Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
24049 05/17/2009 at 04:25:18 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened

 
24050 05/17/2009 at 04:25:42 PM Self University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioethics   I urge the NIH to broaden the proposed guidelines to permit the use of human embryos at infertility clinics which are slated for destruction since there is no contact with those who created them. Informed consent should not be required for the use of embryos in research when those who supplied the gametes are either unknown or who have had no contact with a clinic for a minimum of five years and for whom a reasonable effort at identification of the donor source persons has failed. Informed consent is not the appropriate standard for governing the disposition of 'abandoned' frozen embryos. Consent is meant to protect the interests of gamete or embryo donors but when these persons cannot be found or are known to be dead or otherwise incapable of consent then the utilization of a consent requirement makes neither ethical or legal sense.

 
24051 05/17/2009 at 04:26:42 PM Self     I absolutely and fully support embryonic stem cell research and any and all national funding thereof, and I am both glad and grateful that some of the restrictions against stem cell research are finally being loosened.

 
24052 05/17/2009 at 04:30:09 PM Self     I support the position of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to improve the new federal stem cell research funding guidelines.

 
24053 05/17/2009 at 04:31:00 PM Self     To whom it may concern: I feel that I must comment on this subject. I am a lapsed Catholic, but a very religious person. My arguments are with the hierarchy of the church. I believe that the Catholic Church has lost touch with reality...something Jesus never did. That said, I believe that everything in our lives is God given, including the amazing gifts that science has provided to better our lives and our world. Every new development is God given. Through God's intervention, the medical profession learned safer and safer ways to do what what women were doing since they found out where babies came from. The collecting of zygotes for future implantation is accepted. One wonders why the religious right doesn't balk at this intervention in the natural scheme of things. They cannot pick and choose which science they are willing to accept. It has already been proven that organs from stem cells can be grown in the lab to replace malfunctioning or cancerous organs. Isn't that life a gift of God as well?

 
24054 05/17/2009 at 04:31:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24055 05/17/2009 at 04:32:07 PM Self     please support frderal funding for SCNT

 
24056 05/17/2009 at 04:32:39 PM Self     I've been a strong supporter of stem cell research for many years. As a type one diabetic, stem cell research is a very personal matter for me. There are so many possibilities for therapies and cures that can only come from stem cell research. I worry less for myself, but more for my children. I don't want to have to explain to them why they can't eat like normal children, or why they have to prick their fingers and get painful shots. Diabetes affects millions in this nation alone, and is one of the fastest growing diseases in this country. Diabetes is my main concern, but I know that countless other diseases could prevented, treated, or even cured by discoveries from stem cell research. How could you limit funding of something that has obvious potential to help and save so many lives? I am pleased that these draft guidelines--in Section II B --would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you.

 
24057 05/17/2009 at 04:34:42 PM Self     I fully support stem cell research, and I am always glad to see restrictions on this important area of medicine loosened!

 
24058 05/17/2009 at 04:35:10 PM Self    

May 14, 2009 NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997 To Whom It May Concern: As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
24059 05/17/2009 at 04:35:37 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24060 05/17/2009 at 04:37:32 PM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research and applaud the efforts of the Obama administration.

 
24061 05/17/2009 at 04:39:09 PM Self     I strongly support embryonic stem cell research. Please continue to loosen some of the restrictions so that further research may be done.

 
24062 05/17/2009 at 04:39:11 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24063 05/17/2009 at 04:39:47 PM Self     Please continue stem cell research to assist my sister with her multiple myeloma cure.

 
24064 05/17/2009 at 04:40:25 PM Self     Members of my family suffer from diseases which might be helped by the use of stem cells. My grandfather, his sister, and two of his brothers died from complications of Alzheimer's Disease. I desperately want to find a way to recover from the effects of this devastating disease, should I also become affected (as I understand it, my odds are about 50-50). Stem cell research currently shows the best promise to not just slow the progression, but reverse the effects.

The number of chronic diseases which might become treatable through appropriate use of stem cells grows every day. You probably know the list better than I do. Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury are just a few that cost individuals and our government billions of dollars every year in treatment, to say nothing of lost productivity.

Let me say that I firmly support expanded research into the medicinal uses of stem cells.

