Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
23150 05/17/2009 at 06:14:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened."

 
23151 05/17/2009 at 06:15:44 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
23152 05/17/2009 at 06:17:19 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23153 05/17/2009 at 06:17:48 AM Self     I am opposed to the use of embryos as sources of stem cells for research. There are other sources that are just as viable, such as adult tissue, umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, blood, muscle, fat, nerves, and even in the pulp of baby teeth. Some of these examples are already being used to treat people with various diseases.

 
23154 05/17/2009 at 06:20:08 AM Self     I oppose federal funding of research on human embryonic stem cells. Human embryos that supposedly are "leftover" from in vitro fertilization should be provided for adoption. The only medical advancements made thus far have been provided by utilizing adult stem cells.

 
23155 05/17/2009 at 06:20:10 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. Guidelines should be shaped in close collaboration with the scientists whose crucially important work will have to be conducted within them.

 
23156 05/17/2009 at 06:23:09 AM Self     i support stem cell research

 
23157 05/17/2009 at 06:26:46 AM Self     The scientific and medical research performed on stem cells may be the single most valuable contribution to humanity this century. I cannot conceive of a logical, thinking reason for restricting or worse, ceasing such an invaluable opportunity. If human life is considered valuable, than this research should be supported and federally funded, for the benefit of all of us.

 
23158 05/17/2009 at 06:29:40 AM Self     I am an American with a degree in Biology (Bachelor of Science from the University of Cincinnati in 2000) and I want to comment that I am in full support of loosening the restrictions on stem cell research. I have worked as a research technician in academic and industry labs and have also worked as a science journalist over the last ten years (beginning when I was still in college.)

Stem cell research is vital to the future of America's biotechnology industry and health care. As an American citizen currently living overseas, I have seen many professionals and students who have chosen to study or work overseas because of the restrictions on the work they would be allowed to do in the US compared to the cutting-edge work they could do elsewhere. I am concerned that any trend to restrict stem cell research will hamper US biologists from competing in the world pharmaceutical and biotech arenas as well as keeping us far behind other countries in the realm of health care, especially for our aging population.

I believe the current guidelines could be strengthened by including a "grandfather clause" in Section II B, which would insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will remain eligible for federal funding.

I also strongly recommend that the final guidelines should allow federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, including but not limited to somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines should allow these stem cell line to be used.

This research is extremely important to the future health of Americans and to keeping our biotech industry competitive with the rest of the world.

 
23159 05/17/2009 at 06:31:53 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23160 05/17/2009 at 06:33:36 AM Self     I support embryonic stem-cell research. I believe a "grandfather clause" is necessary to ensure that all previously-approved cells will be eligible, and I also believe that alternate sources of stem-cell lines should not be excluded from funding and other benefits.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

This technology has the potential to improve and even save thousands of lives. Please don't legislate this hope away.

 
23161 05/17/2009 at 06:35:04 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23162 05/17/2009 at 06:35:30 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of people all over the world suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest, having worked as a science journalist for many years. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23163 05/17/2009 at 06:35:50 AM Self     I can not state how important it is to allow funding for new lines of stem cells. Any and all lines of stems cells need to be available for federal funding to inspire/create both scientific freedom and hope for the many of us who suffer from debilitating diseases now and potentially in the future.

I know for a fact that a recent treatment I had would not have been possible without research into stem cells. What I had to endure was just the beginning steps of what could be a truly revolutionary way of treating disease.

It has given me hope when everything else pointed to doom and despair.

Further research is needed to make the treatment I received and other options better and improve the lives of millions who suffer needlessly.

Please do not restrict access to funding on stem cells in any way.

 
23164 05/17/2009 at 06:36:27 AM Self     I can't imagine how horrible it is for a person to be paralyzed, not able to walk outside or hike through a hillside. I supported President Bush in nearly everything he did, but his policies on embryonic stem cell research were archaic and that has to change. Even if the possibility of reversing spinal cord injuries is less than 1%, we have to take the chance it might just work and expand the research and funding.

