Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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Organization
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Comments Attachment
22950 05/17/2009 at 03:27:11 AM Self     Do not let systematic conservative flooding of this comment period create the image that only 1% of the American public supports stem-cell research. That is simply not true!

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22951 05/17/2009 at 03:27:27 AM Self     I believe every pathway should be open to helping people and I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
22952 05/17/2009 at 03:27:31 AM Self     We need stem cell research. Please help us.

 
22953 05/17/2009 at 03:27:59 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22954 05/17/2009 at 03:28:09 AM Self     Please approve stem cell research. It is a vital science for the future health of the human race. To not approve is to stop scientific progress and succumb to antiquated and controlling religious organizations.

 
22955 05/17/2009 at 03:28:16 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22956 05/17/2009 at 03:28:28 AM Self     I support the loosening of the rules on stem cell research. we need to be able to have all doors open! i have a sister who could be saved through stem cell research, she has diabetes. I have a grandmother who could als be saved through stem cell research, she has Parkinson. There have even been ways to convert regular skin cells into stem cells. We need to be ahead of the game here! lets not step backwards and not learn how to cure the sick! im already going to lose my grandmother soon, but please! dont take my sister away. lets get this moving!

 
22957 05/17/2009 at 03:28:29 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22958 05/17/2009 at 03:28:36 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22959 05/17/2009 at 03:28:57 AM Self     I am glad that the ridiculous restrictions that the Bush administration placed on stem cells are being loosened. However, even more can be done, and honestly it needs to be done to reverse the damage the last eight years have done to scientific progress in America. A grandfather clause is needed, and alternate cell lines cannot be excluded. Please, think of the benefits that this research could provide. Thank you for your time.

 
22960 05/17/2009 at 03:30:02 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22961 05/17/2009 at 03:30:02 AM Self     Stem Cell Research if fundamental to advancing our understanding of science, ourselves, & the diseases which afflict us, & I fully support it.

 
22962 05/17/2009 at 03:30:31 AM Self     I support federal funding for all forms of stem cell research. Obviously, this issue needs to be handled ethically and responsibly, so I understand the need for clear guidelines as to how stem cells may be obtained. However, I'm not sure why stem cells from sources other than what is outlined in section IIb wouldn't be eligible for funding. It seems that better, quicker results would come from researching all of our options ASAP. And in the case of stem cell research, better, quicker results could save lives. I think the guidelines for obtaining excess IVF stem cells are reasonable, and I don't see why similar guidelines couldn't be established for the other sources of stem cells. Still, even in their current state, the guidelines are a huge step forward for stem cell research, so I still support them fully. Please let this crucial step forward take place.

 
22963 05/17/2009 at 03:30:42 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research. I am hopeful that policy has been slowly changing around this topic. Please continue to loosen restrictions.

 
22964 05/17/2009 at 03:30:45 AM Self     The good that can be done by advancing human knowledge with stem cell research is infinitely more important than a perceived sanctity of life. Those stem cells are no more human entities than individual sperm or skin cells. Something having the potential to be a human being under the right conditions (being in a womb) is not the same as being sacred human life.

Science is the best way to improve the human condition. It should not be held back because of an ill-educated group's muddled views on biology.

 
22965 05/17/2009 at 03:31:00 AM Self     I support loosened guidelines on Stem Cell Research.

 
22966 05/17/2009 at 03:31:46 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist yet, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest, and I am currently studying a Bachelor of Science so I can change the world for the better. Significan strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you, I hope the NIH continues towards medical and scientific progress.

 
22967 05/17/2009 at 03:31:49 AM Self     I unequivocally support the stem cell research outlined in the Federal Register Notice. I think this work is vital for *useful* medical research that cannot and should not be interrupted by religious groups who misrepresent stem cell research and whose bias does not serve the health or wellbeing of this nation and the world. Abandoned IVF embryos deserve a chance to do something great: cure and treat diseases. So many already born children and adults are suffering. It makes no sense, medically or otherwise, to deprive the those afflicted with conditions that could be better understood or cured with the help of stem cell research of whatever salvation medical science can provide. Those embryos aren't going anywhere, be we surely are. Let's go someplace with less Parkinson's, arthritis, spinal cord trauma. Those are just a few of the conditions that have afflicted my family.

