Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
20952 05/14/2009 at 07:54:32 AM Self     Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
20953 05/14/2009 at 07:56:49 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

 
20954 05/14/2009 at 07:57:27 AM Self     Dear NIH, I object to Human Stem Cell experimentation when the source of the stem cells are embryonic. I understand other sources are available and have been developed over the past 10 years or so which do not present the moral objections I have and do not lead us down the slippery slope of devaluing human life. thank you,

 
20955 05/14/2009 at 07:57:45 AM Self     I do not support stem cell research. It is playing with human life. Only God is the creator and sustainer of life. It is up to him to decide when a life begins and when a life ends. To form embryos, which are the beginning of life, just for research is morally wrong.

 
20956 05/14/2009 at 07:59:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

You were once an embryo, let others become the person GOD intended for them to be.

 
20957 05/14/2009 at 08:03:46 AM Self     In the "Guidelines" under Section I, Scope of Guidelines, "human embryonic stem cells" are defined as "...cells that are derived from human embryos, ......". Both research and intuition support God's Word that at conception a life is formed. To destroy that life in order to harvest cells for research that is negligable in results at best is wrong. I DO NOT support support Executive Order 13505.

 
20958 05/14/2009 at 08:07:10 AM Organization Hadassah Houston Texas "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
20959 05/14/2009 at 08:08:43 AM Self     I applaud these guidlines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailingthical standards at the time they were derived are eligible forfederal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be leigible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidlines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients, who are tax payers. Our son in law suffers from MS and we are anxious for NIH research to take the lead. Thank you.

 
20960 05/14/2009 at 08:16:47 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20961 05/14/2009 at 08:17:12 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20962 05/14/2009 at 08:17:23 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately

 
20963 05/14/2009 at 08:17:44 AM Self     I strongly support federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, and I support the Administration’s efforts to ensure federal funding of this important research. I am pleased that the draft guidelines will permit federal funding for new stem cell lines, and will finally allow meaningful embryonic stem cell research to move forward. It is important to me and my family that politics not stand in the way of scientific progress that may lead to better treatments and a cure for Alzheimer's, Parkinson’s, cancer, and heart disease.

I am concerned, however, that Section II B does not “grandfather” or ensure the continued use of the few embryonic stem lines that were eligible for federal funding under the Bush policy. As we work to lift the de facto ban, the final guidelines must allow the current lines to remain eligible for federal funding. We cannot lose the progress scientists have achieved over the past several years. We cannot afford to lose any more time.

In addition, NIH must regularly update the guidelines as science advances. There will be important research tools discovered over the next several years that will necessitate regularly updated guidelines, such as human Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer cell lines. The guidelines must adapt to new science that will help researchers better understand and treat diseases.

It's time to get politics and unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles out of the way. It's time to speed the pace of progress. It’s time to develop better treatments for people living with diseases.

 
20964 05/14/2009 at 08:21:45 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20965 05/14/2009 at 08:24:34 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20966 05/14/2009 at 08:28:11 AM Self     i would love to be parkinsons free and live a normal life, thru stem cells. see this video and se how this disease makes me feel. Try: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnHzp8p7syA

 
20967 05/14/2009 at 08:28:48 AM Self     I am a health care provider and daily witness the ravages of diseases for which stem cell research holds promise in modifying, curing or preventing. In addition, both of my parents died of cancer, one of the colon and the other of ovarian. Both my parents had very healthy lifestyles and had regular medical preventive care. Their cancers were of the types that stem cell research could hold great promise in preventing or reversing. My husband's step-father was a brilliant man who recently succumbed to the effects of Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and diabetes. The last few years of his life were ones of great struggle and suffering, for himself and his family. Stem cell research is very likely the answer to these types of diseases. No one lives forever but to have life cut short and the quality of life so hideously altered is the problem. To stymie the funding and research into the possible answers to these diseases based on ideological matters is inexcusable and a betrayal to the people who depend on science and government to aid us in realizing our full potentials.

