards and executive compensation under Federal assistance awards issued in FY2011 or later.  All awardees of applicable NIH grants and cooperative agreements are required to report to the Federal Subaward Reporting System (FSRS) available at www.fsrs.gov on all subawards over $25,000.  See the NIH Grants Policy Statement for additional information on this reporting requirement. 

Section VII. Agency Contacts

We encourage inquiries concerning this funding opportunity and welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants.

Application Submission Contacts

eRA Commons Help Desk (Questions regarding eRA Commons registration, submitting and tracking an application, documenting system problems that threaten submission by the due date, post submission issues)
Telephone: 301-402-7469 or 866-504-9552 (Toll Free)
Finding Help Online: http://grants.nih.gov/support/index.html
TTY: 301-451-5939
Email: commons@od.nih.gov

Grants.gov Customer Support (Questions regarding Grants.gov registration and submission, downloading forms and application packages)
Contact CenterTelephone: 800-518-4726
Web ticketing system: https://grants-portal.psc.gov/ContactUs.aspx
Email: support@grants.gov

GrantsInfo (Questions regarding application instructions and process, finding NIH grant resources)
Telephone: 301-435-0714
TTY 301-451-5936
Email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov

Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Linda Brady, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-443-3563
Email: lbrady@mail.nih.gov

Kristopher Bough, Ph.D.   
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Telephone: 301-443-9800
Email: boughk@mail.nih.gov

Mark Egli, Ph.D.
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 301-594-6382
Email: megli@mail.nih.gov

Peer Review Contact(s)

David Armstrong, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-443-3534
Email: armstrda@mail.nih.gov

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Rebecca Claycamp, M.S., CRA
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Telephone: 301-443-2811
Email: rclaycam@mail.nih.gov

Yinka Abu
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Telephone: 301-490-3203
Email: abuy@nida.nih.gov

Judy Fox
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 301-443-4704
Email: jfox@mail.nih.gov

Section VIII. Other Information

Recently issued trans-NIH policy notices may affect your application submission. A full list of policy notices published by NIH is provided in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. All awards are subject to the terms and conditions, cost principles, and other considerations described in the NIH Grants Policy Statement.

Authority and Regulations

Awards are made under the authorization of Sections 301 and 405 of the Public Health Service Act as amended (42 USC 241 and 284) and under Federal Regulations 42 CFR Part 52 and 45 CFR Parts 74 and 92.


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