Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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19686 05/13/2009 at 10:22:30 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19687 05/13/2009 at 10:22:30 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

About JDRF | Email: advocacy@jdrf.org Forward to a Friend | Unsubscribe | Update Profile

For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done!

As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

About JDRF | Email: advocacy@jdrf.org Forward to a Friend | Unsubscribe | Update Profile For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recentresearch suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19688 05/13/2009 at 10:22:58 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if y

 
19689 05/13/2009 at 10:23:12 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19690 05/13/2009 at 10:25:26 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19691 05/13/2009 at 10:26:02 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19692 05/13/2009 at 10:26:11 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19693 05/13/2009 at 10:27:38 AM Self     Please fund research on adult stem cells rather than embryonic stem cells. Our Declaration of Independence acknowledges every human's right to "life." No scientist should knowingly destroy a human life, even in its embryonic stages.

Adult stem cell research has resulted in amazing treatments for heart disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and more. Let's use our resources to amp up this research which has already proven so effective.

 
19694 05/13/2009 at 10:28:23 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19695 05/13/2009 at 10:28:54 AM Self     I find it disgusting to even consider my tax dollars could be spent on research I find so wrong in my moral core.

 
19696 05/13/2009 at 10:29:40 AM Self     We strongly oppose Stem Cell research & all funding of it. Thank you!

 
19697 05/13/2009 at 10:29:53 AM Self     I do not want my tax dollars paying for any procedure that takes or prevents a human life.

 
19698 05/13/2009 at 10:30:19 AM Self     Many Americans including myself are opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. Experts insist that embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous. While it has been demonstrated that research with adult stem cells is, in fact, effective.

This proposed legislation has been touted as freeing scientific research from the constraints of morality or religion. Nonsense. Neither religion nor morality has ever prevented the progress of true science, nor has true science ever threatened the foundations of true religion and morality. Please study more before acting.

 
19699 05/13/2009 at 10:30:27 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19700 05/13/2009 at 10:30:28 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19701 05/13/2009 at 10:30:40 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Thanks!

 
19702 05/13/2009 at 10:30:52 AM Self     Although I am glad to read that there are no plans to create embroys to use for research, I am against all use of embryos for research purposes. Whether or not this person is going to be birthed, it is still a human being and must not be destroyed for educational purposes. It continues to amaze me that rationalizations can always be made to do wrong. The use of adult stem cells has yielded mammoth potential to stop/change outcomes of diseases. This is not true with the experiments done on embryonic stem cells. To continue along this path will lead to broadening the use of emryonic stem cells and I believe eventually to the creating of life to be destroyed in the name of research.

 
19703 05/13/2009 at 10:30:57 AM Self     The NIH guidelines are well developed and will increase the research on ESC in the United States. I would encourage the NIH to also include the ESC which are eligible for federal funding and bank them in a government funded or organized institution.

 
19704 05/13/2009 at 10:31:08 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is necessary if we want to save lives. This includes the creation of new cell lines from different sources. Consider this: if cancer researchers were limited to only a handful of cell lines, many of the advances we have made in cancer therapy would not be available. However, all such research must meet the ethical guidelines that are set up, or risk compromising the results. NIH needs to take a strong stand not only to promote stem cell research and the creation of new cell lines, but also provide guidance to those lawmakers who are drafting the guidelines.

 
19705 05/13/2009 at 10:31:17 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to genetic diseases including type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for many gentically inhereted diseases including type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes, among others. It is clear that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19706 05/13/2009 at 10:31:49 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19707 05/13/2009 at 10:32:03 AM Self     I am opposed to using tax-dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research. Just because Obama changed the regulations, you don’t have to fund it in the federal budget.