 
24065 05/17/2009 at 04:41:06 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a biologist, but I am a scientist, and I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
24066 05/17/2009 at 04:46:28 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and celebrate the loosening of restrictions. To allow sophistic, fear based theologies & ideologies to stand in the way of research that will help those who truly need it and further the frontiers of science is traitorous to the freedom that America is supposed to embody.

 
24067 05/17/2009 at 04:46:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24068 05/17/2009 at 04:48:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24069 05/17/2009 at 04:49:02 PM Self     Save lives!

 
24070 05/17/2009 at 04:49:38 PM Self     I am writing to urge the NIH to exclude embryonic stem cells from its research funding. NIH funded research should be "ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law."

Embryonic stem cell research is NOT ethically responsible as it requires the destruction of human life to derive new stem cell lines. Even though human life is not destroyed once the lines are established, it does take the destruction of human life to establish new lines.

Embryonic stem cell research is also NOT scientifically worthy. To date no medical benefit has been obtained by research on embryonic stem cells. Adult stem cell research and induced pluripotent stem cells have yielded benefit to the medical community and are an ethical and scientifically worthy alternative to embryonic stem cell research. Funding should be removed from embryonic stem cell research and be instead given to these areas that are already being used (adult stem cell research successes) to treat diseases.

In summary: embryonic stem cell research uses unethical means to establish new lines for research and has to date proven to be utterly useless in terms of treatment of disease. Alternatively, Adult stem cell research is already being used to treat disease and is and ethical alternative that should have more funding. Induced pluripotent stem cells are an ethical alternative to embryonic stem cells that can be used for research eliminating the need for embryonic stem cells and should also have increased funding.

As a health care practitioner I urge you to fund research that is already proving to be beneficial and is ethical and to eliminate research funding for unethical, and scientifically flawed embryonic stem cell research.

 
24071 05/17/2009 at 04:50:10 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24072 05/17/2009 at 04:50:17 PM Self     I support stem cell research and I believe the restriction imposed by President Bush should be loosened.

 
24073 05/17/2009 at 04:51:13 PM Self     I SUPPORT THE CIRM FUNDING AND RESEARCH.

Point 1: If the federal govenment puts one dime into abortion or the death penalty it would be construed as discrimination not to support stem cell research on the grounds that it ends human life. More education aimed at the public is needed to eliminate peoples fears and ignorance.

Point 2: Money makes the world go around. If the USA does not move forward with Stem Cell research then another country, most likely European will have control of the market. The positive developements in Stem Cell research will feed our economy at every level and make bring an abundance of commerce in the treatment of dozens of disabling diseases.

Point 3: Finding a way to cure Alziemers, Parkinsons, Diabetes, spinal chord injuries, and a whole host of other disabling diseases will save us billions of dollars in health care costs both as individuals and as a nation. Medicare and Medical are on the verge of collapse and many individuals with these diseases are dependent on govenment programs.

 
24074 05/17/2009 at 04:51:21 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which, for the first time, will encourage the destruction of human life subsidized by taxpayers.  These guidelines promote a biased and rushed consent process by allowing use of embryos that were never frozen and go beyond using frozen embryos that may be discarded by allowing the option upfront for parents to donate their embryos for destructive research alongside permitting them to live.   Furthermore, use of ESC extends beyond developing new treatments to other uses such as drug safety testing.

A little known fact of this procedure is that the women used to harvest eggs are being exploited by having to take hormones and need to have operations to excise the eggs and have many problems from this procedure.

Fallacy about stem cells - Only embryonic stem cells can be used in research and with patients. Ans. No: stem cells can come from aborted fetuses, those stem cell lines available now, the placenta, amniotic fluid, fat from liposuctions, nasal epithelial cells, bone marrow and cadavers for brain cells up to 20 hours after death.

There are no successes with embryonic stem cell research, but this is never told to the American public by the mass media.

 
24075 05/17/2009 at 04:54:11 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24076 05/17/2009 at 04:55:31 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order

 
24077 05/17/2009 at 04:55:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24078 05/17/2009 at 04:55:50 PM Self     Adult stem cell research should be continued and publicly fundet. The destruction of embryos for ANY reason must NOT be publicly funded and should by law be prohibited, as it is otherwise against the law to take human lives.End of comment.

