Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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21051 05/14/2009 at 10:01:35 AM Self     There is a line between right and wrong, and if left in the hands of the researchers it always ends up being very questionable according to ethics.

 
21052 05/14/2009 at 10:01:47 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am a member of the Home Health Care community providing services and clinical care to patients with Parkinsons disease and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21053 05/14/2009 at 10:02:13 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21054 05/14/2009 at 10:03:49 AM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I am seeing a broad disrespect for life coming from this administration which is very disappointing. A president who has brought hope for so many around the country and world should not destroy his reputation by continuing this sweeping disregard for the sanctity of human life -- please do not pursue this program in its present form. Utilize the existing adult stem-cells for all research and development in this field.

Respectfully,

 
21055 05/14/2009 at 10:03:54 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21056 05/14/2009 at 10:04:07 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21057 05/14/2009 at 10:04:26 AM Self     I am a mother of a daughter with type 1 diabetes. My daughter ***** has suffered with this disease for 13 years. ***** says type 1 is 24-7 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) with no breaks. Since she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 11, I have always encouraged ***** to take care of her diabetes. One reason I gave her for complying with the formidable efforts of self care is that when the cure for diabetes is a reality, she would be in good health and able to see the benefits of a cure.

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21058 05/14/2009 at 10:04:34 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner

 
21059 05/14/2009 at 10:05:22 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding whenever NIH wants in the future. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other infertile couples.

 
21060 05/14/2009 at 10:05:41 AM Self     As a taxpayer, I strongly oppose the NIH draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research that require destruction of human embryos. NIH funding should be directed to adult stem cell research which has recently been shown to be effective.

 
21061 05/14/2009 at 10:07:12 AM       I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21062 05/14/2009 at 10:07:29 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21063 05/14/2009 at 10:08:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21064 05/14/2009 at 10:08:37 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21065 05/14/2009 at 10:09:12 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21066 05/14/2009 at 10:10:12 AM Self     applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21067 05/14/2009 at 10:16:23 AM Self     I am a Bladder Cancer survivor, so far. Please consider allowing Federal funding for Section II B to include ALL current stem cells lines and any created in the future by ethical means.

 
21068 05/14/2009 at 10:17:06 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21069 05/14/2009 at 10:18:17 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21070 05/14/2009 at 10:18:34 AM Self     May 12, 2009 Ensure Strong Federal Support for Embryonic Stem Cell Research As you know, President Barack Obama recently signed an Executive Order designed to reverse restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research that have been in place for the last eight years. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are now in the process of developing guidelines to implement the Order. NIH has released its draft guidelines, and will be reviewing public comments on the draft over the next several weeks. So far, NIH has received far more comments opposed to stem cell research than in support. It is therefore critical that NIH hear from as many stem cell supporters as possible during the comment period. While the draft guidelines would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics, as drafted, it is unclear whether current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlined and be eligible for federal funding. Further, the draft does not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). SCNT is a very promising scientific technique for creating embryonic stem cells, yet opponents of SCNT mistakenly liken it to reproductive cloning. This comparison is completely false. The purpose of reproductive cloning is to create another human being; the purpose of SCNT is to create stem cells for research. Embryonic stem cell research holds the promise to treat and potentially cure many devastating diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis – illnesses which affect over 100 million Americans. As a world leader in stem cell research at our Goldyne Savad Institute of Gene Therapy in Israel and as a leading advocate for stem cell research in the United States, Hadassah has a special interest in ensuring that the NIH guidelines are crafted so to advance stem cell research as quickly as possible. Action Needed: Submit the following comments to NIH: I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you. To submit comments, click http://nihoerextra.nih.gov/stem_cells/add.htm to be connected to the NIH comment form. Provide your name and affiliation and copy and paste the text above into the comment box. Provide the security check ID on the form and click ‘submit comments.’ Comments may be submitted until May 26, 2009 Please forward this message on to your friends, family, contacts and urge them to send this important message to the NIH.

 
21071 05/14/2009 at 10:18:40 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21072 05/14/2009 at 10:18:43 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21073 05/14/2009 at 10:19:53 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21074 05/14/2009 at 10:20:54 AM Self     No part of embryonic stem cell research has been beneficial in any way thus far, no matter what your agenda. It's a proven fact. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and already are producing good and positive results. In no case or circumstance should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21075 05/14/2009 at 10:23:27 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21076 05/14/2009 at 10:23:47 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21077 05/14/2009 at 10:26:47 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21078 05/14/2009 at 10:26:47 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21079 05/14/2009 at 10:26:59 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21080 05/14/2009 at 10:27:40 AM Self     As a son of a father suffering from Parkinson's, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
21081 05/14/2009 at 10:28:31 AM Self     It has been proven that adult stem cells have all of the necessary elements for this research and are available without using the fetus of an unborn child.