 
19708 05/13/2009 at 10:32:06 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requirng the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and have already proven successful. Government support should not be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has proven to be ineffective, and dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems.Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and effective in treating patients. We should not fund research that destroys human life. Other options are available and proven effective. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding of embryonic stem research that could lead to the creation of clones and human animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19709 05/13/2009 at 10:32:21 AM Self     My comment is short. Please consider the common sense aspect of the debate between Adult Stem Cell research and Embryo stem cells, which take a human life. It IS life you must consider, not a lab experiment. I urge you to put this idea of using embryonic stem cells for research out of the question and to put into use what you know actually works and has promise for the future. For Life…

 
19710 05/13/2009 at 10:32:45 AM Self     I am opposed to these draft guidelines because they force taxpayers to subsidize ineffective and ethically unsound embryonic stem cell research. This research destroys innocent life, and it has not proven to be at all effective in treating diseases or injuries. On the contrary, it has caused tumors and rejection problems. Adult stem cell research is effective as well as uncontroversial and ethical, so we should fund this instead. Furthermore, the proposed guidelines do not prevent funding that could someday go to human cloning and human-animal hybridization research. This loophole should be closed immediately.

 
19711 05/13/2009 at 10:32:46 AM Self     As soon as an egg and sperm unite and begin multiplying, medical science tells us we have life, a new life, distinct from any other. Life proceeds according to a prescribed plan unless nature causes a spontaneous abortion. As science discovers more and more about the life process we should not lose sight of the life process and its original purpose - the reproduction of the human race. We have seen what happens when we destroy our environment for our pleasure - we lose respect for the wonderful gifts of nature - rivers, oceans, trees, etc. Our society is losing respect for all life by the abortion of babies because they are inconvenient at this time; created to fix something in another person when adult stem cells offer the best solution to research and eventual cure of disease. Let's protect all life and show it the proper respect. I am against embryonic stem cell research and in vitro fertilization for this purpose.

 
19712 05/13/2009 at 10:33:16 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19713 05/13/2009 at 10:34:14 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19714 05/13/2009 at 10:35:45 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19715 05/13/2009 at 10:35:52 AM Self     Dear Legislators, In-vitro fertilization as a means to creation of embryoes is often followed by testing corpus luteum-destroying abortifacients. Embryological stem-cell research has a close accomplice in destruction of preborn children, also eugenics research. Look back in history, and see how Nazi Germany did similar tests which denied morality in order to attempt scientific advance. American scientists and legislators will end in a similar manner unless they fear God, and his plan for the human family.

Why not do presex, premarriage diagnosis and encourage those with at-risk traits to remain abstinent? Or else, trust in God and accept whichever child He chooses to send.

Money-hungry, morally dubious medical professionals “flock around the new technology [and newly aborted babies] like vultures around a ripe carcass (Facts of Life, HLA 258).”

For your reading I suggest you look up Archbishop Nienstadt's book "Human Life in a Test-tube; the Moral Dimension of In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer," lest you disregard the least among us and end up in a bad place (see Mt 24:37)

In Christ, ***** St. Mary's of MN Graduate, Environmental Biology

 
19716 05/13/2009 at 10:36:17 AM Self     Adult stem-cell research has been used successfully now for some time. I do not see the need to use tax dollars to subsidize research requiring the destruction of an innocent human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem-cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. I believe in the sanctity of human life. We as human beings created in God's image should always care for one another and NEVER kill.

 
19717 05/13/2009 at 10:36:35 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19718 05/13/2009 at 10:36:35 AM Self     Since our new Sec. of Health has a proven track record of NOT defending life, giving her office the power over stem cell research is tragic. It has been proven that embyronic stem cells are not successful. This is a simple desire to play God. And, will result in aberrant results.

 
19719 05/13/2009 at 10:37:35 AM Self     I am against my money being used for the embryonic stem cell research.

 
19720 05/13/2009 at 10:38:03 AM Self     I believe that embryonic stem cell research is immoral as it requires dismembering another person who is only the early stages of physical develolpment.

