Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

Browse Comments Beginning With:
Record ID:
Entry Date:
On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



|First 100 Records   Back 1000 Records   Back 100 Records   Records 6759 - 6858 of 49015 Forward 100 Records   Forward 1000 Records   Last 100 Records|

ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
6759 05/02/2009 at 04:18:56 PM Self     Please do not use my tax dollars for experimentation on human embryonic stem cells. I believe that life begins at conception and that a human life is taken when embryonic stem cells are used. Much success has been achieved with adult stem cells and these can be used without the taking of a human life. I strongly urge you not to use federal funds for the purpose of embryonic stem cell research.

 
6760 05/02/2009 at 04:19:28 PM Self     This is criminal behavior. It assumes the embryo is not a life and gets no vote on what happens to it. What about its right to life. No proof exists that embryonic stem cells are more useful than adult stem cells.

 
6761 05/02/2009 at 04:19:48 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to the use of human embryos for stem cell research. From what I have read, good results have been gotten from umbilical cord stem cell research and other adult stem cells; none have come from human embryos even though testing has been done. Morally I am against embryonic stem cell research.

 
6762 05/02/2009 at 04:20:57 PM Self     I am opposed to new NIH guidelines which would allow government funding on new embryonic stem cell lines. I feel research done with other stem cell lines has been promising, and the possible benefits of using new embryos for research does not outweigh the moral cost of destroying human life in the name of research.

I would encourage you to oppose all regulations which provide funding for embryonic stem cell research on new lines.

 
6763 05/02/2009 at 04:21:28 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6764 05/02/2009 at 04:22:00 PM Self     There are alternative methods that can be used without using stem cell from a human fetus. I understand former Vice President Gore is working with individuals on a different process. The President should be knowledgeable in these areas of research and protect the morality of this nation and its people. God has blessed America as we have followed Him as a nation. IN GOD WE TRUST needs to still be our guide in this nation, not IN OBAMA WE FOLLOW.

 
6765 05/02/2009 at 04:22:12 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6766 05/02/2009 at 04:22:30 PM Self     Please stop using our taxes to pay for this type of stem cell research. Be resourceful and focus on the adult stem cell research which works and not the embryonic which has so many problems.

 
6767 05/02/2009 at 04:22:38 PM Self     I am in favor of funding ADULT STEM CELL research only. This is where the most positive results have been occurring and it does not cause the death of an innocent child. To deny that a fertilized human egg would result in anything but a human baby is pure folly. The ends does not justify the means. Thank you for allowing me to voice my opinion on this matter. Sincerely,

 
6768 05/02/2009 at 04:22:52 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6769 05/02/2009 at 04:23:09 PM Self     I am against spending federal tax dollars on human embryonic stem cell research. All the research that's be done to date has turned up little or no results whereas adult stem cells have yielded great potential. At a time when our economy is struggling is it good sense to spend tax payers dollars to kill embryos? NO!

 
6770 05/02/2009 at 04:23:22 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6771 05/02/2009 at 04:24:39 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6772 05/02/2009 at 04:25:11 PM Self     I support the loosening of restrictions on human embryonic stem cell research. The use of discarded embryos from IVF clinics for deriving new ES cell lines is appropriate and should be supported by the NIH.

 
6773 05/02/2009 at 04:25:14 PM Self     I object to the killing of human embryos to harvest stem cells for research. It is unecessary, cruel, and immoral. Adult stem cells offer great opprtunities and hope for future treatments, and they don't require the loss of human life. Please do not expand access to any human embryos other than those already designated by former President Bush's legislation. Thank you.

 
6774 05/02/2009 at 04:25:20 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6775 05/02/2009 at 04:25:58 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6776 05/02/2009 at 04:26:06 PM Self     I am morally opposed to the experimentation of FETAL Stem Cells. They are Human Beings and should not be experimented on.This extraction of cells will cause death to the embryos. I believe that if there are left over stem cells they should be offered for adoption by couples unable to conceive naturally.

Money should be placed into adult stem cell experimentation where no lives are lost and there has been more promising advances.

 
6777 05/02/2009 at 04:26:21 PM Self     This is morally wrong and I oppose.

