Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
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Organization
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Comments Attachment
21152 05/14/2009 at 11:36:06 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21153 05/14/2009 at 11:36:15 AM Self     We dislike using our tax dollars for human embryonic stem cell research.

 
21154 05/14/2009 at 11:36:55 AM Self     Life begins at conception. I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

-Adult stem cells are non-controversial and ethical. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21155 05/14/2009 at 11:37:19 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning wihich force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no on and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21156 05/14/2009 at 11:38:37 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Thank you!

 
21157 05/14/2009 at 11:38:59 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. ADULT STEM CELLS are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

PLEASE GIVE ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH FUNDING..NOT EMBYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH.........YOU ARE MISSING THE BIG PICTURE HERE! WE ARE NOT AGAINST SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH.......DO YOUR RESEARCH!.......FUND ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH..........

 
21158 05/14/2009 at 11:40:09 AM Self     I write to let you know that I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning wihich force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no on and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes. Your much needed support for life and not detruction, would always be appreciated.

 
21159 05/14/2009 at 11:40:20 AM Self     Most things the government assumes do not succeed. Why should their dabbling in morality (human stem cells) be any different? If the private sector thinks it is a poor investment, does being a person employed by the govenment make them omnescient? This statement is just from a sectarian standpoint. If there really is a God, will there be any repercussions from usurping His perogatives?

 
21160 05/14/2009 at 11:40:42 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21161 05/14/2009 at 11:41:26 AM Organization Susan B Anthony 1800 N Kent St, Ste 1070, Arlington, VA 22209 -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21162 05/14/2009 at 11:41:47 AM Self     I write to let you know that I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning wihich force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no on and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21163 05/14/2009 at 11:41:50 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21164 05/14/2009 at 11:42:05 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21165 05/14/2009 at 11:42:29 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

 
21166 05/14/2009 at 11:44:58 AM Self     -I can't believe that with the largest deficit in our history you want taxpayes to pay for embryonic stem cell research when adult stem cell research is having major breakthroughs and respects life. These Companies have their own money and don't need mine.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21167 05/14/2009 at 11:45:12 AM Self     I offer my suport for the continued research on adult stem cells and induced pluipotent cells since it does not require the destruction of human embryos and it is coming to b ethe same plasticity of human embryos. I believe that the human embryos expected to be discarded from in vitro fertilization clinics should be allowed to die normally just as the rest of us do. I see the use of human embryos for research puposes as an exploitation of human beings and though our culture prizes "efficiency" this should not come at the cost of sacrifice of human. May we be conscious that the "end does not justify the means".

 
21168 05/14/2009 at 11:45:13 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21169 05/14/2009 at 11:46:50 AM Self     Greetings! Thank you for the opportunity to comment on NIH's proposed guidelines for federal funding of human embryonic stem-cell research (ESCR). I oppose expanding the availability of federal funding beyond the current restrictions because ESCR destroys nascent human life. Embryos left over from fertility treatments, if allowed to develop, would become human lives and should not be used for scientific research. I would encourage federal funding be diverted to morally acceptable forms of research, such as those using stem cells derives from non-embryonic sources such as skin cells, placenta and umbilical cord blood. As a member of the Center for Moral Clarity, a non-partisan Christian grassroots organization, my wish is for NIH to support only morally neutral forms of research. Thank you for considering my opinion.

 
21170 05/14/2009 at 11:47:16 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21171 05/14/2009 at 11:50:32 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I have suffered from Parkinson's disease for over 15 years. The gold standard treatment for Parkinson's is over 40 years old. I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21172 05/14/2009 at 11:51:32 AM Self     As a spouse of a person suffering from diabetes, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. Thank you!