 
24079 05/17/2009 at 04:56:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24080 05/17/2009 at 04:58:06 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds immense promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. While I am not a scientist, I have been following progress in this field with great interest; I have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and my father is suffering from Alzheimer’s. Could these diseases ever be cured by stem-cell-related treatments? I don’t know. But I don’t mind if millions of other people get cured of their terrible diseases, even if my father and I do not! Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should NOT create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I strongly recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24081 05/17/2009 at 04:58:12 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24082 05/17/2009 at 04:58:15 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
24083 05/17/2009 at 05:00:36 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24084 05/17/2009 at 05:01:31 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. When I had my son a request to use his remaining embical cord. My husband and I were more than happy to for the hope to aid in the research for cures or advancements for health of others. Please don't throw away the opportunity to better life for all human beings.

Thank you

 
24085 05/17/2009 at 05:02:26 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
24086 05/17/2009 at 05:03:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use TAX DOLLARS for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos.

No clone-and-kill rubbish. Creation of new humans solely to destroy them would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

Please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24087 05/17/2009 at 05:03:39 PM Self     I strongly support stem cell research. These guidelines are timid, but they are a good first step.

 
24088 05/17/2009 at 05:04:12 PM Self     I am glad to see NIH turning its attention once more to federally funded embryonic stem cell research, but it is discouraging to see that many useful techniques (e.g., SCNT) for acquiring and employing them are still being vigorously opposed and thus not included in the draft guidelines. I call on those who oppose embryonic stem cell research for ideological /political reasons, TO START REALLY THINKING PRO-LIFE! That is, to think about saving the lives of people who are not imaginary, virtual or potential but who are unequivocally here in the world with us right now, often surrounded by loved ones, and in desperate need of the salvation that stem cell research promises! How ironic that pro-lifers attack it! It should be not only allowed but rather encouraged to proceed full-speed-ahead!

 
24089 05/17/2009 at 05:04:36 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
24090 05/17/2009 at 05:08:47 PM Self     I am opposed to my tax dollars being used to fund stem cell research that destroys human life. Embryonic stem cells are not effective and are even dangerous causing the growth of tumors. Please direct funding to adult stem cell research that has been proven effective and successful.

Sincerely,

 
24091 05/17/2009 at 05:10:04 PM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure thatany current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
24092 05/17/2009 at 05:10:56 PM Self     The moral debate is one that should be had, but it shouldn't stop the research. Morality should never be legislated, its an individual's choice. And in a free society, that which does not harm others is not just allowed, but protected.

For those that understand that stem cell research never ceases a life that would otherwise be, and instead could potentially help millions of people all over the world, no debate it needed.

Don't let a vocal minority stop you from helping people. Stem cell researchers are heroes.

P.S. Please find a cure for multiple sclerosis, I want my old mom back.

 
24093 05/17/2009 at 05:11:51 PM Self     I am writing to support Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and to say that I am glad to see some of the restrictions being loosened. However, I am concerned that research that is currently going on and was approved under the previous, harsher guidelines, will not be eligible for NIH funding. Perhaps including a grandfather clause would solve this problem.

 
24094 05/17/2009 at 05:12:48 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
24095 05/17/2009 at 05:14:11 PM Self     Not taking advantage of the advances that stem cells give us in medical research would be not only irresponsible, but unwise. The amount of people that stem cells could potentially help is mind-boggling.

I do believe, however, that there should be a nation-wide effort to educate people about stem cells and their origins. It seems to me that most people in opposition to stem cell research have issues with it that are based on gross misconceptions.

With a little education and a lot of research, stem cells could be the next giant step in medicine.

 
24096 05/17/2009 at 05:16:02 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24097 05/17/2009 at 05:17:48 PM Self     Do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life!

 
24098 05/17/2009 at 05:17:49 PM Self     please DO research stem cells.

for those who are against it, just don't treat their cancer. priests included.

it's simple, really.

 
24099 05/17/2009 at 05:18:11 PM Self     Please remember that LIFE begins with conception...and murder begins when life is deliberately terminated...for what ever reason. The end result cannot be justified by means that involve the deliberate taking of life. Stem cell research is so often based on aborted babies...

