Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
24149 05/17/2009 at 06:16:15 PM Self     No human stem to be used ever.

 
24150 05/17/2009 at 06:17:23 PM Self     We oppose the unlimited use of embryonic stem cells for research and profit. The Draft Guidelines would allow use of 'discarded' embryos for stem cell research. While the end - possible medical discoveries - is tempting, the means is daunting. At what point do we stop experimenting with human life? Why are these embryos deemed useful for experimentation when others were deemed desirable for procreation? Will the desire for medical solutions and profit someday cause us to step further and manufacture embryos for production?

It is somewhat comforting that NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited.

 
24151 05/17/2009 at 06:17:33 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and hope that it will one day find a cure for my mother's diabetes. I am grateful that the irrational restrictions are being removed.

 
24152 05/17/2009 at 06:17:49 PM Self     As someone who has watched dear friends slowly fade away because of diseases that might have been prevented or at least ameliorated had embryonic stem cell research in this country not been so shackled by the ideological power of mythology, may I say how much I welcome these relaxations -- and how much I wish they were even broader.

 
24153 05/17/2009 at 06:19:44 PM Self     The Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines are inhumane and unethical. What is America coming to?

 
24154 05/17/2009 at 06:20:22 PM Self     As a private citizen I find the use of human embryos for experimentation unconscienable. The very fact that these embryos are considered by some to be ideal to find cures for other humans proves their humanity. This is the modern version of cannabalism. Also this experimentation is unnecssary as adult srem cells have produced dozens of cures while embryonic stem cells have produced only tumors. Using adult stem calls is not morally objectionable. I object to tax dollars being used for this immoral embryonic stem cell research.

 
24155 05/17/2009 at 06:21:38 PM       I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I don't want my taxes to be used to support research that requires the destruction of innocent human life. I will, however support adult stem research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. The government should not extend support to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown, as I have read, to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and they are often rejected by the patient’s body. The government should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life, which is sacred. Adult stem cell research is non-controversial, ethical and proven to be effective in treating patients. Although finding cures for the diseases affecting humanity is important, it is much more important to respect life. Please, respect taxpayer’s feelings and moral principles by RESPECTING HUMAN LIFE. Thank you.

 
24156 05/17/2009 at 06:23:19 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24157 05/17/2009 at 06:23:51 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research! Perhaps retreive the aborted feti and use their stem cells to help increase the pool of available data.

 
24158 05/17/2009 at 06:27:48 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24159 05/17/2009 at 06:28:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24160 05/17/2009 at 06:28:03 PM Self     I am deeply troubled that a reported 99% of comments submitted through this page have been from conservative religious organizations such as The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) (http://www.usccb.org/stemcellcampaign/) who have organized what essentially amount to a spamming campaign to corrupt the process.

I clearly recognize a group of priests should not be the go-to people for science policy. As a non-scientist but concerned citizen, I should hope that the opinions of the scientifically-literate and especially of the stem cell research scientists themselves should be give appropriate weight in this issue.

My understanding (my science background is physics and not the biosciences) is that the guidelines as they stand are already politically very timid, and must be strengthened. Problems are:

- a "grandfather clause" is needed to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will be eligible;

- alternate sources of stem cell lines such as SCNT should not be excluded from funding

Thanks for listening.

 
24161 05/17/2009 at 06:29:48 PM Self     I support stem-cell research

 
24162 05/17/2009 at 06:29:56 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been

made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build

on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly

as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles

that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
24163 05/17/2009 at 06:31:58 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
24164 05/17/2009 at 06:34:03 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24165 05/17/2009 at 06:35:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24166 05/17/2009 at 06:35:59 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24167 05/17/2009 at 06:37:05 PM Self     We are opposed to funding for embryonic stem cell research. Why does our government want to keep pouring money into this area when the use of adult stem cells have a proven record of success and embryonic has no medical results?

 
24168 05/17/2009 at 06:37:14 PM Self     Advances and great promise have been shown with adult stem cells and umbilical stem cells. Both are superior to embryonic stem cells. Destroying an embryo to harvest its stem cells is destroying a tiny human being. This should be discouraged if we consider the sanctity of life to be of any importance in our country. Please do not contribute any tax dollars to this cause. Embryonic stem cells oftentimes end up creating cancer cells - not a good thing.

