Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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20851 05/13/2009 at 11:54:59 PM Self     I am a 54 retired Navy, looking forward to retire from my second career in the civilian word. However due to connective tissue disease that has attacked my lungs my golden years may not be that golden. There is no treatment for the damage that has been done to my lungs. The only thing that has any promise for treatment is stem cell to repair the damage in my lungs. I wish that the fanatics would be drowned out and allow science to do there research that have a chance of helping people live better lives.

May God help these sciencetist find speedy break throughs.

PS: I have never smoked, done drugs, and very seldom have a drink. I have worked hard, help others, and lived a clean life. In other words I think these fanatics are brained wash, if they are agaist Stem Cell, then they have a right not to have it, but don't denie others that right.

 
20852 05/14/2009 at 12:02:06 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20853 05/14/2009 at 12:04:04 AM Self     My mother died four years ago. The last several years of her life were very hard. She suffered from a number of things, but Parkinson's Disease was what caused her quality of life to be diminished dramatically in the end. So I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20854 05/14/2009 at 12:04:32 AM Self     I am personally opposed to using federal funds for use in research in human embronyic stem cell. All the results from the past 25 years have been in ADULT stem cell research - which doesn't cost a life.

 
20855 05/14/2009 at 12:05:10 AM Self     If life doesn't begin at conception then when does it begin? If embronic research goes the way of Roe vs. Wade then the (when does life begin issue) will see us taking babies up to the point they are being born for embryonic research. There is no one that does not know that a baby being born is a human life and yet there are those that say it is OK to kill a baby using partial birth abortion. They will undoubtedly also sanction taking unborn babies at any stage for medical research once the embryonic stem cell hurdle is overcome. Where will the immoral conduct of this nation stop. Surely once it is OK to kill a baby being born, then there is no stopping where it will end. People have already said that a baby is still not a viable being until it is over one year old. Even one year old is not where it will end. My new 11 month old grand daughter is an incredible human being loved by me and by God. Once the restraints of concience are cast off, there is no limit to where the evil will go. Only the concience of moral men and women will preserve our nation and its people. Proponents of partial birth abortion and embryonic stem cell research are going to destroy this nation and freedom as we know it. If we are no longer a moral nation, how can we lead the rest of the world which has shown again and again that it is more than willing to decend into the dark and hopeless pit of immorality.

I for one refuse to have my tax dollars spent in a way that is morally repugnant to me.

 
20856 05/14/2009 at 12:05:18 AM Self     Because I believe that every baby has received life at the time of conception and should be protected to the full extent of our Constitution, I find it reprehensible that my taxes are being used to fund the destruction of embryonic cells for research. What is even more reprehensible is that none of this embryonic research to date has born any fruit. More than 70 conditions have been effectively improved through research using adult stem cells.

As a country, we should be trying to protect the lives of all who are conceived, not deciding that this one is valuable only for being killed to continue research that has not proven anything. We need to be compassionate towards all babies from the time of conception. We should not be establishing or condoning any guidelines or procedures that will lead to mass-production of in vitro fertilizations so there will be plenty of "crop" for researchers to harvest and to argue over in order to continue to get government funds for their failed research.

To fund death over life using anybody's money, especially monies taken from taxpayers who believe in protecting all life as I do, I find it despicable and shameful. I hold in contempt all officials promoting and all researchers taking this funding. It is unacceptable to the way I was raised, to the way I have raised my family and to the way I believe our country was founded, to not respect all life.

I support funding of adult stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell research because this research has proven successful and does not destroy life. Any and all other types of research should be stopped or be highly restricted to protect all life from conception.

 
20857 05/14/2009 at 12:10:45 AM Self Hadassah 50 W. 58th Street, NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20858 05/14/2009 at 12:12:17 AM Self     If you do your research into the subject from the thousands to tens of thousands of trained doctors on the subject, such as Dr. Oz, you will discover that stem-cell research simply does not offer the success rate that umbilical cord or adult stem cells can offer. To me, this is just another lame political way of making abortion acceptable, and speaking on behalf of the millions of us Americans who have a moral conscience, I would strongly urge all of you politicians to keep any stem-cell research from happening, for it's not only unethical, it's also ineffective. Thank you.

