Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
21851 05/15/2009 at 08:16:38 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21852 05/15/2009 at 08:18:09 AM Organization Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Louisville, Ky. For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21853 05/15/2009 at 08:20:30 AM Self     Section II B, Allow federal funds for research using ALL stem cell lines created by following best ethical practices at the time they were derived.

 
21854 05/15/2009 at 08:21:08 AM Organization Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America 50 West 58th Street, NY, NY, 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21855 05/15/2009 at 08:21:44 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21856 05/15/2009 at 08:22:58 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21857 05/15/2009 at 08:23:01 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21858 05/15/2009 at 08:26:45 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

 
21859 05/15/2009 at 08:30:55 AM Self     The lives of two of my loved ones depend upon loosening stem cell research restrictions, and I definitely believe that this should be done as soon as possible. Please, please do what you can.

 
21860 05/15/2009 at 08:31:23 AM Self     Strong support for extensive stem cell research is a priority now. Please, please support funding for unbiased, apolitical, research for the benefit of all mankind.

 
21861 05/15/2009 at 08:32:06 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21862 05/15/2009 at 08:35:51 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21863 05/15/2009 at 08:39:12 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21864 05/15/2009 at 08:41:15 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21865 05/15/2009 at 08:42:13 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21866 05/15/2009 at 08:44:47 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful by helping at least 70 different diseases and conditions. There is no evidence that any research using embryos has been successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21867 05/15/2009 at 08:45:54 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21868 05/15/2009 at 08:50:49 AM Self     I have been paralized for 13 years from a spinal cord injury. I have a daughter 4 years old that I want to see grow up. You have the resouces to make that happen. PLEASE LET ME HAVE HOPE THAT MAYBE I CAN WALK MY DAUGHTER DOWN THE ISLE OF HER WEDDING SOMEDAY

 
21869 05/15/2009 at 08:51:29 AM Self     One area of concern is Section II B, which does not ensure that current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlines and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following best ethical practices at the time they were derived.

 
21870 05/15/2009 at 08:51:45 AM Self     I am strongly in favor of stem cell research and of removing restrictions on it.

 
21871 05/15/2009 at 08:54:34 AM Self     I SUPPORT embryonic stem cell research! There should be no question that this most important scientific issue continue. We have lost 8 precious years of advancement for cures due to the last administastion. The new guidlines should be precise and pro-research. Don't let those who oppose abortion continue to high-jack this issue to advance their cause. The two issues have NOTHING to do with one another. Lets get going and give those who have been waiting for a cure the opportunity to experience it.

 
21872 05/15/2009 at 08:57:18 AM Self     I support advanced embryonic stem cell research, and hope that restrictions are being loosened to meet ends that medical professionals find necessary for best and most timely results. Those suffering from illnesses that embryonic stem cell research is likely to help are struggling each day, and any potential benefits that only research and development can bring, are breathlessly awaited.

 
21873 05/15/2009 at 08:57:19 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21874 05/15/2009 at 08:58:44 AM Self     i am in support of the stem cell research and loosening the restrictions.

 
21875 05/15/2009 at 09:04:51 AM Self     i think http://www.awd.co.il/cpack.html

is a very good website.

 
21876 05/15/2009 at 09:05:01 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research and wish to see this program proceed.

 
21877 05/15/2009 at 09:13:04 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21878 05/15/2009 at 09:14:12 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21879 05/15/2009 at 09:15:19 AM Self     I support loosening restrictions on step cell research

 
21880 05/15/2009 at 09:15:48 AM Self     At a time when so many people are concerned about research performed on animals and the death penalty being "cruel and unusual punishment", please do not start "researching" on human beings. You are no longer 'scientists' but torturers and murderers. May what you do unto others be done unto you--what after all are you but more cells?

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

The Lord hears the cry of the poor, blessed be the Lord. Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His faithful ones.

 
21881 05/15/2009 at 09:16:39 AM Self     I am in favor of loosening the restrictions on stem cell research."

