Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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Comments Attachment
22850 05/17/2009 at 03:07:53 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22851 05/17/2009 at 03:07:55 AM       i support stem cell research

 
22852 05/17/2009 at 03:08:01 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22853 05/17/2009 at 03:08:10 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and believe its continuance to be important.

 
22854 05/17/2009 at 03:08:16 AM Self     Embryonic Stem Cell Research is an important step in advancing medicine to its fullest potential. It is VITAL that existing approved stem cell lines be eligible as well as loosening restrictions to allow this research to continue for the good of all mankind.

 
22855 05/17/2009 at 03:08:17 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

Hampering scientific research in the name of, mostly, religious views is against the very idea of progress and human development.

 
22856 05/17/2009 at 03:08:38 AM Self     I believe in and support the benefits that can be gained from stem cell research. Please consider how many advancements could be made because of stem cell research as opposed to the moral stance others may be taking against advanced research.

 
22857 05/17/2009 at 03:08:50 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Don't let extremists and fundamentalists with little regard or knowledge of science determine our best chance of curing disease and extending the quality and span of life for all Americans.

 
22858 05/17/2009 at 03:09:11 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22859 05/17/2009 at 03:09:15 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and I hope that the government continues to support scientific research initiatives to help provide the best possible options for finding cures for degenerative diseases and spinal cord injuries.

 
22860 05/17/2009 at 03:09:17 AM Self     I am pro-Stem cell research. It is best for the future of the world to loosen any restrictions on this innovative science.

 
22861 05/17/2009 at 03:09:22 AM Self     I support stem cell research, and those who would seek to regulate it on self-styled ethical or moral grounds are deeply misguided.

 
22862 05/17/2009 at 03:09:28 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22863 05/17/2009 at 03:09:43 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22864 05/17/2009 at 03:10:42 AM Self     I strongly support embryonic stem cell research, and I feel that the potential benefits to future generations far outweigh supposed ethical issues of said research.

 
22865 05/17/2009 at 03:10:43 AM Self     Stem cell research is an important step forward in therapeutic and medical science and technology, and we should not allow those who have a vested interest in hindering and ignoring those important elements of our society to dictate policy.

 
22866 05/17/2009 at 03:10:49 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22867 05/17/2009 at 03:10:58 AM Self     The guidelines, while apparently reasonable, are a foray into reproductive law that frightens me. I'm concerned about the lack of legal clarity on the issue of who owns the genetic property of an individual. Does the individual own themselves or do their parents own the genetic material? I understand the medical potential that stem cells can unlock, but the path behind that door is murky morality at best. Legally, we must come to a consensus on when an individual comes into existence. If a person isn't a person at all until they are born, then what's to prevent people from becoming "donors for dollars" down the road. (I understand the provisions against compensation laid out in these guidelines.) In short, I think no laxity in these guidelines should be permitted. We are putting the cart before the horse. Define a person. Define ownership of genetic property. Then maybe, this can be discussed.

 
22868 05/17/2009 at 03:11:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and believe that the proposed guidelines for such are needlessly restrictive.

 
22869 05/17/2009 at 03:11:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22870 05/17/2009 at 03:11:06 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened."

 
22871 05/17/2009 at 03:11:15 AM Self     I have an arachnoid cyst on my brain, please do not limit research that could go a long way to helping ease the pain I feel on a daily basis.

 
22872 05/17/2009 at 03:12:03 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research! I am happy that some of the restrictions on this research are being loosened, and I look forward to the advances in combating devastating diseases, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and cancer, among many others, that I know stem cell research will provide, and I hope that new guidelines will not be put into place or older ones restricted in any way to slow this research process. I also think federal funding should be permitted for stem cells obtained from other sources other excess IVF embryos.

 
22873 05/17/2009 at 03:12:08 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened

 
22874 05/17/2009 at 03:12:18 AM Self     I support any and all stem cell research. I encourage everyone too do the same. It will help Produce a better tomorrow. Thanks.