 
6778 05/02/2009 at 04:26:25 PM Self     I would like to officially state that I oppose the use of my taxpayer dollars for experiments and research that rely on killing embryonic human beings to derive stem cells. I do not want to open up the floodgates for the destruction of these embryos. This is the voice of the majority of people, not the loudest nor the ones surrounding the administration. If this is a true democracy, you will hear the majority, not the loudness of one's particular agenda.

 
6779 05/02/2009 at 04:26:33 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6780 05/02/2009 at 04:27:02 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6781 05/02/2009 at 04:27:13 PM Self     I am a Canadian with a 7 year old grandson who was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when he was only 3. Canadians Banting and Best were courageous in 1921 when they discovered insulin. Now, President Obama has been courageous in opening up another door for those who live with Type 1 diabetes. I wish all researchers, who now have new doors opened for them, speed in finding a new solution that will be less onorous on those afflicted with the disease and those who love them.

Please add my comments to your collection of comments on the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidleines.

Thank you.

 
6782 05/02/2009 at 04:27:19 PM Self     I oppose the use of my taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. My point is that if all the money given to organizations that use embryonic cells had been given to research on adult stem , we would so much farther along with cures. Adult stem cells have had cures but embryonic has had none-zero so far. Absolutely no cures but a variety of cures and great potential with adult cells. Why are we killing potentail human beings when we do not need to for the cures we are seeking?

 
6783 05/02/2009 at 04:27:30 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6784 05/02/2009 at 04:27:39 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds to experiment on stem cell research. This is against God's law and should be voted down.

 
6785 05/02/2009 at 04:27:44 PM Self     Dear NIH, In the opening statement of these proposed guidelines...it states that embryonic stem cell research "may yield information" and "could provide information" ...we have already major success discoveries from adult stem cell research and the use of pluipotent cells, embryonic stem cell research is a waste of money. These embryonic cells are - life - we must not use human life for tests! I do not wish United States government money to fund embryonic stem cell research or testing. Look at the University of Wake Forest and University of Pennsylvania...they are making great strides in organ/body part production from adult stem cell medical research. Embryonic stem cell research is old news that didn't work! Do not use embryonic stem cells for research. It is non-productive and morally questionable to continue along the path of embryonic stem cell research!

 
6786 05/02/2009 at 04:28:23 PM Self     Please resume/begin using stem cell research to help people who have Type 1 Diabetes. I want to see big improvements to the health and life of my family and friends who have Type 1 Diabetes. Thank you

 
6787 05/02/2009 at 04:28:23 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6788 05/02/2009 at 04:28:49 PM Self     AS A BELIEVER IN LIFE AT CONCEPTION, I AM TOTALLY AGAINST EMBRIONIC CELL RESEARCH....W W J D!!!!

 
6789 05/02/2009 at 04:29:27 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6790 05/02/2009 at 04:29:46 PM Self     It is my sincerely held belief that it is imoral and improper to use my tax dollars to fund this activity, which was announced in the April 23, 2009 Federal Register Notice and embrionic stem cell research is also imoral and improper!

 
6791 05/02/2009 at 04:29:56 PM Self     AS A BELIEVER IN LIFE AT CONCEPTION, I AM TOTALLY AGAINST EMBRIONIC CELL RESEARCH....W W J D!!!!

 
6792 05/02/2009 at 04:30:00 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6793 05/02/2009 at 04:30:37 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6794 05/02/2009 at 04:31:08 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6795 05/02/2009 at 04:31:21 PM Self     I support federal funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and are no longer needed for that purpose.

 
6796 05/02/2009 at 04:31:43 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research should be fully funded under the guidelines presented by President Obama.

 
6797 05/02/2009 at 04:32:12 PM Self     To National Institute of Health: I object to my taxpayer dollars being used to fund embryonic research; it would be better to use those funds for adult stem cell research that have already shown potential for success. This method doesn't necessitate destruction of one's life or potential life. I believe our research is getting ahead of our ethical concerns. Some kinds of research should not be done, if it means destruction of a life. In fact, I believe that in-vitro fertilization is wrong, look at the problems it has led to. God did not intend for life to be created in a petri dish.

