Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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18952 05/12/2009 at 10:10:22 PM Self     The embryonic cells have had no results but the stem cell have had over 70 successful results so why isn't money given to the group who has wonderful results? Some of the embryonic ones have been hideous and are not reliable.

 
18953 05/12/2009 at 10:10:56 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18954 05/12/2009 at 10:11:09 PM Self     Please hear my voice! I am SO opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research which force me, as a taxpayer, to SUBSIDIZE research requiring the DESTRUCTION of INNOCENT human life. Support should be directed to stem cell RESEARCH and TREATMENTS THAT DO NOT DESTROY HUMAN LIFE and are already proven successful. There is NO CASE under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be INEFFECTIVE and even dangerous, forming UNCONTROLLABLE TUMORS and causing rejection problems. ADULT stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, EFFECTIVE in treating patients. We should NOT fund controversial research that DESTROYS HUMAN LIFE when we have OTHER OPTIONS that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18955 05/12/2009 at 10:11:10 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18956 05/12/2009 at 10:11:19 PM Self     I believe embryonic stem cell research is immoral. It causes the death of very small vulnerable developing human beings. It is another step down the slipeery slope to the moral decay of American society and will ultimately lead to more horrors. Further, adult stem cell research is not a moral problem and gets better results. Please stop embryonic stem cell research.

 
18957 05/12/2009 at 10:12:02 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18958 05/12/2009 at 10:12:11 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18959 05/12/2009 at 10:12:20 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Please foster this research to be cooperative rather than competitive.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner!

 
18960 05/12/2009 at 10:12:36 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

 
18961 05/12/2009 at 10:13:31 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to any research that destroys embryonic life. I am also very strongly opposed to my tax dollars supporting this destruction of life that has not proven as successful as adult stem cell research.

 
18962 05/12/2009 at 10:14:46 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18963 05/12/2009 at 10:15:09 PM Self     ***** ***** English III 31 March 2009 Let the Innocent Live! One of the most controversial topics the United States faces today is stem cell research. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have unique capabilities of dividing and renewing themselves for long periods of time. These cells have the abilities to morph into muscle cells, nerve cells, blood cells, and many other types of cells. Scientists examine and test two basic types of stem cells; embryonic stem cells and adult (human) stem cells. They believe that these cells hold the key to unlock the cure of many terminal or life changing diseases. These diseases range from diabetes, Parkinson’s and heart disease. But this is where the ethical side of these experiments come into question. Scientists find embryonic stem cells to have more favorable capabilities and can differentiate into almost any cell type, where adult stem cells have more limitations. Yet, in the process of using stem cells from embryos, the embryo is completely destroyed. Although embryonic stem cell research opens doors to finding cures to dozens of life altering diseases, there are other options to destroying potential human life, because there are opportunities like umbilical cord blood cells and adult stem cells that require further research, but can produce the same results. The fact of the matter is, is an embryo is fully alive. Taking a life and “playing god” does not justify attempts to save a life. The Coalition of Americans for Research Ethics states, “The early embryo is not only ‘alive’ in the sense that all human cells are, but is a human life, [at] the first stage in development.” To deny the fact that an embryo isn’t human life is like denying science and creation in general. Bruce M. Carlson from Patten’s Foundation of Embryology agrees, “Almost all higher animals start their lives from a single cell… the time of fertilization represents the starting point in the life history, or ontogeny, of the individual.” Even though the embryos are the product of a lab and not physically retracted from a woman’s body, the makeup and purpose of the embryo remain the same; they are meant to grow and flourish into a breathing human being. There are a few alternatives to using and killing embryonic stem cells. Just a couple of them are umbilical cord blood cells or adult stem cells. The C.A.R.E observes that “Most hospitals discard cord blood after a baby’s birth, despite the fact that the cord blood contains stem cells that could be used in transplants…” Moreover Dr. Brian Mason states that, “four million samples of cord blood are discarded in hospital nurseries every year.” That is a plethora of stem cells that could be used for a greater cause, but it is being simply disposed of. Another option to explore further is the adult stem cells. The NIH observes that, “some evidence suggests that adult stem cells plasticity may exist; increasing the number of cell types a given cell can become.” The plasticity of the embryonic stem cell is part of what makes it so appealing to scientists. So, if the adult stem cells just require further investigation, why not channel more funding in that direction and save more innocent lives. In truth, the adult stem cells have advantages over new embryonic cells. One advantage being that the patient’s own cells could be expanded and cultured, and then be reintroduced to the patient’s body. This denies any possibility of a dangerous case of transplant rejection. This is when the body’s immune system detects the foreign cells and attacks them when they are introduced to the body. Many believe that embryonic stem cells still have the upper hand over adult stem cells, because they can practically specialize into any type of cell in the body. Adult stem cells are believed to not have this quality. It’s also known that the embryos used are from in vitro fertilization clinics where the donors have given full informed consent for their embryos to be used for this cause. These embryos are considered clinic “waste”. But who can truly determine when human life is to be defined as waste and when it gets to push forward and live? Who is to say scientists will not breach a new ethical line and try to create human life for stem cell research purposes? Allowing embryonic stem cells to be used and discarded, could domino effect and open up the doors to creating human life for that purpose solely. The Coalition of Americans for Research Ethics states that “cord blood may provide a new bounty of cures and treatments for many other medical conditions, including heart attack, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, spinal cord injuries… types of leukemia, sickle cell anemia, and metabolic disorders.” This long list justifies just how closely related the cord blood stem cells and the embryonic stem cells work. They both cover many if not all the same diseases. It doesn’t make sense to waste the lives and money on the embryonic stem cells when hospitals discard a surplus of cord blood that could literally save thousands of lives in the same way that embryonic cells can. As for all humankind, this is a call to action. This is a massacre of innocent embryos that are being destroyed for a cause that is found to be easily avoidable. Although there are people around the world who believe they are in need of the embryonic stems cells, there are alternatives and better ways than taking a life. One of those embryos could grow to be a baby, and then someday an adult. And that adult could be the one to find the cure-all for cancer. What would happen if that budding doctor or genius died in a lab, because of an experiment that today’s citizens allowed?

