Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

Browse Comments Beginning With:
Record ID:
Entry Date:
On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



|First 100 Records   Back 1000 Records   Back 100 Records   Records 23050 - 23149 of 49015 Forward 100 Records   Forward 1000 Records   Last 100 Records|

ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
23050 05/17/2009 at 04:03:11 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

seriously even though this letter is copied, i still believe everything in it! make these changes!

 
23051 05/17/2009 at 04:03:26 AM Self     I fully support stem cell research, and am glad that some of the ludicrous restrictions on this potentially life-saving research will be lifted. Thank you!

 
23052 05/17/2009 at 04:07:08 AM Self     Stem Cell research is a vital science, requisite to solving many of the world's health problems.

It is imperative that we support and advance this growing field.

 
23053 05/17/2009 at 04:07:56 AM Self     I fully believe that embryonic stem cell research is important for the advancement of medical solutions for crippling diseases like Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

 
23054 05/17/2009 at 04:09:18 AM Self     I support stem cell research. I think it's vital, I think it's medically necessary, and I think there is so much yet to be learned, so many lives that can be saved, from stem cell research. Please do not let those who have never experienced the crushing blow of an impairment that, given time, stem cell science could *reverse*, hold this government and her people back. We are desperately in need. Please listen.

 
23055 05/17/2009 at 04:09:20 AM Self     I am very stongly in favor of widespread testing of stem cell research, especially in curing brain disorders and paralysis. I would caution against making too many restrictions in research before we get completely left behind in 21st century medical advances.

 
23056 05/17/2009 at 04:10:21 AM Self     I support all stem cell research. It can save lives. It is important to people who care about people.

 
23057 05/17/2009 at 04:10:36 AM Self     How can anyone possibly be opposed to somthing that could so greatly improve the quality of life? The possible outcomes of this research are incredible and infinite. R we still letting mothers die during childbirth if the baby is breach? NO! As a society, as humans, it is our job to substain life. What better way to do that than stem cell research? I may not be a knowlegable scientist, but I don't have to be to know that this is possibly a way to cure what we have no cure for. As it does no harm to anyone, why not? Don't even pull the card of "precious life" as we all know that the percentage of people mwho masturbate is astronomical (conservatives included) The meaning of any biological life is to procreate and survive.Don't worry; Fate will intervene, but to stand by idle is cetain death. Anyone who has ever watched a loved one die, and put it in "God's Hands" still wishes that there was something that could have been done. Stem cell research could make that possible. Haven't seen a good reason yet NOT to explore this venue.

 
23058 05/17/2009 at 04:13:34 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

Stem cell research is vital for saving lives and modernising.

 
23059 05/17/2009 at 04:14:53 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23060 05/17/2009 at 04:14:54 AM Self     These guidelines are excellent, if I understand them correctly. Researchers desperately need new stem cell lines to work on, because the current lines are so few. Although we are all more than 99% alike, the vast difference in appearances between people is a testimony to how diverse we really are. 21 stem cell lines (those which you list) can hardly account for that kind of diversity. Opening new lines would likely lead to newer discoveries, because each line would be genetically different and may respond differently to the same experimental setup.

In B.7.h., privacy issues of the donor are considered. Would it be possible to keep the ethnicity of the donor regardless of their desire to remain anonymous or not? I am unsure of whether this affects stem cell research, but many ethnic groups have predispositions to certain diseases and disorders, which may be important to account for.

I hope that you will consider the content of the comments you receive carefully. A person commenting on these guidelines should understand what they are talking about in respect to both the guidelines and the biology of stem cell research. Thus, if someone uses a fraudulent piece of information to side against this proposal, it should not be considered.

After so many years of being stalled, I am hopeful that these guidelines will finally aid researchers in the progress of their research. The potential of stems cells is enormous, in curing of diseases and disorders and in better understanding of genetics.

 
23061 05/17/2009 at 04:15:07 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23062 05/17/2009 at 04:15:40 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you.

 
23063 05/17/2009 at 04:15:51 AM Self     I am in favor broad government support of stem cell research. These regulations are a good start, though I would prefer to see the regulations modified to encourage even more research. I have no problem with the use of stem cells from unwanted and discarded human embryos.

 
23064 05/17/2009 at 04:15:59 AM Self     Stem cell research is a good thing, the opportunities to save lives are endless, look to the bigger picture and save lives.