 
21173 05/14/2009 at 11:53:58 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21174 05/14/2009 at 11:54:58 AM Self     "As a parent of a child suffering from spinal cord injury.I also have family members with diabeties, and Auto Immune Diseases( untreatable at this time)and myself with trouble that can medicine can only mask the symptoms.I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. " There are safe and moral ways to start using stem cells right away that would help more people than we can imagine. Please do not heitate any long there are so many people who are desperate for an end to the pain. And yes even with spinal cord injury there is pain and alot of other problem that are almost entolerable. My daughter ***** also had some head trauma and it has not only affected her but the problem has effected my younger daughter ***** and myself. So on behalf of the millions of us out there PLEASE WE NEED HELP SOON! Thank you, Sincerely,

 
21175 05/14/2009 at 11:55:09 AM Self     I had a miscarriage when I was three month along and was devastated at the loss of my "baby". I can not understand how you can harvest what you call embryos for research. These so called embryos are someones child.

Adult stem cells are just as useful for research.

Please stop killing babies, even those unwanted pregnancys are someones adoptable child.

Thank you.

 
21176 05/14/2009 at 11:56:15 AM Self     Mr. President: Please, donot authorize the stem cell research. I believe it ot be dangerous. Secondly, I do not want my tax dollars paying for the research.

Thank you.

 
21177 05/14/2009 at 11:56:20 AM Self     "As a patient suffering from diabetes and multiple sclerosis, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

Sincerely,

 
21178 05/14/2009 at 11:58:45 AM Self     As the wife of a Type 1 diabetc, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

Thank you for your consideration.

 
21179 05/14/2009 at 11:58:51 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21180 05/14/2009 at 11:59:15 AM Self     We are strongly opposed to the Obama Administration order, drafting a funding program for stem cell research that destroys human life.

Research and treatment programs that do not destroy human life are already in place, and new tax payer funding should not be implemented to support human cloning or use of human embryos for research purposes. This program does not belong in the government sector, but should be kept and financed in the public sector without any interference of a political nature, and NOT subsidized by taxpayer dollars.

I trust sincere consideration will be given to our objection, and repeal this executive order immediately

Thankyou,

 
21181 05/14/2009 at 12:00:46 PM Self     I am against using my taxpayer dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research. It is ethically and morally unconscionable to destroy the potential they have for development as human beings. From 1984 up to 2008, it is estimated that between 350,000 and half a million IVF babies have been born from embryos controlled rate frozen and then stored in liquid nitrogen. It is disturbing to think that embryos used in research for years to come would not have the opportunity to be born. Have we become so hardened and convinced in our own "power to create" that we have eluded ourselves into thinking that these embryos are expendable? Let's not snuff out human life for fixes that are temporary at best. Adult stem cells are non-controversial and effective in treating patients.

 
21182 05/14/2009 at 12:00:50 PM Self     Gentlemen, this is in response to invitation for public comment in regard you draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. One must never do evis, so good will come out of it. Deliberate destrcution of human being for whatever reason violates moral and religious responsibilities of millions of taxpayers. Destrction of human life is not scientificy worthy. So far there has not been a single cure for any human illness using embryonic item cells, while adult stem cells provide cure for thousands of patients with over 70 diseases. Embryonic stem cells form fatal tumors and patients develop severe immune rejection problems when they are used; they can't be called " scientifically worthy" therefore. The U.S. Constitution guarantees the life for all humans. Science tells us that embryos are jhuman,. Once the human egg and sperm unit, the embryo has all DNA needed to become a unique human being with a unique hair and eye color, personality traits, etc. Embryos as a human individual is entitled to the same protection under Federal law as any other human being. Deliberate destruction of human life for research violates every principle found in existing law, like the Code of Federal Regulations 45 CFR 46 and the Dickey WIcker Amendment which was signed into law by President Clinton. It States: SEC. 509 (a)None of the funds made available in this act may be used for (1) the criation of the human embryo as embryos for research purposes; or (2) research in which human embryos or embryos are destroyed , disgarded or knowingly objected to risk of injury or dealth greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in vitro under 45 CFR 46.208 (a) (2) and section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 289 g (b) (Title 42 Section 289 g(b) United States code (b) for purposes of this section, the term "human embryo or embryos" includes any korganism not protected as a human subject under 45 CFR 46 (the human subject protection regulation).... that is derived from fertilization, pathemogenics, cloning or any other means from one or more human gameter (sperm or egg) or hjman diploid cells (cells that have two sets of chromosomes such as somatic cells. Over 615,000 Americans support the Campaign for Ethical Vaccines as several vaccines are produced with the use of aborted fetal cell lines. Families refuse to use them for this reason. Pulc fund should be used only for research focused on treatments that citizens of the entire world can benefit from with out a moral compromise. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to make acomment on the such a vital issue. My wife shares my opinion.