 
20968 05/14/2009 at 08:33:01 AM Self     My father suffers from Parkinson's Disease, and it is sad to see him gradually and permanently lose mobility and cognitive function. Both he and my mother are burdened by his disabilities; rather than enjoying their retirement years as many people can, they are struggling just to get through every day.

I believe that embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

For the sake of my family and others like mine, please do not slow progress toward a cure. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
20969 05/14/2009 at 08:35:01 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20970 05/14/2009 at 08:36:39 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20971 05/14/2009 at 08:37:19 AM Self     Why are we willing to fund by taxes what the general investor is not willing to fund since embryonic stem cell research has not worked - the science in bad and the stem cell too "wild". Teh adult stem cell has been successful in over 70 diseases - this is so politically charged that the government is not using basic logic to forego this bad investment- much less the murder of innocent human life.

 
20972 05/14/2009 at 08:37:24 AM Self     Why are you wasting our money? You have huge economic problems going on and yet you choose to put money into worthless research. It doesn't make any sense except that you are making a political move rather than a scientific one. ESCR has been proven to be not only medically unpromising but HARMFUL! And not just to the embryos that are destroyed for it but for the very people it is supposed to be helping. Adult stem cell research has already been successful in treating many diseases and the possibilities are huge. That is where ALL the money for stem cell research should be going.

 
20973 05/14/2009 at 08:38:17 AM Organization Hadassah New York I strongly believe we need federal funding for stem cell research since this could potentialy irradicate many diseases.

 
20974 05/14/2009 at 08:39:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
20975 05/14/2009 at 08:40:01 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20976 05/14/2009 at 08:40:27 AM Self     When my sister was 16 years old she found out she had type 1 diabetes. Watching her have to prick her finger, and having to be so constricted in her diet broke my heart. She is a very healthy girl, and there is no record of diabetes in our family. I support stem cell research. I would like to see my sister be "normal", and enjoy her life with out being controlled by this disease.

 
20977 05/14/2009 at 08:42:09 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20978 05/14/2009 at 08:49:38 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Embryos are not "lesser humans." They are a stage of development-- like infancy, toddlerhood, puberty-- that everyone on this planet has already passed through. Who can be so arrogant to deny these children the opportunity to develop and grow? What if someone had made that decision for you?

 
20979 05/14/2009 at 08:49:48 AM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research!!

 
20980 05/14/2009 at 08:50:05 AM   JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Regards,

 
20981 05/14/2009 at 08:51:11 AM Self     If nothing else, stem cell research holds the prospect for many years of debate. Nevertheless, to avoid unnecessary delays in the quest for safe and efficacious treatments, the federal government should establish a framework for the rapid resolution of any on-going issues. More specifically, any distinctions derived from religious beliefs should be eliminated from government regulation of stem cell research.

Over the past decade, many of the state and federal policies on stem cell research have been driven by religious beliefs, curtailing or slowing down various types of stem cell research. The religious belief that life begins at conception has lead to the creation of an overlay of government regulations and restrictions based upon the different types of stem cell research.

In addressing this issue in the broader context, the government’s framework for stem cell research must be in accord with the Constitutional imperative that “no religious test shall ever be required”. The U. S. Supreme Court in Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971) established the following three-part test for meeting this imperative: 1) the government action must have a secular purpose; 2) its primary purpose must not be to inhibit or to advance religion; and 3) there must be no excessive entanglement between government and religion.

The government’s overall framework for stem cell research and its restrictions on somatic cell nuclear transfer fail this test. No basis – other than a religious belief – has been established for the various distinctions that have been put into practice.

The American legal system rests on the facts and application of logic to those facts. There is no basis other than faith for the belief that life begins at conception. The legal system must recognize the fact that an embryo must attach to a uterus in order to develop into a human being. Hence, unless the embryo attaches to a uterus, it cannot become a human being and therefore it cannot represent a life.

In the case of somatic cell nuclear transfer and similar forms of stem cell research, the embryo is produced in a Petri dish and will never attach to a uterine wall. Hence, these embryos will never become a life and therefore cannot be considered to be a life in their present form. These embryos don’t even have the potential for life given that the embryos are restricted to research purposes and are utilized within 14 days.

