Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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21951 05/15/2009 at 10:42:07 AM Self     It would be cost-ineffective and morally wrong to use American taxpayers' money to fund embryonic stem cell research. The evidence shows major problems with such research, and the many successes with adult stem cell research.

The following article shows how adult stem cell research is already successfully treating, for example, spinal cord injuries, and how it is even being used to alleviate the tumor-causing properties of injected embryonic stem cells.

The source of the article is CitizenLink e-mail newsletter, May 13, 2009. Web address: http://www.citizenlink.org/content/A000010016.cfm

"Good News: Adult Stem Cells Solve Embryonic Research Problems" "Scientists are using embryonic stem cells to try to treat mice with spinal-cord injuries. The problem is that life-destroying embryonic stem-cell research forms tumors. So, the researchers are co-transplanting adult stem cells to deal with the tumor growth.

"The irony is adult stem cells are already ahead of embryonic stem cells when it comes to spinal-cord injuries. Researchers have done trials on humans and have seen restored sensation in patients.

"Wesley J. Smith, senior fellow at the Discovery Institute, said the public should not forget the core of the debate between ethical adult stem-cell research and embryonic stem-cell research.

“'I think in discussing any scientific achievement — whether it’s adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or otherwise — it’s important to understand that the embryonic stem-cell debate is an ethics debate,'” he said. “'It’s a fight over morality, not over science.'”

— Nima Reza (author of article)

Please consider the facts concerning both kinds of stem cell research, and choose the one that is both morally and practically appropriate.

Sincerely,

 
21952 05/15/2009 at 10:43:02 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21953 05/15/2009 at 10:43:12 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
21954 05/15/2009 at 10:44:12 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21955 05/15/2009 at 10:44:18 AM Self JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.  I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21956 05/15/2009 at 10:44:41 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21957 05/15/2009 at 10:44:47 AM Organization New York Neural Stem Cell Institute   I support embryonic stem cell research

 
21958 05/15/2009 at 10:47:48 AM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because my Mom has suffered from Parkinson's for over 20 years. Embryonic stem cell research offers her and milliions of others hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise my Mom's health by restricting scientists. She deserves the best treatment science can provide.

Thank you,

 
21959 05/15/2009 at 10:48:26 AM Self     I support the wonderful opportunity to help find the cures for so many horrible diseases. Thank God we have a forward thinking president.

 
21960 05/15/2009 at 10:48:41 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21961 05/15/2009 at 10:50:38 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21962 05/15/2009 at 10:54:55 AM Self     Neither this country nor the international community permit experimenting on non-consenting human beings, much less killing them, even though it be for the advancement of medical research and technology, even though such practices could doubtlessly lead to many discoveries. It is equivalent to slavery to reduce the body and life of a person, or the bodies and lives of a class of persons, to mere tools for the medical benefit of others. This is precisely what embryonic stem cell research does.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21963 05/15/2009 at 10:56:52 AM Self Boston University School of Medicine 72 E Concord St, B7800, Boston MA 02118 My comments are mainly about section II which operationalize the stem cell lines.

These changes in the wording (making it simpler and more general) may allow preservation of all existing lines as well as federal funding for more lines to be created.

No comments on Section I

Comments on Section II: 1. Suggest using simpler language and obtaining consents at the onset. 2. Clarifying life is preserved when stem cells are made.

I have drafted an example section II using the above ideas as follows:

Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from Human Embryos: Human embryonic stem cells may be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes, were no longer needed for this purpose, were donated for research purposes, and for which documentation for all of the following can be assured: 1. All donors be informed of their option to allow the use of embryos that are no longer needed for reproductive purposes for creating stem cells, allowing them to consent for donation of their embryos at the outset by a yes/no answer in the consent form before a reproductive donation can be made. 2. No inducements were offered for the donation. 3. A policy be in place at the health care facility where the embryos were donated that no donations of any kind can be made unless there is an yes/no answer for sub-section 1 above. 4. If there are individuals who at the time of donation, consented only for reproductive services, those donors be notified in writing, to answer yes/no to section 1 and given a 2 year window to not allow donation. 5. Include a statement that donor(s) understood alternative options pertaining to use of the embryos; 6. Information that the embryos not selected for reproductive purposes are routinely destroyed and donation of the same to derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research will lead to preservation of life of those embryos, even though existing as cell lines and lack a human form. 7. A statement that the research was not intended to provide direct medical benefit to the donor(s); 8. A statement as to whether or not information that could identify the donor(s) would be retained prior to the derivation or the use of the human embryonic stem cells (relevant guidance from the DHHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) should be followed, as applicable. 9. A statement that the results of research using the human embryonic stem cells may have commercial potential, and a statement that the donor(s) would not receive financial or any other benefits from any such commercial development. C. Prior to the use of NIH funds: Funding recipients must ensure that: (1) The human embryonic stem cells were derived consistent with sections II.A and B of these Guidelines; and (2) the grantee institution maintains appropriate documentation demonstrating such consistency in accordance with 45 CFR 74.53, which also details rights of access by NIH. The responsible grantee institutional official must provide assurances with respect to (1) and (2) when endorsing applications and progress reports submitted to NIH for projects that utilize these cells.

No comments on Section III. Delete Section IV entirely.

 
21964 05/15/2009 at 10:57:26 AM Self     My family has a history of diabetes

 
21965 05/15/2009 at 10:57:29 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21966 05/15/2009 at 10:58:28 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21967 05/15/2009 at 10:59:27 AM Self     - Embryonic stem cell research, where a human embryo is destroyed, has been in use for years but has yet to yield any cures. Other types of stem cell research, which do NOT involve the destruction of human life, have already proven successful in just a few years' time. - Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. - The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21968 05/15/2009 at 11:00:36 AM Self     As one of many citizens of our wonderful United States and after hearing from the Concerned Women of America Organization, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. And I do not appreciate being forced to do this. I also know that I do not stand alone. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. I am among many who know we are talking about human beings, not just embryos. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. This opens us up as a nation for horrendous unethical, immoral, and dangerous practices.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
21969 05/15/2009 at 11:02:38 AM Self     Do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life!

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21970 05/15/2009 at 11:03:17 AM Self     I believe that funding for stem cell research should be increased.

 
21971 05/15/2009 at 11:03:27 AM Self     Please do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life!

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21972 05/15/2009 at 11:03:30 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner

 
21973 05/15/2009 at 11:04:00 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21974 05/15/2009 at 11:04:23 AM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21975 05/15/2009 at 11:04:55 AM Self     No one has a right to destroy human beings. There is a better way, not killing, but promote life. There is no need for the research on the human embryonic stem cells. It has been proven that the human adult stem cells will be the best because of their stability. Embryos are unstable. There should be research for a cure for the diseases not research on embryos. There is no evidence that the embryonic stem cells would help in the diseases and conditions: Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis. I could not live with the fact that I would be treated with embroynic stem cells for the diseases listed above, because of the destruction of life. I will live with my disease and save a human life.

 
21976 05/15/2009 at 11:06:00 AM Self     I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21977 05/15/2009 at 11:06:45 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21978 05/15/2009 at 11:07:25 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21979 05/15/2009 at 11:08:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21980 05/15/2009 at 11:09:27 AM Organization levy center for healing arts 24E Montgomery Village Ave, Gaithersburg, MD 20879 Please loosen standards for stem cell research.

 
21981 05/15/2009 at 11:09:30 AM Organization levy center for healing arts 24E Montgomery Village Ave, Gaithersburg, MD 20879 Please loosen standards for stem cell research.

 
21982 05/15/2009 at 11:10:17 AM Organization     funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21983 05/15/2009 at 11:10:35 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21984 05/15/2009 at 11:11:23 AM Self     I would like to urge that destructive embryonic stem cell research be banned. Adult stem cell research has resulted in extraordinary advances in treatments and therapies. I strongly object to the creation of embryos for the single purpose of killing them and harvesting their stem cells. The symantic gymnastics of calling the process by different names to dupe the public is not worthy of what this country has always stood for. The utilitarian argument that it will help so many people is not only disengenuous it is morally wrong. Embryonic stem cells have not helped anyone...stick to ethical (adult/placenta/cord blood) stem cell research!