 
21082 05/14/2009 at 10:28:33 AM Self     My dad has Parkinsons. So did his brother.

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21083 05/14/2009 at 10:28:39 AM Self     I oppose your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. There is no case to indicate that government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

We have options other than embryo-destructive stem cell research. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients;therefore,we should not fund controversial research that destroys human life.

A severe loophole that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids must be addressed and closed immediately. The proposed regulations do nothing to prevent this type of future funding for embryonic stem cell research.

 
21084 05/14/2009 at 10:29:19 AM Self     I STRONGLY oppose using public funding for embryonic stem cell research-----there has been NO successful human results with this so far, and MANY successful human results using the plentiful adult stem cells.........Please use the time and money on ADULT stem cell research, not embryonic, which is highly controversial! Thank you *****, MD

 
21085 05/14/2009 at 10:29:58 AM Self     I STRONGLY oppose using public funding for embryonic stem cell research-----there has been NO successful human results with this so far, and MANY successful human results using the plentiful adult stem cells.........Please use the time and money on ADULT stem cell research, not embryonic, which is highly controversial! Thank you *****, MD

 
21086 05/14/2009 at 10:30:40 AM Self     Stem cell research IS WRONG. It's a SIN. The scientific community that wants to practice this believes that the world and everything on it just happened by chance. They are arrogant enough to ignore and deny God’s very existence. Bad decisions cause bad consequences and you can't avoid that.

 
21087 05/14/2009 at 10:30:46 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21088 05/14/2009 at 10:30:48 AM Self     Please do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life! It is unethical and immoral. Taxpayers should not be forced to fund such research.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which forces taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
21089 05/14/2009 at 10:32:06 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21090 05/14/2009 at 10:32:48 AM Self     As a pediatrician I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

I am a Catholic and served as co-chair of Catholics for Stem Cell Research along with Senator Thomas Eagleton in the successful effort to allow stem cell research in Missouri by amending the state constitution. The opponents from the far right, including the Catholic Church and others, purposely distorted the truth in their campaign. They continue to do so. We must conduct all research in this country without political interference. Out future depends on the outcome.

 
21091 05/14/2009 at 10:33:24 AM Self     This should have stayed stopped. Our government is in bad finacial troubles withour funding this stupid idea.

 
21092 05/14/2009 at 10:34:08 AM Self     Parkinson's disease exacts a devastating toll on people and their families. I know because my father has suffered from the disease. Embryonic stem cell research offers our family hope for a better future and the final NIH Guidelines should not create new bureaucratic obstacles that will slow the pace of desperately needed progress. While it is commendable that the guidelines, Section 11 B, would permit the use of excess IVF embryos for research, federal funding of stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be encouraged, not prohibited. The final guidelines should include a grandfather clause, enabling scientists to build on progress that has already been made and allowing federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. Please don't compromise my dad's need the best treatment science can provide.

 
21093 05/14/2009 at 10:39:06 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21094 05/14/2009 at 10:41:09 AM Self     We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force us as taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21095 05/14/2009 at 10:42:29 AM Self     (1)Ethically Responsible It is scientifically proven that the human organism is genetically determined and complete at conception and that the destruction of human life for research purposes is not ethical no matter what the perceived benefit may be. Consequently the use of taxpayer money for such purposes is a violation of the consciences if countless taxpaying citizens.

 
21096 05/14/2009 at 10:42:37 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guideline for embryonic stem cell research which would force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is NO case under which government tax monies should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21097 05/14/2009 at 10:43:05 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21098 05/14/2009 at 10:43:49 AM Self     Sir/Madame,

Adult stem cells have been PROVEN to be effective in research and development of health advancement methods and treatments.

Umbilical cord blood and discharge after a baby is born has adequate stem cells.

The abortion industry would not make any money from these two methods, which is why it is never discussed. If you follow the money, you will see that fetal stem cell research is possible without abortion. Murder is not necessary for the sake of science. I thought we learned that from our old nemesis - Hitler?

If you continue to leave UNPROTECTED the most vulnerable in our society where will it end? We protect sea turtles but not an unborn child? We send Federal dollars to "health" organizations who promote sterilization and abortion?

Take a scientific and logical approach to this issue. It is about money for a particular industry, not about advancing medicine or human welfare.