 
24169 05/17/2009 at 06:37:49 PM Self     Incurable, debilitating diseases such as Diabetes Parkinson's, Huntington's, MS and ALS exact a devastating toll on patients, their families and society in general. Embryonic stem cell research offers milliions hope for a better future, and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines in Section 11 B will permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made by allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise millions of people's health by restricting the ability of scientists to cure and prevent these devastating diseases. We all deserve the best healthcare science can provide.

 
24170 05/17/2009 at 06:39:12 PM Self     I am in full support of Stem cell research. I am extremely greatfull for the change in policies and hope they will be enough to push this research forward and possibly help many millions of people have better healthier longr lives. Thank You

 
24171 05/17/2009 at 06:40:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24172 05/17/2009 at 06:45:40 PM Self     "Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos." That quote from the list of "guidelines" put forth by the HHS Dept and signed by YOU tells ME, Mr. Obama, that YOU, do NOT have respect for human life, except maybe your own. I feel that you are leading our nation down a path of complete destruction. Why you continue to devalue the sanctity of human life is beyond my comprehension. These new guidelines on stem cell "abuse" are just further proof of what I and MILLIONS of others believe about you and it is NOT good. I would ask you to reconsider the guidelines that you have put forth in these abominable regulations and stop the destruction of life. I realize that Stem cell manipulation is somewhat different from abortion, but it really does not make any difference to you one way or another. Maybe you could think about it like this---your mother was gracious enough to continue to carry YOU to full term even though it was probably a very unwelcome hardship for her. Have you ever thought of "life " from that perspective? Just think you may not be here if she had done otherwise. Enough said?

 
24173 05/17/2009 at 06:45:45 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I am EXTREMELY relieved and happy that some of the restrictions are being loosened. We need to continue to step into the future, towards better understanding and healing. Thank you!

 
24174 05/17/2009 at 06:47:46 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24175 05/17/2009 at 06:48:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24176 05/17/2009 at 06:48:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24177 05/17/2009 at 06:49:10 PM Self     The Federal Government has no right to authorize the use of taxpayer dollars for embryonic stem cell research. There is no natural law authority for the Federal government to take the life of innocents for the sake of "scientific" research, in the name of anyone in this country. I, for one, do not and can not authorize the Federal governments actions.

 
24178 05/17/2009 at 06:49:39 PM Self     For the past 10 years, I have volunteered my time in assisting The National Parkinson Foundation, Arizona Chapter, After 2 years as President of the chapter, I have an appreciation of the importance of new research, especially, Stem Cells.

Stem Cells, to me, represent one of the most important areas of research that we presently have.

Your continued support of such is vital to many people.

 
24179 05/17/2009 at 06:51:11 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24180 05/17/2009 at 06:53:03 PM Self     We are completely against using embryotic stem cells for research. There has already been successful cures using adult stem cells and there has been no success at all using embryotic stem cells. Also,embryotic stem sells are acquired by killing an embryo in the earliest stages of being a baby.

 
24181 05/17/2009 at 06:53:48 PM Self     As a citizen, I feel very strongly that the health and well-being of my fellow Americans should be a top priority. There are so many diseases that could potentially be cured through this research, that denying access to stem cell research is a perversion of this wonderful gift God has given us.

Viewing these guidelines, and some of the comments here, I am deeply saddened by what I see. A "grandfather clause" is needed to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will be eligible, as anything else is unconscionable waste. I also feel very strongly that alternate sources of stem cell lines such as SCNT should not be excluded from funding.

We have a chance here to save lives, improve lives, and to see miracles in action. Inaction or weak political pandering serves no one, and only harms our families and our children. Please, support stem cell research and strengthen the guidelines. If we take the first bold steps now, it is possible that in twenty years, this will be a moot point. Don't condemn your fellow humans to lives of pain and suffering, when there is such an avenue for healing available to us all.

 
24182 05/17/2009 at 06:54:03 PM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
24183 05/17/2009 at 06:57:11 PM       I support stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, because it is vital to better our understanding of and capacity to cure diseases that have harmful, far-reaching effects.

 
24184 05/17/2009 at 06:57:33 PM Self     Adult stem cells have already shown usefulness and adaptability in treating many diseases. Further monies must be directed toward developing these areas of research more fully rather than chasing an elusive embryo. Put MY taxmoney to work more quickly by using proven technology.