 
23065 05/17/2009 at 04:16:52 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23066 05/17/2009 at 04:19:47 AM Self     I support stem cell research and believe it is important to lift any restriction impending its development.

 
23067 05/17/2009 at 04:20:37 AM Self     I look forward to the day when science can continue research that cures disease and saves lives. When people die because the government interferes with medical research that might have found a cure, the government is directly guilty of negligent homicide and depraved indifference.

The people in need right now, who desperately need medical help now, take precedence over vague and ill-defined religious objections.

Politics and religion have no place in science. Why is that even in question?

 
23068 05/17/2009 at 04:22:16 AM Self     Your organization is dedicated to the advancement of health through the use of science. Please ignore the voices of the anti-science crowd and continue to do your part to help the human condition.

 
23069 05/17/2009 at 04:24:16 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23070 05/17/2009 at 04:24:37 AM Self     Stem cell research is important and has the realistic potential to help solve so many medical problems. Despite much rhetoric from the opposing forces, it harms no-one and must continue, unrestricted.

 
23071 05/17/2009 at 04:26:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research.

I would like it if all restrictions were removed, but any lightening of the restrictions is a good start.

 
23072 05/17/2009 at 04:26:47 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23073 05/17/2009 at 04:27:15 AM Self     Not loosening the restrictions for embryonic stem cell research completely undermines President Obama's reversal of stem cell research. Please loosen the guidelines on this very important issue.

 
23074 05/17/2009 at 04:29:53 AM Self     Simple as possible, I support stem cell research and consider its benefits to bring humankind closer to the eradication of many diseases as well as the possible development of organ harvesting.

 
23075 05/17/2009 at 04:30:12 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23076 05/17/2009 at 04:30:36 AM Self     Thank you for drafting the Human Stem Cell Guidelines; I am excited at the prospects available for reducing suffering and improving research and treatment through this line of research.

I would also echo the points others have made to ensure progress made thus far can continue uninterrupted and well-funded. Section II B should insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous guidelines will be eligible for use here; and that alternate sources of stem cell lines such as SCNT should not be excluded from funding in Sections II B and IV.

 
23077 05/17/2009 at 04:32:23 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23078 05/17/2009 at 04:33:14 AM Self     I support stem cell research. I'm no scientist, but I believe stem cells are a key to finding a way to cure to treat diseases for which we have yet to find a way to treat.

My sentiments reflect this entirely:

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

---------

Honestly, if it is believed that these guidelines cannot be passed unless they stay as conservative as they are, please don't revise them. In other words, I support the research in any form, as long as the research is allowed to happen.

 
23079 05/17/2009 at 04:35:05 AM Self     I support stem cell research and am glad to see that the NIH is looking at loosening some of the restrictions involved in this research. However, I'm concerned that the proposed guidelines in Section II B may mean that stem cell lines approved prior to the changes may not still be eligible. I would suggest changing that section to ensure that these previously approved lines still be eligible.

I would also urge you to continue looking into alternate stem cell sources and allowing federal funding for those sources--the current draft guidelines (Sections II B and IV) restrict federal funding for alternate sources.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on these draft guidelines.

 
23080 05/17/2009 at 04:35:46 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23081 05/17/2009 at 04:36:35 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Please continue the funding and research ... there are many, MANY persons who could use the benefits of their OWN 'usable' cells to perpetuate healthy lives.

 
23082 05/17/2009 at 04:39:04 AM Self     I am a supporter of embryonic stem cell research, and I believe the restrictions should be loosened.

 
23083 05/17/2009 at 04:43:57 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23084 05/17/2009 at 04:45:22 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23085 05/17/2009 at 04:46:05 AM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research.

 
23086 05/17/2009 at 04:46:12 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and I was very happy to hear that president Obama was repealing president Bush's restrictive laws against this research. However, I am concerned that the new guidelines may wind up being more restrictive. Please review the new guidelines to be sure that they do not have negative repurcussions that make it harder to carry out this research.

 
23087 05/17/2009 at 04:46:27 AM Self     I strongly support stem cell research. There is so much potential for good, it should not be ignored simply because certain individuals with freshly greased palms have used their positions of power for personal gain, something that's happened time and time again. This goes beyond medical implications, vast though they may be. It ranks amongst the definitive issues which will determine whether the beast that our political system has become actually works for the good of us all, or just the few who hold the reigns.

