Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
20888 05/14/2009 at 01:49:44 AM Self     "I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes."

 
20889 05/14/2009 at 02:00:12 AM Self     Please allow the research to go on with stem cell research. This could help save so many lives. It may take awhile for the answers to come, but how can we turn our backs on the possibility to helping endless numbers of people?

 
20890 05/14/2009 at 02:28:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. My mother died of Parkinson's disease and I think she may have had a few more years of health if stem cell research would have been pursued.

 
20891 05/14/2009 at 02:28:40 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20892 05/14/2009 at 02:37:00 AM Self     Our government should not be killing to promote any kind of research.

 
20893 05/14/2009 at 02:39:59 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20894 05/14/2009 at 02:46:47 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20895 05/14/2009 at 02:46:53 AM Self     Please don't allow this to happen... embryonic stem cells is proven ineffective for many of the conditions and diseases that people have. In fact, they cause more problems than ever. Adult stem cells, however, do more goodand since it is from the person who is getting the treatment, no worries of rejection!

 
20896 05/14/2009 at 02:47:51 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most important, are effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Human embryos are human persons. Experimenting with them is akin to what was done to Jews, Gypsies, and others by the notorious Dr. Mengele and other perverted doctors in Nazi Germany. Killing human embryos is just plain murder - the unjust taking of a life belonging to another person.

On the other hand, experimenting with adult stem cells has not only led already to more than 70 beneficial treatments, but is perfectly moral and an acceptable practice of medicine and research. Such work should be encouraged.

It should be the policy of the United States to prevent experimentation with human beings as embryo stem cells, and to prosecute for murder in the first degree, any who destroy such embryo persons.

 
20897 05/14/2009 at 02:57:46 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of people suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest as my mum is suffering from it. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.

 
20898 05/14/2009 at 03:06:50 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20899 05/14/2009 at 03:08:36 AM Self     To the National Institutes of Health: On the grounds that human life begins at the moment of conception, I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
20900 05/14/2009 at 03:47:48 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20901 05/14/2009 at 03:48:20 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20902 05/14/2009 at 04:10:51 AM Self     "For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner."

This is a very important process for people with type 1 diabetes. This may help to find a cure. I hope this stem cell research continues in full force in an ethical manner so that many may have an opportunity to live without this disease and its complications. Diabetes needs to be eradicated just like polio was. Andrea Dover, mother of Type 1 diabetes child

 
20903 05/14/2009 at 04:11:18 AM Self     help save my husband with stem ce;; treat,emts for parkinsons

 
20904 05/14/2009 at 04:15:01 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20905 05/14/2009 at 04:29:32 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
20906 05/14/2009 at 04:35:19 AM Self     Please honor the President's Order to continue at all levels with embryonic stem cell research.

I took care of my first husband through two years of a very painful illness with cancer. He died at age 47. Also, I have a Sister-in-law who suffers with early on-set Parkinson's Disease.

I write not only on behalf of these loved ones of mine, but also for thousands of others who suffer similarly. It is my strong belief that progress toward a cure for such diseases is truly a "Pro Life" activity!

 
20907 05/14/2009 at 04:50:06 AM Self     Please do not fund embryonic stem cell research with our tax money because it destroys human life. Human life begins at conception, when we each have 46 chromosomes. Even our sinful nature, inherited from Adam and Eve, is passed on at conception (c.f. Psalm 51:5). Choose life, so that our children may live. Shift the focus, instead, to Adult Stem Cell research, where great successes have been proven.

 
20908 05/14/2009 at 04:51:19 AM       I support ESCR. Please do this research and help cure Parkinsons and other terminal illness. Thank you.

 
20909 05/14/2009 at 04:55:28 AM Self     Comment Text (please copy and paste into Comments section)

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20910 05/14/2009 at 05:11:46 AM Organization Hadassah New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.6557

 
20911 05/14/2009 at 05:35:12 AM Self     As President Obama says this is a time to be prudent with our spending. I oppose funding for embryonic stem cell research since it does not work, is destructive to human embryos, and limits funding to adult stem cell research which has real potential to restore health and productivity to people.

 
20912 05/14/2009 at 05:42:26 AM Self     Extracting stem cells requires murder!

 
20913 05/14/2009 at 05:48:57 AM Self     I have prostate cancer. I had my prostate removed 5 years ago but the cancer has returned and I will be having radiation treatments. I strongly support the proposed stem cell guidelines. Thank you.