Accordingly, the federal government should eliminate, or clarify, its basis for any distinction between the different forms of stem cell research. The current distinctions and regulations are arbitrary and capricious and violate the U.S. Constitution as constituted.

Respectfully submitted,

 
20982 05/14/2009 at 08:51:53 AM Self     I am objecting to further extension of embryonic stem cell research. No valid results have resulted from using embryonic stem cells in medical procedures. This leaves the door wide open to scientists to begin life and then kill it in order to participate in questionable procedures.

 
20983 05/14/2009 at 08:52:21 AM Self     I have multiple sclerosis and have been pleased to see the new Administration’s changes in stem cell research. However, I believe that the federal guidelines should make sure that all stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. Section II B should read to allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT. I support changing the guidelines to allow federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. I and many other patients look forward to the potential treatments and cures that can come from stem cell research.

 
20984 05/14/2009 at 08:52:48 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20985 05/14/2009 at 08:52:54 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called “leftover” embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding whenever NIH wants in the future. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other fertile couples.

 
20986 05/14/2009 at 08:53:14 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20987 05/14/2009 at 08:53:46 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20988 05/14/2009 at 08:56:19 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20989 05/14/2009 at 08:57:16 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20990 05/14/2009 at 08:57:44 AM Self     I am a relative of someone with a life threatening illness that would benefit from continued stem cell research. Please expand the federal funding guidelines, specifically, section II B should read to allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20991 05/14/2009 at 08:59:05 AM Self     I would hope that you vote for the Stem Cell initiative. Diabetes runs in our family and I feel we need to do all the research possible to help this rid ourselves of this disease which is so prevelant in our population. Also it can help in such good ways prevent or help those with many other diseases and improve lifestyles of those with other conditions. Please consider those of us who really support research and hope that you will vote accordingly.

 
20992 05/14/2009 at 08:59:12 AM Self     A human embryo is a complete person. To create and use these embryo's for research is nothing short of murder. Research has shown that progress can be made by using adult stem cell research. Please use this method and stop all embryonic step cell research. I have had 2 miscarriages. In both cases (early term) I knew my children. They were real to me, we had already connected as mother and child. You are #1 creating humans without that connection to their mother and #2 you are killing them. Also remember that human beings were meant to have a finite life, we will all die of something, we can't prevent or stop everything. We (humans) are not in control.

 
20993 05/14/2009 at 08:59:16 AM Organization Hadassah Capital District Albany, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20994 05/14/2009 at 09:00:14 AM Self     If the government finds it necessary to define such specific and rigid guidelines as to the appropriateness of using an embryo for reaseach purposes only, then clearly those promoting this cause have a conflict with ethics & conscience. STOP the purposeful destruction of human life ! STOP the conflict with ethics & conscience! It's that simple.

 
20995 05/14/2009 at 09:01:44 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20996 05/14/2009 at 09:04:29 AM Organization Hadassah Richmond, VA I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20997 05/14/2009 at 09:08:19 AM Self     Once again, the battle to use my tax dollars to fund fetal stem cell research is being waged. I am opposed to any attempt to fund fetal stem research on the grounds that it is politically motivated, not scientific. I have read a great deal about the issue and have discovered that this line of research is a waste of finite resources that will never result in significant cures for any disease, and serves to help the abortion lobby promote their agenda. Please divert our resources to adult stem cell research. I do not expect you to share my Christian values, nor do I expect you to see this as a moral issue, but spending my money on fetal stem cell research will only delay real cures. Thank you,

 
20998 05/14/2009 at 09:10:37 AM Self     I am against the experimentation of stem cell research on human babies. As soon as the sperm and egg unite they are a human. Do you want to be experimented on?