 
19721 05/13/2009 at 10:39:57 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19722 05/13/2009 at 10:40:36 AM Organization JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19723 05/13/2009 at 10:41:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19724 05/13/2009 at 10:41:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19725 05/13/2009 at 10:42:00 AM Self     I am deeply opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. Alternative methods using stem cells derived from adult tissue are safe, effective, and ethical. Please do not allow human embryos to be destroyed for the purpose of medical research.

 
19726 05/13/2009 at 10:42:30 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19727 05/13/2009 at 10:43:01 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19728 05/13/2009 at 10:44:21 AM Self     Mr. Obama, please do not fund stem cell reasearch that destroys human life. God will hold you and our country accountable for these actions.

 
19729 05/13/2009 at 10:45:34 AM Self     It seems as though common sense is not so common anymore. Embryonic stem cell research has proven to be ineffective, often causing tumors and other problems. This is what we (taxpayers)are funding? If the government must give taxpayers' hard-earned money to research, why must it be to ethically controversial and ineffective practices like ebryonic stem cell research, especially when adult stem cell research has been extrodinarily promising and successful.

Cloning? Creating human life for the sole purpose of research? Human-animal hybrids? What guarantee is there that these practices won't take place?

When bringing this point up in the past, I've been told that the Iraq war is controversial as well, and taxpayers have to pay for that too. Well yes, I believe Bush made a mistake with the Iraq war. That doesn't justify another adminstration to make another mistake. It's time our polititians make decisions based on common sense, and not politics.

 
19730 05/13/2009 at 10:46:11 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19731 05/13/2009 at 10:46:23 AM Self     Please help us to cure diabetes 1. Help us by giving federal

fund to do stem cell research.

 
19732 05/13/2009 at 10:46:32 AM Self     We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force us as taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. We must have regard for the sanctity of human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
19733 05/13/2009 at 10:46:35 AM Self     It is not right or just to kill one innocent human being for the benefit of another. Please promote adult stem cell research and forget about embryonic stem cell research. Thank you.

 
19734 05/13/2009 at 10:46:38 AM Self     Tax funding of stem cell research should be used only for adult stem cell research because it is ethical & effective. Embryonic stem cell research kills embryos & is not effective anyway. To my knowledge, all the progress has been with adult stem cells. I believe that the government owes it to the taxpayers to refrain from using tax money to destroy human life. The government should not be using tax money for an unproven enterprise. Tax money for embryonic stem cell research is a waste of life and money.

 
19735 05/13/2009 at 10:47:11 AM Self     I don't think it's appropriate to allow Federal money to go towards funding research that uses embryos that are created just to be destroyed.

 
19736 05/13/2009 at 10:48:33 AM Self     There is no way we should be subsidizing embryonic stem cell research with taxpayer dollars. ADULT stem cells are successfully treating or even curing well over seventy medical conditions. Embryonic stem cells are growing tumors. There has yet to be a single success using them in humans. In such areas as diabetes, where neither has worked yet, the adult cells show considerably more promise. One of the reasons embryonic stem cell researchers are so anxious for government funding is that private investors care about seeing some progress made with their money. The only other reason for re-directing money from what works to what does not is the desire to at last make abortion look like something positive and to reinforce the view of the pre-born as inert material to be disposed of solely for the benefit of another. Even if there were no ethical problem with embryonic stem cell treatment, it does not work. Even if it worked, it would be inexcusable to kill one human being - unique, living, and irreplaceable - to help another. Organ transplants work, but we do not kill one adult or child to save another. Further, it is wrong to use the tax dollars of all to finance what so many abhor. Thank you.

 
19737 05/13/2009 at 10:48:50 AM Self     There is absolutely no sense or reason to force the United States Citizens to pay for embryonic stem cell research when that research has been in effect for many years in the private sector and not a single cure has resulted from it, whereas the skin cell research and adult stem-cell research already in effect as well has brought about many cures. The human embryo contains all the dna needed to produce a unique person. Humans do not give birth to tomatoes or cockatoos. The human embryo is a human being endowed by our government with inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Destroying a human embryo is premeditated murder of a complete innocent. I do not want my tax dollars to fund it.