 
21183 05/14/2009 at 12:01:42 PM Self     I am a c-5,6 quadriplegic. I would not use cells from an unborn fetus to walk, because I that would be wrong in the eyes of God. Thank you,

 
21184 05/14/2009 at 12:02:47 PM Organization Missouri Coalition for Lifesaving Cures P.O. Box 16580, St. Louis, MO 63105 As a friend of family members suffering from cancer, diabetes, parkinsons, MS, ALS and alzheimers, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
21185 05/14/2009 at 12:03:08 PM Self     -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21186 05/14/2009 at 12:03:52 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21187 05/14/2009 at 12:04:40 PM Self     Do not spend tax dollars (and make it illegal) to use human embryos in stem cell research. Embryos are human beings, unique and deserving of life. Embryonic stem cell research has had ZERO success and has resulted in tumors. Embryonic Stem Cell Research destroys human life and wastes money. The success of other stem cell research makes Embryonic stem cell research obsolete -- unless you have a desire to get involved with human cloning and animal/human genetic experimentation - which is just sick. Close all loopholes that allow for it, immediately.

It does not make sense that you reduced funding to Adult Stem Cell Research which has already provided cures for 70 conditions. Now, new research that brings adult stem cells to a form that allows it to fulfill the dreams of embryonic stem cells makes embryonic stem cell research unnecessary.

You devalue human life. AND you are borrowing money from other countries and taxing us to make it happen. STOP.

 
21188 05/14/2009 at 12:05:12 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. I can't fathom the reasons why there is this government resistance to wholeheartedly backing the proven adult stem cell technologies, to improve on and expand on them.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21189 05/14/2009 at 12:06:26 PM Self     I am a nurse in the neuroscience department of *****Hospital and a concered family member of someone battling Parkinsons disease. I respectfully write to you in support of clear guidelines that promote and allocate federal funds for stem cell research. I know that important progress has occurred in the field of embryonic stem cell research over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you!

Sincerely,

 
21190 05/14/2009 at 12:07:49 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21191 05/14/2009 at 12:08:34 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21192 05/14/2009 at 12:09:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21193 05/14/2009 at 12:09:39 PM       As a taxpayer, I am adamently opposed to my tax dollars being used to perform embryonic stem cell research. It is a FACT that NOTHING has been shown to be a positive result from the use of embryonic stem cells. However, much evidence supports the use of adult stem cells. I do not support my money being used to further legitimize the awful practice of destroying human embryos.

 
21194 05/14/2009 at 12:10:50 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
21195 05/14/2009 at 12:11:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21196 05/14/2009 at 12:14:17 PM Self     I am not a scientist, however the way I understand this is that adult stem cells can be used instead of a babies stem cells. It is saying it is ok to murder children when we use embryonic stem cells, that life has no real meaning. Why not instead use adult inmates for stem cell reserch it does not hurt the adults and it would give them a chance to give something back for all of the tax money they suck out of us for being in jail ect. I do not want my tax money to go to something that destroyes human life. How is this different then a culture that sacrifices their children to their idols such as Baal? Only it seems here that the idol is not Baal but money. I just think there are other ways that everyone can be happy and no one no matter how small has to die. Everyone can win but with embryonic stem cell reserch only one side wins, and that is being selfish.