 
23088 05/17/2009 at 04:47:54 AM Self     I am not a scientist, but I understand that embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans. HOWEVER I think that it is too controversial an issue to validate using taxpayers money. I am not pleased that the final guidelines -- in Section II B -- appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. I believe that it is important that progress be made and that we build on the progress that has been made, but certainly not by forcing millions of Americans (some the same that would benefit from the research)to pay for something that they are morally opposed to. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, and I think that it should stay this way.

Thank you!

 
23089 05/17/2009 at 04:49:55 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23090 05/17/2009 at 04:50:25 AM Self     I believe that stem cell research should be supported and I'm glad to see that the strict guidelines are being slackened.

 
23091 05/17/2009 at 04:52:45 AM Self     I would like to say that I absolutely support stem cell research.

 
23092 05/17/2009 at 04:53:52 AM Self     I support research on human stem cells. We need to advance our understanding of medicine, and ignore the slippery slope arguments against it.

 
23093 05/17/2009 at 04:54:27 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I have studied stem cell research as part of my degree and I follow progress in this field with great interest and have a lot of respect for the scientists involves, as well as a great hope that the science is allowed to progress further, without so many restrictions as there have been in the past. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23094 05/17/2009 at 04:57:18 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23095 05/17/2009 at 04:57:50 AM Self     Stem cell research is the ultimate good. It has endless possibilities for repairing broken lives and healing the sick. It also will help scientists understand more about the body.

 
23096 05/17/2009 at 04:59:17 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
23097 05/17/2009 at 05:01:24 AM Self     I think that the new proposed guidelines are a good first step in the advancement of stem cell research. They make steps towards opening new lines, which is very necessary to the advancement of the research. I don't know if the new guidelines go far enough, but they are a step in the right direction in a sensitive area of research.

 
23098 05/17/2009 at 05:01:46 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
23099 05/17/2009 at 05:02:12 AM Self     Watching the my mother mobility deteriorate over the last 30 years with Multiple Sclerosis had how this has affected her life. I would support any potential research that would stop this suffering to someone else.

 
23100 05/17/2009 at 05:02:23 AM Self     I am not a scientist, but I AM a young American suffering from several systemic disorders that don't have cures or fully effective treatments. The potential for advancement of knowledge and the development of new techniques and treatments that embryonic stem cell research provides is great--and it's not just a question of personal preference or scientific curiosity--it's a question of the health of myself and my family, of the future of medicine itself. I have been following progress in this field with understandable interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines--in Section II B--would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you, and please think of your potential to help by expanding the guidelines thusly.

 
23101 05/17/2009 at 05:02:52 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. As a scientist having studied stem cells I understand their potential for medical use. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23102 05/17/2009 at 05:04:23 AM Self     As I understand it you can obtain stem cells from placenta / umbilical chord blood, so as such stem cell research doesn't equal more abortions. If research could be guided towards using this source & it made a matter of course to save such material the whole issue becomes a non-issue as far as pro-life / pro-choice is concerned.

 
23103 05/17/2009 at 05:04:36 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23104 05/17/2009 at 05:05:43 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23105 05/17/2009 at 05:07:02 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I believe it is imperative that we pursue this type of research. The possible cures and therapies that might be developed will benefit people with certain diseases and disorders everywhere. Thank you.

 
23106 05/17/2009 at 05:07:15 AM Self     I am very much in favor of stem cell research

 
23107 05/17/2009 at 05:07:17 AM Self     Stem cell research is one of the most important avenues to explore in modern medical science and restrictive/conservative rules or laws will only hinder the scientists' ability to make new advancements. Allowing baseless political and religious ideas to halt or slow these advances is not only wrong but potentially destructive to the health of many Americans.

 
23108 05/17/2009 at 05:13:32 AM Self     I am not an American citizen but the diseases that stem cell research may help to alleviate affect everyone worldwide; equally the benefits that may flow from such research will have a global impact on millions of lives. Restrictions on research in the interest of safety and ethics are of course necessary but not to the extent that viable avenues of enquiry and scientifically proven techniques are hampered by overly restrictive guidelines. I hope that the standards eventually adopted will encourage and facilitate this uniquely promising, innovative and valuable research so that as many lives as possible will be changed for the better.

 
23109 05/17/2009 at 05:13:45 AM Self     I have little to say, other than that I am in support of both Stem Cell Research and the new, proposed amendment. I believe that most any progress in a scientifc field is a step in the right direction; I also personally feel that the regulations are conservative enough to be utilized without too much of an outcry from any informed, non-bias individual(s).