 
19738 05/13/2009 at 10:48:58 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19739 05/13/2009 at 10:49:21 AM Self     Human embryo stem cell research is a risky business with various side effects. Since adult stem cell research lacks these side effects, is effective, and even less costly, put our tax money there. Further, this human embryo research could result in human cloning and other human variants with a potential for great problems. Finally, such destruction of human life is forbidden by natural law. Every time we humans violate the natural law grave consequences occur.

 
19740 05/13/2009 at 10:49:25 AM Self     It is important to support stem cell research and allow government funding for research involving adult and embryonic stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells.

Stem cells are very likely to become a major life-saving medical treatment for a broad range of human diseases. This research is vitally important.

 
19741 05/13/2009 at 10:49:59 AM Self     I opposeyour draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Please support research that does not destroy human life. Do not allow human cloning or creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Thank you,

 
19742 05/13/2009 at 10:50:01 AM Self     For many Americans and Canadians with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19743 05/13/2009 at 10:51:51 AM Self     Dear President Obama:

Please stop spending our tax dollars on human embryonic stem cell research. I don't understand why our government is not pursuing adult stem cell research when it has proven to be successful. Human embronic stem cell research has not proven to be successful.

There is no reason to destroy human life. Every life is sacred as it is ordained by our Creator. Each embryo has the God-given RIGHT to grow and develop throughout all of the stages of life. Pope John Paul II said, "A nation that kills ITS OWN CHILDREN is a nation without HOPE."

I hope and pray our country stands up for life. We will all be judged on how we protected the most vulnerable.

Respectfully,

 
19744 05/13/2009 at 10:51:58 AM Self     I had an abortion 31 years ago and regret it. I would not have had one if it had been illegal. Now that I can actually SEE what an unborn child looks like in the womb, I am totally against anything that would endanger his/her life. Although I did not write these comments, I support them wholeheartedly. -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19745 05/13/2009 at 10:52:00 AM Self     PLEASE do not kill innonce children by using FETAL embryonic stem cells for research!

 
19746 05/13/2009 at 10:52:48 AM Self     Pres.Obama is the most pro-abortion/anti-life Pres. we've had in my time. First re-instating the "Mexico City Policy, killing babies around the world with our tax dollars,then voicing his determination to re-instate DX(Partial-birth abortions),and now this!May God save us!But I fear the Creator of all life may lift his hand of protection(or already has) from this nation that was founded on His word, and the principles thereof.

 
19747 05/13/2009 at 10:53:03 AM Self     I am finding it very difficult to believe that the intelligence pushing stem cell research, more specifically embryo research, is at an all time low. It makes us (The People) wonder who running the show anyways? (Dumb or Dumber?)

Research, and the CURES!, shows that embryonic stem cells are absolutely not working but that stem cells from the "adult owners" body does. 85+ cures. It's not taking rocket science to figure this one out.

That should be good news to a President who treasures his children... I mean, to know that he's not wasting the lives of someone elses on a going-nowhere science project. Let's just stop killing the babies anyway, we'd all be better off. Let's find a way to raise our own, not kill them. Let's not fund this atrocity.

 
19748 05/13/2009 at 10:53:43 AM Self     I do not appreciated my tax fund dollars being allocated for stem cell research..it is an abomination to God.

 
19749 05/13/2009 at 10:53:59 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19750 05/13/2009 at 10:54:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19751 05/13/2009 at 10:54:38 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19752 05/13/2009 at 10:54:53 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19753 05/13/2009 at 10:55:02 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner. Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org. Thank you! JDRF Government Relations Additional Background: In March President Obama signed an Executive Order, which lifted previous federal funding restrictions on stem cell research. Although this action was a great victory for those of us in search of a cure for type 1 diabetes, our job is not done! As part of the Executive Order, President Obama instructed the NIH to issue guidelines governing this research. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here. The draft guidelines would permit federal funding for research using stem cells derived from embryos created by in-vitro fertilization and no longer needed for reproductive purposes. The draft guidelines also would ensure that embryos utilized for embryonic stem cell research were donated under the highest ethical standards. While JDRF supports these guidelines, we would encourage the NIH to extend funding eligibility to currently-funded stem cell lines and existing lines that were derived according to prevailing ethical guidelines.

