Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

Browse Comments Beginning With:
Record ID:
Entry Date:
On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



|First 100 Records   Back 1000 Records   Back 100 Records   Records 19788 - 19887 of 49015 Forward 100 Records   Forward 1000 Records   Last 100 Records|

ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
19788 05/13/2009 at 11:05:27 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19789 05/13/2009 at 11:05:28 AM Self     I approve of the guidelines and am anxious for the ultimate cure of this terrible disease.

 
19790 05/13/2009 at 11:05:38 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning, the creation of human embryos for research purposes, or the destruction of "left-over" embryos created from the IVF process.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, proven effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Destroying one human being to supposedly treat another is a crime and should never be condoned or sanctioned in civil society.

 
19791 05/13/2009 at 11:05:45 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19792 05/13/2009 at 11:05:59 AM Self     I am appalled that, as a taxpayer, I will be forced to subsidize the destruction of innocent human life under the guise of "research." Tremendous break-throughs have been achieved using stem cells that do not destroy human life and have already proven highly successful. I would gladly support more research along these lines, but it is unconscionable to support human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Not only has embryo-destructive stem cell research been shown to be ineffective and dangerous (forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems), government support of such research is no different than the German/Nazi support of Dr. Mengele's hideous experiments. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. In short, there is absolutely no scientific or social value to be earned by funding controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. Nor will they prevent the "sale" of embryos by women in desperate straits. These loopholes must be closed immediately.

 
19793 05/13/2009 at 11:06:18 AM Organization Hadassah 50 W 58th Street New York, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19794 05/13/2009 at 11:06:53 AM Self     Please do not fund research that destroys life. We have already killed the lives of many that could have had the knowledge and wisdom to prevent the situation we find ourselves in now in America. How can God bless us when we are killing the created ones He would have help us.

 
19795 05/13/2009 at 11:07:23 AM Self Homemaker   I am totally against using my tax monies to fund human stem cell research I believe there are already other techniques that are proven to work without using human life stem cells to further the research. Please, as a person who loves babies and am very involved in humans lives as a mother and grandmother, youth leader and friend I am against using any of our hard earned money to end any human life. Please listen to those of us who are pleading to stop this kind of research. Thank you

 
19796 05/13/2009 at 11:09:11 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19797 05/13/2009 at 11:09:26 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

8340

 
19798 05/13/2009 at 11:09:36 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
19799 05/13/2009 at 11:10:03 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19800 05/13/2009 at 11:10:14 AM Organization Hadassah 50 W. 58th St. NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19801 05/13/2009 at 11:10:32 AM Organization Hadassah, Women's Zionist Organization of America NYC I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19802 05/13/2009 at 11:10:57 AM Self     I am OPPOSED to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems.

ADULT STEM CELLS are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients.

We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole MUST BE CLOSED IMMEDIATELY. This is dangerous and frightening.

 
19803 05/13/2009 at 11:10:58 AM Organization Hadassah 50 West 58th Street NY, NY applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19804 05/13/2009 at 11:11:05 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19805 05/13/2009 at 11:11:36 AM Self     I am very happy with President Obama's decision to lift the federal ban on funding for esc research. I cried when I heard. I have a son with Type I Diabetes and hope one day there will be a cure for Type I and many other diseases. Stem cell research may provide these cures. I am sorry President Obama stopped short of allowing federal funding for SCNT. This research is also crucial to understanding and possibly curing many diseases. I believe it is only a matter of time before SCNT will also be permitted with gov't. oversight, but how much time will it take? During the past eight years under the Bush guidelines/restrictions, imagine all the experiments that were not done; experiments that may have provided important clues, if not cures for diseases. I believe sound science will eventually overcome all political hurdles, but it is frustrating to wait while politicians debate.

 
19806 05/13/2009 at 11:11:38 AM Organization Hadassah Valley of the Sun Scottsdale, Az I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19807 05/13/2009 at 11:11:57 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19808 05/13/2009 at 11:12:00 AM Self     President Obama, Please do not allow stem cell research on human embryo's. New science shows adult stem cells are the ones with the most potential for research and possible healing properties. There is no reason to destroy human life. You to were once an embryo. I pray for the end to the destruction of life and your conversion on this matter.