 
21197 05/14/2009 at 12:14:17 PM Self     Why is it necessary to use embryonic stem cells when adult stem cells have shown to be more effective? I am offended that my tax dollars will be used to kill innocent lives.

 
21198 05/14/2009 at 12:15:32 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21199 05/14/2009 at 12:16:49 PM Self     I oppose NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines Draft on moral grounds: Each human embryo is a unique and complete human being, in process of development. Another human being has no right to purposefully destroy a very early human life for scientific experimentation. A society in which the stronger members can destroy the weakest among us will destroy itself. Respect for every human life is the core value of the American experiment in human government. Without that, we will ultimately destroy our society. In addition, IPS cell technology has made it unnecessary to destroy the early human child to obtain stem cells. Thus we don't even have a "scientific" excuse for our immorality.

 
21200 05/14/2009 at 12:19:11 PM Self     First of all, I can't pay for this because it goes agianst my beliefs and convitions which are protected and I can't be forced to pay for it.

Use adult stem cells instead of fetal. A living human embryo is killed in the process of harvesting the cells. This is murder. We have laws against murder even if you could save a life or gain from it, it is still ilegal. ( murder that is) In contrast, adult stem cells can be harvested without a loss of life, and they are readily available from bone marrow, skin, fat, umbilical cord blood and other sources. To date, current research on embryonic stem cells has resulted in no promising results. Ironically, a leading pro-ESCR advocate is the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, but ESCR research has failed in fighting this disease.

Past supporters of this controversial research are now speaking out about the false hype surrounding the results. The San Francisco Chronicle recently reported that doubters are coming out of the woodwork. Paul Billings, who studied stem cells' effects and co-founded a stem cell bank, said that hopes for major new medical treatments based on embryonic stem cells are "very remote". "The problems are so complex that we're not likely to be able to tackle them with the stem cell gambit in the foreseeable future."

Researchers in China met with a disastrous result. Fetal tissue injected into a patient's brain produced temporary improvement, but within two years the patient developed a brain tumor and died. An autopsy revealed that the fetal cells had taken root, but had then metamorphed into other types of human tissue - hair, skin and bone. These grew into the tumor, which killed the patient.

A devastating result occurred at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, and was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

In some of the patients, the implanted embryonic cells apparently grew too well, churning out so much of a chemical that controls movement that they writhed and jerked uncontrollably. Dr. Paul E. Greene called the uncontrollable movements developed by some patients as "absolutely devastating." He said, "They chew constantly, their fingers go up and down, their writs flex and distend. It's a real nightmare. And we can't selectively turn it off. No more fetal transplants. We are absolutely and adamantly convinced that this should be considered for research only."

In stark contrast to the failures of embryonic stem cell research, the future looks very promising for treatment with adult stem cells.

Forbes Magazine provided additional confirmation that adult stem cell research is far more successful that embryonic stem cell experimentation. In their September 3, 2001 issue, page 36, they quoted an article printed in the Wall Street Journal Europe by Richard Miniter.

 
21201 05/14/2009 at 12:19:25 PM Self     The government should not be using my tax dollars to subsidize research that requires the destruction of innocent human life. Embryonic stem cell research has been shown to be ineffective, while adult stem cells have been effective in treating a multitude of conditions. Adult stem cells are uncontroversial and ethical, and far more promising than embryonic stem cells. Please fund successful adult stem cell research, not unethical embryonic stem cell research that destroys human life.

 
21202 05/14/2009 at 12:20:13 PM Self     It is so important that we loosten the restrictions on development of stem cell lines in this country. We are unduely limiting our researchers and it is our health care that will suffer. It is shocking that embryos are thrown out yearly instead of allowing them to be used to find cures for our sick and to grow much needed replacement organs. At the present time our only option for organ failure is to wait for someone to die and donate thier organs. I do not understand what that is consider to be a more moral option than to grow ones own replacement organ. It would also be a far supiorior organ in that it would be a perfect match and there would be no need for anti-rejection medication.