 
21985 05/15/2009 at 11:11:33 AM Self     The embryonic stem cell research that the NIH guidelines would permit are both morally objectionable AND lacking in ANY proven utility.I do not comprehend how any thinking human being could recommend such research, in light of successful and ethically responsible alternatives utilizing adult stem cells.

In other words, I think these new guidelines should be thrown out.

I wish you people would get a clue, and use your common sense.

 
21986 05/15/2009 at 11:12:09 AM Self     As a taxpayer, I cannot agree to have these funds used to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do NOT destroy human life and have already been proven successful. There is no qualifiable case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. We cannot create life just to destroy it; we cannot trade one life for another.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. I demand and expect that my government will honor and protect ALL human life, especially that of those who cannot protect themselves. As stated by our Founding Fathers, every person is entitled to "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness." To deny life to the unborn would be a serious denial to what this country stands for.

 
21987 05/15/2009 at 11:13:30 AM Self     You do not have my permission to use my tax dollars to destroy life. This blood will not be on my hands. Adult stem cells are the best choice because they have proven effective and they do not involve killing potential life. Do not be driven be death and destruction but by life and health.

 
21988 05/15/2009 at 11:13:40 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21989 05/15/2009 at 11:13:49 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21990 05/15/2009 at 11:14:07 AM Self     I am totally in favor of embro. cell research! Millions of Americans lives can be saved and changed as a result of this kind of research. We've lost so much valuable time. I'm appreciative the new Administration realizes the importance of this valuable research.

 
21991 05/15/2009 at 11:14:48 AM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
21992 05/15/2009 at 11:15:43 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21993 05/15/2009 at 11:16:50 AM Self     I am opposed to the use of federal tax money for the embryonic stem cell research. Do not use my tax dollars for this research!!!!

 
21994 05/15/2009 at 11:18:53 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

Even though morality is controversal and often times politically incorect; please don't do something that could bring a curse on this land. Thank you. Sincerily Prophet ***** P>S>know that I am always praying for God's blessings, wisdom and protection for you.

 
21995 05/15/2009 at 11:19:24 AM Organization Concerned Women for America   As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
21996 05/15/2009 at 11:20:18 AM Organization Hadassah Parkland, Florida I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21997 05/15/2009 at 11:22:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21998 05/15/2009 at 11:25:59 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21999 05/15/2009 at 11:26:34 AM Self     For many americans with a personal connection to type1 diabetes, the Adminstrations expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Adminstration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaning the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH , however to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically responsible manner according to the best practices at this time.Research on these stem cells lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigoursly pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages this research has already yielded impresssive results ins our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin producing betat cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or pratical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commmend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22000 05/15/2009 at 11:26:38 AM Self     Hello. I am concerned about Section II B. It sounds as though this Section does not ensure that current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlines and, thus, be eligible for federal funding. I believe it's important for the final guidelines to allow federal funding for research using all stem cell lines created by following the best ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
22001 05/15/2009 at 11:27:48 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing you to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. I am opposed to the proposed regulations when alternatives to embryonic stem cells have proven to be more effective and are actually treating patients today. As a taxpayer, I do not feel that I should be forced to pay to subsidize unethical research that will be difficult to oversee. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22002 05/15/2009 at 11:29:55 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
22003 05/15/2009 at 11:34:58 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
22004 05/15/2009 at 11:36:37 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22005 05/15/2009 at 11:37:25 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern,

I am opposed to using embryonic stem cells for research. A unique human person is created at the moment of conception and shares the same rights as those of us who are out of the womb.

Please do not condone this research.