 
19809 05/13/2009 at 11:12:05 AM Self     President Obama, We are disgusted and angered that you would use pre-born babies for experimentation! It has been proven time and time again that the use of Adult Stem Cells are successful, while the destructive use of embryo stems cells cause malignancies. This destructive path will not be rewarded. It is a crime for you to murder these individuals for your political advancement. Remember what happened to the Pharaoh when he hardened his heart to the Lord's demands that he respect Life. He was destroyed! Change this policy Mr. President and quickly, please! You are leading our America down the path to her destruction, I hope you don't want that.

 
19810 05/13/2009 at 11:12:17 AM Self     I am writing because I believe that life is sacred and that it must be valued and protected, especially the unborn who cannot protect themselves.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
19811 05/13/2009 at 11:12:27 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19812 05/13/2009 at 11:13:55 AM Self     Please-----this obsession over embryonic research has never yielded anything but moral failure & extreme "after affects" (tumors).

More effort & funding should be directed to the already succesful use of adult stem cells.

 
19813 05/13/2009 at 11:14:20 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19814 05/13/2009 at 11:14:39 AM       I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19815 05/13/2009 at 11:14:49 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19816 05/13/2009 at 11:15:02 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19817 05/13/2009 at 11:15:13 AM Self     Please do not allow embryonic stem cells to be used like laboratory rats for experimentation. Babies are still human babies even at the embryonic stage - they will grow only into human beings,not lab rats, frogs or any other species. I strongly oppose any funding for embryonic stem cell research. All the trials done overseas have yielded 10-70% tumors in animals and humans -not a single one has been successful or has produced medical applications. Our focus should be on adult stem cell research and iPS cells - which have 70 successful applications to date - all of our funding should be in this direction only -this is the future and is ethical. We should not be playing God with embryonic stem cell research or using it to justify the use of tiny babies. It is morally wrong and bankrupt in philosophy - we will become like the Nazi regime using humans as lab rats for whatever purpose. Let's not go down that horrible road. Let's go with the ethical and successful adult stem cell research only.

 
19818 05/13/2009 at 11:15:48 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes

 
19819 05/13/2009 at 11:17:33 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19820 05/13/2009 at 11:17:39 AM Self    

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19821 05/13/2009 at 11:17:41 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19822 05/13/2009 at 11:17:49 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19823 05/13/2009 at 11:17:54 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19824 05/13/2009 at 11:18:11 AM Organization HADASSAH   I support embryonic stem cell research.

 
19825 05/13/2009 at 11:18:12 AM Self     I am a professor who works in the area of proteomics and biomarker discovery as well as a parent of a 25 year old MD who has type 1 diabetes. I know full well the potential of stem cell research for developing the cure of many diseases including type 1 diabetes. I urge that all limitation be removed for stem cell research as soon as possible. Too long this country has been held hostage to the irrational views of a tiny minority of religious fanatics. In my view the current administration guideline did not go far enough in removing the restrictions.Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19826 05/13/2009 at 11:18:55 AM Self     I strongly oppose any form of embryonic stem cell research and ask my elected representatives to refuse to allow the continued murdering of the most innocent and vulnerable citizens of the United States of America! I am appalled that the NIH would refer to them as unneeded.

"...human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose."

Also, the statement that the stem cells are not themselves human embryos does not eliminate the reality that they are still a part of a real human being. My goodnes there would be instant outrage if someone someone suggested removing a part of a fully developed body and say that it was only a piece of a human body and therefore not really human? These stem cells as an individual component does not equate to a true human being, but the same can be said for any single cell or specific body part or organ. A heart alone can't survive. An arm won't grow or mature without being attached to the blood and oxygen that are supplied by the veins. The same for these babies. They are undeveloped but still viable.

Furthermore, to my knowledge, there has not been any actual medical discoveries using the embryonic stem cell method. However, there has been many studies using adult stem cell research that have had promising results. Therefore, why kill innocent lives and waste tax payers dollars on unproven scientific methods.