 
6798 05/02/2009 at 04:32:12 PM Self     i object to the use of embryonic stem cells for research. The use of embryonic stem cells has not produced any cures for disease, as opposed to adult stem cells, which have been used to treat over 70 diseases. In addition, by using embryonic stem cells, you will be responsible for the killing of human life. Please do not waste any more of the public's hard-earned money on this immoral choice.

 
6799 05/02/2009 at 04:32:13 PM Self     I oppose the regulations that on March 9, 2009 President Barack Obama issued as an executive order that overturned President Bush's policy and opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. What these guidelines do is send my tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

 
6800 05/02/2009 at 04:32:41 PM Self     I oppose funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization for reproductive purposes that are no longer needed for that purpose as stated in the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines.

 
6801 05/02/2009 at 04:33:36 PM Self     I am personally opposed to any type of research on embryonic stem cells. There has been so much research done that show that stem cells can be used from other sources of the body without using embryonic stem cells. Please do not support this bill . . . leave the embryonic stem cells alone.

 
6802 05/02/2009 at 04:34:32 PM Self     With all the documentation of successful adult stem cell research and all the documented lack of success of embryonic stem cell research, seems logical to me that funding for stem cell research should be focused on adult stem cells, not embryonic stem cells. Focusing on what is working would enable additional success and reduce resource losses (money & time) associated with unproductive lines of research that also create unnecessary ethical dilemnas.

 
6803 05/02/2009 at 04:34:53 PM Self     To: National Institute of Health,

Since stem cell research has been successfully performed using adult tissue, why kill an unborn child in order to accomplish the same research? This is not a rhetorical question, would someone in your Agency give me at least one reason?

Although this request will most likely be ignored, I want to make it clear that I am asking for a response to the foregoing question.

Response(s) can be sent to *****

Sincerely,

 
6804 05/02/2009 at 04:35:06 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research has produced no effective treatments for any illness or condition. Adult stem cells have produced a number of effective treatments. More research dollars should go to research the type of stem cells that already have a demonstrated benefit.

 
6805 05/02/2009 at 04:36:38 PM Self     Any destruction of human life is subject to God's commandments "Thou shalt not kill". If the life of the mother is at stake, or if there has been rape or incest, of in the case of person deserving the death penalty, then there is rational reasoning to terminate life. Otherwise all who violate the commandment "Thou shalt not kill" are guilty of a crime and must pay for that sin. Either here on in the hereafter. What is it that you or anyone else does not understand about this? Oh, and there are sins that Christ's atonement does not cover. That means that those who committ those sins will have to pay for them. Is there someone out there that wants to tske a chance on pleading ignorance?

Stay away from controversial or lethal acts. Life is too short and there are a lot of ways to be happy.

 
6806 05/02/2009 at 04:42:07 PM Self     I do not believe that embryonic stem cells should be used for research and I do not want my tax dollars used to fund such research. Adult stem cells have successfully been used for medical purposes and show much promise. If you need young stem cells haw about using placenta cells etc. which don't involve harvesting and destroying humans.

 
6807 05/02/2009 at 04:43:00 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal money spent on embryonic stem cell research. I am sure you will find this offensive, but, murdering children to improve health or prolong life is more offensive and a grave sin.

 
6808 05/02/2009 at 04:43:59 PM Self     i strongly object to our federal tax dollars being used to fund experiments on embryonic stem cell research my wife has Type one diabetes and muscular dystrophy and we could not in good conscience want her to be cured or helped at the expense of the death of another human person.

 
6809 05/02/2009 at 04:45:37 PM Self     If we are to err, why are we not erring on the side of life?

 
6810 05/02/2009 at 04:46:43 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
6811 05/02/2009 at 04:47:11 PM Self     i strongly object to our federal tax dollars being used to fund experiments on embryonic stem cell research i have Type one diabetes and muscular dystrophy and I could not in good conscience want to be cured or helped at the expense of the death of another human person.

 
6812 05/02/2009 at 04:47:15 PM Self     This is murder! I strongly oppose the use of human embryos for stem cell research. Adult stem cells should be used instead.