 
20914 05/14/2009 at 05:51:08 AM Self     As a physician, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20915 05/14/2009 at 05:55:11 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20916 05/14/2009 at 06:08:06 AM Self     PLEASE do not use tax-payer money to fund embryonic stem cell research. You will find it is a senseless and life-terminating act and not beneficial to anyone.

 
20917 05/14/2009 at 06:09:31 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20918 05/14/2009 at 06:22:36 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20919 05/14/2009 at 06:26:15 AM Self     Stem cell research on embryonic stem cells is repugnant and futile. The government must protect human life at all stages -- not destroy it. An embryonic cell is a human being -- it's not an alligator or a group of indeterminate cells. It is a developing human being. It must be protected. Embryonic stem cell research has not had any successes. Studies on adult- and umbilical-cord stem cells have provided much more promise and successes. It's a fact.

 
20920 05/14/2009 at 06:30:45 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20921 05/14/2009 at 06:31:14 AM Self     Using Tax Dollars to Fund Embryonic Stem Cells:

I do not want my tax dollars used to destroy human embryos for research, when we already have the use of adult stem cells; and are having wonderful results! This is unnecessary!!!!!!

Sincerely,

 
20922 05/14/2009 at 06:33:43 AM Self     Please read your Bible. God says do not murder . In God's eyes willfilly taking a human life is murder. The babies you are allowing to be killed could some day do great things for the human race. But if not allowed to live their contributions will never be manifested. I Pray the God of all creation forgives your unwilling stubbornness to acknowledge He is in control YOU are not .

 
20923 05/14/2009 at 06:39:23 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20924 05/14/2009 at 06:51:21 AM Self     Dear Sirs/Madams:

These regulations as proposed have put us on a moral slippery sloop from which our nation will never recover the moral high ground that we have enjoyed as a nation. While the intentions may be good the means require the destruction of fellow human beings, albeit, at the earliest stages of life. Once we have set into law a "legal" reason for snuffing out life at one end of lifes spectrum there will be nothing holding us back from snuffing it out at the other end - an end which we are all fast approaching. The moral reality is either all human life is sacred or none is, you can not pick and chose that spectrum of life which will be regarded as valuable and worth protecting and that which is expendable for other "good" reasons. Once you've embarked on a selective course, the human spirit has been mortally wounded and violence towards all life is unleashed. If you can legally justify killing little ones, you can legally justify killing old ones, infirmed ones, handicapped ones, malformed ones - all of course in the name of a greater good. This is the same fatal thinking that the Nazi's fell too, and our end as a society and a nation will be no better should we violate the value of all human life.

 
20925 05/14/2009 at 06:52:52 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20926 05/14/2009 at 06:54:35 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20927 05/14/2009 at 07:15:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20928 05/14/2009 at 07:19:47 AM Self     I personally disagree with the proposed guidelines for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. I do not support the destruction of Embryonic Stem Cells, which are actually human lives, and therefore believe as a taxpayer my taxes should not go towards destroying innocent lives. Doing research on Adult Stem Cells is just as effective in treating patients, and much more ethical. We should go this route using Adult Stem Cells for research instead of destroying Embryonic Cells. I’m also concerned that these guidelines do not prevent possibility of cloning in the future, whether its humans or animals or a mixture of both (hybrids). I feel that this needs to be addressed and we need to ensure that this closing does NOT happen.

 
20929 05/14/2009 at 07:22:32 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20930 05/14/2009 at 07:26:13 AM Self     Do not use my tax dollars to support embryonic cell research that can be done with private funds. If it is truly beneficial then private money will be invested for a future profit.

Support the FairTax NOW to give the poor a chance and bring jobs back to the US !!!

 
20931 05/14/2009 at 07:31:12 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding.

Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20932 05/14/2009 at 07:33:48 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20933 05/14/2009 at 07:36:04 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern,

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please consider where legislation may lead. Destroying the life a person in an attempt to benefit another? And, this person does not have a voice, a choice? Using tax dollars that could be used to better research already proven results with adult stem cells would be the best choice.

Sincerely,

 
20934 05/14/2009 at 07:37:14 AM Self     It's bad enough that you have now allowed embryonic stem cell research when science has shown that the same can be obtained without embryonic cells, but DO NOT USE OUR TAX DOLLARS FOR THE ABORTIONS THAT ARE REQUIRED FOR THAT RESEARCH!

 
20935 05/14/2009 at 07:37:46 AM Self     I am a senior in South Florida and the sooner this bill is passed in comlete form the better off peop0le will be. It seems the diseases are worsening.