 
24185 05/17/2009 at 06:57:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

Truly, those of you who are employed at NIH, your own parents do not see your valuable life as a commodity? I'm confident that you must realize that the deliberate creation of human embryos for the purpose of destruction will establish it's own money trail, where women, particulary the poor, will be enticed and encouraged to sell their eggs for this purpose.

What would your mother think of you and your intentions?

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24186 05/17/2009 at 07:00:01 PM Self     i support human embryonic stem cell research.

 
24187 05/17/2009 at 07:02:24 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24188 05/17/2009 at 07:02:52 PM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. With stem cell research we will finally, as human beings, have a chance to eliminate disease and possibly death.

 
24189 05/17/2009 at 07:03:19 PM Self     I'm for it.

 
24190 05/17/2009 at 07:03:23 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Please, don't let the religious right of our country mess this up for the rest of us. We're sitting on potential cures for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, ALS, etc. and they're trying to hold it up by getting their gullible flocks to try to gum up the works here by flooding the comment boxes and so on because they think you're snapping babies' necks and sucking their blood. Keep fighting the good fight!

 
24191 05/17/2009 at 07:06:22 PM Self     I fully support Human Stem Cell experimentation. I believe this is the only way to ensure continued medical and scientific advances.

 
24192 05/17/2009 at 07:08:22 PM Self     To the National Institutes of Health I am asking that you protect human embryos from destruction. I am also asking you to focus on adult stem-cell research, which already has provided dozens of therapies and treatments for humans. Sincerely,

 
24193 05/17/2009 at 07:09:29 PM Self     I am in full support of any research that has the potential to improve the health and quality of life for so many people.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24194 05/17/2009 at 07:09:42 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24195 05/17/2009 at 07:09:56 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad that some of the restrictions are being loosened. I believe it is important to not restrict lines of study at this early stage of research.

 
24196 05/17/2009 at 07:10:52 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. It has shown tremendous promise and I am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. More must be done.

 
24197 05/17/2009 at 07:11:32 PM Self     I agree with these guidelines, but hope that restrictions will loosen further as research shows how potentially beneficial stem cell science can be.

 
24198 05/17/2009 at 07:12:41 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research, where a human embryo is destroyed, has been in use for years but has yet to yield any cures. Other types of stem cell research, which do NOT involve the destruction of human life, have already proven successful in just a few years' time. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
24199 05/17/2009 at 07:13:17 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which, for the first time, will encourage the destruction of human life subsidized by taxpayers. These guidelines promote a biased and rushed consent process by allowing use of embryos that were never frozen and go beyond using frozen embryos that may be discarded by allowing the option upfront for parents to donate their embryos for destructive research alongside permitting them to live. Furthermore, use of ESC extends beyond developing new treatments to other uses such as drug safety testing.

 
24200 05/17/2009 at 07:14:20 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which, for the first time, will encourage the destruction of human life subsidized by taxpayers. These guidelines promote a biased and rushed consent process by allowing use of embryos that were never frozen and go beyond using frozen embryos that may be discarded by allowing the option upfront for parents to donate their embryos for destructive research alongside permitting them to live. Furthermore, use of ESC extends beyond developing new treatments to other uses such as drug safety testing.

 
24201 05/17/2009 at 07:15:42 PM Self     America is the gold standard for health care. Surely we won't let this profound scientific opportunity slip away from us now that we are so close. I don't know anyone who fails to cherish the lives of little ones, but what of those little ones who are doomed to a lifetime of disease and disability or who will lead live shortened by their physiology? I am a Diabetes sufferer, and as a result, am in Stage 2 Kidney Failure. I didn't want this chance to state my support of stem cell research slip away.

 
24202 05/17/2009 at 07:20:20 PM Self     I support the use of embryonic stem cells in research and medical treatment provided there are adequate checks and balances such as those outlined in the Draft Guidelines.

 
24203 05/17/2009 at 07:20:22 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24204 05/17/2009 at 07:20:28 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
24205 05/17/2009 at 07:21:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities. I am against stem cell research of embryos, and the above ways of creating embryos for stem cell research. My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24206 05/17/2009 at 07:22:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24207 05/17/2009 at 07:23:48 PM Self     I do not agree with President Obama that we should kill live embryos to do research or use for people who are already alive to give them some health measure they need. There must be other ways to help sick people other than to kill a potential human life to aid that person. Please do not take the possible human life of a stem cell and kill it to use for someone already alive. Just explore other ways to help sick people - please.