 
21882 05/15/2009 at 09:19:39 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. U.S.A always leads in the every science field, and this is the reason why USA has become the most powerful nation through over the word in only few hundreds years. We can't lag in the stem cell field, can't lose the advantage in research because we have abundant and the most excellent scentists in the world.

 
21883 05/15/2009 at 09:21:00 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21884 05/15/2009 at 09:21:47 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21885 05/15/2009 at 09:23:52 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21886 05/15/2009 at 09:24:13 AM Self     We are vehemently opposed to the use of embryonic stem cell research. We cannot hope to advance our society by destroying life. There is so much potential for cure in stem cell research that does not destroy life, that is where we need to concentrate our efforts.

 
21887 05/15/2009 at 09:24:48 AM Organization Cure Paralysis Now PO Box 600812, Jacksonville, FL 32260 The NIH guidelines are unnecessarily restrictive and should include federal funding for therapeutic cloning (SCNT), and the generation of disease specific embryonic stem cells.

 
21888 05/15/2009 at 09:26:36 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

(You may cut and paste these points in your e-mail.)

Please take this opportunity to stand up to this executive order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
21889 05/15/2009 at 09:31:14 AM Self     I am in favor of loosening the restrictions on stem cell research.

 
21890 05/15/2009 at 09:31:48 AM Self     i support human embryonic stem cell research

 
21891 05/15/2009 at 09:32:29 AM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21892 05/15/2009 at 09:33:49 AM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21893 05/15/2009 at 09:34:07 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21894 05/15/2009 at 09:36:44 AM Self     Please go forward with what the president has asked of you.

 
21895 05/15/2009 at 09:37:45 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21896 05/15/2009 at 09:38:35 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21897 05/15/2009 at 09:39:09 AM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21898 05/15/2009 at 09:40:39 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
21899 05/15/2009 at 09:44:22 AM Self     Dear NIH:

As a scientist working in the stem cell field, I feel it is my duty to add my voice to that of colleagues working specifically on ES cells and respond to the appeal launched by ISSCR and the Cell Stem Cell journal.

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

Sincerely,

 
21900 05/15/2009 at 09:44:33 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21901 05/15/2009 at 09:44:47 AM Self     I am in favor of loosening the restrictions on stem cell research.

 
21902 05/15/2009 at 09:45:59 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21903 05/15/2009 at 09:46:16 AM Organization Concerned Women for America 1015 Fifteenth St. N.W., Suite 1100 Washington D.C 20005 To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21904 05/15/2009 at 09:46:53 AM Self     I am very much in favor of loosening the restrictions on stem cell research.

 
21905 05/15/2009 at 09:46:56 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21906 05/15/2009 at 09:47:10 AM Self     I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients, like Adult stem cells.

Regards,

 
21907 05/15/2009 at 09:47:52 AM Self     I support Stem Cell research, including allowing funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by IVF. I believe that the Dickey-Wicker Amendment should be overturned and full access to Stem Cell lines be granted.

 
21908 05/15/2009 at 09:48:50 AM Organization Concerned Women of America 1015 Fifteenth St. N.W., Suite 1100 Washington D.C 20005 To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21909 05/15/2009 at 09:49:02 AM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern: As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21910 05/15/2009 at 09:50:45 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

We am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. This is a moral choice that if given the right to, we would choose not to do! Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. We all want to be efficient with our spending now a days, don't we? The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and dreadful human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can be useful in actually treating patients.

Sincerely,

 
21911 05/15/2009 at 09:52:11 AM Self     I fully support and urge a lreversal of all of restrictions on any stem cell research...

 
21912 05/15/2009 at 09:52:20 AM Self     I am against federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. There has been no positive outcome from this type of research. Adult stem cell research has achieved cures for many diseases. Why should our tax dollars fund something that is so unethical as destroying human life? This is even against our constitution as we have a right to life.

 
21913 05/15/2009 at 09:54:41 AM Self     Experimentation on human embryos should ring a very loud bell in those who have a mature and enlightened conscience. Just using adult stem cells has proven to be very useful. I wonder at the real, hidden motive for using embryonic stem cells.