 
20936 05/14/2009 at 07:40:01 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20937 05/14/2009 at 07:40:58 AM Self     As a parent of a child who has Type I diabetes I believe the science of stem cell research should be moved forward to save lives and mitigate the suffering of millions of people.

I also believe stem cell research could save billions of dollars in medical costs in the near future.

Sincerely,

 
20938 05/14/2009 at 07:42:20 AM Organization Missourri Cures St. Louis, Mo I have lost sevral family mambers because of Cancer, including my mother. If there is any chance of stem cell research helping to cure or slow the cancer, why would there even be a question about not allowing it. I see nothing but a good things happening from it. Studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes could provide information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated somatic cells generated from human embryonic stem cells.

 
20939 05/14/2009 at 07:43:18 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos.

 
20940 05/14/2009 at 07:43:38 AM Self     Life begins at conception. God's word is truth. Researcher's search for the truth, which constantly changes as they proceed with their research.

 
20941 05/14/2009 at 07:43:43 AM Self     As much as intentions of those wanting embiotic stem cell research seem to be for life giving opportunities, it is the distruction of a human life that is being used to do this. Please do not consider it but do consider stem cell reasearch without using embrios. It just goes beyond our nature as human beings to do this. We all started this way. Thankfully we were not used for embrionic stem cell research.

 
20942 05/14/2009 at 07:43:43 AM Self     I don't think human life should be taken for the purpose of research, even tiny little embryo lives. It's just a good principle to have. Please include something that prevents cloning and human animal mixes and weird experiments like the nazis did. They say adult stem cell research is the one that has shown promise in experiments. Please disntinguish between adult and embryo research in the legislation, and encourage and support the ethical one in all cases, don't let there be an attitude of "anything goes in the name of research".

 
20943 05/14/2009 at 07:44:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20944 05/14/2009 at 07:44:47 AM Self     To the President of the United States:

Please DO NOT use taxpayers(my) money to kill embryos (human life) for research. Embryonic stem cells have not been proven to help or cure any type of disease or condition. Adult stem cells has proven to have many positive results. This nation is killing the young/ no wonder the social security and Medicare is running out of money - the United States is "killing off" their young. I am sorry that you see our future like that.

 
20945 05/14/2009 at 07:48:23 AM Organization Hadassah New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20946 05/14/2009 at 07:48:58 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20947 05/14/2009 at 07:50:03 AM Self     I oppose using my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions. Rescind guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

 
20948 05/14/2009 at 07:50:59 AM Self Haddassah 50 West 58th Street; New York, N.Y. 10019

May 12, 2009

Ensure Strong Federal Support for Embryonic Stem Cell Research

As you know, President Barack Obama recently signed an Executive Order designed to reverse restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research that have been in place for the last eight years. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are now in the process of developing guidelines to implement the Order.

NIH has released its draft guidelines, and will be reviewing public comments on the draft over the next several weeks. So far, NIH has received far more comments opposed to stem cell research than in support. It is therefore critical that NIH hear from as many stem cell supporters as possible during the comment period.

While the draft guidelines would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics, as drafted, it is unclear whether current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlined and be eligible for federal funding.

Further, the draft does not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). SCNT is a very promising scientific technique for creating embryonic stem cells, yet opponents of SCNT mistakenly liken it to reproductive cloning. This comparison is completely false. The purpose of reproductive cloning is to create another human being; the purpose of SCNT is to create stem cells for research.

Embryonic stem cell research holds the promise to treat and potentially cure many devastating diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis – illnesses which affect over 100 million Americans.

As a world leader in stem cell research at our Goldyne Savad Institute of Gene Therapy in Israel and as a leading advocate for stem cell research in the United States, Hadassah has a special interest in ensuring that the NIH guidelines are crafted so to advance stem cell research as quickly as possible.

Action Needed: Submit the following comments to NIH:

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20949 05/14/2009 at 07:51:15 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20950 05/14/2009 at 07:52:46 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20951 05/14/2009 at 07:54:16 AM Self     My Wife & I will not support any candidate that

MY wife & I are against executive order 13505 as it pretains to intramural NIH funded research.With the documented break throughs in skin cell research & to our knowledge there has not been any evidence with the human stem cell,which is surrounded by contraversey,Why have we not been putting all our resourses into this proven research?

 
20952 05/14/2009 at 07:54:32 AM Self     Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
20953 05/14/2009 at 07:56:49 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

 
20954 05/14/2009 at 07:57:27 AM Self     Dear NIH, I object to Human Stem Cell experimentation when the source of the stem cells are embryonic. I understand other sources are available and have been developed over the past 10 years or so which do not present the moral objections I have and do not lead us down the slippery slope of devaluing human life. thank you,

 
20955 05/14/2009 at 07:57:45 AM Self     I do not support stem cell research. It is playing with human life. Only God is the creator and sustainer of life. It is up to him to decide when a life begins and when a life ends. To form embryos, which are the beginning of life, just for research is morally wrong.