 
19754 05/13/2009 at 10:55:14 AM Self     Dear Sir: I am strongly opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Executive orders should not be used at a mere whim to promote personal agendas or to appease small financial groups.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming unknown tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. This would set a dangerous precedence for research.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19755 05/13/2009 at 10:55:16 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19756 05/13/2009 at 10:55:32 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19757 05/13/2009 at 10:55:48 AM Self     If we want to find the cure to many diseases that plague mankind, stem cell research is vital. It is the future towards a healthier world.

 
19758 05/13/2009 at 10:55:55 AM Self     -I am opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes, but neither is it ethically acceptable to conduct research on embryonic stem cells derived from human embryos whose innocent lives were destroyed. Such research is unethical even if the embryos were fertilized solely for reproductive purposes, for the destruction of innocent human life is intrinsically immoral. And even if the "derivation" of stem cells from embryos was not funded, it is still immoral to become accessory by funding subsequent research.

-Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not sufficiently prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. The current wording is too vague. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19759 05/13/2009 at 10:57:11 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19760 05/13/2009 at 10:57:45 AM Self     Please reconsider the decision to fund embryonic stem cell research with my tax dollars. I have a problem with my money going to something that I am personally and spiritually opposed to. There is more research that supports the success of adult stem cells than embryonic stem cells. I would rather support that kind of research than the research that will destroy human life.

 
19761 05/13/2009 at 10:57:46 AM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research (ESCR). Besides the fact that ESCR requires the destruction of innocent human life, ESCR has been found to be ineffective and dangerous, resulting in tumors and rejection problems. It is preferable to allocate taxpayers' money to research and treatments that do not destroy human life and which have already been proven successful.

Adult stem cells have been effective in treating over seventy diseases with recorded cures for thousands of individuals. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients.

 
19762 05/13/2009 at 10:57:55 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19763 05/13/2009 at 10:58:12 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19764 05/13/2009 at 10:58:25 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19765 05/13/2009 at 10:58:33 AM Self     While opening up the use of embryonic stem cells for research purposes sounds like a good idea due to the increased availability of these cells, the truth is it opens the door for increased over-production of IVF designated embryos with the underlying purpose of creating availability of more embryos for research. This can result in greater risk to IVF related pregnancies, and unnecessary loss of human life. While the stem cells are not themselves embryos, the process of obtaining the stem cells destroys the embryo so the result is the same. This process of obtaining stem cells for research results in the loss of human life. Finally, research conducted since 2001 has demonstrated significantly successful research can be performed using adult stem cells in lieu of embryonic stem cell research. The risk to mothers struggling with fertility, the significant lack of improved results in their use, and most importantly, the definite loss of human life that results in obtaining them is sufficient cause to refrain from the use of embryonic stem cells for research. Please refrain from this type of research and save lives now in lieu of killing conceived children to conduct research that is fully capable of being conducted by non-destructive means. Thank you and may God bless you for making the right choice.

 
19766 05/13/2009 at 10:58:35 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19767 05/13/2009 at 10:58:50 AM Self     I would like to make it clear that I deeply opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

It matters not what personal beliefs or race or creed that one follows. What matters is the right for the unborn who have no say wheather they live or die. I'm ashamed of this new administrations double standards. Those who shout out free choice are hypocrites-What about the innocent childs free choice? oh they can't choose for themselves because they are killed before they can speak. Shame on all of you.