Please fund and use whatever resources that might be available to continue and expand stem cell research, it just might make a difference, God forbid, to one of us or our families. Thank you.

 
23165 05/17/2009 at 06:37:24 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
23166 05/17/2009 at 06:38:06 AM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
23167 05/17/2009 at 06:42:27 AM Self     I support the proposed guidelines. I believe that stem cell research will bring enormous benefits to our knowledge of biological processes and our ability to treat various illnesses, and that the proposed guidelines provide adequate safeguards in regard to the donation of embryos for this purpose.

 
23168 05/17/2009 at 06:42:50 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I hope that a few conservative religious groups won't be allowed to stand in the way of progress on this matter. Research like this can save and improve lives.

 
23169 05/17/2009 at 06:43:35 AM Self     As a medical student and a future medical professional I support embryonic stem cell research and see it as vital and necessary.

 
23170 05/17/2009 at 06:50:33 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23171 05/17/2009 at 06:52:26 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad that some of the restrictions are being loosened. I feel it is unethical to not pursue an option that could help so many members of our society.

 
23172 05/17/2009 at 06:54:33 AM Self     I am strongly in favor of as much stem cell research as can be done -- I believe it is going to come up with a number of breakthroughs that will advance medicine and human life.

 
23173 05/17/2009 at 06:56:11 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and development.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should ot create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23174 05/17/2009 at 06:57:08 AM Organization     I support stem cell research and I'm glad the sanctions against it are being loosened.

 
23175 05/17/2009 at 06:57:10 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I urge you to shape your guidelines on a firm background of research as doing otherwise would be detrimental to the potential scientific advancement that could come from work with stem cells. Many thanks.

 
23176 05/17/2009 at 07:02:15 AM Self     I believe if we are to advance together as a human race, and live long healthy existences we need to support ever aspect of Stem cell Reasearch, as it is an important tool in the advancement in Humankind and Sciene alike, this simple process of Creating new cells from practically nothing has applications to the medical field that can only be described nothing short of a miracle. because of Stem Cell we could abolish Cancer, and Terminal illness alike. why would you or anyone for that Matter, look so poorly on something that can help so many. what reasoning would you have to say no to the Future of Humanity?

 
23177 05/17/2009 at 07:02:17 AM Self     I totally support stem cell research and would like to see boundaries loosened or perhaps even done away with all together

 
23178 05/17/2009 at 07:02:18 AM Self     I just want to say that I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad to see some of the restrictions loosened. For that, I want to say thank you.

 
23179 05/17/2009 at 07:02:24 AM Self     I support stem cell research, and I'm glad the policies were loosened. Stem cell research can help us discover cures and remedies we wouldn't be able to find otherwise.

 
23180 05/17/2009 at 07:03:09 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and I'm glad some of the laws against it have been loosened.

 
23181 05/17/2009 at 07:04:11 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

 
23182 05/17/2009 at 07:05:45 AM Self     I am a physician who supports embryonic stem cell research. I hope the new guidelines will allow for the creation of new cell lines of embryonic stem cells for research in the near future.

 
23183 05/17/2009 at 07:06:30 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23184 05/17/2009 at 07:08:55 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23185 05/17/2009 at 07:12:26 AM Self     I fully support these new guidelines. Please adopt them--stem cell research is vital to saving lives.

 
23186 05/17/2009 at 07:14:34 AM Self     I believe stem cell research is necessary. My maternal grandfather died a slow, miserable death from Parkinson's Disease and I think stem cell research could have helped, if it hadn't been banned. I am an evangelical Christian and believe life is sacred. I also believe something good coming out of a sad, but sometimes necessary, event benefits everyone. Thank you.