 
20956 05/14/2009 at 07:59:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

You were once an embryo, let others become the person GOD intended for them to be.

 
20957 05/14/2009 at 08:03:46 AM Self     In the "Guidelines" under Section I, Scope of Guidelines, "human embryonic stem cells" are defined as "...cells that are derived from human embryos, ......". Both research and intuition support God's Word that at conception a life is formed. To destroy that life in order to harvest cells for research that is negligable in results at best is wrong. I DO NOT support support Executive Order 13505.

 
20958 05/14/2009 at 08:07:10 AM Organization Hadassah Houston Texas "I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you."

 
20959 05/14/2009 at 08:08:43 AM Self     I applaud these guidlines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailingthical standards at the time they were derived are eligible forfederal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be leigible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidlines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients, who are tax payers. Our son in law suffers from MS and we are anxious for NIH research to take the lead. Thank you.

 
20960 05/14/2009 at 08:16:47 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20961 05/14/2009 at 08:17:12 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20962 05/14/2009 at 08:17:23 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately

 
20963 05/14/2009 at 08:17:44 AM Self     I strongly support federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, and I support the Administration’s efforts to ensure federal funding of this important research. I am pleased that the draft guidelines will permit federal funding for new stem cell lines, and will finally allow meaningful embryonic stem cell research to move forward. It is important to me and my family that politics not stand in the way of scientific progress that may lead to better treatments and a cure for Alzheimer's, Parkinson’s, cancer, and heart disease.

I am concerned, however, that Section II B does not “grandfather” or ensure the continued use of the few embryonic stem lines that were eligible for federal funding under the Bush policy. As we work to lift the de facto ban, the final guidelines must allow the current lines to remain eligible for federal funding. We cannot lose the progress scientists have achieved over the past several years. We cannot afford to lose any more time.

In addition, NIH must regularly update the guidelines as science advances. There will be important research tools discovered over the next several years that will necessitate regularly updated guidelines, such as human Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer cell lines. The guidelines must adapt to new science that will help researchers better understand and treat diseases.

It's time to get politics and unnecessary bureaucratic hurdles out of the way. It's time to speed the pace of progress. It’s time to develop better treatments for people living with diseases.

 
20964 05/14/2009 at 08:21:45 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20965 05/14/2009 at 08:24:34 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20966 05/14/2009 at 08:28:11 AM Self     i would love to be parkinsons free and live a normal life, thru stem cells. see this video and se how this disease makes me feel. Try: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnHzp8p7syA

 
20967 05/14/2009 at 08:28:48 AM Self     I am a health care provider and daily witness the ravages of diseases for which stem cell research holds promise in modifying, curing or preventing. In addition, both of my parents died of cancer, one of the colon and the other of ovarian. Both my parents had very healthy lifestyles and had regular medical preventive care. Their cancers were of the types that stem cell research could hold great promise in preventing or reversing. My husband's step-father was a brilliant man who recently succumbed to the effects of Alzheimers, Parkinsons, and diabetes. The last few years of his life were ones of great struggle and suffering, for himself and his family. Stem cell research is very likely the answer to these types of diseases. No one lives forever but to have life cut short and the quality of life so hideously altered is the problem. To stymie the funding and research into the possible answers to these diseases based on ideological matters is inexcusable and a betrayal to the people who depend on science and government to aid us in realizing our full potentials.

 
20968 05/14/2009 at 08:33:01 AM Self     My father suffers from Parkinson's Disease, and it is sad to see him gradually and permanently lose mobility and cognitive function. Both he and my mother are burdened by his disabilities; rather than enjoying their retirement years as many people can, they are struggling just to get through every day.

I believe that embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

For the sake of my family and others like mine, please do not slow progress toward a cure. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
20969 05/14/2009 at 08:35:01 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20970 05/14/2009 at 08:36:39 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20971 05/14/2009 at 08:37:19 AM Self     Why are we willing to fund by taxes what the general investor is not willing to fund since embryonic stem cell research has not worked - the science in bad and the stem cell too "wild". Teh adult stem cell has been successful in over 70 diseases - this is so politically charged that the government is not using basic logic to forego this bad investment- much less the murder of innocent human life.