I strongly urge the NIH to not fall for the grotesquely inflated response it is sure to be getting from allegedly "pro-life" groups and individuals. This really is about preserving life, but the mistake is to privilege the unborn over those who are already among us. There are a lot of innocents on this side of the womb who desperately need this research to go forward, with all appropriate legal and ethical safeguards, which are only possible with government guidelines and approvals.

I am a woman of faith, and my faith demands that while I live, I do everything I can to serve the health and safety of all people and this planet. Advocating stem cell research most certainly is included in this mandate.

 
22968 05/17/2009 at 03:31:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and I'm happy to see some of the restrictions loosened, but I hope that you will add a "grandfather clause" to insure that stem cell lines approved under the previous stringent guidelines remain eligible.

 
22969 05/17/2009 at 03:32:01 AM Self     I support the use of human embryonic stem cells in medical research. I feel that the guidelines require an excess of paperwork, much of which is redundant and seemingly introduced as an obstacle. I also believe that NIH funds should be allowed to be used in the derivation of ESC from embryos, although I realise that this is beyond the scope of these guidelines.

 
22970 05/17/2009 at 03:32:30 AM Self     I am writing this in absolute support of this Guideline and in favor of Stem Cell Research. We need to move forward with this possibly transformative and certainly beneficial scientific endeavor and should not be held back by those with little understanding of medicine, science, reproductive development and genetics. So many lives could be saved and improved.

 
22971 05/17/2009 at 03:32:48 AM Self     I support cell stem research.

 
22972 05/17/2009 at 03:32:53 AM Self     We cannot allow religious fundamentalists to stop scientific progress. Please consider the lives that will be saved if embryonic stem cell research is furthered and do not be bullied into halting restrictions. Loosening the restrictions will make me happy as a voter.

 
22973 05/17/2009 at 03:33:08 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22974 05/17/2009 at 03:33:19 AM Self     I support stem cell research.

 
22975 05/17/2009 at 03:33:24 AM Self     I fully support utilizing stem-cell research and am exceedingly pleased that the guidelines are being loosened.

 
22976 05/17/2009 at 03:33:37 AM Self     I support fully open stem cell research and feel that the guidelines under consideration are too restrictive, but any research with ESCs is better than no research.

 
22977 05/17/2009 at 03:33:42 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is a potential source of treatment for millions of Americans who suffer from a variety of illnesses and conditions. I have been following developments that loosen the too-strict restrictions in this field with great interest. Scientists should be allowed to pursue research on stem cells without undue restriction so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

As a former infertility patient, I am pleased that this draft, in Section II B, would appear to open federal funding to stem cell lines previously not eligible, and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. As currently written, however, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made instead of creating new restrictions.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such assomatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding; I recommend that the final guidelines allow for federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

Thank you.

 
22978 05/17/2009 at 03:34:25 AM Self     Research on embryonic stem cells is vital, and this is the most ethical way to obtain them - from embryos that will simply be otherwise discarded.

 
22979 05/17/2009 at 03:34:58 AM       I'm a registered voter and I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
22980 05/17/2009 at 03:35:04 AM Self     Valid and complete science only occurs when we make decisions based on solid scientific principles, not on misunderstandings so tightly tied to religion as to be indistinguishable. There is no rational or ethical reason not to use fetal stem cells.

 
22981 05/17/2009 at 03:35:13 AM Self     As a means of advancing scientific research to help further the advancement of all humans, I am completely and totally in support of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

In response to the moral debate regarding this issue, I would like to state that in terms of determining whether supporting this research also means supporting the termination of human lives, there is a clear, indisputable characteristic that defines a human as alive; it's called birth.

 
22982 05/17/2009 at 03:35:26 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.

The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding.

It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22983 05/17/2009 at 03:35:49 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and fully believe that the next big medical breakthrough will come through this avenue. I am glad for the restrictions loosening and will be happy when this can be fully utilized and explored for its benefit to humanity.