 
22875 05/17/2009 at 03:12:18 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened

 
22876 05/17/2009 at 03:12:27 AM Self     I am 100 percent in FAVOUR of stem-cell research. This is a valuable tool, and is research on this subject is ABSOLUTELY necessary! Right now the States are behind numerous other countries in their research, it is my belief that if the United States were to get behind stem-cell research GREAT advancements could be made!

 
22877 05/17/2009 at 03:12:40 AM Self     I absolutely support the use of stem cell research to aid in combatting disease, injury, birth defects and whatever other uses it can possibly have to make our lives better.

 
22878 05/17/2009 at 03:12:41 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22879 05/17/2009 at 03:12:44 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I'm glad to hear some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22880 05/17/2009 at 03:12:46 AM Self     I support stem cell research. Please continue to lift the restrictions.

 
22881 05/17/2009 at 03:12:54 AM Self     I consider it morally reprehensible to use embryonic stem cells for research. There are other sources available to comprise our selves unnecessarily in this way when there are viable alternatives is sad and a waste of money I pay as an American.

 
22882 05/17/2009 at 03:12:58 AM Self     I fully support embryonic stem cell research.

 
22883 05/17/2009 at 03:12:58 AM Self     I feel strongly that Human Stem Cell research should be not only permitted but aggressively engaged in. It is my sincere hope that this mild loosening of restrictions is merely a first step to a more comprehensive and less small-minded policy. So many people could be helped by this research in so many ways. We should not allow fear and ignorance stop or slow our efforts.

 
22884 05/17/2009 at 03:13:15 AM Self     I think to deny the lives that would be saved through the products of stem cell research is inhumane. Allow it. Please.

 
22885 05/17/2009 at 03:13:22 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

We have let misguided theists dictate matters of science long enough. I urge you to break this habit and vote in favor of total government funding for embryonic stem cell research.

 
22886 05/17/2009 at 03:13:22 AM Self     I absolutely support embryonic stem cell research. I'm actually surprised that with the new administration there is still a question about it.

 
22887 05/17/2009 at 03:13:24 AM Self     Support this research!

 
22888 05/17/2009 at 03:13:25 AM Self     The possible benefits of stem cell research are too miraculous to be ignored. Please loosen some of the restrictions governing the use of embryonic stem cells. I fully support stem cell research and wish to support it by all means!

 
22889 05/17/2009 at 03:13:28 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Furthermore, I believe that religious considerations should be kept apart from decisions dealing with scientific matters.

 
22890 05/17/2009 at 03:13:35 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22891 05/17/2009 at 03:13:36 AM Self     I support Stem Cell Research.

 
22892 05/17/2009 at 03:13:36 AM Self     I am a graduate student in information science and while stem cell research is far outside my field of expertise, I firmly support it as a citizen and as a student of science.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22893 05/17/2009 at 03:14:00 AM Self     Stem cell research is important to the future of medicine. I support looser restrictions so that it can be used to produce new and more effective cures and treatments.

 
22894 05/17/2009 at 03:14:10 AM Self     Please consider what you are doing. Stem cell research could benefit millions.

 
22895 05/17/2009 at 03:14:11 AM Self     Stem cells may be the only possible deterrent of Alzheimer's, dementia, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, etcetera. Scientists must be allowed to use human subjects and must have leeway to do their best to make changes for this world. However, the knowledge gained from that research and its' results must be mandated and restricted. This research walks a fine line between medical miracles and playing God. My personal opinion, which is conflicted, stems from me being a vegan, animal rights activist, environmentalist, genius, ... and candidate for the rare early- onset Alzheimer's and eventually, Parkinson's. My ethical beliefs conflict deeply with my core belief that my intellect and my capabilities could better the world, but by the time I am 30 I might be mentally useless, eventually physically useless as well. I have watched everyone in my family on my maternal and paternal side mentally rot away from (maternal) Alzheimer's dementia, and (paternal) Parkinson's.