 
20999 05/14/2009 at 09:10:56 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
21000 05/14/2009 at 09:11:03 AM Self     As a medical researcher, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways

 
21001 05/14/2009 at 09:13:10 AM Self     Absolutely do not fund the embryonic stem cell research. All the date shows that adult stem cells are the best. Research DOES SHOW that human life begins at conception and just creating life to kill it is in defiance of our Almighty God. We are a Christian country and this is Wrong Wrong Wrong Wrong--Thank you

 
21002 05/14/2009 at 09:13:36 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21003 05/14/2009 at 09:13:50 AM Self     I can not comprehend why the issue of embryonic and adult stem cell research continues to be debated when clearly the only stem cell research that shows ANY promise of success is that from ADULT stem cells! It seems an extreme waste of money and time to continue to pursue an avenue which shows NO progress! Make everyone happy and ONLY use ADULT stem cells!

 
21004 05/14/2009 at 09:14:07 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21005 05/14/2009 at 09:14:47 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21006 05/14/2009 at 09:15:31 AM Self     I am emphatically opposed and disgusted with your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human beings. Our money and support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proved very successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

You must know that embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We absolutely should not fund immoral research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. And I have now heard that embryonic researchers after destroying a human life then needs to use adult stem cell results to stop the negative effects on these human guinea pigs...how absolutely disgraceful. It doesn't even make any sense.

Also the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Stop using my tax dollars to destroy other human life...in the womb or in the petri dish.

 
21007 05/14/2009 at 09:15:54 AM Self     I support embrionic stem cell research and non-reprodutive cloning.

 
21008 05/14/2009 at 09:16:48 AM       I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21009 05/14/2009 at 09:17:10 AM Self     I believe life begins at conception, period. When we destroy one life for another, or chose to manipulate life for scientific purposes, I believe that it is wrong. It is also wrong to use tax dollars for controversial, or experimental research on baby embyros when there is just as much hope and promise with adult stem-cells and stem-cells from the placenta. We are teetering on the cliff of a moral abyss!!

 
21010 05/14/2009 at 09:18:41 AM Self     Great things are promised by those advocating embryo stem cell research. Sadly, the promises are in contradiction to what has been observed thus far. Adult stem cells have shown positive results. Embryonic stem cells have no comparable success stories. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Our government is several trillion dollars in debt, yet the current administration seems to have no problem throwing more money at a bad technology with negative moral implications. What's the deal? Is the purpose of the Obama administration to serve the people, or the multi-million dollar abortion industry? Judging by late Friday passed pro-abortion legislation, it looks like the latter. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. This is life you're toying with.

 
21011 05/14/2009 at 09:18:51 AM Self     There are plenty of other sources to gather stem cells. Please leave the unborn alone.

 
21012 05/14/2009 at 09:19:26 AM Self     I am emphatically opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human beings. Our money and support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proved very successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

You must know that embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We absolutely should not fund immoral research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. And I have now heard that embryonic researchers after destroying a human life then need to use adult stem cell results to stop the negative effects on these human guinea pigs...how absolutely disgraceful. It doesn't even make any sense.

Also the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Stop using my tax dollars to destroy other human life...in the womb or in the petri dish.

 
21013 05/14/2009 at 09:20:58 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21014 05/14/2009 at 09:22:29 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21015 05/14/2009 at 09:22:45 AM Self     I am opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I, as a tax payer, should not be forced to fund research which requires the destruction of of innocent human life. Support should be directed toward adult stem cell research, which has proven success stories, and does not require the destruction of innocent human life. Also, no support should be given to the production of human embryos for research purposes. Embryonic stem cell research has shown to be ineffective, even dangerous. However, adult stem cell research is non-controversial, safe, and has produced safe treatments for patients.

 
21016 05/14/2009 at 09:23:15 AM Self jdf   I am writing to support bryonic stem cell research, It is greatly needed for the cure of jdf, The bryonic stem cell will help find a cure for these children. I am pleading with you to pass this bill. It will open the doors for many other sickness's. I had a son with cyctis fibrois who passed away feb 12,2007 He was 30 years, they said he would not live past 16 years, but the research and new drugs kept him alive and with our family for 30 wonderful years, He was married. And lived a prductive life, because of all the new drugs.So please help the other family's with there kids, If stem cell is needed lets go for it.