I believe that the guidelines should permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding be allowed for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

Thansk you,

 
21203 05/14/2009 at 12:20:16 PM Self     Mr. President, Please know that I am opposed to all funding of embryonic stem cell research. Where is the evidence of hope as compared to adult and other stem cell efforts which are exhibiting great healing and very ligament promise for more. The money we are marking for research should be where there is the greatest potential for short term return. The sooner we see success, the more likely we are to allocate more!

There are moral issues as well. Taking life for any good whatsoever is not going to receive my vote and a growing number of others who feel they got blind sided in 2008. It will be different in 2010. While we were confused by "catholic" politicians and those of other denominations who justified voting for the immoral issues. These core issues will be much better protected next time.

 
21204 05/14/2009 at 12:20:21 PM Self     You've heard all the arguments why this is wrong yet your eyes and ears remain closed. I know that the research could one day save my life from a catastrophic illness, but it's not worth the sin committed to do it. I'm not going to repeat the arguments again, but will just plainly state in black and white what a 2 year old can understand. EMBRYONIC CELL RESEARCH IS MORALLY AND ETHICALLY WRONG!!!!!!!

 
21205 05/14/2009 at 12:21:48 PM Self     Embryonic Stem Cell Research has not shown one positive outcome, but has only given people false hope, whereas, adult stem cells have not given people hope, but results in cures for more then 50 maladies. Also, ESCR kills a living human being. The philosphy of the person who has his/her hope in taking the life of the other is truly a utilitarian philosophy. We should not be killing embryos as a means to an end, this is barbaric.

 
21206 05/14/2009 at 12:22:48 PM Organization JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21207 05/14/2009 at 12:23:55 PM Organization Hadassah 50 W. 58th Street NYC, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21208 05/14/2009 at 12:25:41 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic st em cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org. Thank you! JDRF Government Relations Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done! As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guide lines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
21209 05/14/2009 at 12:27:32 PM Self     I oppose NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines Draft on moral grounds: each human embryo is a unique and complete human being, created in the image of God, in process of development. Another human being has no right to purposefully destroy a very early human life for scientific experimentation. The saying, "the ends don't justify the means" applies very strongly in this situation. As a global community, we learned this lesson from the "scientific" data accumulated by the unethical research conducted by the Nazis, and have agreed as a scientific community to ignore that information.

A society in which the stronger members can destroy the weakest among us will destroy itself. Respect for every human life is the core value of the American experiment in human government. Without that, we will ultimately destroy our society.

In addition, IPS cell technology has made it unnecessary to destroy the early human child to obtain stem cells. Thus we don't even have a "scientific" excuse for our immorality. There are feasable scientific alternatives that will still allow us to address the many illnesses in hope of a cure through stem cells.

Please carefully consider these regulations and remeber ethics upon which our country was founded.

Thank you,

 
21210 05/14/2009 at 12:27:33 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you

 
21211 05/14/2009 at 12:28:01 PM Self     I join in prayer and petition in behalf of protecting human life in the womb.

 
21212 05/14/2009 at 12:30:54 PM Self     Dear Sir or Madam,

I am in opposition to the proposed draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. As a tax paying citizen, it is beyond belief that I will be required to pay for research which destroys innocent human life.

There have already been proven approaches to stem cell research (and treatment) which do not destroy human life. Also, under no circumstances, should our government uphold any policy which supports the cloning of humans, or the creation of human embryos for research of any kind.

I have heard and I believe, that the destruction of human embryos for scientific stem cell research has not proven to be effective, and it is also perilous. However, stem cells taken from adults is neither controversial nor unethical, and it has proven to be effective. I do not want, under any circumstance, for our government to fund or support research that destroys human life when there are other alternatives.

Additionally, I am not only requesting that regulations be put in place which will prevent any funding of embryonic stem cell research, but I am also requesting regulations which will restrict any form of research that will result in the cloning of humans, animals, or a combination of the two. This loophole must be closed without delay.