 
24100 05/17/2009 at 05:18:15 PM Self     I am writing to oppose the modification of the existing guidelines on stem cell research to permit the use of taxpayer funds to use stem cells from embryos. These embryos are human beings, and they should not be used or viewed as a source or resource for research material. The existing guidelines and restrictions imposed by the Bush administration, though not perfect, still sought to restrict the killing of embryos and human beings for research. Even if the argument is made that discarded embryos are already doomed to die, using them for research will inevitably lead to the temptation to create more embryos than necessary in fertility clinics and to create embryos merely for their use in research. I view all of these actions as morally wrong; as a taxpayer, I should not be forced to pay for such activities. These arguments are strengthened by the fact that other sources of stem cells exist that do not involve sacrificing human beings, such as umbilical cords and adult fat cells. Whatever good is obtained from ethically tainted research will be tainted by the means through which it was achieved.

 
24101 05/17/2009 at 05:18:18 PM Self     Please allow doctors to do stem cell research to cure diseases and save lives!

 
24102 05/17/2009 at 05:18:59 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24103 05/17/2009 at 05:19:48 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24104 05/17/2009 at 05:20:17 PM Self     Do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life.

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24105 05/17/2009 at 05:20:17 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24106 05/17/2009 at 05:22:20 PM Self     What more could you posssibly need than the research that has been brought to light concerning the effectiveness of adult stem cells in relation to embryonic stem cells. Embryonic stem cell research should be outlawed along with abortion. What future do we have if we lose our moral fabric concerning the value of life.

 
24107 05/17/2009 at 05:22:48 PM Self     I am totally opposed to using tax-payer dollars to fund destructive (of life) procedures. Effective and safe procedures are known and in use that don't destroy embryos.

 
24108 05/17/2009 at 05:23:28 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24109 05/17/2009 at 05:24:22 PM Self     There can never be any benefit to mankind which is derived from the deliberate destruction of life. A recent article quoted Robert Lanza, Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology:

"So promising is the research that the 1998 discovery gave birth to a whole new specialty, regenerative medicine. But the science also raises ethical concerns. Because the embryo is killed in the retrieval process, it has been called a direct attack on innocent human life."

I join many other voices to ask that tax dollars not be used to fund the destruction of potential human lives. We, the tax-paying public have a moral obligation and a right to bring our objections into the debate.

Sincerely,

 
24110 05/17/2009 at 05:28:22 PM Self     YES! With IVF procedures on the rise (it seems), I'm so glad that there's a plan to benefit from the remaining embryos. I hope that in the future, stem cell research on non-IVF embryos will be included. There is so much to be gained.

 
24111 05/17/2009 at 05:32:00 PM Self     You can copy and paste into Comment section of NIH comment form and edit as appropriate for you.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24112 05/17/2009 at 05:32:23 PM Self     Stem cell research has the potential to save my mother's life, and someday, my own. My mother suffers from a number of debilitating and deadly autoimmune diseases - which are hereditary, but could be prevented or treated with advances in stem cell research. Please, I beg you, to do whatever possible to support stem cell research. Support the draft guidelines. Support expanding permission to more cell lines. Support a medical advance that could save me from a long and agonizing death.

 
24113 05/17/2009 at 05:33:01 PM Self     I support stem cell research and am glad to see it furthered. I understand the need for regulations on sources, especially considering recent outbreaks of disease. I appreciate the third clause under heading B in section II regarding the treatment of donors and non-donors. However, I question the judgement of narrowing the scope of donations to those created for reproductive purposes only.

 
24114 05/17/2009 at 05:33:20 PM Self     While composing your comments please consider making the following points:

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. To President Obama and whom it may concern:

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I encourage you to support human life in every stage, from conception to death.

Sincerely,

***** Concerned Citizen

 
24115 05/17/2009 at 05:33:57 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and restrictions must be loosened in order for proper advancements for human living and health to occur.

 
24116 05/17/2009 at 05:37:26 PM Self     As a citizen of this country, I do not want my hard earned money spent on stem cell research, unless it is adult stem cell research. There is no need to kill to get proven research. Adult stem cell research has shown hope. Put our money there. Let the facts be our guide.

Thank you for your time.