 
23187 05/17/2009 at 07:16:56 AM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
23188 05/17/2009 at 07:17:38 AM Self     I do not believe in throwing my money away. I do not want to spend my money on killing people for their parts. It is not necessary because there is another way which has given us results. I believe adult stem cell research should be exhausted in every way first. This proven research could use more money.

 
23189 05/17/2009 at 07:20:13 AM Self     I support stem cell research in all forms. Great advances have been achieved and I believe stem cell research holds the key to curing many diseases including Alzheimer's, from which my mother recently died.

Thank you.

 
23190 05/17/2009 at 07:21:11 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. This research can save lives.

 
23191 05/17/2009 at 07:21:41 AM Self     I support stem cell research and I'm glad to see it's restrictions being loosened for the sake of our continued scientific progress.

 
23192 05/17/2009 at 07:23:28 AM Self     please support federal funding for SCNT

 
23193 05/17/2009 at 07:23:43 AM Self     I do not agree on killing embyonic cells to do testing.

 
23194 05/17/2009 at 07:25:00 AM Self     I support stem cell research and believe that loosening the restrictions is the right decision. Please do not push the law back to what they were before.

 
23195 05/17/2009 at 07:25:45 AM Self     I absolutely support researching medical use of stem cells. This science shows great promise for improving health and well-being of people suffering from a variety of diseases and disorders.

 
23196 05/17/2009 at 07:26:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23197 05/17/2009 at 07:26:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I would hope that the importance of this research is recognized, above demands from religious and/or conservative groups. This research can & will impact lives already born & yet to be, if it is allowed to follow the unrestricted paths set forth. I hope my voice is heard & that the politicians governing this process put party & lobbies aside, and do the right thing. One of your family...one of your children or grandchildren may depend on this research one day. And I guarantee someone‚Äôs child is depending on it right now.

 
23198 05/17/2009 at 07:26:15 AM Self     I feel that stem cells are single cells, just like blood cells or nerve cells or a biopsy of a brain. As singe cells they enjoy no rights and no protection beyond what we assign; they're not people. They don't even have the potential to be people without an enormous ammout of time and truly unnatural effort. They should have the same legal protection as anything containing DNA from a human, and nothing more: the person has the right to decide what happens to stuff with their DNA in it, the parent has the right to decide what happens to stuff with their kid's DNA in it.

I feel that getting stem cells from any source which doesn't cause harm to a living person is a legitimate way to procure them. If someone says "Yes, use those stem cells" then that's their choice as an individual. It's pretty much the same as donating an organ or donating blood: up to the person. Up to the parent if the dead child's heart is used to save another child through transplant; up to the parent if the stem cells are used to let a paralyzed person walk again.

I feel that to refuse to allow stem cell research is to place government restrictions on an area of personal choice. As a side issue, I feel that it would be crippling to our country's chances at maintaining some form of scientific equality with the rest of the world - but that's at best a secondary issue. If using stem cells were wrong, "keeping up with the Joneses" would not be an effective argument in its favor. But it's not wrong; there's no real ethical dilemma. Cells are cells. Stem cells are neat, and cool, and potentially very very useful, but they are not people. They should not be valued above people. We are greater than the sum of our parts; to say that any one type of cell is too sacred to study is to return us to the days of bloodletting and superstition.

Please ensure that we are allowed to benefit from stem cel research legally, in a carefully monitored and appropriate setting. To criminalize new avenues of stem cell research is to give up on the future, to retreat into a stubborn denial of progress, to stagnate and eventually see the world pass us by without our input. If it were the right thing to do it would be worth it - but it's not.

 
23199 05/17/2009 at 07:27:51 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23200 05/17/2009 at 07:27:53 AM       As a Registered Nurse, I feel stem cell research is important and should be federally funded to find cures for for currently incurable debilitating diseases. I am glad that these restrictions are being loosened and hope that great strides can be made now and into the future. Provisions should be made to allow funding the formation of new stem cell lines as well as maintaining stem cell lines currently available. I look forward to the day that ends the suffering of patients who currently have no effective treatment options.