There should be a clause to make sure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous guidelines will be eligible for use in research under the new guidelines.

Alternate sources of stem cell lines should not be excluded from funding. I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

 
22984 05/17/2009 at 03:36:08 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I am very glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22985 05/17/2009 at 03:36:31 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22986 05/17/2009 at 03:37:09 AM Self     I support Stem Cell Research and can barely comprehend the "logic" of anyone who claims not to.

 
22987 05/17/2009 at 03:37:16 AM Self     I do not believe that any embryonic stem cells should be excluded from use in research. I think no issues should be had with using cells produced through discarded embryos, created embryos, any method of obtaining short of harm to the subject. Stem cells and embryos are perfectly acceptable to be used in research and that research using these stem cells (obtained from all legitimate sources) should receive federal funding.

 
22988 05/17/2009 at 03:37:23 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22989 05/17/2009 at 03:37:49 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22990 05/17/2009 at 03:37:56 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am pleased to see some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22991 05/17/2009 at 03:38:34 AM Self     I am in support of embryonic stem cell research and glad it is moving forward to help find cures for many of the illnesses in our society.

 
22992 05/17/2009 at 03:38:39 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and it think it is imperative some of the restrictions are being loosened. Not doing so on religious or religion-inspired ethical grounds discriminates against non-believers and may be a death sentence for some because of the beliefs of others. It is anachronistic and self-destructive.

 
22993 05/17/2009 at 03:38:51 AM Self     I support stem cell research and am excited to see the restrictions of the past administration lifted. Stem cell research is crucial to fighting disease and our scientists need to have all the resources possible at their disposal.

 
22994 05/17/2009 at 03:38:56 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened

 
22995 05/17/2009 at 03:39:25 AM Self     Speaking out FOR stem cell research.

 
22996 05/17/2009 at 03:39:37 AM Self     This research is valuable, and should be handled and treated as such! Revise these guidelines!

 
22997 05/17/2009 at 03:39:45 AM Self     I am very much in favor of stem cell research. Though there are many moral/cultural/ethical concerns I believe that the promise this research holds is far too good to not go down this path.

 
22998 05/17/2009 at 03:39:55 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22999 05/17/2009 at 03:41:56 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and all the benefits that our species can hope to derive from it.

 
23000 05/17/2009 at 03:41:59 AM Self     I support stem cell research, and am glad to see some of the restrictions being loosened. However, while Section II B appears to permit federal funding for new stem cell lines, it seems to have left out any stem cell lines *currently* in the hands of researchers from eligibility. Furthermore, why does Section IV specifically prohibit the use of stem cells from somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning)? Unless there is concern about the viability of lines created in such a way, it seems to me there would be less of an ethical objection to such sources, and the NIH should keep all ethically viable options open.

 
23001 05/17/2009 at 03:42:18 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

I have indeed copy-and-pasted this comment, but only because it's well written and I agree with it whole heartedly.

Thank you!

 
23002 05/17/2009 at 03:42:19 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened and wish they were loosened more.Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23003 05/17/2009 at 03:42:35 AM Self     I support and encourage Stem Cell Research and I think the ultra-conservative guidelines need to be loosened. Americans are falling behind in the scientific world because their hands are tied by overwrought government afraid of backlash. Stem cells do NOT require fetal destruction, so please loosen the handcuffs on America's researchers!

 
23004 05/17/2009 at 03:42:48 AM Self     As the grandmother of a child with a primary immune deficiency, I give my support to all stem cell research. My grandson is headed down this road as without a stem cell transplant, he will die before the age of 21. The last administration set back US research by too many years and many of us have been living in terror. Terror that these delays will cost us the life of our loved ones. It is time to move onward.

 
23005 05/17/2009 at 03:42:54 AM Self     I support Stemcell research and the relaxing of guidelines on their use. Stemcell research is a lifesaving process and should be encouraged not hindered.

 
23006 05/17/2009 at 03:43:03 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23007 05/17/2009 at 03:43:23 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened!

 
23008 05/17/2009 at 03:43:33 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23009 05/17/2009 at 03:43:36 AM Self     I am for adult stem cell research. From what I've read, the results so far are great, and it looks like there are many opportunities for the future of what can be done.