While there are those who choose not to support even the concept of Stem Cell Research, I respect that and recognize that they are entitled to their opinion, and may peacefully protest by withholding their personal funds and their embryos from the cause. Just the same, those who are willing to venture further into this field should be entitled to an attempt at achieving their goal, which is the improvement of human life.

 
23110 05/17/2009 at 05:17:56 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and I'd love to see these guidelines loosened to promote more fruitful scientific research.

 
23111 05/17/2009 at 05:19:43 AM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
23112 05/17/2009 at 05:19:49 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23113 05/17/2009 at 05:21:59 AM Self     I am an American citizen and a supporter of stem cell research.

 
23114 05/17/2009 at 05:24:13 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and believe it is time to give the American scientific community the freedom to conduct the kind of important, innovative research that has allowed their foreign colleagues around the world to make ground-breaking discoveries in this field.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of people suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines regularly as the research progresses.

Thank you.

 
23115 05/17/2009 at 05:24:53 AM Self     I am extremely pleased that at least SOME of the restrictions are being lifted on stem cell research and the United States is finally making itself a responsible country when it comes to saving the lives of countless people who can only be helped due to stem cell research, instead of letting ourselves fall behind the rest of the world in yet another field of medicine and science.

 
23116 05/17/2009 at 05:25:39 AM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
23117 05/17/2009 at 05:28:06 AM       The benefits of stem-cell research are too important to sweep under the rug. This is an important program that must be allowed to see the light of day.

 
23118 05/17/2009 at 05:28:16 AM Self     In the past five years, I have gone from working happily as a sign language interpreter and instructor of college English for deaf students, with competitive fencing as a hobby, to sitting at home, unable to work -- let alone fence! -- due to being disabled by two illnesses for which there is currently no cure, Graves' disease and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/CFIDS).

Although I have always supported embryonic stem cell research as an important hope for medical discoveries, the subject is even more crucial to me now. It is my hope that the final guidelines will open the doors to research and not create more red tape.

Here is a boilerplate passage that sums up my views on the current guidelines better than I could write myself:

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

I grew up in Bethesda, and as a junior high school student was allowed to spend a day working alongside the scientists at NIH. I have always had the greatest fascination and respect for your work, and I look to you now to strengthen these guidelines and bring hope to the lives of millions of people like me.

Thank you.

 
23119 05/17/2009 at 05:28:35 AM Self     I am generally impressed with the draft guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research, especially the expansion of federal funding of previously-ineligible stem cell lines and for new cell lines which may be developed in the near future from surplus embryos: the potential of this research to cure many diseases, disorders, and even injuries is enormous, and the United States ought to be leading the way.

Which is why I share ***** concerns about the narrow phrasing of this draft. As he pointed out, the guidelines in Section IIB may still leave some current stem cell lines ineligible for federal funding: his suggestion that the draft be amended to ensure that federal research funding can be available for "all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived" is a good one.

I also support his suggestion that the final guidelines be explicitly clear about permitting federal funding for stem cell lines originating from sources other than surplus embryos (such as those derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer), and that the NIH ought to continue to update the guidelines in order to allow for federal funding of research using those sources. The final draft of Sections IIB and IV ought to at least permit funding for SCNT-derived stem cell lines (there being absolutely no good reason to exclude it), with room to allow funding for other varieties of stem cell lines that might be developed in the near future. We gain nothing by limiting our options at this stage, after all: by making it possible for researchers to explore alternatives, we get better science.

 
23120 05/17/2009 at 05:32:11 AM Self     As a molecular biologist I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23121 05/17/2009 at 05:32:44 AM Self     I believe this is a good and politically reasonable first step in expanding our medical knowledge for the good of all mankind.

 
23122 05/17/2009 at 05:35:08 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23123 05/17/2009 at 05:35:55 AM Self     I support Stem Cell Research and it's potential for saving and improving lives across the world. My only issue with these guidelines is that they are in fact too conservative. More allowances should be made so that we may all benefit from scientific advances found in this manner.

 
23124 05/17/2009 at 05:37:02 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am a scientist, and I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23125 05/17/2009 at 05:38:06 AM Self     I support stem cell research as my sister is downs syndrome and I have Aspergers. I feel that this technique will at least offer us an insight into many diseases and hopefully a cure for some. It is wrong for religious groups to dictate to us what should and should not be allowed. Who are they that they are so arrogant as to think they are the only ones who speak for God? Aren't scientists and doctors also God's children?