 
20972 05/14/2009 at 08:37:24 AM Self     Why are you wasting our money? You have huge economic problems going on and yet you choose to put money into worthless research. It doesn't make any sense except that you are making a political move rather than a scientific one. ESCR has been proven to be not only medically unpromising but HARMFUL! And not just to the embryos that are destroyed for it but for the very people it is supposed to be helping. Adult stem cell research has already been successful in treating many diseases and the possibilities are huge. That is where ALL the money for stem cell research should be going.

 
20973 05/14/2009 at 08:38:17 AM Organization Hadassah New York I strongly believe we need federal funding for stem cell research since this could potentialy irradicate many diseases.

 
20974 05/14/2009 at 08:39:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
20975 05/14/2009 at 08:40:01 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20976 05/14/2009 at 08:40:27 AM Self     When my sister was 16 years old she found out she had type 1 diabetes. Watching her have to prick her finger, and having to be so constricted in her diet broke my heart. She is a very healthy girl, and there is no record of diabetes in our family. I support stem cell research. I would like to see my sister be "normal", and enjoy her life with out being controlled by this disease.

 
20977 05/14/2009 at 08:42:09 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20978 05/14/2009 at 08:49:38 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Embryos are not "lesser humans." They are a stage of development-- like infancy, toddlerhood, puberty-- that everyone on this planet has already passed through. Who can be so arrogant to deny these children the opportunity to develop and grow? What if someone had made that decision for you?

 
20979 05/14/2009 at 08:49:48 AM Self     I am in favor of stem cell research!!

 
20980 05/14/2009 at 08:50:05 AM   JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Regards,

 
20981 05/14/2009 at 08:51:11 AM Self     If nothing else, stem cell research holds the prospect for many years of debate. Nevertheless, to avoid unnecessary delays in the quest for safe and efficacious treatments, the federal government should establish a framework for the rapid resolution of any on-going issues. More specifically, any distinctions derived from religious beliefs should be eliminated from government regulation of stem cell research.

Over the past decade, many of the state and federal policies on stem cell research have been driven by religious beliefs, curtailing or slowing down various types of stem cell research. The religious belief that life begins at conception has lead to the creation of an overlay of government regulations and restrictions based upon the different types of stem cell research.

In addressing this issue in the broader context, the government’s framework for stem cell research must be in accord with the Constitutional imperative that “no religious test shall ever be required”. The U. S. Supreme Court in Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971) established the following three-part test for meeting this imperative: 1) the government action must have a secular purpose; 2) its primary purpose must not be to inhibit or to advance religion; and 3) there must be no excessive entanglement between government and religion.

The government’s overall framework for stem cell research and its restrictions on somatic cell nuclear transfer fail this test. No basis – other than a religious belief – has been established for the various distinctions that have been put into practice.

The American legal system rests on the facts and application of logic to those facts. There is no basis other than faith for the belief that life begins at conception. The legal system must recognize the fact that an embryo must attach to a uterus in order to develop into a human being. Hence, unless the embryo attaches to a uterus, it cannot become a human being and therefore it cannot represent a life.

In the case of somatic cell nuclear transfer and similar forms of stem cell research, the embryo is produced in a Petri dish and will never attach to a uterine wall. Hence, these embryos will never become a life and therefore cannot be considered to be a life in their present form. These embryos don’t even have the potential for life given that the embryos are restricted to research purposes and are utilized within 14 days.

Accordingly, the federal government should eliminate, or clarify, its basis for any distinction between the different forms of stem cell research. The current distinctions and regulations are arbitrary and capricious and violate the U.S. Constitution as constituted.

Respectfully submitted,

 
20982 05/14/2009 at 08:51:53 AM Self     I am objecting to further extension of embryonic stem cell research. No valid results have resulted from using embryonic stem cells in medical procedures. This leaves the door wide open to scientists to begin life and then kill it in order to participate in questionable procedures.

 
20983 05/14/2009 at 08:52:21 AM Self     I have multiple sclerosis and have been pleased to see the new Administration’s changes in stem cell research. However, I believe that the federal guidelines should make sure that all stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. Section II B should read to allow federal funding for research using stem cell lines derived from both excess fertility clinic embryos and other potential sources, such as SCNT. I support changing the guidelines to allow federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. I and many other patients look forward to the potential treatments and cures that can come from stem cell research.

 
20984 05/14/2009 at 08:52:48 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20985 05/14/2009 at 08:52:54 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called “leftover” embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding whenever NIH wants in the future. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other fertile couples.

 
20986 05/14/2009 at 08:53:14 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20987 05/14/2009 at 08:53:46 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page