However, I am very much against embryonic stem cell research. From what I've read, the results of research so far haven't been very good, and further development in this area doesn't look like it's going to be successful. Furthermore, as I believe that life begins at conception, I think it is morally unethical to be using embryos for scientific research. Although they are not fully developed humans, they are still human--made of the same stuff as us, created in the image of God. Allowing embryos to be used for embryonic stem cell research is wrong; it gives them no choice in the matter and it denies them dignity. The ends does not justify the means.

 
23010 05/17/2009 at 03:43:49 AM Self     I am not in favor of federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research. There is no way to verify IVF embryos would not be created solely for the purpose of research. I do not want my tax money used to create and destroy life.

 
23011 05/17/2009 at 03:43:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23012 05/17/2009 at 03:44:00 AM Self     I believe that stem cell research is a good thing and should be kept.

 
23013 05/17/2009 at 03:45:00 AM Self     This is a serious topic and the use of stem cells can lead to discoveries of cures for catastrophic diseases. This is a process that must continue to be explored . .

 
23014 05/17/2009 at 03:46:43 AM Self     I support the use of embryonic stem cells for stem cell research, and am very happy that, at long last, some of the restrictions on potentially life-saving research are being loosened.

 
23015 05/17/2009 at 03:47:06 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research!

 
23016 05/17/2009 at 03:47:26 AM Self     I approve the use of government funding for all forms of stem cell research except for those from embryos. This practice should not be allowed at all in my opinion, but if done it certainly shouldn't be with my money.

 
23017 05/17/2009 at 03:48:09 AM Self     As a former scientific researcher, I am enthused by stem cell research and consider it to be of great potential use. Millions of lives could be saved or improved with this technology. However, I feel that a "grandfather" clause is required to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
23018 05/17/2009 at 03:48:46 AM Self     I support the National Institutes of Health use of stem cells created by in vitro fertilization for research purposes, and thus, this document.

 
23019 05/17/2009 at 03:48:50 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened

 
23020 05/17/2009 at 03:48:55 AM Self     I fully support human stem cell research and endorse the draft guidelines outlined in the April 23, 2009 Federal Register Notice.

 
23021 05/17/2009 at 03:50:19 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Stem Cell research; like any other type of scientific research, should not be restricted. This could pave the way towards any number of cures for debilitating and life threatening illnesses such as Parkinsons Disease.

 
23022 05/17/2009 at 03:50:53 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I feel very strongly that stem cell research is important both directly to medicine (eg therapeutically) and to science, where the impact to future medicine and understanding is incalculable.

 
23023 05/17/2009 at 03:50:56 AM Self     I support research using embryonic stem cells. I feel that the potential benefits far out weigh the moral concerns of using these methods.

 
23024 05/17/2009 at 03:51:45 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23025 05/17/2009 at 03:52:18 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. As someone who has watched loved ones die of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease and cancer, the stakes are too high to not look at all ways to find cures.

Please do not allow the ignorance and anti-science rhetoric of a small--but vocal--portion of the population to disadvantage the rest of the country.

 
23026 05/17/2009 at 03:52:22 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened but this is not enough!

 
23027 05/17/2009 at 03:53:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, I would like to see all restrictions removed.

 
23028 05/17/2009 at 03:53:24 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened but it not enough!

 
23029 05/17/2009 at 03:53:39 AM Self     Stem cell research is as of yet, a relatively untapped resource for mankind. For true, it is and will always be important for scientists to keep a keen eye directed to the writ of morality, but so long as Americans can partake in the pursuit of happiness, it will be similarly important for progress, especially in such a potentially culture-changing study as this.

With opposing, and correct views on matters such as this, it is always important to have an impartial judge to weigh both sides against the other, but let us remember that no man may be truly impartial, and in the race that is the pursuit of fair judgment, there is no end, and the winner is he who runs constantly, at his most, and picks himself up without a moments notice the many times he will inevitably fall.

Good luck.