I ask you make wise decisions and also keep in mind that benefits gained from stem cell research should not be limited to the ultra wealthy. Watching someone you love, or yourself, disappear inside your own mind is a very haunting and horrific experience. Any ability to hinder that from happening should be explored. Thank you for listening to my opinion.

 
22896 05/17/2009 at 03:14:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and want the restrictions to be loosened.

 
22897 05/17/2009 at 03:14:33 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. Saving lives is what we should be doing with federal dollars, even at the cost of discomfiting some religious people.

 
22898 05/17/2009 at 03:15:06 AM Self     I've read the guidelines, and I'm glad to see some potential for stem cell research. The guidelines should be loose, in order to allow this amazing line of research to continue. I appreciate that section III prevents the NIH from funding the mixing of human cells with certain nonhuman cells - that could create unspeakable legal difficulties - but that, otherwise, the restrictions are fairly loose. If the restrictions did tighten on any point, it might make sense to restrict the use of human stem cells with any nonhuman cells, if for no reason other than the potential legal quagmire.

Please, though, be sure to keep the restrictions on stem cell research loose! This could save lives across the world. As a scientist and a citizen, I beg you: don't let the United States fall behind in science again!

You should also probably have a more secure method for feedback. This form could probably be manipulated easily by someone with decent programming knowledge, and it would be tragic for something of this importance to be hijacked by individual interests. If there is an overwhelming push for one position on the issue, please consider soliciting another round of comments with a more secure comment form.

 
22899 05/17/2009 at 03:15:15 AM Self     I wanted to voice my support for the current guidelines as they stand, but also advise that I believe there should still be no funding allowed for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or any other controversial treatments not using discarded IVF embryos.

 
22900 05/17/2009 at 03:15:22 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research. I believe it is an important avenue of research providing many current and potential future advancements to medical and biological knowledge.

In particular, it is important that a grandfather clause be included that allows any stem cell line already approved under previous guidelines to be eligible. Further, alternate sources of stem cell lines (e.g. SCNT) should NOT be excluded from funding.

Our nation has never benefited from the intentional suppression of science and the advancement of knowledge. Thank you for your time.

***** An Undergraduate in Biology at Oregon State University.

 
22901 05/17/2009 at 03:15:49 AM Self     I feel it is my duty to add my voice to the small (but, one hopes, growing) number speaking up in support of any and all forms of stem cell research. Science cannot be held captive to superstition and ignorance. Those who claim to hold life in such high regard have no compunction over letting countless lives be lost to disease which could be completely stopped by continuing research.

 
22902 05/17/2009 at 03:15:51 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

 
22903 05/17/2009 at 03:16:01 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

Please do not allow those who cannot distinguish between science and sin to determine the future course of this important research.

 
22904 05/17/2009 at 03:16:11 AM Self     I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics.

However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22905 05/17/2009 at 03:16:39 AM Self     I greatly support stem cell research, and am pleased that restrictions are being loosened

 
22906 05/17/2009 at 03:16:49 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22907 05/17/2009 at 03:17:02 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22908 05/17/2009 at 03:17:08 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22909 05/17/2009 at 03:17:21 AM Self     I fully support stem cell research. To hold back advancement in this important field of science is to tell our friends, family and citizens that their health is not a priority. If we are to reclaim our status as a world power, we have to be willing to loosen restrictions on such an important field of study.

 
22910 05/17/2009 at 03:17:28 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. It is an important step to learning how to cure diseases and make a better future.

 
22911 05/17/2009 at 03:17:40 AM Self     Science is humanities evolution. wWe will not progress as a race if we are restricted in science. I support stem cell research! Lift all restrictions now!

 
22912 05/17/2009 at 03:17:47 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, I believe it could be extremely beneficial to the world, and am glad to see some of these restrictions being loosened.