Human embryonic stem cell research and cloning should not be supported, nor should it be funded by our government. It is inappropriate to expend tax dollars on courses of action which seek to destroy human life, and which are aberrant, unethical, and also unnecessary.

Sincerely,

 
21213 05/14/2009 at 12:31:13 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21214 05/14/2009 at 12:32:17 PM Self     --I am opposed to your draft guideliines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support shouled be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. --Embryo-destructive stem cell research has been shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. --The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
21215 05/14/2009 at 12:34:21 PM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21216 05/14/2009 at 12:34:39 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21217 05/14/2009 at 12:34:44 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21218 05/14/2009 at 12:34:50 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21219 05/14/2009 at 12:35:39 PM Self     Stem cell research, like many other research projects, should be privately funded. Our country is in a recession, we have crap health care, and people are losing their homes. Taxes should be used toward what the PEOPLE want, not the lobbyists. Start listening to your citizens that you all supposedly represent!

 
21220 05/14/2009 at 12:35:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21221 05/14/2009 at 12:36:58 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21222 05/14/2009 at 12:37:02 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21223 05/14/2009 at 12:38:22 PM Self     DO NOT USE TAX DOLLARS TO FUND EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH!

There have been no advances in medical treatments with this type of research. There has been though lots of advances using the adult stem cells or umbilical stem cells. Put our money to use on these promising researches. They are ethical and without moral contoversy.

 
21224 05/14/2009 at 12:38:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21225 05/14/2009 at 12:39:05 PM Organization Parkinson's Support Group of Upstate NY Rochester NY As a group of over 100 members, we strongly support embryonic stem cell research, and we are grateful that the restrictions are being loosened so that research may continue.

 
21226 05/14/2009 at 12:39:32 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21227 05/14/2009 at 12:40:31 PM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21228 05/14/2009 at 12:40:49 PM Self     Dear NIH: President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

[5] While the NIH draft Guidelines are clearly an effort to open up more lines in the future, the retroactive application of the new standards to lines that had previously been ethically established (but not within the new, proposed Guidelines) is disturbing from both a scientific and economic standpoint. The potential exclusion of hESC lines that have provided the base for research up to this point not only threatens to interrupt work currently being conducted on those lines but simultaneously represents a threat to render the not insignificant amounts of time, money and effort expended a waste.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
21229 05/14/2009 at 12:42:06 PM Self     Prohibit stem cell research that destroys human life.

 
21230 05/14/2009 at 12:43:07 PM Self     We oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells. There is no evidence that embryonic stem cells cure any disease. Stem cells can be collected from live human beings and do not have to be collected from aborted babies.

 
21231 05/14/2009 at 12:43:24 PM Self     i support human embryonic stem cell research.

 
21232 05/14/2009 at 12:43:28 PM Self     As a parent of a child suffering from diabetes, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
21233 05/14/2009 at 12:45:32 PM Self     It is truly a mark of the downfall of a society as it destroys its most vulnerable persons, and only a matter of time when that is extended to destroy persons who in the eyes of someone-do not matter. I am opposed to the use of funds to do embryonic stem cell research when we see the rapid progress that is being made in adult stem cell research without harm. Please lets try to reverse the downward spiral of our society by not destroying human embryos when the progress in adult stem cell research is accelerating and these cells have already been used to treatment without significant harm.

 
21234 05/14/2009 at 12:45:55 PM Self     applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21235 05/14/2009 at 12:46:40 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21236 05/14/2009 at 12:47:13 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21237 05/14/2009 at 12:51:51 PM Self     -History does not look favorably upon those of our forefathers who allowed and encouraged slavery. So too will future generations look back at our complete disregard for the youngest of our species and shudder to think that we encouraged medicalized cannibalism and in so doing embraced a culture of death.