 
23201 05/17/2009 at 07:28:17 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
23202 05/17/2009 at 07:28:32 AM Self     I fully support federal funding for Stem Cell research and I approve of the loosening of the restrictions. These restrictions should be further should be further lightened. Improving the quality of life should be paramount.

 
23203 05/17/2009 at 07:29:41 AM Self     I only need to say that I support stem cell research fully.

 
23204 05/17/2009 at 07:31:47 AM Self     I support stem cell research and cheer for the loosening of restrictions. Time to move forward instead of backward.

 
23205 05/17/2009 at 07:31:48 AM Self     I applaud President Obama for removing the Bush administration's stem cell research restrictions. Human embryonic stem cell research is a difficult ethical question, and the medical benefits must be weighed against the moral and ethical concerns. The draft guidelines address these issues clearly, particularly in the section concerning consent.

My only concern with the guidelines is section 3:

III. RESEARCH USING HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS AND/OR HUMAN INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS THAT, ALTHOUGH THE CELLS MAY COME FROM ALLOWABLE SOURCES, IS NEVERTHELESS INELIGIBLE FOR NIH FUNDING

This section governs research using human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., human cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. There are some uses of these cells that, although they may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding, as follows:

1. Research in which human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells are introduced into non-human primate blastocysts. 2. Research involving the breeding of animals where the introduction of human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells may have contributed to the germ line.

If these limitations are included, I would ask that a grandfather clause be introduced to protect existing stem cell lines that have been created in this fashion. I would also like to see a less broad prohibition that provides for a review process under which specific research can be approved or denied.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
23206 05/17/2009 at 07:32:16 AM Self     I agree strongly with stem cell research and am very glad the strict rules are being loosened.

 
23207 05/17/2009 at 07:32:34 AM Self     I agree strongly with stem cell research and am very glad the strict rules are being loosened.

 
23208 05/17/2009 at 07:33:36 AM Self     I applaud President Obama for removing the Bush administration's stem cell research restrictions. Human embryonic stem cell research is a difficult ethical question, and the medical benefits must be weighed against the moral and ethical concerns. The draft guidelines address these issues clearly, particularly in the section concerning consent.

My only concern with the guidelines is section 3:

III. RESEARCH USING HUMAN EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS AND/OR HUMAN INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS THAT, ALTHOUGH THE CELLS MAY COME FROM ALLOWABLE SOURCES, IS NEVERTHELESS INELIGIBLE FOR NIH FUNDING

This section governs research using human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., human cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. There are some uses of these cells that, although they may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding, as follows:

1. Research in which human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells are introduced into non-human primate blastocysts. 2. Research involving the breeding of animals where the introduction of human embryonic stem cells (even if derived according to these Guidelines) or human induced pluripotent stem cells may have contributed to the germ line.

If these limitations are included, I would ask that a grandfather clause be introduced to protect existing stem cell lines that have been created in this fashion. I would also like to see a less broad prohibition that provides for a review process under which specific research can be approved or denied.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
23209 05/17/2009 at 07:33:53 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23210 05/17/2009 at 07:34:21 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23211 05/17/2009 at 07:37:44 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23212 05/17/2009 at 07:37:51 AM Self     I support early stem-cell research and want to see further loosening of restrictions.

 
23213 05/17/2009 at 07:38:11 AM Self     This scientific research should not be curtailed due to a religious group's agenda. I support stem cell research for both reasons of supporting pure science and also for its potential benefit for humankind.

 
23214 05/17/2009 at 07:38:25 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and the scientists who use this method to learn more about the diseases and medical conditions whose key facts, cures, and treatments can be found in the stem cell. It harms no one. It breaks no religious belief. While 99% of the comments on here may be negative toward stem cell research, 99% of the people I know support it, and would not think twice before taking treatment to help themselves or a loved one that was dicovered through embryonic stem cell research.