 
24208 05/17/2009 at 07:25:13 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24209 05/17/2009 at 07:26:27 PM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
24210 05/17/2009 at 07:27:14 PM Self     Allowing stem cell research is the best thing Obama has done yet.My daughter was recently diagnosed with type 1, keep up the good work on trying to find a cure. The people with alzhymers also are in need of this research. I don't know what else to say. I pray every day for a cure for all deseases.

 
24211 05/17/2009 at 07:27:45 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. In fact I think it's inhumane to restrict/ban research on embryonic stem cells. How many lives could have been saved? How much time has been wasted in gray areas? Are we as a nation so afraid of offending religious sensibilities that we will let people suffer & die knowing that we could help them? You have 100% of my support, go, research, cure.

 
24212 05/17/2009 at 07:28:10 PM Self     I am for stem cell research in every way. The life saving applications are huge and should be researched.

 
24213 05/17/2009 at 07:28:24 PM Self     We do not appreciate our tax dollars being used in Human Stem Cell Research. We believe in the sanctity of life and do not want our money used in the murdering of the unborn.

 
24214 05/17/2009 at 07:28:41 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
24215 05/17/2009 at 07:30:11 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
24216 05/17/2009 at 07:30:22 PM Self     Please fund comprehensive embryonic stem cell research. Science, not politics or religion, should be the dominant discourse in medical research.

 
24217 05/17/2009 at 07:30:39 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Please loosen more.

 
24218 05/17/2009 at 07:30:41 PM Self     This could help so many people. Please don't prevent stem cell research.

 
24219 05/17/2009 at 07:31:11 PM Self     I would like to say that II am in favor of any and all stem cell research, embryonic or otherwise. My mother and brother suffer from genetic bone disorders, my friend's nephew is dying from Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy, and many members of my family as well as some friends have been affected by cancer. ANYTHING we can do to find cures or treatments for diseases and genetic disorders thanks to embryonic stem cell research should be pursued and fully funded by any means necessary. We have already lost 8 years to stupid, ignorant, religiously motivated legislation during the Bush administration, let's not waste any more time now. Separation of Church and State should be the main consideration here.

 
24220 05/17/2009 at 07:31:41 PM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research. This is science. It should be looked at scientifically and groups based on religion should not dictate national policy.

 
24221 05/17/2009 at 07:32:53 PM Self     I believe that stem cell research holds the potential to cure many diseases and disorders, including the genetic eye disease that afflicts me, my father, my grandmother, and one of my uncles. This research deserves federal funding and should be allowed to progress without the Bush administration's ridiculous restrictions. This is valuable and important research.

 
24222 05/17/2009 at 07:33:19 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
24224 05/17/2009 at 07:36:05 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24225 05/17/2009 at 07:37:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos.

It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

Thank you in advance for your consideration.

 
24226 05/17/2009 at 07:39:02 PM Self     I support lifting the restrictions on stem cell research. Please allow federal dollars to go to stem cell research, opening up new possibilities for treatments for many diseases.

 
24227 05/17/2009 at 07:40:18 PM Self     I support stem cell research and the loosening of restrictions recently put into place. I think there should be a grandfather clause to enable the use of existing lines, but on the whole, this is a major improvement on the previous policy on this issue.

 
24228 05/17/2009 at 07:41:14 PM Self     I think it is very important that stem cell research be explored.

"These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose."

There is no-one who would be harmed by this research - the embryos in question would likely be destroyed when no longer required for IVF. There is, however, the potential for great good. It would be a crime to waste the opportunity to (potentially) help so many people.

 
24229 05/17/2009 at 07:41:31 PM       Opposition to stem cell research seems to basically come down to a moral issue, and that further comes down to how certain religious institutions define "morality". The ways that stem cell research would be beneficial to the common good through medical advancements do not really seem to be in question. For this reason, I believe the government should allow stem cell research. (It is not the government's place to legislate morality.) However, I am opposed to funding for this coming from taxpayer dollars. No one should be forced to contribute to something they feel is morally wrong, and Constitutionally speaking, it is not the place of the Federal Government to hand out money for such projects.

 
24230 05/17/2009 at 07:41:52 PM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research of all types, because it is the most promising area of research for a great number of diseases, including one I have.