 
21017 05/14/2009 at 09:24:15 AM Self     I am opposed to the use of embrionic stem cell for research. I support the use of adult and other forms of stem cell research which has proved much more effective.

 
21018 05/14/2009 at 09:26:58 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21019 05/14/2009 at 09:28:23 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you

 
21020 05/14/2009 at 09:30:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21021 05/14/2009 at 09:30:57 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21022 05/14/2009 at 09:32:32 AM Self     Use the money for adult stem cells. You are wasting you time and money on unethical medical practices that do not work.

 
21023 05/14/2009 at 09:32:39 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21024 05/14/2009 at 09:34:26 AM Self     As the parent of a child suffering from diabetes, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appears to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

Thank you for your consideration.

 
21025 05/14/2009 at 09:36:46 AM Self     To Whom it May Concern: My name is ***** and I have a degree in Biology. I strongly oppose the act of providing funding for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. There are other more effective ways to implement cures for disease. Huge breakthroughs are possible through Adult Stem Cell research. In fact, Adult Stem Cell research is more favorable because it carries with it less risk and does not require the life of human beings. Embryonic stem cells are very hard to control and research of this kind has led to cancerous tumors and deaths. Adult stem cell research, or more specifically, pluripotent stem cell research can be more easily controlled and is more effective in creating solutions for disease. If we can get even better results and save lives using adult stem cells, why would we want to waste money on embryonic stem cell research and require the lives of human beings in the process? Surely, one has to see that this practice is both illogical and immoral. I am vehemently opposed to using hard earned dollars for this practice. There is no need to invest money in this unnecessary and harmful research. Please listen and represent us well in this matter. Sources: Dr. Oz explains the harm of embryonic stem cell research on the Oprah Show http://www.cc.org/blog/oprah_and_michael_fox_shocked_dr_oz039s_truth Adult Stem Cell research is not controversial but still delivers effective results http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adult_stem_cell

 
21026 05/14/2009 at 09:37:00 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21027 05/14/2009 at 09:38:17 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21028 05/14/2009 at 09:41:35 AM Self     We feel that stem cell is a good thing as it can help a lot of people, including our great grandson.

 
21029 05/14/2009 at 09:41:41 AM Self     Life is life from the very moment of conception. It's a scientific fact, not a moral issue. No one, NO ONE has the right to place a higher value on a human life. Please do not allow opportunities for sale of human life to become possible.

 
21030 05/14/2009 at 09:42:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
21031 05/14/2009 at 09:42:50 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21032 05/14/2009 at 09:43:34 AM Self     I oppose the federal government funding human embryonic stem cell experimentation and research. I am seriously disappointed in President Obama's overturning the existing restrictions on federal funding (our tax dollars) for embryonic stem cell research. I don't want my tax dollars supporting the destruction of human life.

 
21033 05/14/2009 at 09:44:13 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
21034 05/14/2009 at 09:46:55 AM Self     To whom it may concern:

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Another who loves our country,

 
21035 05/14/2009 at 09:48:00 AM Self     Dear President Obama - There is NO reason to use embryonic stem cells for research or curative purposes when we have unlimited adult stem cells to work with. Why destroy human life? A very danger is that a market for embryos will arise promising profit for the marketers. It smacks of The heinous things done in Germany over sixty years ago. Do not allow this awful legislation to go through.

 
21036 05/14/2009 at 09:48:22 AM Self     I oppose NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines Draft on moral grounds: Each human embryo is a unique and complete human being, in process of development. Another human being has no right to purposefully destroy a very early human life for scientific experimentation. A society in which the stronger members can destroy the weakest among us will destroy itself. Respect for every human life is the core value of the American experiment in human government. Without that, we will ultimately destroy our society. In addition, IPS cell technology has made it unnecessary to destroy the early human child to obtain stem cells. Thus we don't even have a "scientific" excuse for our immorality.