Thank you,

 
23215 05/17/2009 at 07:42:36 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23216 05/17/2009 at 07:43:01 AM Self     This issue has languished for far too long thanks to an anti-science administration. It's about time that some progress has been made in a field with as much potential as stem-cell research has.

 
23217 05/17/2009 at 07:44:04 AM Self     "offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis."

Stem cell research is the most important medical research being conducted today. It is not a question of morality or religion, it is one of whether people today can make the world a better place tomorrow through their concerted efforts. My father is a paraplegic, and my family has a strong history of diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. I would happily supply genetic material to make embryos to harvest stem cells from if it might mean my children could live in a world where these things would no longer be a concern. Throwing money at corrupt banks might help the economy come out of a recession eventually, but were I the one to choose I would rather that money be spent on something that could make a better world for all, rather than just a few people's bonuses. This needs to be a major budgetary concern: undoing the enacted superstitious avoidance of stem cell research by the previous administration is not sufficient: America must move forward, not simply regain lost ground.

Stem cell research is this generation's moon landing. The world looks to America to have the courage and determination to pursue the loftiest of goals, and for the first time in many years, the American government just might be up to the challenge. The choice is not between budgetary constraints, religious viewpoints or political conservatism or liberalism. It is simply one of whether America still has the ability to move forward as leaders in the world. If it does, it will lead and move forward. If it does not, it will shrink into history. I am not an American citizen, but as one of America's neighbors I can say that I am hopeful in America's ability to do what is right for the first time in years. The world is watching: do not disappoint us again.

 
23218 05/17/2009 at 07:46:04 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. In specific, I support the inclusion of a grandfather clause to insure we do not waste any previously approved stem cell lines, and that alternate sources of stem cell lines - such as SCNT - should not be excluded from funding.

 
23219 05/17/2009 at 07:46:07 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23220 05/17/2009 at 07:46:38 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23221 05/17/2009 at 07:47:32 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23222 05/17/2009 at 07:47:34 AM Self     There have been NO viable treatments resulting from embryonic stem cell research; in fact, they have been so far proven to be detrimental. That fact, coupled with the fact that there are so many other proven and ethical means of stem cell research and treatment, mean that Federal dollars should NOT be spent on embryonic stem cell research.

 
23223 05/17/2009 at 07:47:42 AM Self     I'm writing in support of the loosening of regulation for stem cell research. I believe that this is an important, exciting area of research that should be more fully explored, and hope that this funding is the merely the first step.

 
23224 05/17/2009 at 07:48:35 AM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. This is not responsible scientific research when adult stem cells have already been proven effective in treating patients.

In addition, according to a recent Gallup Poll, fifty-one percent of Americans are pro-life, and should not be forced to fund something they find ethically reprehensible.

Pro-life and pro-choice views aside, why would the government want to fund the part of stem cell research that is already going wrong when they could put the money towards the adult stem cell research and treatments that are actually helping patients now?

 
23225 05/17/2009 at 07:49:46 AM Self     Too Conservative guidelines need to allow easier access.

 
23226 05/17/2009 at 07:50:06 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad restrictions are being loosened. I believe a "grandfather clause" is needed to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will be eligible.

I believe in honoring the struggle of those in need of help in the fight for their lives.

I believe that my mother would have had a better chance against breast cancer had stem cell research not had the battle that it has. She could still be here, enriching the lives of her children, grandchildren and every one she met.

Our world is becoming a more toxic place every day, and we need more protections and defense from the effects these toxins have on us.

 
23227 05/17/2009 at 07:50:12 AM Self     I fully support stem cell research and it is important that SCIENCE continues to be supported by the United States government and its associated organizations. Through SCIENCE, we will find a BETTER future for us and our children.

 
23228 05/17/2009 at 07:50:20 AM Self     I'm absolutely in favor of this research. The potential to save lives is far too great to pass up.