 
20859 05/14/2009 at 12:12:21 AM Self     I am concerned about the upcoming draft to support human stem cell research. I recognize that stem cell research has unexplored capabilities that may improve human life, but biomedical research crosses ethical boundaries when improving human life comes at the cost of innocent lives. In the public health sector, embryos are protected by the preventing risky pregnancies, reducing low birth weight deliveries, reducing the prevalence of smoking and drinking during pregnancy. We recognize that embryonic life is something to be guarded and protected, yet we are willing to sacrifice this life for peer reviewed studies, as if human life itself were no more important than frog or rat specimens. I urge you to continue adult stem cell research, and to think creatively to expand the knowledge we have to improve lives without destroying or devaluing human life itself. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20860 05/14/2009 at 12:13:01 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20861 05/14/2009 at 12:16:51 AM Self     Do not use any taxpayer money to fund embryonic stem cell research. This is offensive to many US citizens that do not want to see human life destroyed.

 
20862 05/14/2009 at 12:17:31 AM Self     I support the funding of stem cell research.

 
20863 05/14/2009 at 12:21:02 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20864 05/14/2009 at 12:21:56 AM Self     I am all for women's rights. Paramount among them are the rights of unborn women. I will defy any advocate of the murder of unborn women.

 
20865 05/14/2009 at 12:24:26 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of people suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20866 05/14/2009 at 12:30:18 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20867 05/14/2009 at 12:38:34 AM Self     I do not support the governments need to force embryonic stem cell research on the public as the only viable option. And as one who believes in the sanctity of life, I feel I am being forced to support a method that I feel is morally wrong, with my tax dollars.

 
20868 05/14/2009 at 12:41:21 AM Self     Sorry I took so long to reply as I am loosing my eyesight due to my diabetes,

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20869 05/14/2009 at 12:46:38 AM Self     We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which would make us as taxpayers subsidize research destroying human life. There are treatments that do not destroy human life and are effective so we should be supporting only those, so no human cloning goes on which is wrong. This loophole must be closed at once. We should not fund research that destroys human life when we have other options that are better and do not destroy human life.

 
20870 05/14/2009 at 12:48:58 AM Self     I don't understand why federal dollars should be used for research that has proven ineffective as the embryonic stem cell research has proven. Let's put our money where it has proven itself, adult stem cells.

 
20871 05/14/2009 at 12:50:00 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20872 05/14/2009 at 12:54:08 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20873 05/14/2009 at 12:54:33 AM Self     Thank you for giving me the opportunity to express my objection to tax payer funding of Embryonic stem cell research & these guidelines that promote it. The concept alone of creating life then killing life for the sake of possibly saving life or possibly finding cures is incomprehensible. I understand the need for responsible scientific research but this is not it. Embryonic stem cell destruction has not yielded any results as of yet & even if it did, it's an immoral exchange. Please consider modifying your guidelines to exclude federal funding for any research that uses embryonic stem lines created after 2001. Thanks.

 
20874 05/14/2009 at 12:58:54 AM Self     As a citizen of these United States I would like to go on record in opposing any type of funding for more embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) that creates an incentive to create and destroy human embryos. I especially oppose my tax dollars being used to experiment on stem cells taken from human embryos that are supposedly "leftover" from in vitro fertilization. I believe that it is morally wrong to experiment in such a way that it causes death to these potential persons and I strongly urge the promotion of adoption for these human embryos. There are many, many families that are unable to conceive and would welcome the opportunity to adopt these potential babies.

 
20875 05/14/2009 at 01:01:51 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20876 05/14/2009 at 01:09:49 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20877 05/14/2009 at 01:10:11 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20878 05/14/2009 at 01:10:51 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20879 05/14/2009 at 01:11:37 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Thousands of childen are born in the united states every day, whom are attached to their mothers with an umbiblical cord. Stem cells are available in the cord! Why not have the mother donate the cord for stem cells. Thats an idea, far more practical then creating life then taking it away for the sake of harvesting stem cells. When they are already available everyday from a more natrual and moral way.

 
20880 05/14/2009 at 01:11:40 AM Self     I am an RN, a Christian, mother, pro-choice activist, sister to a Type I Diabetic and aunt to a Type I Diabetic. I strongly support federal funding for stem cell research which should ABSOLUTELY COME FROM EVERY TYPE OF IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit this type of federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cells lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
20881 05/14/2009 at 01:12:40 AM Self     Please do NOT kill babies!! Do Adult stem cell research only & only have taxpayers paying for that research. We should NOT have to pay for killing babies!!

 
20882 05/14/2009 at 01:20:50 AM Self     As a research nurse, I am pleased with the guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. And I hope that the final draft includes language that clarifies that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding as well.

Thank you.