 
19827 05/13/2009 at 11:18:57 AM Self     Comment Text (please copy and paste into Comments section)

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19828 05/13/2009 at 11:19:17 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19829 05/13/2009 at 11:19:36 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me and other taxpayers to fund research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
19830 05/13/2009 at 11:19:46 AM Self Susan B. Anthony   PLEASE DO NOT USE MY TAX DOLLARS FOR FUNDING EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH.

 
19831 05/13/2009 at 11:20:19 AM Self     As a U.S. taxpayer, I am outraged and I strongly oppose your draft guidelines which will force me to subsidize embryonic stem cell research which will destroy and alter innocent human life!

Support should be directed for stem cell research and treatments which have been proven NOT to destroy human life and have been effective! In fact, ADULT stem cell research is not destructive, non-controversial, ethical and EFFECTIVE in treating patients.

This proposed program must be stopped. There is a loophole which must be closed so that it cannot lead to future cloning or experienments with making human/animal hybrids, etc.

Stand up for your beliefs, stand up for your morals, and stand up for protecting innocent human life! Please!

 
19832 05/13/2009 at 11:22:21 AM Organization St. Lawrence O'Toole Catholic Church prospect st. brewster ny. 10509 Embryo stem cell tampering is altering the 1st stages of actual human life(a actual human being!). This is not a glob of mucus or spit, it is not some collection of living cell parts like the nuts and bolts you have at your work bench at home...that are left-overs from previous items....This is the "marriage" of a human male sperm and a female egg that in itself is now in the process of being a true human being in its initial stage. KILLING any human embryo for its stem cells is KILLING the entire process of its progress to continue its next stages in becoming aliving/breathing/loving human being ....exactly like YOU and ME.........we were both exactly here at our initial stage of our lives. Think about it....NO REALLY.....KNIHT !

 
19833 05/13/2009 at 11:23:16 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19834 05/13/2009 at 11:23:16 AM Self     I am strongly opposed to the draft guidelines supporting embryonic stem cell reserach, which forces me as a taxpayer, to subsidize research requring the killing of innocent human life.

Why not focus on adult stem cell which is ethical and effective in treatment? Further, I've read that the proposed regulations could allow for future creation of clone or human-animal hybrids. Please close this loophole as soon as possible.

Thank you for you time,

 
19835 05/13/2009 at 11:23:44 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of=2 0type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19836 05/13/2009 at 11:24:20 AM Self     To NIH:

There is no proven fact that stem cells from other parts of the body will not do the same job that embryonic stem cells will do. And searching for or obtaining embryos by abortion will not give a perfect answer for our illnesses and diseases. Please consider these comments as pro-life - which is what our country is in dire need of - not against life, especially of new life in a mother's womb.

 
19837 05/13/2009 at 11:25:43 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19838 05/13/2009 at 11:26:14 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19839 05/13/2009 at 11:26:17 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19840 05/13/2009 at 11:26:38 AM Self     I do not agree with embryonic stem cell research. The killing of innocent lives is an abomination. Why do we continue this type of research if it has proved nothing. By using adult stem cells has been proven to get better results then that of embryos. I am a christian and I do not believe that using my tax dollars to fund this abomination should continue. don't call yourself a christian soul! You are willing to allow death of innocent babies and that is not what God our savior wanted us to so.

 
19841 05/13/2009 at 11:26:46 AM Self     I am against the destruction of life, and against the requirement for taxpayers to fund that.

 
19842 05/13/2009 at 11:26:55 AM       Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19843 05/13/2009 at 11:27:05 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

President Obama has wagged his finger at individuals whom he claims are pushing their ideologies on the nation. His move to increase funding for embryonic stem cell research while simultaneously removing funding for all other types (i.e. adult SCR and umbilical cord SCR, etc. which are the only forms that have produced results)is a strategic one forcing his own ideology on the nation, one that is entirely unethical for a variety of reasons. Firstly, it destroys human life for utilitarian purposes, which is never acceptable, regardless of the end trying to be achieved. Secondly, it defies all common sense by thwarting the only area of stem cell research (i.e. adult and umbilical cord SCR) which has successfully treated over 70 maladies and promises even more success. How can our President and our government justify such a move to those suffering from debilitating conditions who would benefit from such research? Neither the destruction of lives on the one hand nor misuse of funds on the other can be justified. Such an offense is unacceptable. In the name of human reason and dignity, please put an end to this grievous error.