 
21914 05/15/2009 at 09:55:24 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21915 05/15/2009 at 10:00:49 AM Self     I am opposed to Stem Cell Research since it destroys an innocent human life. There is very promising results from umbilical cord blood and that should be used. Please consider the lives that will be lost only to save other lives. We as a society should not choose who's life is more important. I believe it should be a crime to destroy a perfectly healthy life to save someone with a terminal disease especially when other means are available

 
21916 05/15/2009 at 10:00:50 AM Self     Embrionic Stem Cell is so important to our well being as well as to the future of science and medical research. I am hoping we forge ahead with courage and clarity of purpose.

 
21917 05/15/2009 at 10:02:38 AM Self     Please do not fund embryonic stem cell research. This approach is doomed to failure, while adult stem cells have proven effective time and again. Furthermore, "leftover" embryos can be adopted. They are children, and should not be killed and dissected for research. I have met some of these "snowflake" children. I am aghast that my tax dollars may be used for this gruesome and worthless research. STOP!

 
21918 05/15/2009 at 10:02:47 AM Self     I am very opposed to destroying embryos for research. I, along with thousands of other Americans, strongly believe that these embryos are now a life and cannot just up and be destroyed. I recommend finding an appropriate mother for each of these embryos rather that their fullness of life may be completed.

Thank You for your time.

 
21919 05/15/2009 at 10:04:35 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Also, I feel this would lead to the sale of human embryos. Is this the value of Human life under the Obama regeim? Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Let's not open a "Pandora's box" of horrors!

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21920 05/15/2009 at 10:04:49 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.3239

 
21921 05/15/2009 at 10:05:58 AM Self     Diabetes and its complications exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because diabetes has enacted its horrendous effects on our family and friends for way too many years!. Embryonic stem cell research offers millions of people hope for a better future, and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise my family's health by restricting scientists. We all need the best treatment science can provide.

 
21922 05/15/2009 at 10:07:21 AM Self     I FEEL THAT THOUGH THE HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH THAT THERE WILL BE A CURE FOR DIABETES WHICH IS THE CHRONIC DISEASE THAT I SUFFER WITH. I PRAY THAT MY GENERATIONS TO COME WILL NOT BE AFFECT BY DIABETES. I KNOW THERE ARE TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS LINING THE POCKETS OF THE DRUGS COMPANIES AND THE POWERS THAT BE BY THE SUFFERING OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES HAVING TO TAKE MEDICIATIONS, BUT WITH THE ADVANCES MADE WITH HSCR WE CAN BE CURED OF SOME OF THE DISEASES.

 
21923 05/15/2009 at 10:09:59 AM Self     May 14, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21924 05/15/2009 at 10:10:14 AM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21925 05/15/2009 at 10:10:30 AM Self     Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21926 05/15/2009 at 10:10:59 AM Self     May 15, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21927 05/15/2009 at 10:12:48 AM Organization     I am against using additional embryonic stem cells for experimentaion. This science has proven to be without merit. Adult stem cell research has a proven record of helping and curing medical problems. More money should be invested in this research and stop pretending that embryonic stem cells will be as useful as adult stem cells. You are wasting valuable time and money in questionable research when there is a proven way to use adult stem cells.

 
21928 05/15/2009 at 10:13:24 AM Self     As a physician, I am deeply concerned about the fate of stem cell research in this country. I believe strongly in federal funding of stem cell research and feel that certain language should be used in drafting the NIH recommendations. For instance,Section II B should read to "allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT." I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
21929 05/15/2009 at 10:13:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21930 05/15/2009 at 10:14:46 AM Self     I fully support Stem Cell Research and am glad restrictions are being loosened.

 
21931 05/15/2009 at 10:14:48 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21932 05/15/2009 at 10:16:36 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21933 05/15/2009 at 10:17:03 AM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[If you are utilizing specific lines in research, it would be helpful to mention the lines you are using and the nature of your research. In addition, it would be useful if you would cite publications by yourself or others concerning existing lines, and point out that the sort of research that would not have been, or will not be fundable by the NIH if the lines used or generated in that research were not eligible for funding. ]

[If you perform work internationally, it would be helpful to describe the nature of your collaborations.]