 
20883 05/14/2009 at 01:23:12 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20884 05/14/2009 at 01:23:47 AM Self     As the grandfather, son and grandson of Type I diabetics, I wonder why I was spared and why my seven-years old grandson was not. I see the devastation this lifetime affliction has wrought upon our entire family and I despair. If modern medicine can develop the likes of CIALIS and VIAGRA, surely stem cell research can bring about a cure for juvenile diabetes.

 
20885 05/14/2009 at 01:25:51 AM Self     Do not appropriate any more funds for stem cell research under any circumstances.Thank you.

 
20886 05/14/2009 at 01:34:49 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of=2 0type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20887 05/14/2009 at 01:49:02 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20888 05/14/2009 at 01:49:44 AM Self     "I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes."

 
20889 05/14/2009 at 02:00:12 AM Self     Please allow the research to go on with stem cell research. This could help save so many lives. It may take awhile for the answers to come, but how can we turn our backs on the possibility to helping endless numbers of people?

 
20890 05/14/2009 at 02:28:20 AM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened. My mother died of Parkinson's disease and I think she may have had a few more years of health if stem cell research would have been pursued.

 
20891 05/14/2009 at 02:28:40 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20892 05/14/2009 at 02:37:00 AM Self     Our government should not be killing to promote any kind of research.

 
20893 05/14/2009 at 02:39:59 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20894 05/14/2009 at 02:46:47 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
20895 05/14/2009 at 02:46:53 AM Self     Please don't allow this to happen... embryonic stem cells is proven ineffective for many of the conditions and diseases that people have. In fact, they cause more problems than ever. Adult stem cells, however, do more goodand since it is from the person who is getting the treatment, no worries of rejection!

 
20896 05/14/2009 at 02:47:51 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most important, are effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Human embryos are human persons. Experimenting with them is akin to what was done to Jews, Gypsies, and others by the notorious Dr. Mengele and other perverted doctors in Nazi Germany. Killing human embryos is just plain murder - the unjust taking of a life belonging to another person.

On the other hand, experimenting with adult stem cells has not only led already to more than 70 beneficial treatments, but is perfectly moral and an acceptable practice of medicine and research. Such work should be encouraged.

It should be the policy of the United States to prevent experimentation with human beings as embryo stem cells, and to prosecute for murder in the first degree, any who destroy such embryo persons.

 
20897 05/14/2009 at 02:57:46 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of people suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest as my mum is suffering from it. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.

 
20898 05/14/2009 at 03:06:50 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20899 05/14/2009 at 03:08:36 AM Self     To the National Institutes of Health: On the grounds that human life begins at the moment of conception, I oppose the use of federal funds for research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
20900 05/14/2009 at 03:47:48 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20901 05/14/2009 at 03:48:20 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20902 05/14/2009 at 04:10:51 AM Self     "For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner."

This is a very important process for people with type 1 diabetes. This may help to find a cure. I hope this stem cell research continues in full force in an ethical manner so that many may have an opportunity to live without this disease and its complications. Diabetes needs to be eradicated just like polio was. Andrea Dover, mother of Type 1 diabetes child

 
20903 05/14/2009 at 04:11:18 AM Self     help save my husband with stem ce;; treat,emts for parkinsons

 
20904 05/14/2009 at 04:15:01 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20905 05/14/2009 at 04:29:32 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
20906 05/14/2009 at 04:35:19 AM Self     Please honor the President's Order to continue at all levels with embryonic stem cell research.

I took care of my first husband through two years of a very painful illness with cancer. He died at age 47. Also, I have a Sister-in-law who suffers with early on-set Parkinson's Disease.

I write not only on behalf of these loved ones of mine, but also for thousands of others who suffer similarly. It is my strong belief that progress toward a cure for such diseases is truly a "Pro Life" activity!

 
20907 05/14/2009 at 04:50:06 AM Self     Please do not fund embryonic stem cell research with our tax money because it destroys human life. Human life begins at conception, when we each have 46 chromosomes. Even our sinful nature, inherited from Adam and Eve, is passed on at conception (c.f. Psalm 51:5). Choose life, so that our children may live. Shift the focus, instead, to Adult Stem Cell research, where great successes have been proven.

 
20908 05/14/2009 at 04:51:19 AM       I support ESCR. Please do this research and help cure Parkinsons and other terminal illness. Thank you.

 
20909 05/14/2009 at 04:55:28 AM Self     Comment Text (please copy and paste into Comments section)

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20910 05/14/2009 at 05:11:46 AM Organization Hadassah New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.6557

 
20911 05/14/2009 at 05:35:12 AM Self     As President Obama says this is a time to be prudent with our spending. I oppose funding for embryonic stem cell research since it does not work, is destructive to human embryos, and limits funding to adult stem cell research which has real potential to restore health and productivity to people.