 
6813 05/02/2009 at 04:48:08 PM Self     Embryos are people, too. STICK with adult stem cell research and applications. Embryonic stem cells are a DEAD end.

 
6814 05/02/2009 at 04:49:06 PM Self     Please do not allow federal money to be used for research that involves human stem cells taken from human embryos. Killing human embryos is morally wrong. Promoting the adoption of these embryos would be the moral and right thing to do.

 
6815 05/02/2009 at 04:49:22 PM Self     I believe this is wrong, and to use taxpayers money to fund it is wrong. By doing this it gives us no choice and I thought in America we always had a choice or is that the change we were told would happen. NO MORE CHOICES FOR HONEST AMERICANS

 
6816 05/02/2009 at 04:49:43 PM Self     Using our tax money to support an activity that many legitimatly find morally reprehensible (destruction of embryos) especially when REAL SCIENCE HAS MEDICAL SOLUTIONS WHICH ARE MUCH MORE VIABLE, ALREADY SUCCESSFUL AND NOT CONTROVERSIAL is extraorinarily irresponsible and is obviously pure politics at work. SHAME SHAME SHAME

 
6817 05/02/2009 at 04:49:50 PM Self     I oppose all stem cell research on unborn children. I oppose the use of Federal Funds to help any stem cell research.5787

 
6818 05/02/2009 at 04:50:39 PM Self     Please oppose the use of human embroyonic stem cells for stem cell research. There are other options that can lead to the same results in research.

 
6819 05/02/2009 at 04:51:13 PM Self     I am contacting you on the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines because I am greatly concerned they will be used to permit the taking of defenseless human lives. We were all once embryos and created equal. So, every human being should be respected, no matter what race, gender, or stage of life. Part of the rationale, used to justify the killing of a human embryo, is that it’s going to be destroyed anyway. This is like saying that since someone has thrown out the baby with the bath water, we have the right to kill the baby. This isn’t ethical. It’s a rationalization for immorality. Another guideline is that the patient, who is the source of the embryo, will be consulted. We're talking about a human being here, not a possession. No one should be allowed to sign away an innocent human life, not even the parent. In addition, recent progress has made it possible to return adult cells to the pluripotent state. These cells can be taken from the one who needs them, so the rejection problem caused by using a different human’s stem cells is avoided. Hence, we need not kill one person to save another. Please tell the president that human embryonic stem cell research is unnecessary, and that there is no ethical way to pursue it.

 
6820 05/02/2009 at 04:51:24 PM Self     Use adult stem cells only. Adult stem cells are successful against many diseases.

Do not murder embroyo stem cells. Twenty plus years have not produce any success at all.

 
6821 05/02/2009 at 04:51:38 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: Last month President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
6822 05/02/2009 at 04:52:02 PM Self     please do not use federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. Only use stem cells from adults.

 
6823 05/02/2009 at 04:52:11 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is just another aspect of the liberal pro-death agenda. There is ZERO need to pursue this line of research considering the positive results of adult stem cell research. ALL taxpayer funds for stem cell research should be channeled to adult stem cell research.

 
6824 05/02/2009 at 04:54:21 PM Self     I am completely against the use of my tax dollars being used for experiments that rely on killing human embryos!! Please move to protect and preserve them. Allow them to be placed for adoption. Thank you.

 
6825 05/02/2009 at 04:54:29 PM Self     Hi,

I do not support spending public funds to research embryonic stem cells. Research on adult stem cells has been productive and there is enough private funding available to conduct embryonic stem cell research along with available samples for those entities that want to pursue this area of research.

Thank you

 
6826 05/02/2009 at 04:56:33 PM Self     There is no need to misuse humans for stem cell research. Playing God will only bring further troubles to our country. It is unethical and wrong. Please reinstate what Bush had.

 
6827 05/02/2009 at 04:56:42 PM Self     It is clear from what scientists tell us, that the use of human beings in the embryonic stage of life for harvesting stem cells is not only unnecessary, but has yielded little to science. The obvious alternatives are producing healing advances. To use resources for ending human life in the embryonic stage violates two ethical principles: the best use of limited resources and the protection of human life.