Sincerely,

 
19844 05/13/2009 at 11:27:29 AM Self     To start with, abortion should not be allowed, it is murder. Then you take the unborn baby, yes I said baby, and use it for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I am for stem cell research but not from the destruction of human life.

 
19845 05/13/2009 at 11:27:47 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19846 05/13/2009 at 11:28:25 AM Self     Stem cells derived from human embryos should not be used, since embryos are human beings and should not be killed.

 
19847 05/13/2009 at 11:29:19 AM Organization Hadassah Atlanta, Georgia I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19848 05/13/2009 at 11:29:25 AM Self     Myself ( ***** ) and my 7 yr old both have type 1 diabetes. I have had it for 29 yrs and have both neuropathy and retinopathy, among other complications. My 7 yr old has had diabetes for 2 yrs now and what really bothers me is the fact that in many years of research very little has been done to finding a cure, however a lot has been done to making life w/diabetes easier. Now we have a real opportunity to cure this disease, and others, so stop holding back the researchers from using embryonic cells, which would otherwise be discarded, to good use. All this talk about our healthcare I don’t believe and I am normally not a conspiracy theorist person, but my TRUE THOUGHTS are that too many people are against a cure for the typically true reason of GREED. The same way the mortgage industry was about shady lending $$$$ signs. Doctors, Pharmacies and the pharmaceutical companies which get paid a very high amount of money because of all the medications, blood work, and doctors visit a diabetic must endure in a lifetime. Let’s make a true effort to cure this disease and others for our children and the many who suffer from day to day with a debilitating illness. For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner

 
19849 05/13/2009 at 11:29:35 AM Self     There is no need to use embryonic stem cells. It has been shown that adult stem cells are at least as effective or better. People want to use babies because they can then say that abortion is for a good purpose. THINK! Let's investigate adult stem cells further.

 
19850 05/13/2009 at 11:29:44 AM Self     I am strictly against stem cell research from babies. It is murder of a defenseless person. It has been proven that there is not any benefit to baby stem cell research but rather adult stem cell is more effective and beneficial. Research these statements and quit killing babies.

 
19851 05/13/2009 at 11:29:51 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
19852 05/13/2009 at 11:30:16 AM Self     I AM OPPOSED TO THIS; SR. CITIZEN ON FIXED INCOME, CANNOT AFFORD THIS EXPENDITURE.

 
19853 05/13/2009 at 11:30:31 AM Self     As a citizen of the United States who votes at each city, state and Federal election, I am apposed to your guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do NOT destroy and are already proven successful. ADULT stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and are EFFECTIVE in treating patients. Why should we fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options? My husband and I pray daily that you will stop this terrible experimentation.

 
19854 05/13/2009 at 11:30:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19855 05/13/2009 at 11:31:41 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson's community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

 
19856 05/13/2009 at 11:32:24 AM Self     Dear Sirs:

Please know that I am absolutely opposed to embryonic stem cell research. I believe that human life begins at conception. I don't want any small lives destroyed, let alone destroyed for "research" that is funded by taxes that I help pay.

Moreover, adult stem cell research has already been proven to be effective. It is logical to use stem cell's generated from a patient to treat that patient. It is illogical to use stem cells from embryos. Stem-cells generated from embryos would be recognized as "foreign" by the host patient and that patient would have to take anti-rejection medicine for the rest of his/her life. Why spend money on something that is only a half-way cure when there is something already available that can be a total cure?

To reiterate, I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

Thank you for taking the time to read my comments.