 
20912 05/14/2009 at 05:42:26 AM Self     Extracting stem cells requires murder!

 
20913 05/14/2009 at 05:48:57 AM Self     I have prostate cancer. I had my prostate removed 5 years ago but the cancer has returned and I will be having radiation treatments. I strongly support the proposed stem cell guidelines. Thank you.

 
20914 05/14/2009 at 05:51:08 AM Self     As a physician, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways.

 
20915 05/14/2009 at 05:55:11 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20916 05/14/2009 at 06:08:06 AM Self     PLEASE do not use tax-payer money to fund embryonic stem cell research. You will find it is a senseless and life-terminating act and not beneficial to anyone.

 
20917 05/14/2009 at 06:09:31 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20918 05/14/2009 at 06:22:36 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20919 05/14/2009 at 06:26:15 AM Self     Stem cell research on embryonic stem cells is repugnant and futile. The government must protect human life at all stages -- not destroy it. An embryonic cell is a human being -- it's not an alligator or a group of indeterminate cells. It is a developing human being. It must be protected. Embryonic stem cell research has not had any successes. Studies on adult- and umbilical-cord stem cells have provided much more promise and successes. It's a fact.

 
20920 05/14/2009 at 06:30:45 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20921 05/14/2009 at 06:31:14 AM Self     Using Tax Dollars to Fund Embryonic Stem Cells:

I do not want my tax dollars used to destroy human embryos for research, when we already have the use of adult stem cells; and are having wonderful results! This is unnecessary!!!!!!

Sincerely,

 
20922 05/14/2009 at 06:33:43 AM Self     Please read your Bible. God says do not murder . In God's eyes willfilly taking a human life is murder. The babies you are allowing to be killed could some day do great things for the human race. But if not allowed to live their contributions will never be manifested. I Pray the God of all creation forgives your unwilling stubbornness to acknowledge He is in control YOU are not .

 
20923 05/14/2009 at 06:39:23 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
20924 05/14/2009 at 06:51:21 AM Self     Dear Sirs/Madams:

These regulations as proposed have put us on a moral slippery sloop from which our nation will never recover the moral high ground that we have enjoyed as a nation. While the intentions may be good the means require the destruction of fellow human beings, albeit, at the earliest stages of life. Once we have set into law a "legal" reason for snuffing out life at one end of lifes spectrum there will be nothing holding us back from snuffing it out at the other end - an end which we are all fast approaching. The moral reality is either all human life is sacred or none is, you can not pick and chose that spectrum of life which will be regarded as valuable and worth protecting and that which is expendable for other "good" reasons. Once you've embarked on a selective course, the human spirit has been mortally wounded and violence towards all life is unleashed. If you can legally justify killing little ones, you can legally justify killing old ones, infirmed ones, handicapped ones, malformed ones - all of course in the name of a greater good. This is the same fatal thinking that the Nazi's fell too, and our end as a society and a nation will be no better should we violate the value of all human life.

 
20925 05/14/2009 at 06:52:52 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20926 05/14/2009 at 06:54:35 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20927 05/14/2009 at 07:15:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20928 05/14/2009 at 07:19:47 AM Self     I personally disagree with the proposed guidelines for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. I do not support the destruction of Embryonic Stem Cells, which are actually human lives, and therefore believe as a taxpayer my taxes should not go towards destroying innocent lives. Doing research on Adult Stem Cells is just as effective in treating patients, and much more ethical. We should go this route using Adult Stem Cells for research instead of destroying Embryonic Cells. I’m also concerned that these guidelines do not prevent possibility of cloning in the future, whether its humans or animals or a mixture of both (hybrids). I feel that this needs to be addressed and we need to ensure that this closing does NOT happen.

 
20929 05/14/2009 at 07:22:32 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20930 05/14/2009 at 07:26:13 AM Self     Do not use my tax dollars to support embryonic cell research that can be done with private funds. If it is truly beneficial then private money will be invested for a future profit.

Support the FairTax NOW to give the poor a chance and bring jobs back to the US !!!

 
20931 05/14/2009 at 07:31:12 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding.

Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20932 05/14/2009 at 07:33:48 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20933 05/14/2009 at 07:36:04 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern,

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please consider where legislation may lead. Destroying the life a person in an attempt to benefit another? And, this person does not have a voice, a choice? Using tax dollars that could be used to better research already proven results with adult stem cells would be the best choice.