 
18964 05/12/2009 at 10:15:44 PM Self     Aside from disagreeing on a moral basis, I feel funding embryonic stem cell research at this stage is premature. Adult stem cells may provide avenues for science, which until fully explored, makes this funding unecessary.

 
18965 05/12/2009 at 10:15:50 PM Self     Dear Sirs: I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which forces us as taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. Please be consistent in using proven evidence-based research that already is working. Sincerely,

 
18966 05/12/2009 at 10:16:24 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18967 05/12/2009 at 10:16:26 PM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

My tax dollars should not fund ineffective and controversial embryonic stem cell research.

 
18968 05/12/2009 at 10:16:48 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18969 05/12/2009 at 10:17:19 PM Self     To whom it may concern,

I am writing to voice my objections and protest against the use of tax dollars for funding of embryonic stem cell research. This research is an unethical use of American tax money for two reasons. First, embryonic stem cell research destroys innocent human life. Second, embryonic stem cell research has failed to produce any viable treatments, and only serves as a distraction from more fruitful avenues of research.

Embryonic stem cell research requires the destruction of a human embryo. This is morally unacceptable, because a human embryo is a unique person that is deserving of full protection under the law. Biologically speaking, a human embryo is an individual organism of our species. The embryo meets all of the criteria used by scientists to define an organism, such as the ability to undergo metabolism, the possession of DNA, the ability to grow, and the ability to respond to stimuli. In a purely biological sense, a human embryo is an organism of the species Homo sapiens.

Since a human embryo is a member of our species, the embryo is entitled to the same human rights enjoyed by all people. Some may argue that although an embryo is a member of our species, the embryo has not achieved “personhood”, and therefore does not deserve protection under the law. Some argue that an embryo is not a true person because the embryo has not developed consciousness, or has not achieved the full mental faculties enjoyed by more mature members of our species. However, this argument is invalid, because it essentially states that we should deny human rights to members of our species based on their level of development. This is a disturbing line of thought. Using the same reasoning, one could claim that a newborn infant is not a person. After all, a newborn does not have fully developed mental capabilities, either.

If we deny human rights to an embryo because he or she is not fully developed, we are only continuing a sad tradition of human history. In the past, different groups of people were denied human rights based on an arbitrary trait. For centuries, people of African descent were enslaved or otherwise oppressed because of an arbitrary trait, skin color. In Germany during the 1930’s and 1940’s, Jewish people were subjugated and murdered because of another arbitrary trait, their religious beliefs. In both of these cases, a group of people was denied human rights because they were in some way different than the majority group of people in power. The traits that separated them from the majority (race or religion) did not disqualify them from being human. Today, human beings are being targeted for destruction because of yet another arbitrary trait: their level of development. As before, this trait does not in any way disqualify this group from being fully human. It is illogical and immoral for us, as a society, to consider human organisms to be inhuman based on their level of development.