 
23126 05/17/2009 at 05:38:18 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23127 05/17/2009 at 05:42:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I have long thought that it is crazy that politics has tainted medicine- something that could save untold lives. I am an American now living in the UK it has just underlined for me how ridiculous the restrictions have been.

 
23128 05/17/2009 at 05:43:25 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and am happy to see that previous restrictions have been loosened. Being a devout Catholic, I recognize that this is one of the most controversial areas of scientific study, but I am pleased to see that the guidelines are aiming towards responsible research into cures and treatments for degenerative diseases that afflict so many people world wide. I also approve of the measures taken to secure informed consent for donors. I would suggest adding a clause to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous guidelines will still be eligible.

 
23129 05/17/2009 at 05:43:48 AM Self     If you want to advance in medical research, discover the cures, help people who suffer from untreatable accidents and need certain transplants not available, then stem cell research is needed.

I support Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

 
23130 05/17/2009 at 05:43:50 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23132 05/17/2009 at 05:45:22 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23133 05/17/2009 at 05:45:32 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23134 05/17/2009 at 05:47:23 AM Self     I support embyonic stem cell research and the loosening of some restrictions.

 
23135 05/17/2009 at 05:47:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23136 05/17/2009 at 05:54:02 AM Self     As a person with MS, I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and I am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23137 05/17/2009 at 05:56:21 AM Self     I support stem cell research and welcome the loosening of guidelines by the Federal government.

 
23138 05/17/2009 at 05:59:22 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23139 05/17/2009 at 06:00:28 AM Self     Please support federal funding for SCNT. I have battled PD for 12 years and need a cure. This is my best hope. Thank you.

 
23140 05/17/2009 at 06:02:10 AM Self     I support stem cell research. I also support scientists and research physicians deciding on the limits themselves, obviously already informed by both scientific pursuits and their own ethics. Not the ethics of an uninformed but well-intentioned public.

 
23141 05/17/2009 at 06:02:47 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Research of this type is vital to the continuing fight against serious diseases and genetic disorders.

 
23142 05/17/2009 at 06:03:19 AM Self     I think the proposed stem cell guidelines should be looser.

 
23143 05/17/2009 at 06:04:44 AM Self     As a doctor, scientist and humanist I strongly support embryonic stem cell research and believe that this form of inquiry is in the best interests of future generations.

 
23144 05/17/2009 at 06:05:23 AM Self     Human Stem Cell research is vital for the advancement of our knowledge of disease processes and the discovery of cures for a multitude of human ailments, I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23145 05/17/2009 at 06:06:15 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23146 05/17/2009 at 06:09:29 AM Self     I am a thirty year old man who holds no specific political party affiliation nor do I hold any particular religious denomination. I'm merely here to give my support towards the advancement of human embryonic stem cell research. It is my understanding that these are stem cells that would never take any part in the creation of a human life and therefore not endangering any pregnant mothers nor fetuses. Human Stem Cell or Embryonic stem cell research is a very new yet potentially highly beneficial towards individuals with a variety of diseases and/or disorders. I myself am a patient who has Truncus Arterious or commonly stated I have a congenital heart defect. I will have this condition all my life. However cardiologists are continuously doing research with and for patients with mine or similar conditions. Embryonic Stem Cells can and must be just one more tool made available for this research for the advancement of medical science in the United States as well as worldwide. I strongly insist that you take this statement as well as other families with children and family members who's lives may well depend on the research being done with human stem cells into account when making these decisions regarding the Human Stem Cell Guidelines. Do not let political nor theological agendas hinder our development in the research and experimentation with Human Stem Cells. For what may merely be theory and ideas presently, might be the tools that create a breakthrough that may alter millions of lives in the not too distant future.

 
23147 05/17/2009 at 06:09:50 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am a geneticist and although I do not myself work with stem cells, I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Amazing scientific advances have been made in this area over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line being used in research will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made and that work in progress need not be abandoned.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23148 05/17/2009 at 06:10:36 AM Self     I'm for stem cell research. How else are we going to cure Parkinson's Disease or have the possibility of repairing damaged spinal cords?

 
23149 05/17/2009 at 06:12:21 AM Self     I believe that stem cell research holds medical information that can benefit millions of people. I believe it should be funded and encouraged.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page