Sincerely,

***** (former embryo)

 
22006 05/15/2009 at 11:37:35 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you. ***** P.S. Regardless of the politics in America, opposition to embryonic stem research will not stop the research---the benefits are too great. Instead it will just impair our U.S. scientists ability to participate in these new scientific advancements, and hence threaten the world leadership role we have held in healthcare sciences since the end of World War II

 
22007 05/15/2009 at 11:38:03 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
22008 05/15/2009 at 11:38:03 AM Organization     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22009 05/15/2009 at 11:38:32 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
22010 05/15/2009 at 11:39:11 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. As someone who is diabetic and who suffers from degenerative disc disease I see great hope for effective treatments as a direct result of stem cell research. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
22011 05/15/2009 at 11:41:53 AM Self     I am in favor of loosening the retrictions on stem cell research.

 
22012 05/15/2009 at 11:42:47 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22013 05/15/2009 at 11:47:19 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
22014 05/15/2009 at 11:49:57 AM       I feel stem cell research holds great potential to improve health care for people suffering from a variety of conditions. As humans we have been driven to pursue methods to improve the quality of life for ourselves and those around us. Stem cell therapies have the potential to increase the quality of life for people suffering from a vast number of diseases from neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's, to autoimmune disease or even cancer. The true potential of these techniques won't ever be clear if research is not allowed to freely continue.

 
22015 05/15/2009 at 11:50:29 AM Self     I strongly support federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, and I support the Administration’s efforts to ensure federal funding of this important research. I am pleased that the draft guidelines will permit federal funding for new stem cell lines, and will finally allow meaningful embryonic stem cell research to move forward. It is important to me and my family that politics not stand in the way of scientific progress that may lead to better treatments and a cure for Alzheimer's, Parkinson’s, cancer, and heart disease.

I am concerned, however, that Section II B does not “grandfather” or ensure the continued use of the few embryonic stem lines that were eligible for federal funding under the Bush policy. As we work to lift the de facto ban, the final guidelines must allow the current lines to remain eligible for federal funding. We cannot lose the progress scientists have achieved over the past several years. We cannot afford to lose any more time.

In addition, NIH must regularly update the guidelines as science advances. There will be important research tools discovered over the next several years that will necessitate regularly updated guidelines, such as human Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer cell lines. The guidelines must adapt to new science that will help researchers better understand and treat diseases.

It's time to get politics and unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles out of the way. It's time to speed the pace of progress. It’s time to develop better treatments for people living with diseases.

 
22016 05/15/2009 at 11:51:48 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22017 05/15/2009 at 11:52:12 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22018 05/15/2009 at 11:54:18 AM Self     Sample Letter: NIH Stem Cell Guidelines

May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22019 05/15/2009 at 11:54:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22020 05/15/2009 at 11:55:59 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22021 05/15/2009 at 11:57:14 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22022 05/15/2009 at 12:01:16 PM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America?s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama?s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22023 05/15/2009 at 12:03:12 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22024 05/15/2009 at 12:04:01 PM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
22025 05/15/2009 at 12:06:39 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22026 05/15/2009 at 12:07:01 PM Self     I am in favor of all stem cell research. I can only see an up side to helping cure disease and making lives better. As active person diagnosed with MS, such research allows me to be hopeful that my life will remain active and fulfilling.

 
22027 05/15/2009 at 12:13:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22028 05/15/2009 at 12:14:58 PM Self     I have a dear uncle suffering from Parkinson's. I was so pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appears to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

Thank you for your time.

 
22029 05/15/2009 at 12:16:11 PM Self     Incurable, debilitating diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, MS and ALS exact a devastating toll on patients, their families and society in general. Embryonic stem cell research offers milliions hope for a better future, and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines in Section 11 B will permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made by allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise millions of people's health by restricting the ability of scientists to cure and prevent these devastating diseases. We all deserve the best healthcare science can provide

 
22030 05/15/2009 at 12:16:53 PM Self     "As a parent of a child suffering from Multiple Sclerosis, and, mother-in-law of a son with diabetes I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
22031 05/15/2009 at 12:18:00 PM Self     It is God who creates all life and only God who shall take it away.

 
22032 05/15/2009 at 12:19:27 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
22033 05/15/2009 at 12:19:41 PM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
22034 05/15/2009 at 12:20:11 PM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
22035 05/15/2009 at 12:22:10 PM Self     In this document it says that its purpose it to "help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law."