You would be better served to revisit mandatory vaccinations and the increase of Autism, ADHD etc.

Thank you

 
21099 05/14/2009 at 10:44:36 AM Self     That legislation to allow federal funding of embryonic stem cell research is even under consideration is a travesty and reeks of a Nazi mentality by those proposing this outrageous extortion of taxpayer dollars. To create and then destroy innocent lives, however young, underdeveloped, and "not needed" they may be deemed to be as embryos, demonstrates an arrogant, self-serving, hateful attitude of superiority and an utter devaluation of human life. And futher, to support the use of those innocent embryos for commercial profit is to add insidious insult to injury. It officially certifies and stamps the government seal of approval on procedures that haughtily assert that human embryos are not really people, they're just a mass of "unneeded" cells. Whether they are needed, and for what purpose, apparently is only in the eyes of the beholder. In a country whose creed is "all men are created equal," where is equality for the innocent unborn? How can their voices be heard? What rights or say do they have in this matter? What would their thoughts be on whether they are "needed"? Who is the U.S. government and NIH to play God?

If private organizations want to raise funds to field this research, that is one thing, but forcing a shake down of taxpayers to support it is unjust, unfair, and disingenuous at best. Why not support adult and placental stem cell research instead, which destroys no living beings, and has proven benefits with much promise ahead? Those who would support taxpayer funding of embryonic stem cell research will be guilty of having innocent blood on their hands, and will be held accountable for their heinous actions. This pursuit is a dark business and portends a dark road ahead for America. Please stop this insanity now.

 
21100 05/14/2009 at 10:44:44 AM Self     As a grandparent with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner Thank you for your consideration.

 
21101 05/14/2009 at 10:45:59 AM Self     Please do not fund unethical stem cell research.

 
21102 05/14/2009 at 10:47:09 AM Self     IT IS NOT NECESSARY FOR ANY RESEARCH EXCEPT ON ADULT STEM CELLS. THAT HAS PROVEN TO BE MOST HELPFUL TO THOSE IN NEED OF STEM CELLS.

 
21103 05/14/2009 at 10:49:55 AM Self     Please resist the efforts of the uninformed or religiously biased to restrict important aspects of stem cell research. This vital activity may be able to eliminate pain, suffering, disfigurement,disablity in the not too distant future. There are few areas of research as important as reversing the planetary changes of global warming and its effect on humanity but this is certainly one of them.

 
21104 05/14/2009 at 10:51:35 AM Self     I am opposed for further death and destruction of babies in America for the benfits of others-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryonic destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21105 05/14/2009 at 10:52:57 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21106 05/14/2009 at 10:53:26 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21107 05/14/2009 at 10:54:26 AM Self     Last March, President Barack Obama issued an executive order that will allow virtually unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Funding that will create incentives for scientists to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research. This is a complete and total abomination to a human life, humanity in general, and to our nation that was founded UNDER GOD. It is a vicious evil and we cannot allow this to happen. I am a mother and school psychologist. I DO NOT SUPPORT THIS IN ANY WAY AND NEITHER DOES MY FAMILY OR MY GOD. Please put in place measures to stop President Obama's plan for stem cell research. Former President Bush set a policy in place in 2001 that restricted federal funding only to stem cell lines that existed as of that date – thus discouraging “create and kill” behavior. Please keep BUSH'S policy and reject Obama's.

Thank your for your consideration,

 
21108 05/14/2009 at 10:54:34 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21109 05/14/2009 at 10:54:55 AM Self     Please realize that we have had much more success with adult stem cells, than we have had with embryonic stem cells. Lets continue to put our focus where we have seen success, on the adult stem cell research, without the risk of targeting young babies who do not have the choice to say they would like to dedicate their lives to science.

 
21110 05/14/2009 at 10:55:32 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21111 05/14/2009 at 10:56:30 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

As a family physician, I could propose more urgent needs for research funding. If stem cell research is a top priority, please focus on adult stem cells which is more promising for clinical applications.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21112 05/14/2009 at 10:58:08 AM Self     I am the wife of a patient suffering from cone dystrophy. I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. As drafted, it does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer.

 
21113 05/14/2009 at 10:59:15 AM Self     I oppose NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines Draft on moral grounds: Each human embryo is a unique and complete human being, in process of development. Another human being has no right to purposefully destroy a very early human life for scientific experimentation. A society in which the stronger members can destroy the weakest among us will destroy itself. Respect for every human life is the core value of the American experiment in human government. Without that, we will ultimately destroy our society. In addition, IPS cell technology has made it unnecessary to destroy the early human child to obtain stem cells. Thus we don't even have a "scientific" excuse for our immorality.