 
6828 05/02/2009 at 04:57:19 PM Self     I would like to oppose President Obama's executive order regarding stem cell funding for research. It seems to be yet another attack on the beginning of human life. When will we understand that each embryo is already coded by their DNA to become a unique and valuable individual? I don't believe our tax dollars should be spent on research that would only eventually lead to the harvesting of human embryos for the purposes of others. We must protect the next generation.

Sincerely,

 
6829 05/02/2009 at 04:59:57 PM Self     Why is there continued effort to experiment on human embryos for Stem Cell benefits when the work with Adult Stem Cells seems to be the only source of genuine medical breakthroughs. In the name of trying to come up with medical cures we base it upon human death. The society that is built upon the Constitution and Bill or Rights is in decline. When we no longer protect the weakest but sacrifice them upon the altar of expediency we are undermining our very existence. Mother Teresa said that the fruit of abortion and fetal experimentation is nuclear war.

 
6830 05/02/2009 at 05:02:14 PM Self     Please be considerate of the protection that President Bush put in place to protect the unborn, and retain this protection for all unborn children, so they may see the light of day and not to be observed from a microcscope lens.

 
6831 05/02/2009 at 05:03:00 PM Self     I oppose the federal funding for embryonic stem cell research created by IVF for reproductive purposes.

 
6832 05/02/2009 at 05:04:14 PM Self     I oppose federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. I support President George W. Bush's document to stop this research of using Embryo's. President Obama is wrong in trying to reverse this.

 
6833 05/02/2009 at 05:04:33 PM Self     Thank you for the opportunity to comment.

The Federal Register Notice indicates a purpose "to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy...."

Since the foundation legistlation for these guidelines violates the consciences of many taxpaying Americans, there will not reasonably be consensus reached on what is "ethically responsible" nor on what is "scientifically worthy." Given this, please make provisions in the guidelines for each tax payer to disapprove their taxes to be directed toward human embryonic research. This will be of interest to many, or most, Americans. To do less than this will give rise to increasing polarization in our country, and that is unhealthy.

As a country, we have always promoted the protection of any citizen's conscience when related to their sincerely held religious beliefs. Please attempt to do the same by making a provision to honor and respect those American's who are offended by scientists certainly destroying human life under the guise of research intended to ultimately, possibly improving it.

Thank you -

 
6834 05/02/2009 at 05:06:43 PM Self     Do we have no more values? Adult stem cell research is working well. However human embryonic stem cell research is of no value whatsoever. I oppose the use of funds toward this research. Obviously we all know the reason for wanting to do the research...... to kill for money

 
6835 05/02/2009 at 05:09:37 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is obsolete and hasn't provided any cures or treatments. On the other hand, adult stem cells have already done so much for patients, and the new induced-pluriponent stem cells hold far more promise than embryonic stem cells. We need to financially support science that is saving livings and making them better - not science that isn't doing anything.

Embryonic stem cells also kill embryos, but adult stem cells can be easily and cheaply obtained without any moral controversy. Embryonic stem cell research is not the way to go - unless you want to waste money and lives for a supposed cure that will probably never happen. They also have been known to cause life-threatening tumors in patients. It does not take a rocket scientist to see how people are already benefitting from adult stem cell treatments for leukemia, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and other medical problems.

 
6836 05/02/2009 at 05:12:20 PM Self     The government's use of my taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings would be in direct violation of my conscience. Just as many in this nation do not want others' morals "crammed down their throats", I do not want to be required to pay tax money to a government that would use it for this purpose. If the government's agenda is make the U.S. a "pro-choice" nation, so be it, but please give those who are not in support of these experiments the choice of directing their money to other humanitarian efforts, perhaps programs that would work to find adoptive parents for these children. Look at the negative population growth of many European nations... do you really want the U.S. to follow in their footsteps? Who then will pay to care for the elderly?

 
6837 05/02/2009 at 05:13:44 PM Self     Adult Stem Cell research has already yielded great benefit, while Embryonic Stem Cell research with existing strains has yielded little. Moreover, to encourage killing of human embryos for this research is immoral... and will create a market to rev up this immorality.