 
24117 05/17/2009 at 05:40:04 PM Self     This is such an important step for modern medicine to take! When i first read Obama easing regulations with regards to this, i cried tears of happiness. The research that can result from the use of embryonic stem cells will be able to aid so very many and improve the quality of our lives in ways so few people realize! Had the scientific community had this as an available option to them, perhaps we'd have seen Christopher Reeve/Superman able to walk again. Cancer, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, Parkinsons -- can you imagine these being things of the past? How many of you have lost someone from one of the above, or know someone ailing from the above? How many don't have to! The best part about this; is that the embryos are only obtained through informed consent -- much like being an organ donor! Except instead of potentially saving a handful of lives, thousands (or more) could be saved as a result.

 
24118 05/17/2009 at 05:43:39 PM Self     Though I am a proponent of stem cell research the thought of allowing embryonic stem cells for research is abhorrent. How many times have we heard it said that there is no ethical way to study Fetal Alcohol Syndrome due to the inherent dangers to the fetus during the course of any study. Yet here it is proposed to create an embryo and not just passively allow harm to come to it and study the results, but rather to actively cause the harm in question for the explicit purpose of a study. Especially with the possibilities of adult stem cell research looming on the horizon why the focus on embryonic stem cell? There are options that do not raise the ethical or moral questions and objections that Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

 
24119 05/17/2009 at 05:43:40 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research as another tool for defeating multiple illnesses and diseases.

 
24120 05/17/2009 at 05:43:52 PM Self     I believe embryonic stem cell research is one of the best ways to further modern medicine and save lives. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such funding and I believe the final guidelines should provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this important research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24121 05/17/2009 at 05:44:28 PM Self     Using human embryos for stem cell research requires the death of human life. I expect that human embryos will not be used for stem cell research.

 
24122 05/17/2009 at 05:45:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24123 05/17/2009 at 05:45:36 PM Self     I strongly support stem cell research, and welcome and support Pres. Obama's directives regarding same.

 
24124 05/17/2009 at 05:47:12 PM Self     I do not support embryonic stem cell research and all current and future research should be discontinued. All stem cell research should be limited to adult stem cell lines.

 
24125 05/17/2009 at 05:48:27 PM Self     "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
24126 05/17/2009 at 05:50:23 PM Self     Science can save lives. Please let it...

 
24127 05/17/2009 at 05:51:56 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24128 05/17/2009 at 05:53:41 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I am happy some of the restrictions are being loosened. Medical progress will continue in America as long as she ignores the ignorant people who want to drag her down into a medieval cesspool filled with fundamentalist hogwash.

 
24129 05/17/2009 at 05:56:25 PM Self     It has come to my attention that The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is requesting public comment on draft guidelines entitled ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (Guidelines). These Guidelines will implement Executive Order 13505: Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, issued on March 9, 2009, by President Barack H. Obama. The Executive Order states that the Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. This draft for guideline pertains to extramural NIH-funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law.

NIH currently funds ongoing research involving human embryonic stem cells as detailed under Presidential policy prior to August 9, 2001. Under that policy, Federal funds have been used for research on human embryonic stem cells where the derivation process was initiated prior to 9 p.m. EDT August 9, 2001, the embryo was created for reproductive purposes, the embryo was no longer needed for these purposes, informed consent was obtained for the donation of the embryo, and no financial inducements were provided for donation of the embryo. Research efforts on embryo stem cells from that time have been ineffective in breakthrough results, yet have resulted in forming uncontrollable tumors, a high rate of rejection by the gaining cells, and destruction to the original human embryo. Yet, since the August 9, 2001 ban on embryo stem cell research, the scientific community has found that research results from adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Therefore I am opposed to these guidelines for the reasons outlined below.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of the innocent human life, the human embryo. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life, the human embryo.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. I reference Section III, paragraphs A & B. This loophole must be closed immediately.

-These guidelines do not protect the human embryo, the initial stage of any human life, from destruction. The scientific researchers must be given guidelines to ensure respect and protection of human embryos, the earliest stage of human life.

Scientific researchers must know that there are greater interests to humanity with assurances for the continuance of humanity than any shortcut to results that are destructive to any human at any stage of life. There are enough talented researchers in this country to find the results without taking risky, destructive shortcuts.