Many people who favor embryonic stem cell research argue that the research should be allowed because the embryos are surplus, and would simply be thrown out if they were not used for research. However, this line of reasoning is flawed as well. When we remember that human embryos are persons entitled to protection under the law, it follows that these persons cannot be destroyed for any reason, whether they are thrown out or used for research. It is no less immoral to slaughter innocent human beings for research than it is to simply kill them and dispose of their bodies. Since we have established that human embryos are persons, then the same standard applies to them that applies to any human. We would consider it a heinous crime to kill an innocent adult for any reason, regardless of how the corpse is used. Since an embryo is just as much of a human as an adult, then it is just as heinous to kill an embryo for any reason, research or otherwise. While there are certainly a vast amount of human embryos frozen in storage, it is our responsibility to give them the chance to live through whatever means available, rather than assume that they will die and participate in their destruction.

It is wrong in and of itself to kill human embryos for research purposes. In addition, embryonic stem cell research is an impractical and unfruitful practice. To date, embryonic stem cell research has produced no treatments, even in countries where research is unrestricted. On the contrary, trials involving embryonic stem cells have occasionally given the test subjects tumors. On the other hand, adult stem cells have shown remarkable promise. Adult stem cell research has already yielded numerous treatments. In addition, scientists are able to induce pluripotency in adult stem cells, meaning that adult stem cells have the potential to become any cell type. Because of this, many researchers are abandoning embryonic stem cell research in favor of adult stem cells. It is immoral to fund embryonic stem cell research because it diverts precious time, money, and resources from adult stem cell research, further slowing the progress of medicine and the discovery of cures.

We, as a country, cannot fund embryonic stem cell research out of good conscience. The practice destroys the most vulnerable members of our society, treating human beings as human waste. In addition, embryonic stem cell research is an unpractical waste of money, and is a distraction from the more fruitful field of adult stem cell research. For these reasons, I object to the use of my tax money for the funding of embryonic stem cell research.

Sincerely,

 
18970 05/12/2009 at 10:17:19 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18971 05/12/2009 at 10:17:34 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18972 05/12/2009 at 10:17:36 PM Organization JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18973 05/12/2009 at 10:17:39 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18974 05/12/2009 at 10:17:49 PM Self N/A   I like to ask you to support the Hesc therapies in parrallell and equal opportunities with other stem cells such as IPS or Adult stem cells because recently the University of Minesota had completed the Hesc on mice with the 100% outcome after the 13 out of 13 mice had been cured with their cancer therapy . I would ask NIH to support the Hesc therapies as with other stem cells so the new medicine will have their best selection for the future treatment illnesses and that way the small companies will have their opportunity to develope new technologies and the US will have wider support to progress without disadvantages and retrains to smaller companies . Best regards,

 
18975 05/12/2009 at 10:18:20 PM Self     I am opposed to the drafted guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, due to the fact that I am forced as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are successful. There also should not be any government support extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research.Adult stem cells are ethical, moral and most importantly effective in treating patients. Please stop changing our laws that our fore fathers deemed to be good for all manking.

 
18976 05/12/2009 at 10:20:00 PM Self     To whom it may concern,

We as citizens of the United States of America do hereby request that all funding on human embryonic stem cells be prohibited and the funds instead used on already proven and successful adult stem cells. This is in the best interest of the country and of the innocent human life at its earliest stages.

Sincerely,

 
18977 05/12/2009 at 10:20:06 PM Self     • On ethical grounds, I oppose the killing of human embryos. These regulations will force ***** taxpayers like me to fund research that I believe is unethical.

• Although scientists have been conducting research with both adult and embryonic stem cells for years, only research with adult stem cells has yielded any successes in the treatment of human disease. More than 70 diseases and conditions presently are being treated with adult stem cell therapy. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from this successful research with adult stem cells and away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos. Research with embryonic stem cells has been plagued with problems. Tests, which to date have been limited to animals due to the inherent risks, invariably have ended in failure due to immune rejection and rapid replication of cells leading to cancerous tumors.

• The reason most frequently stated for opening up research with embryonic stem cells is the ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into all cells of the body. But research has proven that adult stem cells have the same ability to change into every kind of cell, tissue and organ in the body.