Sincerely,

 
19857 05/13/2009 at 11:32:33 AM Self     Stem cell research can save many lives and positively impact patients and their families with many diseases including type I diabetes ,other auto-immune diseases,cancers, etc. why not promote it?

 
19858 05/13/2009 at 11:32:35 AM Organization HDASSAH NEW YORK, NEW YORK DEAR PRESIDENT OBAMA and all Our Other Honored Elected Officials:

It is now with an urgent plea that I ask you to afirm and authorize the continuation of stem cell research in our great nation!

With scientists here and abroad who have the capacity in experience, education and the ability to do advanced research in stem cell research, they will find answers to the many questions about disease, longevity,our immune system and good health and much, much more that we all need to share with humankind.

I applaud your ethical and forward looking vision for our country that includes sharing knowledge and cooperating with the rest of the world through negotiation to gain world peace.

Let's keep the doors open to scientific knowledge through stem cell research for better health and prosperity for our nation!

Regards and respectfully submitted, *****, Atheist-Humanist

 
19859 05/13/2009 at 11:32:52 AM Self     As a retired sr. citizen on a very fixed income, cannot afford this expense.

 
19860 05/13/2009 at 11:32:56 AM Self     According to science, a human embryo is everything that a human being will ever become. Therefore, to create and destroy one, however well-meaning, is murder. The government of the United States of America should be prohibiting such behavior, not permitting it, and even forcing every taxpayer to fund it.

 
19861 05/13/2009 at 11:32:57 AM Organization Hadassah The Women's Zionist Organization of America, Inc. 50 W58th St. New York, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19862 05/13/2009 at 11:34:09 AM Self     I am absolutely opposed for philosophical, moral and religious reasons to the proposed draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. Purposefully destroying human life for medical research is wrong. It has also been shown to be ineffective in this instance.

I am also opposed to your draft guidelines because they force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

For the reasons cited above, I ask that the proposed guidelines not be approved and that American taxpayers not be required to fund medical research they believe is inherently wrong and unethical.

 
19863 05/13/2009 at 11:34:13 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19864 05/13/2009 at 11:34:14 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19865 05/13/2009 at 11:34:24 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19866 05/13/2009 at 11:34:35 AM Self     The case is pretty simple you guys: Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

This is not a difficult concept. This is not a complicated issue. We can choose life or death.

Adult stem cells do the same job, and by using them we're not murdering. (um...isn't that illegal? If I were to murder my 2 year old, you might have something to say about it right? So why should it be different for my kid if he's younger? Think about it).

America gives tons of money to other countries to support their developing from Thirld-World status to Second or First. Now, if we're willing to fund AIDS prevention in Africa to support LIFE there, we should be willing to vote for LIFE on our own ground.

That is, if we want America to continue as a world superpower. Now here's the deal: if we continue on the track our current President (and others for years) have put us on, we will continue promoting the DESTRUCTION of American lives.

I know patriotism is not a requirement to get elected, but if we keep killing the youth of America by allowing the free use of human embryos as scientific guinea pigs (in addition to our current rate of 158 abortions per HOUR), America will cease to exist in a very short time. We're on a path to self-destruct if we continue killing our kids.

This executive order is one piece of a larger picture. We can choose life or we can choose death. Our President is obviously choosing death. Now, what's your choice?

 
19867 05/13/2009 at 11:34:46 AM Self     Life begins at conception. There is no reason to KILL human babies for research. It is inhuman! There is also no proof that human stem cells harvested from embryos helped anybody. ADULT human stem cells worked in several instances. Look more into that. It saves lifes at any age.

 
19868 05/13/2009 at 11:35:03 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19869 05/13/2009 at 11:35:11 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19870 05/13/2009 at 11:35:18 AM Self Hadassah   Dear Sir/Ma'am, I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19871 05/13/2009 at 11:36:13 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19872 05/13/2009 at 11:36:46 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19873 05/13/2009 at 11:36:49 AM Self     When is it permissable to destroy human life?? Age 65 [ no longer productive ]How about age 12 [ before puberty ]1 day old [ partial birth abortion ]1st trimester , 2nd trimester [ most abortions performed ].......oh , it's only a FETUS not a baby.............How about 1 minute after conception............??? DON'T YOU PEOPLE UNDERSTAND ?? IT IS STILL HUMAN LIFE!!!!!!!!!