 
24130 05/17/2009 at 06:00:47 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research in incredibly important for millions of Americans suffering from numerous diseases and disorders. While I am not a scientist I have been following developments in this field for years. I am disappointed in the draft guidelines presented as they seem to create a different set of bureaucratic hurdles rather than freeing up the research process.

I am happy that Section II B would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines that weren't eligible for federal funding before and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. As drafted, however, Section II B does not grandfather in currently eligible stem cell lines and I believe this could be a serious oversight. It is important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created through ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I it is very importnat that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. It is always a mistake to make guidelines inflexible--it makes it much harder to incorporate new discoveries and methods into approved research practice. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment.

 
24131 05/17/2009 at 06:01:43 PM Self     I oppose embryonic stem cell research and, as such am opposed to the above noted draft. Because life begins at conception, I believe every human life is entitled to protection of their inalienable right to life. Moreover, the selective annihilation of a select group of individuals reeks of the holocaust and the slippery slope created by the implementation of the research noted above is incomprehensible. To be forced to support/ subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life is not only morally reprehensible to me but is a violation of my rights as a citizen of this country.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life These have already proven successful. Truth is truth. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown itself to be ineffective and even dangerous. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients.

In addition, the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids - a loophole which must be closed immediately.

For these reasons I am opposed to the above noted draft.

 
24132 05/17/2009 at 06:02:09 PM Self     I support Embryonic Stem Cell research and hold on to hope that it will lead to many breakthroughs in medical science in the future.

I support that the draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- which would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24133 05/17/2009 at 06:03:10 PM Self     I strongly support stem cell research

 
24134 05/17/2009 at 06:03:39 PM Self     I am absolutely opposed to funding any research on human stem cells. This funding would open the door wide open for taking away life, not giving it.

 
24135 05/17/2009 at 06:03:47 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I pray for the day when the scientific community will reject all procedures that in any way destroy life and will use their resources to explore methods that cure diseases without the loss of innocent life.

 
24136 05/17/2009 at 06:04:38 PM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
24137 05/17/2009 at 06:04:55 PM Self     Stem Cell research should be allowed, the benefits are tremendous based even on the small amount of research that has already been conducted. Hindering further research for the outdated views of the few will only harm the needs of the many who could benefit from stem cells.

 
24138 05/17/2009 at 06:05:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24139 05/17/2009 at 06:06:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24140 05/17/2009 at 06:08:18 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
24141 05/17/2009 at 06:10:49 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
24142 05/17/2009 at 06:11:14 PM Self     My husband has Type 1 Diabetes. It is an autoimmune disease that he did not bring on himself. I feel that research into Type 1 Diabetes, using stem cells from embryos that would be destroyed anyway, might bring about a cure for my husband and the many CHILDREN that are born with it or contract because of a trauma to their immune systems.

Please take this into account whne voting. Thank you.

 
24143 05/17/2009 at 06:12:09 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
24144 05/17/2009 at 06:12:32 PM Self     My grandfather is one of many victims of Parkinson's Disease, my other grandfather died from a second heart attack. Several family members have suffered from cancer. For these and other illnesses like Alzheimer's, diabetes, spinal cord injuries, and more, I urge you to allow stem cell research to go forward so as to help millions of people afflicted and avoid future occurrences of these illnesses and afflictions. Allow existing lines of stem cells to receive funding. Researchers at Univ of Minn in 2005 have proven that it's possible to create cancer killing cells from stem cells. The research was published in the Oct. 15 2005 issue of the Journal of Immunology. This only shows the great potential to researchers and scientists, but only with the needed funding to continue. Again I urge you to maintain ethical guidelines, but stem cells research must continue to be funding and encouraged.

 
24145 05/17/2009 at 06:12:55 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
24146 05/17/2009 at 06:14:23 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for your consideration of these concerns.

 
24147 05/17/2009 at 06:15:58 PM Self     ACTION NEEDED : Submit the following comments to NIH: I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
24148 05/17/2009 at 06:15:58 PM Self     I do not believe that taking a human baby at it's earliest age as a embryo and tearing it apart for medical research to be ethical or humane.I am against it.

 



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