 
23229 05/17/2009 at 07:53:42 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23230 05/17/2009 at 07:54:51 AM Self     I believe that the guidelines set forth in FR Doc E9-9313 are appropriate guidelines that are not too onerous for any parties involved in the donation of embryos for the purposes of Embryonic stem cell research. I believe that the FR Doc E9-9313 provides ethical and appropriate measures to insure the donating parties are fully aware of the implication of their decision to donate and the long term implications of the decision to donate. I support the guidelines as written and look forward to the flourishing of new and exciting research guided by the principles and guidelines of FR Doc-E9-9313, and Executive Order 13505.

 
23231 05/17/2009 at 07:55:44 AM Self     I support stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23232 05/17/2009 at 07:55:45 AM Self     I support human stem cell research.

 
23233 05/17/2009 at 07:55:47 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23234 05/17/2009 at 07:56:52 AM Self     Simply put, scientists should be more restrained by their own ethics rather than those of the government. Ultimately, under our current understanding of the Constitution, scientists are free to act in any way as long as it does not infringe on the rights of others. Separate states are free to make their own restrictions but must of course understand that this will limit the industry in their states, sending profitable research into other areas, losing valuable revenue.

 
23235 05/17/2009 at 07:57:35 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and believe these new guidelines are an improvement over the restrictive Bush-era guidelines.

 
23236 05/17/2009 at 07:57:42 AM Self     I do not agree with the loosening of restrictions for embryonic stem cell research.

 
23237 05/17/2009 at 07:59:17 AM Self     I think that we need to explore ADULT stem cell research. It is wrong to use embryonic stem cells from "left over" embryos, because we do not yet know if such research is worthwhile and we do not yet have a true scientific and moral certainty that we are not destroying human life. We should err on the side of NOT destroying life.

 
23238 05/17/2009 at 08:00:23 AM Self     I do not support embyronic stem cell research. Stem cells are just as effective when taken from the umbilical cord or from adult fat cells.

 
23239 05/17/2009 at 08:05:26 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad that at least some of the restrictions are being loosened, though I believe the NIH should go further.

 
23240 05/17/2009 at 08:07:15 AM Self     I support stem cell research and think that some guidelines needed to be loosened.

 
23241 05/17/2009 at 08:07:55 AM Self     I support stem cell research and want this valuable science to be studied further, to save lives and fight diseases.

 
23242 05/17/2009 at 08:09:30 AM Self     I am writing here in support of stemcell research that has already in it's infancy been able to help mend and repair people's broken spines, if not completely, than partly.

This science is at it's infancy, and we should not let some imagined "moral panic" prevent us from researching on of the most important breakthroughs in medical science. The question is not whether it's moral to research this technique, but that it would be immoral not to so. Think of the possibilities this would have in treating accidents as well as treating the injuries of our soldiers

 
23243 05/17/2009 at 08:09:43 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and am glad that the restrictions currently limiting this type of research are being loosened.

However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

I strongly urge this section to be rewritten in such a way that will "grandfather" existing stem cells to utilized in research.

 
23244 05/17/2009 at 08:11:31 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23245 05/17/2009 at 08:11:44 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
23246 05/17/2009 at 08:12:04 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23247 05/17/2009 at 08:12:25 AM Self     I strongly support continued stem cell research, and government funding is very important to this process. We need to be careful that advances already made can be built upon, and that means that existing lines must remain accessible - this is a fundamental piece of scientific methodology.

It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you.

 
23248 05/17/2009 at 08:14:04 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23249 05/17/2009 at 08:14:15 AM Self     I am in support of embryonic stem cell research. Furthermore, I think the guidelines for procuring stemcells should be as loose as possible to allow for the fastest possible rate of progress. People are dying from diseases that would have been curable today if not for the previous administration's idiotic anti-science attitudes and legislation.

 



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