 
24231 05/17/2009 at 07:42:02 PM Self     The possibility of banning or limiting stem-cell research, whether based on popular opinion or surrender to special interest pressure groups, would be a step backwards and could not be sufficiently deplored. Such an action would represent the triumph of ignorance and prejudice and deprive the world of knowledge and cures that are needed. The door is open to a wondrous future: it should not be slammed by the ignorant and the misguided

 
24232 05/17/2009 at 07:45:18 PM Self     My comment is very simple: please reinstate this important avenue of research. Science makes people's lives better. Stem cells may yet provide the answers we need to cure disease, and as a scientist, I feel we have already lost too much time thanks to rhetoric and false posturing.

 
24233 05/17/2009 at 07:45:50 PM Self     I support stem cell research and hope that you will not replace the restrictions that have been placed on said research during the last presidential administration. Far too many people can be helped with this research for us to be sent back into the dark ages of the last eight years again.

 
24234 05/17/2009 at 07:47:11 PM Self     I firmly believe that human life begins at fertilization of the female gamete and lasts until the death of that being. To kill that embryo for any reason fits the definition of murder. I oppose the use of taxpayer funding for any experimentation on embryos when adult stem cells have already been found to help save or improve lives. This is a matter of morality. The end does not justify the means. Please put our money to work where it will do the job scientists are trying to do, and do it without killing human beings. This is not Nazi Germany!

 
24235 05/17/2009 at 07:48:44 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and would like to see the restrictions relaxed further.

 
24236 05/17/2009 at 07:49:21 PM Self     We are opposed to the draft guidelins which call for embryonic stem cell research. These proposed guidelines would force us, as taxpayers, to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life, to which we are adamantly opposed!

We are also opposed to government support for human cloning, and any creation of human embryos for research purposes, which is morally and ethically unsupportable.

We do, instead, support the continuation of research and resulting treatments from the use of adult stem cells.

 
24237 05/17/2009 at 07:49:42 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

 
24238 05/17/2009 at 07:49:55 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
24239 05/17/2009 at 07:49:56 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24240 05/17/2009 at 07:50:18 PM Self     I believe that stem cell research is crucial to our future, and am very glad to see that some of the restrictions on it are being lifted.

Thank you.

 
24241 05/17/2009 at 07:51:24 PM Self     I strongly urge the government of the United States of America to put its full influence toward allowing stem cell research. There are too many potential uses of such research to blatantly lock us out of science by tying the hands of our best researchers or forcing them to go overseas to labs which do not have restrictions placed on them.

 
24242 05/17/2009 at 07:51:25 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. However, the guidelines are politically very timid, and must be strengthened. Problems are:

--a "grandfather clause" is needed to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will be eligible;

--alternate sources of stem cell lines such as SCNT should not be excluded from funding, and more. (see CAMR comments below.)

 
24243 05/17/2009 at 07:51:52 PM Self     I have primary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Beta-inferon (currently used in relapsing remitting MS) shows some promise... of controlling the symptoms. That's it.

For living people, trying to deal with MS, this research NEEDS to be done to search for a potential cure or way to reverse the illness, not just treat the symptoms and wait until it stops working.

Trying to confuse the issues involved in stem cell research by attempting to get into questions involving morality or the definition of life or when life begins dooms those currently alive at the expense of an unanswerable question.

 
24244 05/17/2009 at 07:52:31 PM Self     I fully support stem-cell research.

 
24245 05/17/2009 at 07:52:44 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad that some of the restrictions are being loosened; further support for scientific research and protection of laws supporting it are some of the most important steps a country can take.

 
24246 05/17/2009 at 07:53:22 PM Self     please allow stem cell research. let us learn more about cells, their function, and find out what we can do to advance science. every major break through of science has been resisted by the church. science does not prove the lack of god, it just brings his marvels to light. these are embryos that would not have been brought to viable term anyway, let them see life in research and expanding our knowledge of the body, who knows what kinds of ailments we might find cures for with this research. even if we d no find ailments, this will help us understand our bodies that much more.

 
24247 05/17/2009 at 07:53:39 PM Self     I support stem cell research. It should be conducted by reputable scholars and scientists under the same restrictions applied to any other human medical research, no more, no less. It should not be co-opted by corporations and hidden from the public venue, and it should not be crippled by irrational fears generated by special interests.

Stem cell research will save lives, limbs, organs and improve the quality of life of people around the globe. It is criminally malicious to repress ethical research and medical progress that saves lives.

 
24248 05/17/2009 at 07:54:00 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I'm glad that some restrictions are finally being loosened.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page