Destroying an embryo in order to harvest its stem cells is not "ethically responsible." An embryo is a small human life. It is a living human being and deserves the same rights we all do. As Horton the elephant says, "a person is a person, no matter how small."

It is impossible to us to understand why embryonic stem cells are still being "experimented on" when there has been NO positive scientific results from their destruction.

If "scientifically worthy research" is sought than adult stem cells should be used. Already amazing, positive results have resulted from the use of these adult stem cells that has not caused the stem cell donor any harm.

To us the choice is clear-embryonic stem cells destroy human life and have yet to yield any viable scientific results.

Adult stem cells cause no harm to the donor and have resulted in many, many positive scientific results that have benefited patients. Adult stem cells are not only scientifically worthy they are also absolutely ethical.

There is no argument.

Thank you for considering my comments and may you prosper in your work.

 
22036 05/15/2009 at 12:22:28 PM Self     Both my sister and my best friend have suffered from Parkinson's for 25 years. Their drugs are no longer effective. At 68, my sister was confined to a wheelchair. Now, 2 years later, her husband can no longer physically care for her and because they live on Social Security, must find a nursing home that accepts Medicaid. It is painfully sad for me to watch the deterioration of both my friend's and my sister's bodies that Parkinson's has caused.

Embryonic stem cell research offers them and so many others hope for a better future. I have seen my sister be close to normal - after having been totally incapacitated - through the use of medicines (while they still worked) and the Deep Brain Stimulation surgical implants (until it, too, became ineffective). I believe that stem cell transplants have the ability to return my sister, my friend and millions of others to a productive, active life.

It is important for the final NIH Guidelines to encourage this desperately needed research through federal funding of stem cell lines derived from not only the use of excess IVF embryos (Section 11 B), but equally important, from sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

Having the final guidelines include a grandparent clause enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made would allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise the health of the people I love by restricting scientists. They deserve the best treatment science can provide.

 
22037 05/15/2009 at 12:22:49 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22038 05/15/2009 at 12:23:04 PM Self     As a private party who abhors the taking of a human life for any reason other than severe criminal aberation, I hereby protest the drafting of any NIH Human Stem Cell guideline/policy which results in the taking of the life of a human fetus or newborn child.

 
22039 05/15/2009 at 12:23:45 PM Self     stem cell research holds promise for treatment of so many diseases and we are thrilled the new administration is allowing research to go forward

 
22040 05/15/2009 at 12:24:12 PM Self     Right to life from conception to natural death

 
22041 05/15/2009 at 12:24:21 PM Self     I strongly oppose your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force taxpayers to subsidize research that destroys human life. This sort of reseach can never be ethical. I support stem cell research and treatments that don't destroy human life and are already proven successful. Adult stem cells effectively and ethically treat patients. Stem cell research that destroys embryos has been ineffective and dangerous, causing tumors, etc. The government should never support creation of human embryos for research. The proposed regulations don't prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids, a loophole that must be closed immediately.

 
22042 05/15/2009 at 12:25:49 PM Self     I am a diabetic and, of even more concern, I have a young nephew with juvinile diabetes that requires medication several times a day, careful diet, and frequent blood tests; his life expectancy is poor. The major hope for his life is stem cell research and I implore you to permit extensive government sponsorship of stem cell research.

 
22043 05/15/2009 at 12:26:56 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22044 05/15/2009 at 12:27:14 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22045 05/15/2009 at 12:28:03 PM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
22046 05/15/2009 at 12:32:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
22047 05/15/2009 at 12:32:13 PM Self     NIH staff members, As you consider the guidelines for Human Stem Cell research, I would strongly urge you to protect Human embryos from destruction for the following reasons: 1. Adult stem cell research has already been successful in demonstating dozens of therapies and treatments. Embryonic stem cells are more likely to form tumors and have not been as successful. It would be a wiser use of tax dollars to spend money where research has been more promising. 2. Human embryos are small human beings and like you, deserve the right to life, not death. Thank you for your consideration.