-We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21238 05/14/2009 at 12:53:22 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21239 05/14/2009 at 12:53:49 PM Self     "As a concerned individual, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
21240 05/14/2009 at 12:54:24 PM Self     My grandson had a spinal cord injury at age 24. He is a quadraplegic. He is now 27 and he has high hopes of walking again with the help of stem cells. My goodness how can we not let that happen. There are many, many like him that are waiting for this miracle to happen. Also others with other debilitation diseases. I'm sure 25 years from now it will seem barbaric that it took so long to get approval for this.

 
21241 05/14/2009 at 12:56:17 PM Self     I strongly urge the NIH to reconsider its draft proposal to remove Bush-era approved stem cell lines from those approved for federal funding. I also strongly urge the use of more intelligent standards for the classification of "ethically derived" stem cell lines. Please allow research to continue on already derived lines created before the new consent guidelines. Thank you.

 
21242 05/14/2009 at 12:57:07 PM Self     I am oppposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. We should be concentrating on stem cell research which does not destroy human life not embryonic stem cells. Human life is sacred and embryonic stem cell research will only lead to abuse. I oppose my taxpayer money being used for this research.

I am also against this proposed draft because it does not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to creation of clones and human-animal hybrids.

 
21243 05/14/2009 at 12:57:23 PM Self     Dear Mr. President: I think this is outrageous that our tax dollars are being used to kill babies. You are suppose to protect the unborn and their inalienalbe rights to LIFE, liberty and pursuit of happiness not kill them even before they get out of the womb. I am extreemly opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21244 05/14/2009 at 12:59:21 PM Self Burnham Institute for Medical research 10901 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA I am in favor of the new guidelines for the use of ES cells.

Restrictions on the use of stem cells based on the ethical grounds are not based in fact. Human embryos are not capable of independent life until after birth. All tissues and most foods are all composed of cells, that include all the instructions for life of the organism in the nucleus. Until embryos are sufficiently organized and developed to survive outside of maternal environment, they have no potential for human life. Extension of the definition of human life to single cells results in logical conflicts such as killing animal and plant life by consuming food or considering human death as not complete until all cells of the body are decomposed.

 
21245 05/14/2009 at 01:00:28 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21246 05/14/2009 at 01:03:24 PM Self     It is my understanding that all the progress made in stem cell research has been made with adult stem cells even though embryonic stem cells have been available to researchers. Any funding allowed for the expansion of embryonic stem cell research therefore seems a waste of the taxpayers money and a slap in the face to Americans who oppose this research as a matter of conscience.

 
21247 05/14/2009 at 01:03:49 PM Self     We oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like us to fund research we believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. It is wrong to make us pay for something like this. Why doesnt President Obama make the decision based on the right standing of all the people and not just what he believes? We shouldn't have to pay with our hard earned cash for something against our religious beliefs.

 
21248 05/14/2009 at 01:04:02 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21249 05/14/2009 at 01:04:38 PM Self     The use of stem cells from pre-born children is abominable, particularly in regard to the proven efficacy of using adult stem cells. Research shows that adult stem cells have produced the same gains as those from pre-born children.

 
21250 05/14/2009 at 01:05:06 PM Self     It is my understanding that all the progress made in stem cell research has been made with adult stem cells even though embryonic stem cells have been available to researchers. Any funding allowed for the expansion of embryonic stem cell research therefore seems a waste of the taxpayers money and a slap in the face to Americans who oppose this research as a matter of conscience.

 
21251 05/14/2009 at 01:06:05 PM Self     It is incredible that with so much productive research being done with adult and cord blood stem cells we have such vociferous and aggressive proponents of embryonic research so intent on diverting funds and attention from this promising field to the more untried embryonic stem cells. Why the insistence on morally dubious if not outright offensive methods if with a clean conscience we can still gain so much? Why the duplicity in trying to make the public believe that all the things done with stem cells require embryonic stem cells? Do they have a Frankenstein or Nazi complex. You can never do evil even for a "good" intent and to destroy innocent life is the greatest evil.

 



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