 
22913 05/17/2009 at 03:17:51 AM Self     Without all aspects of stem cell research being funded either through the government or private research, there will be no furthur breakthroughs. Though the research being done at NIH, patients with cancer, spinal cord injuries, and various other medical issues will be given hope. It is the only way we can save the lives of the living and breathing persons in our world.

 
22914 05/17/2009 at 03:17:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22915 05/17/2009 at 03:17:55 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds huge promise for millions of our fellow humans who suffer from preventable diseases. I am science-educated and understand the state of the technology and am convinced that we will see significant benefits from this research in the near-term.

It is the morally correct thing to do that the NIH allows people to build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using ALL stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

 
22916 05/17/2009 at 03:17:56 AM Self     As someone suffering from a disabling illness, I must hope that medical research may someday find a cure or relief for my condition. I support more research into stem cell science as a way of saving lives, reducing pain and disability, and most importantly in the pursuit of pure science.

 
22917 05/17/2009 at 03:18:35 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22918 05/17/2009 at 03:18:45 AM Self     We need extensive stem cell research; religion has no place in science. I believe stem cells will bring answers to many syndromes, diseases, genetic disorders that current medical technology cannot fix right now.

 
22919 05/17/2009 at 03:18:47 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

However, I think that any and all stem-cell lines that are ethically produced should be eligible for federal funding. Restricting the lines to discarded IVF embryos, as is stated in sections II B and IV, unnecessarily limits the research which can be done. Disallowing somatic cell nuclear transfer, for example, will exclude some important work on creating lines to study diseases that negatively impact many people's lives.

There is also no explicit guarantee that lines which are federally-funded at the present will be eligible going forward.

Thank you!

 
22920 05/17/2009 at 03:18:58 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and I hope you know that a comment forum that most people might not even know about, doesn't necessarily represent Americans and their opinions as a whole. Please, please keep this in mind when this major of a decision.

 
22921 05/17/2009 at 03:19:14 AM Self     I am strongly in support of stem-cell research. Many of the restrictions on stem-cell research are short-sighted at best (some might say 'criminally negligent'). I am overjoyed that some of these restrictions are being loosened.

 
22922 05/17/2009 at 03:19:19 AM Self     I am relieved to hear that the restrictions on stem cell research have been loosened. People with life-threatening illnesses deserve at least the chance that the results of this research will point toward a cure. The restrictions previously imposed were not based on science and denied the legitimacy of this effort. Thank you for moving forward with stem cell research.

 
22923 05/17/2009 at 03:20:07 AM Self     I am support of embryonic stem cell research and am glad restrictions are being relaxed.

 
22924 05/17/2009 at 03:20:10 AM Self     I support stem cell research. Tightening restrictions and making research more difficult will only keep us from making discoveries that could change the way we look at medicine today. I support loosening the restrictions.

 
22925 05/17/2009 at 03:20:54 AM Self     I support stem cell research because the value of human life doesn't depreciate after birth.

 
22926 05/17/2009 at 03:20:59 AM Self     I support increased funding of and loosened restrictions on human stem cell research.

 
22927 05/17/2009 at 03:21:15 AM Self     As a voter, a tax payer, and an informed citizen I want to throw my support behind Stem Cell research. So much can be done to better our world if we allow science to march forward without tying their hands because of a small contingent of people who are against it mainly because they don't understand it.

How many things would not have happened if we were too scared to push forward? The discovery of the new world? The Space Program? The treatment of disease?

Do not take a handful of right wing zealots and consider it the will of the people.

We owe it to the future of the world to pave new roads and stand tall in the face of our critics.

 
22928 05/17/2009 at 03:22:07 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I hope that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. I support research using all viable stem cell lines that are derived ethically - the potential gains from this research are so enormous that scientists should have access to all the stem cell lines they need.

 
22929 05/17/2009 at 03:22:27 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. It holds great promise to those with spinal cord injuries, Parkinson's among other things. Please eliminate any and all restrictions.