 
22048 05/15/2009 at 12:32:46 PM Self     Why should we support something that is not only demeaning to our respect for our own humanity but that has not proven to be usefull as it has been seen to cause more cancer. It has been more succesfull but little recognized the use of the patient's own body's stem cells.

 
22049 05/15/2009 at 12:34:17 PM Self     I would like to address the proposed policy and procedures for Executive Order 13505 which provides taxpayer funding for research using embryos that were produced through in vitro fertilization clinics, but will no longer be used for reproductive purposes. The NIH proposes that the research will be conducted in a manner that is “ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law.” Any research that involves the deliberate destruction of human beings in order to obtain stem cells for so called therapeutic purposes is not ethically responsible. A human individual, is entitled to a right to life as guaranteed in the US Constitution. Any intervention that is not of benefit to the embryo itself is not an ethically responsible action and further, it would violate the laws established in US 45 CFR 46, the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights and the Nuremberg Code. Whether the NIH agrees with such universally known principles or not is of little consequence because by using federal funds to destroy human life, millions of taxpayers would be forced to become complicit with the immoral actions of the government. Embryonic stem cells have failed to effect the cure of even one disease, while more than 70 diseases have been successfully treated using adult stem cells. Moreover, embryonic stem cells, in addition to being ineffective in the treatment of disease, have demonstrated a tendency to cause immune rejection and cancerous tumors. Medical treatments are supposed to be of aid to the patient, not to induce death by another disease. To invest taxpayer money in a clear (and dangerous) failure, while a proven success is at hand is completely irresponsible, a betrayal of public trust. One is left wondering at the pursuit of such research, especially since it features a total lack of respect for the human person; a human being is a thing to be used, experimented with and then disposed of when no longer useful. Dr. Joseph Mengele, the Angel of Death at the infamous Aschwitz concentration camp was known to conduct experiments on human beings which frequently resulted in their deaths. The purpose of these experiments is unclear. Their value to the science of medicine is negligible. A staggering cost in human suffering was paid, and for a return that amounted to virtually nothing. In the aftermath of this horror the Nuremberg Code, which was established in 1947 and later became the basis for US 45 CFR 46, states in Article 2: “The experiment should be such as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study, and not random and unnecessary in nature.” As the saying goes: “He who will not learn the lesson of history is condemned to repeat its mistakes.” Under Section B. Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from Human Embryos, the guidelines state that, “ Human embryonic stem cells may be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes, were no longer needed for this purpose, (and) were donated for research purposes” In other words, since they are going to die anyway we might as well use them for whatever we think worthwhile. Doctor Megele’s reason was virtually identical. Since the occupants of this camp are going to die anyway, why not use them for experimentation? No regulations exist for the limitation of embryo production. Therefore, embryo farming would be a growth industry, supplying much the same opportunity as was enjoyed by Mengele at Aschwitz. In summary, embryonic stem cell research using Federal Funding violates the moral and religious rights of millions of US citizens who oppose the destruction of human life for research purposes. It has not yielded any benefits to society; it has not produced treatments or therapies despite years of research using private funds. It violates existing laws governing the use of human subjects for research; it opens the door for reckless abuse of the law and the potential for massive production and destruction of innocent human life. Even if embryonic stem cell research might one day produce some sort of human benefit, millions of people in need will forego such treatments rather than violate their religious beliefs. To date, over 615,000 Americans have joined the Campaign for Ethical Vaccines because there are several immunizations that are produced using aborted fetal cell lines and families are refusing to use them. Please do not make the same mistake again! Research that uses public funding should be focused on treatments that all Americans and indeed, citizens of the entire world can benefit from without moral compromise.

 
22050 05/15/2009 at 12:34:59 PM Self     Please fund adult stem cell research instead of embryonic stem cell research. Adult stem cells have been doing a lot of good in a noncontroversial way. Our limited funds should not be spent on controversial embryonic stem cell research when a proven alternative is available. Embryonic stem cell research sets a dangerous precedent, that life is expendable. Our grandparents would be appalled at its use.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page