 
21114 05/14/2009 at 10:59:42 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. Furthermore, it is a waste of taxpayer money to fund embryonic stem cell research when it has proven to be ineffective. America can not afford to throw our money away on ineffective and controversial research.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. Because of the obvious ethicacl implications of this, this loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21115 05/14/2009 at 10:59:48 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21116 05/14/2009 at 11:00:20 AM Self Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02115 As a researcher in the field of type 1 diabetes, I write to express my support for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines governing federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

While embryonic stem cell research is in its early stages, research on embryonic stem cells is critical to our understanding of the early events in human and disease development. The draft guidelines will help those of us in the research community to realize the promise of embryonic stem cell research for the development of therapies to treat more than 100 million Americans living with debilitating conditions such as type 1 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, heart disease, and spinal cord injuries.

Like many researchers who work to advance science, I encourage the NIH to review and update the final guidelines on a regular basis to reflect the most recent achievements in this rapidly changing field. To ensure that these guidelines build on the progress achieved to date through embryonic stem cell research, I also would encourage the NIH to make the following changes to Section II B of the guidelines:

1) Stem cell lines previously eligible for federally-funded research – as part of the 2001 Human Embryonic Stem Cell Policy – should remain eligible for federally-funded research in the future; and

2) Cell lines derived prior to the issuance of these guidelines should be eligible for federal funding as long as they were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time.

While the previous federal policy governing embryonic stem cell research hampered our ability to maximize the therapeutic potential of this research, significant advancements have been made on both the cell lines previously eligible for federal funding and those derived and studied with private grant funds. Ethically-derived lines should not be disqualified from future federal funding simply because they failed to meet the letter of ethical guidelines that did not yet exist. Therefore, I would encourage the NIH to deem lines previously approved for research by Institutional Review Boards eligible for federal funding going forward to ensure that the research community can build on the scientific progress achieved to date by studying these lines.

As a researcher, I applaud the NIH for its commitment to scientific achievement and look forward to engaging in the expansion of the field of embryonic stem cell research.

 
21117 05/14/2009 at 11:05:03 AM Self     I do not support the use of our tax dollars to support the research that requires the destruction of innocent human lives.

Use cord blood or another source.

Embroy destructive research has shown to be destructive and causes rejection and tumors.

Additionally this regulation does not close out the option to use my tax dollars for human cloning or human animal hybrids.

I can not support this regulation and I do not want my tax dollars spent on this.

 
21118 05/14/2009 at 11:05:55 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21119 05/14/2009 at 11:06:30 AM Self     I fully support the President in his initiative to use stem cells of any type--such as embryonic and adult--for research purposes. I have nothing further to contribute to the specific language of the statement. It is the action with which I am most interested--let us concern ourselves with advancing our research--begin to act.

I further believe these measures are necessary for the United States to compete internationally. Already, Germany has successfully used stem cells to alleviate the effects of Parkinson's disease on a recent patient.

Again, I fully agree with the President and the National Institute of Health's guidelines in support of stem cell research.

 
21120 05/14/2009 at 11:07:47 AM Self     I strongly oppose this issue - harvesting and eventually killing human embryos is wrong....period...and as far as I've learned of this issue, it has not proved any benefit whatsover as using existing adult stem cells.... (even if this info is incorrect, nonetheless, I stand firmly to my opening statement

 
21121 05/14/2009 at 11:10:08 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21122 05/14/2009 at 11:10:54 AM Self     I am a 51 year old man with Parkinson's disease. It is extremely important to me, and to my family, that research be allowed to explore all potential avenues that may lead to a cure for Parkinson's disease. Without question, I support federal funding of stem cell research by qualified scientists.

I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

Thank you.

 
21123 05/14/2009 at 11:11:35 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21124 05/14/2009 at 11:11:50 AM Self     I strongly oppose your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I do not want my tax dollars to be spent on research which requires the destruction of human life. All life is precious and there are various methods of research and treatments available which do not destroy human life - and are incredibly successful.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has already proven ineffective and even dangerous - causing tumors and rejection problems. Adult stem cells, which are readily available are effective and a MUCH BETTER alternative.

In addition, I do not support the guidelines which would not prevent future funding for embyonic stem cell use that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This cannot happen. You need to stop this, President Obama.

Sincerely,

 
21125 05/14/2009 at 11:12:02 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21126 05/14/2009 at 11:12:59 AM Self     * I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos.

* Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos.

 
21127 05/14/2009 at 11:14:35 AM Self     I feel that embryonic stem cell research is invaluable in its potential to help Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I work in a research laboratory and I have strong feelings in support of hESC research. I am hoping that the guidelines set forth by NIH help improve the process of conducting research in this field.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21128 05/14/2009 at 11:15:17 AM Self     My boyfriend has Parkinson's disease, and I am in full support of anything that can possibly cure this horrible disease. Anyone who would watch him get worse day by day would have to support any possible stem cell reasearch to save him and others.

Please, please, allow Obama's support for full stem cell research to go forward.

I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. " Thanks for listening!!

 
21129 05/14/2009 at 11:15:27 AM Self     I am against the new guidelines for stem cell research. The present law should stay in effect. The is no need to use a child embryo. This is immoral.

 
21130 05/14/2009 at 11:15:34 AM Self     Dear President Obama:

I am adamant that you not use my tax dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research and work! I am against any form of funding regarding this topic. It is morally and fundamentally wrong to use embryonic stem cells when you have available for use adult stem cells that is proven science and does not destroy lives to achieve the end result!

It's obvious you have no comprehension of what you are signing into legislation...please follow due diligence on all matters relating to human life and stop appeasing the left wing.

Sincerely,

 
21131 05/14/2009 at 11:16:08 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from SCNT -- somatic cell nuclear transfer -- will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will quickly lead to therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. I am especially interested in those suffering from MS -- a devastating disease that has struck close friends. Thank you.

 
21132 05/14/2009 at 11:16:47 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
21133 05/14/2009 at 11:18:43 AM Self     I passionately support stem cell research. It is one of the most exciting and potentially life saving approaches to medical research that we have today. It is vital that the research be allowed and to be funded!

 
21134 05/14/2009 at 11:21:04 AM Self    

I highly oppose the use of embryonic stem cells

According to what I know there have not been any

advances made with embyonic cells. While adult stem cell studies have been proven very fruitful.

 
21135 05/14/2009 at 11:22:10 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21136 05/14/2009 at 11:22:48 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21137 05/14/2009 at 11:24:01 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21138 05/14/2009 at 11:24:19 AM Self     I feel that stem cell research is essential for finding cures for many diseases, not least of all juvenile diabetes. Why not use the placenta, that is only thrown away,for research that can possibly help millions of people suffering from various diseases. It should not even be an issue.

 
21139 05/14/2009 at 11:25:01 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
21140 05/14/2009 at 11:25:09 AM Self     I oppose NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines Draft on moral grounds: Each human embryo is a unique and complete human being, in process of development. Another human being has no right to purposefully destroy a very early human life for scientific experimentation. A society in which the stronger members can destroy the weakest among us will destroy itself. Respect for every human life is the core value of the American experiment in human government. Without that, we will ultimately destroy our society. In addition, IPS cell technology has made it unnecessary to destroy the early human child to obtain stem cells. Thus we don't even have a "scientific" excuse for our immorality. Dr. Oz boldly alerted Oprah that the debate over stem cells "is dead," alluding to the overwhelming success of IPS cell technology!

 
21141 05/14/2009 at 11:25:50 AM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21142 05/14/2009 at 11:26:33 AM Self     As a citizen, I am OPPOSED to the funding of Destructive Embryonic Stem Cell Research per President Obama’s March 9 executive order. The previous policy set in place by the Bush Administration did not deny research; rather it blocked the use of taxpayer funds for the killing of embryonic human beings for their stem cells beyond those already in possession of researchers or the government.

This executive order effectively divorces biomedical research from its necessary ethical foundation, respect for human life at all stages. Embryonic stem cell research treats innocent human beings as mere sources of body parts, as commodities for our use.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Serious people should be aware Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
21143 05/14/2009 at 11:27:55 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21144 05/14/2009 at 11:28:28 AM Self     Please consider what you are doing and how you are going about it and WHY??????

 
21145 05/14/2009 at 11:29:20 AM Self     This is your chance to raise your voice against funding stem cell research that destroys human life! While composing your comments please consider making the following points: -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. On the other hand, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21146 05/14/2009 at 11:30:28 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21147 05/14/2009 at 11:31:27 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21148 05/14/2009 at 11:32:25 AM Self     I have been a stem cell donor and I believe that we have to give anyone who is suffering with diseases such as Lukemia, Parkinsons or ALS every thing science can offer tham. We must make stem cell transpants available.

 
21149 05/14/2009 at 11:34:12 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21150 05/14/2009 at 11:35:07 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page