 
22930 05/17/2009 at 03:22:33 AM Self     I support human stem cell research for the simple reason that it will save lives.

 
22931 05/17/2009 at 03:22:38 AM Self     Please, for the sake of all living Americans, allow stem cell research with as few restrictions as possible.

 
22932 05/17/2009 at 03:22:44 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. It holds great promise to those with spinal cord injuries, Parkinson's among other things. Please eliminate any and all restrictions.

 
22933 05/17/2009 at 03:22:49 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22934 05/17/2009 at 03:22:50 AM Self     I support stem cell research and wholly welcome the scientific advancements that may come from it. I am relieved that the restrictions are being relaxed.

 
22935 05/17/2009 at 03:22:52 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
22936 05/17/2009 at 03:23:08 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. We cannot afford to indulge those who wish to hamper human progress due to superstitions.

 
22937 05/17/2009 at 03:23:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and believe it deserves no more restrictions than standard medical research.

 
22938 05/17/2009 at 03:23:30 AM Self     I fully support UNLIMITED stem cell research! My grandfather died of ALS. I know someone who is paralyzed. I've lost several relatives to cancer. I could care less about a few cells in a petri dish, that is in no way a human or equal to one. This research can cure REAL living humans. To give cells in a petri dish rights over actual living human beings is a crazy theological view and wrong! Supernatural superstition has no place mixed with science! Ignore the religious right and help REAL suffering people! Science is the real miracle, advance it!

 
22939 05/17/2009 at 03:23:46 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and to its work in advancing human development.

 
22940 05/17/2009 at 03:23:53 AM       We need this, stem cells could save thousands of lives.

 
22941 05/17/2009 at 03:25:20 AM Self     I am very glad to hear of the new guidelines involving stem cell research. While I am no scientist, I have seen the good stem cell research can do and the lives that are meaninglessly lost because of their previous restrictions. I think that this decision has given way to the improvement of medicine, and how many more cures and therapies can now be explored and discovered.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22942 05/17/2009 at 03:25:28 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. but they should go further.

 
22943 05/17/2009 at 03:25:32 AM Self     please lift restrictions on embryonic stem cell research.

 
22944 05/17/2009 at 03:25:38 AM Self     I support embryonic cell research and I am glad the guidelines are now being improved, but I still think they are too prohibitive. For instance, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will be eligible for federal funding. It is important to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by ethical practices and for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We need to build on progress that has already been made. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines currently do not permit such federal funding and I recommend they be revised.

 
22945 05/17/2009 at 03:26:16 AM Self     As a former IVF patient whose plans (with my husband) for any extra embryos that might have been generated by our procedure included splitting them between other infertile patients as embryo donations AND donating them to research, I would like to state, unequivocally that:

I SUPPORT the suggested loosening of the NIH human stem cell guidelines, including allowing federally funded research using extra embryos from IVF procedures.

I further SUPPORT the suggestion (not in the proposed guidelines) that previously created stem cell lines also be permitted for further federally funded research.

I further SUPPORT that alternate sources of embryonic stem cells, such as somatic cell transfer, be premitted for federally funded research.

I feel that the benefits of stem cell research, while still in infancy, are amazingly promising. I know that extraneous embryos produced in IVF procedures often sit in cryogenic suspension for many years, and if a clinic goes out of business, the embryos are simply discarded. Rather than having that happen, I infinitely prefer that they be used to benefit the human race.

Once again, I SUPPORT the proposed NIH stem cell guidelines.

 
22946 05/17/2009 at 03:26:19 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22947 05/17/2009 at 03:26:37 AM Self     I support stem cell research. Do not give in to religious fanatics on this one please!

 
22948 05/17/2009 at 03:26:52 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22949 05/17/2009 at 03:27:11 AM Self     Stem Cell Research will help break open the possibilities in new science development for cures and aid. Please help researchers do all they can to get the funding, support, and legalization to do their best work for our futures, and childrens' futures.

 



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