 
19768 05/13/2009 at 10:58:51 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
19769 05/13/2009 at 10:59:32 AM Self     I am greatly opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I oppose them as a taxpayer and as a human being with a conscience. We must protect all life, born and unborn. This research is too contraversial and destroys human life. These proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. It must be stopped immediately.

 
19770 05/13/2009 at 10:59:41 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
19771 05/13/2009 at 10:59:46 AM Self     I am dishearteded by the executive order that uses my hard earned tax dollars to belittle the sanctity of human life by using newly concieved children to help those already out of the womb; It has been proven (last paragraph, 'supplemental information)that existing technologies can be used for the same ends, and no such 'exec order' was needed; The values this country was founded on are becoming more and more clouded, and the fog is soon to be unbearable; where have "Life, Liberty, & the Pursuit of Happiness" gone? It seems as if our President has foregone the 'Life' part, & is working strenously on eliminating the 'Liberty' part as well.

 
19772 05/13/2009 at 11:00:02 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19773 05/13/2009 at 11:00:11 AM Self JDRF San Diego Ca For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19774 05/13/2009 at 11:00:32 AM Self     I can't believe that our government is going to make monies avaiable for embryonic stem cell research. First of all, this research is not illegal, and in many states, is already being carried out. Secondly, there has been, up to this time, no instance where embryonic stem cells have registered any success in medical usage. Thirdly, skin stem cells, and adult stem cells, have been proven to be very successful, and would be a far better use of tax funds for further research. In addition, this type of research, which has already a proven success record, is not tainted by the moral issues involved in the use of embryonic cells. Whether anyone in the Government believes that life begins at conception, the whole argument of when life begins would cease to be a factor if only those stem cells with already proven success were deemed eligible for Federal funds. I find it extremely callous of this administration to completely disregard a significant portion of our population by proposing this legislation.

 
19775 05/13/2009 at 11:00:34 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19776 05/13/2009 at 11:01:02 AM Organization Hadassah New York I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19777 05/13/2009 at 11:01:04 AM Self     To Staff of NIH: I am a father/grandfather/and registered voter for over 40 years. I know my one voice is not much, but it is all I have. I beg you not to proceed with federal funds to create and kill human life. We already abort our future at an alarming rate. I beg you not to do this stem cell research in the name of the one voice that I have. Thanks and God bless

 
19778 05/13/2009 at 11:01:36 AM Self     Please consider placing all stem cell monies in the research field of ADULT stem cell research. There have been many findings and promises in this field. There have yet to have any promising results from the embryo stem cells. Many of those have developed into teeth, hair, and bones. It's no wonder because they are supposed to develop into human beings. With that being said, I am fully AGAINST embryonic stem cell research and fully for adult stem cell research.

 
19779 05/13/2009 at 11:03:18 AM Self     I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
19780 05/13/2009 at 11:03:22 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19781 05/13/2009 at 11:03:26 AM Self     As a christian I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. These guidelines will force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I believe that support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. I also believe that there is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Furthermore, embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Why should we fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life? I am asking you to please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life. I am praying for you to make the right decision.

 
19782 05/13/2009 at 11:03:32 AM Self     I want to discouraging the “create and kill” behavior. I am very much against unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. I hear embryonic stem cell research has not been successful where as other other stem cell research has.

 
19783 05/13/2009 at 11:03:47 AM Self     dear sir; I studied the registration notices and my questionss: Is it possible to design cells with targetting special charachteristics of tumoral cells to induce apoptosis or limit their growth. My another question is whatever human changes on plants and animals by inducing correctness and healthiness, is really this final change is the best version? As you see many creatures with many limitations but accelerated progress in other fields and many other healthy creatures with devastating thoughts. And finally why the cells (with all their even unknown specificities for us) should not theiselves select their destinate ways?!

 
19784 05/13/2009 at 11:04:18 AM Self     I disagree with removing restrictions on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

Given the great progress and promise of adult stem cell research, there is no legitimate reason to fund research with embryonic stem cells.

 
19785 05/13/2009 at 11:04:50 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 



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