 
23030 05/17/2009 at 03:53:47 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23031 05/17/2009 at 03:53:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23032 05/17/2009 at 03:54:23 AM Self     I strongly support stem cell research.

 
23033 05/17/2009 at 03:54:39 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
23034 05/17/2009 at 03:55:02 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad that the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23035 05/17/2009 at 03:55:38 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23036 05/17/2009 at 03:56:08 AM Self     I am in favor of providing federal funding for research using human embryonic stem cells. This research is of vital importance in manufacturing cures for fatal degenerative diseases that both shorten lifespan and drastically reduce the quality of life for victims. I see no moral problem with the use of embryonic stem cells with the proposed NIH guidelines.

 
23037 05/17/2009 at 03:57:16 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I would like to see increased support for this initiative in the future, as I believe it is vital to the development of science.

 
23038 05/17/2009 at 03:57:29 AM Self     No matter what side of the abortion issue you take, we can't let the death of unborn fetuses drift away, be forgotten so easily. If stem cell research comes up with a cure for a cancer and saves the life of someone, than neither of those lives, whether the person died or not, were not in vain. The pursuit of science and of health, and from there of life and happiness, could be drastically furthered by the discoveries that could come from this research. This is an opportunity that can't be let go to waste.

 
23039 05/17/2009 at 03:57:37 AM Self     I consider stem cell research to be a vital tool in the fight against many currently crippling diseases, and support its advancement. Loosening restrictions is vital in allowing this line of research to reach its full potential.

 
23040 05/17/2009 at 03:57:59 AM Self     I support looser restrictions on stem cell research. It can only advance the prosperity for the average American and benefit a long neglected industry in this nation.

 
23041 05/17/2009 at 03:59:24 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23042 05/17/2009 at 03:59:39 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research. It is great that we have made this step politically and scientifically but the current guidelines do not go far enough to really allow for the freedom of scientists. The guidelines need to be less prescriptive and allow and, for example, allow current stem cell lines to be eligible for federal funding. Developments that will no doubt be made through the research in this field will benefit the entire world. I would ask you, please do not be thrown off course by the vocal minority who I'm sure you are aware have been mobilising against the progress we are making.

 
23043 05/17/2009 at 03:59:42 AM Self     I completely support embryonic stem cell research, and absolutely support the restrictions are being loosened.

The conservative, timid approach does not serve the people who are ill, their loved ones or the people who become ill in the future.

I expect my government to do what is needed to protect us, and this is part of it. Consider it the Department of Health Security.

 
23044 05/17/2009 at 04:00:36 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I hope that moving forward the forces reactionary ignorance plays less of a role in the shaping of scientific policy.

 
23045 05/17/2009 at 04:00:48 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23046 05/17/2009 at 04:01:06 AM Self     As a parent of a child with Type 1 Diabetes I am writing to support Stem Cell Research. Our son is 5 years old, and has diabetes for more than three years. He is in good health, due to 24/7 care by my husband and myself. He is healthy, and has a 6.7 A1C, which is a three month calculation of his blood sugar control. Max's is almost "normal." Taking care of Max's diabetes is a full time job. I am very lucky to have the time to do this all day, and night (2:00 a.m. blood sugar checks every night). Not all parents are that lucky. Children need to be rid of this disease. The side effects can be devestating, or even deadly. Please support the research. It is the way to end Type 1, insulin dependent, diabetes. Please contact me if I can help in any way possible, my cell phone number is *****.

 
23047 05/17/2009 at 04:02:36 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
23048 05/17/2009 at 04:02:47 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. I fully support embryonic research. To counter those who believe we are murdering, I believe that if they are to "die" that is their fate and it is necessary for their spirit's development. But from a science perspective, I really think stem cell research is necessary to improve medicine and health. I think being able to harness stem cells will be able to cure plenty of people with incurable diseases (if they so wish it). Check out the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's. I think this is a good cause and one of the ways stem cell research can be supported.

 
23049 05/17/2009 at 04:02:56 AM Self     PLEASE, PLEASE support stem cell research without restriction. Stem cell research is, by far, the most important medical breakthrough opportunity we have for so many diseases and yet-to-be-found discoveries.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page