Sincerely,

 
20934 05/14/2009 at 07:37:14 AM Self     It's bad enough that you have now allowed embryonic stem cell research when science has shown that the same can be obtained without embryonic cells, but DO NOT USE OUR TAX DOLLARS FOR THE ABORTIONS THAT ARE REQUIRED FOR THAT RESEARCH!

 
20935 05/14/2009 at 07:37:46 AM Self     I am a senior in South Florida and the sooner this bill is passed in comlete form the better off peop0le will be. It seems the diseases are worsening.

 
20936 05/14/2009 at 07:40:01 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
20937 05/14/2009 at 07:40:58 AM Self     As a parent of a child who has Type I diabetes I believe the science of stem cell research should be moved forward to save lives and mitigate the suffering of millions of people.

I also believe stem cell research could save billions of dollars in medical costs in the near future.

Sincerely,

 
20938 05/14/2009 at 07:42:20 AM Organization Missourri Cures St. Louis, Mo I have lost sevral family mambers because of Cancer, including my mother. If there is any chance of stem cell research helping to cure or slow the cancer, why would there even be a question about not allowing it. I see nothing but a good things happening from it. Studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes could provide information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated somatic cells generated from human embryonic stem cells.

 
20939 05/14/2009 at 07:43:18 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos.

 
20940 05/14/2009 at 07:43:38 AM Self     Life begins at conception. God's word is truth. Researcher's search for the truth, which constantly changes as they proceed with their research.

 
20941 05/14/2009 at 07:43:43 AM Self     As much as intentions of those wanting embiotic stem cell research seem to be for life giving opportunities, it is the distruction of a human life that is being used to do this. Please do not consider it but do consider stem cell reasearch without using embrios. It just goes beyond our nature as human beings to do this. We all started this way. Thankfully we were not used for embrionic stem cell research.

 
20942 05/14/2009 at 07:43:43 AM Self     I don't think human life should be taken for the purpose of research, even tiny little embryo lives. It's just a good principle to have. Please include something that prevents cloning and human animal mixes and weird experiments like the nazis did. They say adult stem cell research is the one that has shown promise in experiments. Please disntinguish between adult and embryo research in the legislation, and encourage and support the ethical one in all cases, don't let there be an attitude of "anything goes in the name of research".

 
20943 05/14/2009 at 07:44:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
20944 05/14/2009 at 07:44:47 AM Self     To the President of the United States:

Please DO NOT use taxpayers(my) money to kill embryos (human life) for research. Embryonic stem cells have not been proven to help or cure any type of disease or condition. Adult stem cells has proven to have many positive results. This nation is killing the young/ no wonder the social security and Medicare is running out of money - the United States is "killing off" their young. I am sorry that you see our future like that.

 
20945 05/14/2009 at 07:48:23 AM Organization Hadassah New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20946 05/14/2009 at 07:48:58 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
20947 05/14/2009 at 07:50:03 AM Self     I oppose using my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions. Rescind guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

 
20948 05/14/2009 at 07:50:59 AM Self Haddassah 50 West 58th Street; New York, N.Y. 10019

May 12, 2009

Ensure Strong Federal Support for Embryonic Stem Cell Research

As you know, President Barack Obama recently signed an Executive Order designed to reverse restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research that have been in place for the last eight years. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are now in the process of developing guidelines to implement the Order.

NIH has released its draft guidelines, and will be reviewing public comments on the draft over the next several weeks. So far, NIH has received far more comments opposed to stem cell research than in support. It is therefore critical that NIH hear from as many stem cell supporters as possible during the comment period.

While the draft guidelines would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics, as drafted, it is unclear whether current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlined and be eligible for federal funding.

Further, the draft does not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). SCNT is a very promising scientific technique for creating embryonic stem cells, yet opponents of SCNT mistakenly liken it to reproductive cloning. This comparison is completely false. The purpose of reproductive cloning is to create another human being; the purpose of SCNT is to create stem cells for research.

Embryonic stem cell research holds the promise to treat and potentially cure many devastating diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis – illnesses which affect over 100 million Americans.

As a world leader in stem cell research at our Goldyne Savad Institute of Gene Therapy in Israel and as a leading advocate for stem cell research in the United States, Hadassah has a special interest in ensuring that the NIH guidelines are crafted so to advance stem cell research as quickly as possible.

Action Needed: Submit the following comments to NIH:

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20949 05/14/2009 at 07:51:15 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
20950 05/14/2009 at 07:52:46 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page