Put federal money into Adult Stem Cell research where there is no moral issue and the promise is so much greater.

 
6838 05/02/2009 at 05:15:19 PM Self     I oppose the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines because many newly-derived human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines will become eligible for NIH funding. This will encourage the future derivation of hESC lines, which I strongly oppose. Although NIH funding of the actual derivation is prohibited at this time, these new guidelines will result in federal funds going to those who do derive the hESC lines, allowing them to profit at taxpayers' expense from the derivation of new hESC lines.

To address my concerns, I would strongly recommend modifying the Draft Guidelines to prevent obvious conflicts of interest and profiteering. One way to do this would be for the NIH to bank newly-authorized hESC lines and provide them to all NIH-funded researchers. This will remove the profit motive for those who derive hESC lines.

I also believe that the NIH should prioritize funding of non-controversial stem cell research. The NIH should build upon the proven successes of adult and post-natal stem cell research more quickly and explore frontier of induced pluripotent stem cell research faster. Expansion of funding and/or the number of hESC lines will merely detract from these goals.

 
6839 05/02/2009 at 05:15:50 PM Self     I would encourage Mr. Obama to reverse his decision and stop research with Stem Cells. In my opinion, he is pursuing his own agenda and not everyone in the country agrees with his plan or motives.

 
6840 05/02/2009 at 05:16:02 PM Self     President Obama, You said yesterday that you would welcome input from the "teapart people" I am one amoung many and here is one of my many issues: Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines, these guidelines will send my tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

 
6841 05/02/2009 at 05:16:38 PM Self     Please remember that adult stem cell research has gotten the research successes, and that embryo stem cells are not as helpful. There is no need to destroy human beings, at the embryo stage, for this type of business. Call it what it is. Taking a life for research has the same moral consequences as what happened on 911.

Sincerely,

 
6842 05/02/2009 at 05:18:39 PM Self     I oppose the use of federal tax dollars to be used on embryonic stem cell research research for the following reasons; 1. The destruction of human lives in the process of embryonic stem cell research devalues the sanctity of human beings. 2. After years of study, embryonic stem cell research has so far resulted in no significant results. 3. Other types of stem cell research have already returned valuable results that have already been implemented in medical treatments.

We need to ignore the promises we have heard for years that justify the killing of human life through the destruction of embryos that have had no return on investments and focus these funds on the continuing success of research being conducted in other areas of stem cell research.

 
6843 05/02/2009 at 05:19:54 PM       I oppose the use of taxpayer dollars for experiments that rely on killing embryonic human beings. Funding should be targeted only toward the use of adult stem cells, which have proven numerous times to be effective in finding cures to numerous diseases. PLEASE do not use taxpayer dollars to kill embryonic human beings.

 
6844 05/02/2009 at 05:19:56 PM Self     I believe the use of Embryonic stem cells for research is both unecessary and harmful to our respect for human life. It is unecessary because there are other sources for stem cells. It is harmful to our respect for human life because embryos are a human life. They should be respected as such, and we should care for them as a human life entrusted into our care. To perform research on them is to violate their freedom to choose, because they are not yet at an age to choose for themselves. Like an orphan abused by those in control of their lives these embryos are used not for the benefit of the embryo but so that those who have power over them can achieve what they perceive to be a better life. Therefore I appose these new guidelines to allow research on human ambryos.

 
6845 05/02/2009 at 05:21:14 PM Self     Embryonic stem cells have little, if any proven benefits for curing diseases. That's scientific FACT. Research would be better served into projects that are already working such as adult stem cells and developing stem cells that are similar to, but not derived from embryos. Life at all stages need to be valued or else we will very rapidly destroy what is so basic to each of our existences.

 
6846 05/02/2009 at 05:21:21 PM Self     My tax dollars SHOULD NOT fund embryonic stem cell research!!!

 
6847 05/02/2009 at 05:21:25 PM Self     Do not creat life,just to destroy it.Most of the advances in stem cell research have come from adult stem cells,not embroynic,created byIVF.Stem cells can also be obtained from the umbilical cord!!Therefore there is absolutely no need for IVF embryos!!And I'm sure the cost is enormous,also.