 
21037 05/14/2009 at 09:48:29 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21038 05/14/2009 at 09:48:30 AM Self     "As a patient, suffering from cancer, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
21039 05/14/2009 at 09:50:44 AM Organization hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
21040 05/14/2009 at 09:51:29 AM Self     -I am opposed to murder...in any form, but especially as described in your draft guidelines!

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-As you contemplate your vote, imagine yourself as the person standing in the place of the researcher, doctor, whomever, that makes the first destructive blow to end a human life.

-God help us all!

 
21041 05/14/2009 at 09:51:30 AM Self     I am writing to urge you to withdraw your proposal to fund any type of stem cell research which involves the destruction of human embryonic stem cells. Stem cell research can lead medicine to new and breakthrough treatments without destroying the life that is already present in an embryo. I urge you to expand the funding for research into adult stem cell lines which have already yielded promise in the area of new treatments for chronic and deadly diseases. Please do not destroy an already present life to try to save another.

 
21042 05/14/2009 at 09:52:09 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21043 05/14/2009 at 09:52:32 AM Self     all for it

 
21044 05/14/2009 at 09:52:50 AM Self     I am in disagreement that the funding of Embryonic Stem Cells by the US Government. This is the destruction of Human Life of the Embryo, which is a human being. This research has not proven any successes.

It would be much more prudent to continue funding research on Adult Stem Cells which has proven to be very successful and does not entail the destruction of human life.

 
21045 05/14/2009 at 09:57:10 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21046 05/14/2009 at 09:58:33 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21047 05/14/2009 at 09:58:39 AM Self     There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

You were once an embryo.

 
21048 05/14/2009 at 09:59:13 AM Self     I am completely opposed to any change in the embryonic stem cell policy. Embryonic stem cell research is a poor choice for limited research dollars. Adult stem cells alredy can treat over 70 diseases and is being tested on over 20 more. Including adult patients with spinal cord injuries! The very thing that we are trying to 'get' to with embryonic stem cell research, we already have achieved so why dump more money into research that is unethical and unproductive. This is poor science and poor financial management. In addition language needs to be added that prohibits human cloning.

 
21049 05/14/2009 at 09:59:55 AM Self     As a researcher in the field of "Tolerance induction to pancreatic islets in type 1 diabetes", I write to express my support for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines governing federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

While embryonic stem cell research is in its early stages, research on embryonic stem cells is critical to our understanding of the early events in human and disease development. The draft guidelines will help those of us in the research community to realize the promise of embryonic stem cell research for the development of therapies to treat more than 100 million Americans living with debilitating conditions such as type 1 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, heart disease, and spinal cord injuries.

Like many researchers who work to advance science, I encourage the NIH to review and update the final guidelines on a regular basis to reflect the most recent achievements in this rapidly changing field. To ensure that these guidelines build on the progress achieved to date through embryonic stem cell research, I also would encourage the NIH to make the following changes to Section II B of the guidelines:

1) Stem cell lines previously eligible for federally-funded research – as part of the 2001 Human Embryonic Stem Cell Policy – should remain eligible for federally-funded research in the future; and

2) Cell lines derived prior to the issuance of these guidelines should be eligible for federal funding as long as they were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time.

While the previous federal policy governing embryonic stem cell research hampered our ability to maximize the therapeutic potential of this research, significant advancements have been made on both the cell lines previously eligible for federal funding and those derived and studied with private grant funds. Ethically-derived lines should not be disqualified from future federal funding simply because they failed to meet the letter of ethical guidelines that did not yet exist. Therefore, I would encourage the NIH to deem lines previously approved for research by Institutional Review Boards eligible for federal funding going forward to ensure that the research community can build on the scientific progress achieved to date by studying these lines. As a researcher, I applaud the NIH for its commitment to scientific achievement and look forward to engaging in the expansion of the field of embryonic stem cell research.

 
21050 05/14/2009 at 10:00:36 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
21051 05/14/2009 at 10:01:35 AM Self     There is a line between right and wrong, and if left in the hands of the researchers it always ends up being very questionable according to ethics.

 



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