 
19874 05/13/2009 at 11:37:10 AM Self    

May 12, 2009

Ensure Strong Federal Support for Embryonic Stem Cell Research

As you know, President Barack Obama recently signed an Executive Order designed to reverse restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research that have been in place for the last eight years. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are now in the process of developing guidelines to implement the Order.

NIH has released its draft guidelines, and will be reviewing public comments on the draft over the next several weeks. So far, NIH has received far more comments opposed to stem cell research than in support. It is therefore critical that NIH hear from as many stem cell supporters as possible during the comment period.

While the draft guidelines would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics, as drafted, it is unclear whether current stem cell lines will meet the criteria outlined and be eligible for federal funding.

Further, the draft does not permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). SCNT is a very promising scientific technique for creating embryonic stem cells, yet opponents of SCNT mistakenly liken it to reproductive cloning. This comparison is completely false. The purpose of reproductive cloning is to create another human being; the purpose of SCNT is to create stem cells for research.

Embryonic stem cell research holds the promise to treat and potentially cure many devastating diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis – illnesses which affect over 100 million Americans.

As a world leader in stem cell research at our Goldyne Savad Institute of Gene Therapy in Israel and as a leading advocate for stem cell research in the United States, Hadassah has a special interest in ensuring that the NIH guidelines are crafted so to advance stem cell research as quickly as possible.

Action Needed: Submit the following comments to NIH:

I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19875 05/13/2009 at 11:38:16 AM Organization Hadassah 58 West 58th Street, NY, NY I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19876 05/13/2009 at 11:38:23 AM Self     Research on living human embryos is immoral and unethical, and should be prohibited by law, not encouraged by government funding.

 
19877 05/13/2009 at 11:38:26 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

*Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

*The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19878 05/13/2009 at 11:38:48 AM Self     Please take out of the document the following wording: "These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose."

Please stand up and protect these young American citizens from murder.

 
19879 05/13/2009 at 11:39:57 AM Self     I urge the use of embryonic stem cell research in which the embryos would be destroyed anyway for research for curing and giving a new life to people with type 1 diabetes. My son is 8 and has endured 6 years of this complicated always changing disease. Yesterday we just found out his thyroid is no longer functioning due to complications of the diabetes. We never know what it will effect next. Why "throw away" this priceless source of scientific resource when it can possibly be the cure and end the suffering of our precious children...Sincerely

 
19880 05/13/2009 at 11:40:04 AM Self     I am opposed to using embryonic stem cells for reserch. Adult stem cells are noncontroversial,ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Whereas, emmbryonic stem cells can be dangerous, forming oncontrolable tumors and causing rejection problems.

I do not want my tax dollars used for such risky research.

 
19881 05/13/2009 at 11:40:05 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

 
19882 05/13/2009 at 11:40:10 AM Self     Over the last 4 years, both myself and 10 yr old daughter have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19883 05/13/2009 at 11:40:27 AM Self     On behalf of the American people, please do not force us to participate in the willful destruction of human life as a means to justify research that has been nothing but inconclusive, dangerous and fruitless.

Adult stem cell research is far more promising and we don't have to compromise our moral integrity as a nation to fund it.

Let's hold ourselves to a higher standard than Nazis who also experimented on humans. Do not drag unwilling participants into these sick experiments.

Thank you.

 
19884 05/13/2009 at 11:40:34 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

-NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos is prohibited by the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. According to these Guidelines, there are some uses of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells that, although those cells may come from allowable sources, are nevertheless ineligible for NIH funding. Let's keep this Act in place and protect those that can't defend themselves.

 
19885 05/13/2009 at 11:41:29 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you

 
19886 05/13/2009 at 11:41:48 AM Organization Hadassah 50 West 58th Street, NY, NY 10019 I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19887 05/13/2009 at 11:42:19 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page