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[If you have had a research protocol reviewed, it would be helpful to describe the comprehensive nature of the review and oversight.]

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
21934 05/15/2009 at 10:17:41 AM Self     I am against this whole form of research. There has to be another way than destroying precious little embryos that will one day grow into a productive human being. I highly resent the fact that my hard-earned tax dollars are being used to fund this atrocity. It is no different than Auschwitz.

 
21935 05/15/2009 at 10:18:56 AM Self     I am very much in favor of loosening restrictions on stem cell research. Many people are suffering daily from diseases that may in the future be cured or made more bearable by the use of stem cell research. I pray that is in our lifetime, but the important thing is to continue research and support those scientists in their critical efforts to end devastating diseases worldwide. There is no scientific or medical reason to avoid research on stem cells. We live in a modern society, where church is separate from state, and as citizens, we deserve to reap the rewards of living in such a state. I refuse to allow my freedoms and my country's freedoms to be hijacked by a small group of religious extremists -- for that is what is happening when stem cell research is banned due to religious concerns. My father had diabetes, and later, dementia. My uncle is struggling with Parkinsons. It is too late for my father, but I hope that the younger generation will be helped by stem cell research. Thank you for your time,

 
21936 05/15/2009 at 10:24:58 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21937 05/15/2009 at 10:26:01 AM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because I have a very close friend who has suffered from Parkinson's for 24 years from this devistating disease. Embryonic stem cell research offers her hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress.

While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited.

The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.

Please don't compromise my friends health by restricting scientists. We deserves and need the best treatment science can provide.

 
21938 05/15/2009 at 10:26:24 AM Self     I know many people with serious and debilitating health problems that have little to no hope for improvement in their lifetimes without potential new treatments. These will not happen without loosening the restrictions on stem cell research. Please loosen the restrictions, or at least craft them more deftly so that general research may proceed.

 
21939 05/15/2009 at 10:27:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21940 05/15/2009 at 10:27:39 AM Self     I oppose the drafted guidelines on human stem cell research proposed by the National Institutes of Health. I object to forcing taxpayers to subsidize research that is unethical. i believe it is unethical because it destroys human embryos. The money spent on embryonic stem cell research globally has yielded nothing but failures and the destruction of human embryos. In light of the amazing success of adult stem cell research and the many current cures and treatments already helping people, it is reckless and against the evidence of true results to proceed with the unethical embryonic research when that money could be much better spent on adult stem cell research that is producing results. The other concern I have is that the regulations proposed by the NIH will inspire a financial incentive to create human embryos for the sole purpose of research and ultimately destruction. This is unconscionable and invites all manner of unethical activity such as human cloning. With adult stem cell research this is not a problem because every human being has adult stem cells in abundance and we produce them as a normal part of body activity and function.

We are failing our society at a deep level when we try to harness what belongs to another and cause his or her destruction to further our own agendas or ideas, all the while trying to label it progress. Instead we are walking blindly into deep societal regression.

With deep concern,

 
21941 05/15/2009 at 10:29:15 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21942 05/15/2009 at 10:30:33 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21943 05/15/2009 at 10:32:14 AM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
21944 05/15/2009 at 10:33:48 AM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
21945 05/15/2009 at 10:34:25 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

Thank you,

 
21946 05/15/2009 at 10:35:08 AM Self     research for somatic cell nucelar trasnsfer is very important and should not be left out of the bill

 
21947 05/15/2009 at 10:36:12 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21948 05/15/2009 at 10:40:00 AM Self     NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-7997

To Whom It May Concern:

As one of Concerned Women for America’s over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama’s Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

Sincerely,

 
21949 05/15/2009 at 10:40:30 AM Self     Why, oh way, do we allow ourselves to be so policially correct that we are behind the rest of the enlightned world is so many fields?

We have the research facilities,the man power and the money but after we develop a viable product, we allow the rest of the world to steal it from us and profit while we just sit bac withour hands tied behind our backs!!

How many more industries or products will be allow to leave this country?

 
21950 05/15/2009 at 10:42:00 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 



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