 
6848 05/02/2009 at 05:21:43 PM Self     It is wrong to open federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. These guidelines send my tax dollars to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. Instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos, these draft guidelines would require their death.

In addition to the fact that it is ethically wrong to destroy human beings in whatever stage of life, it has already been proven that embryotic stem cell research is a huge was of time and taxpayer money. Adult stem cells have shown miraculous abilities to heal everything researchers have been trying to get embryotic stem cells to do. There is no good excuse for pissing off most Americans by continuing in this vein.

 
6849 05/02/2009 at 05:22:05 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to embryonic stem cell research. Please do not provide any additional federal support to such research. It's morally indefensible, and there is a viable alternative in adult pluripotent cell research.

 
6850 05/02/2009 at 05:22:54 PM Self     I do not believe that taxpayers dollars should be used to fund research using embryonic stem cells.

 
6851 05/02/2009 at 05:23:08 PM Self     This is not right....Stop playing god! we can get the same results from the umbilical cord after birth.

 
6852 05/02/2009 at 05:25:25 PM Self     I am writing as a concerned citizen. I am a 63 year old Pastor and am heavily involved in my community and have an international outreach. I am quite disturbed about the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines, as announced in the April 23, 2009 Federal Register Notice. If your plans are carried out, it will prove to be a boost to the already out-of-control abortion industry.

PLEASE DO NOT ALLOW OUR GREAT NATION TO GO ANY LOWER IN ITS MORALS AND INTEGRITY. WE ARE BASE ENOUGH - FAR TOO MUCH SO - AND ARE HEADING TOWARDS GREAT DIFFICULTIES AS A RESULT. In fact, the difficulties are already upon us.

YOU can help put the brakes on our decline. PLEASE KILL THIS DRAFT BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!

Thanks & God Bless!

 
6853 05/02/2009 at 05:27:39 PM Self     The Constitution of the United States guarantees the right to life. It is unconstitutional and unconscionable to destroy human life for any purpose, and especially for research! Additionally, embryonic stem cell research has not produced any cures, whereas adult stem cells have. Stem cells are available from adults as well as newborn cord blood. There is no need to destroy human embryos.

 
6854 05/02/2009 at 05:27:50 PM Self     I would like to oppose the fact that my tax dollars will be spent on experimenting on stem cells taken from human embryos instead of promoting the adoption of these human embryos. To allow this policy through means of executive order shows President Obama is unwilling to allow discussion and a vote by the representatives of the people of the United States. There has been no medical advances through this line of experiment while over 100 advances have taken place with adult stem cell experiments. Why are we throwing money at experiments that have proved futile?

 
6855 05/02/2009 at 05:28:12 PM Self     i beleave that if a women deos not want a baby there are other options out there like putting the child up for adoption so really no reason to kill one that has begun to grow it's sad that wemon are raped but if that is the reason for not wanting it then there are wemon that want one and caan't have...but there are wemon that just won't carrie a child to term and will do it in the bath room on their on or search out a under ground doctor so for that reason for some this might be good in the short run but will have to face concer qunice's later on so it's on the one that has it done an the one that does it killing a life that has begun hmmmm...!!!!

 
6856 05/02/2009 at 05:28:15 PM Self     I don't want my tax dollars to go towards funding research on embyos to use the stem cells. More positive results have come from adult stem cells and also no life is destroyed like in embryonic stem cells. No more funding of destroying human life!!!!!!!

 
6857 05/02/2009 at 05:29:03 PM Self     Human Stem Cell research is equavilent to killing tiny humans. Please consider not allowing embronic stem cell research.In your guidelines, adult stem cell research is the better choice. As a nation we do not wish to have these deaths on our hands.

 
6858 05/02/2009 at 05:30:18 PM Self     As a labor and delivery nurse, I see this precious cord blood being disposed of. It would be much easier and COST effective to use this blood once the baby has delivered, the doctor puts this cord blood into a cup. It is extremely immoral to use tiny embryo's for experimentation, even if "left over" from in vitro. Please do not allow this to occur.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page