• These guidelines do not require any separation between an in vitro fertilization (IVF) doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say that they “should” be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called “leftover” embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds.

• The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other infertile couples.

 
18978 05/12/2009 at 10:20:06 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and definitely resulting in death of the embryo. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18979 05/12/2009 at 10:20:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18980 05/12/2009 at 10:21:28 PM Organization True Hope Community Fellowship 1226 Market St NE Navarre OH 44662 -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Many countries have abandoned Embryonic Stem Cell Research due to the lack of success as seen in adult stem cells.

 
18981 05/12/2009 at 10:21:42 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18982 05/12/2009 at 10:23:42 PM Self     I think it is absurd that thinking people do not see the basic evil in killing human beings at any level of development . When they justify doing research on human embryos because the embryos would be destroyed if not "used" (i.e. killed) --this implies that the embroys should not be created initially so that the need to destroy them would not be an issuue.

***** May 12,2009

 
18983 05/12/2009 at 10:24:00 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18984 05/12/2009 at 10:24:26 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18985 05/12/2009 at 10:24:29 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
18986 05/12/2009 at 10:24:43 PM Self     The thought of my personal hard-earned tax dollars contributing more funding to the senseless destruction of human life sickens me.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

How the American people can be so fooled is beyond my understanding. I shouldn't even have to be submitting these comments.

 
18987 05/12/2009 at 10:24:46 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18988 05/12/2009 at 10:25:10 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

. Unfortunately, the draft guidelines do not explicitly ensure that current lines that are already being used in research will be eligible for federal funding. It is our recommendation that the final guidelines include a provision that allows for inclusion of current lines, already being used in very important research, if those lines were derived using the prevailing ethical practices at the time.

The draft guidelines prohibit federal funding of research using embryonic stem cells derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), IVF embryos created for research purposes, and parthenogenesis. It is our belief that these very promising research techniques have potential that is beyond what is possible with embryonic stem cell lines that are derived from the IVF process and should be eligible for federal funding.

 
18989 05/12/2009 at 10:25:30 PM Organization JMJ Life Center 1400 W Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32804 On behalf of all the staff, volunteers and board members, I oppose any use of taxpayer funds to support in any way embryonic stem cell research. The facts show that current embryonic stem cell research has failed to provide any cures or benefits. The money would be better used in supporting adult stem cell and cord blood research. Sincerely, ***** ***** JMJ Life Center

 
18990 05/12/2009 at 10:27:54 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18991 05/12/2009 at 10:29:11 PM Self     As a physician and a member of the scientific community, I am puzzled by the move by President Obama to allow increased funding for embyronic stem cell research in light of his ideal to prevent politics from trumping sound scientific evidence. Indeed, his legislation is a step backwards from the policies of the former administration. While many thousands of people suffer from diseases that are potential targets of stem cell therapy, we look to divert funds and effort towards a line of research that is not only morally problematic, but has been a miserable failure for multiple years. Meanwhile, there are hundreds of NIH registered trials regarding adult stem cells. In addition, there are multiple publications showing very promising results with clinical applications of the same. Perhaps, with all of the bailout fervor, we decided to do the same for the embryonic stem cell researchers. However, this is one member of the scientific community who would like to see research funds go towards that which has already shown results. Thank you.

 
18992 05/12/2009 at 10:30:42 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18993 05/12/2009 at 10:31:10 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18994 05/12/2009 at 10:31:42 PM Self     It is very important to move vigorously with all means if we are ever able to find a cure for type 1 Diabetes. That means to use all stem cell technology possible.This includes embryonic stem cells. It is cruel to those families who are affected by type 1 diabetes to further delay using this technology. It is impossible to predict which approach will come up with a cure, so every conceivable way should be explored. There are living people whose health and very life depend on it.

 
18995 05/12/2009 at 10:31:51 PM Self     I am going to make this very brief and to the point. Mr. President Obama, why are you completely sold on the destruction of embryos, with your federal funding of embryonic stem cell research? Are you afraid that you will no longer receive political points and tons of $$$ from your constituents? Did you know that over 72 cases that involved adult stem cells are saving lives and curing deseases? Adult stem cells can be extracted from bone marrow, wisdom teeth, nose tissue and the list goes on. Oh! stem cells can also come from fat tissue, after all I am kind of a chubby girl from Wisconsin and I would love to have some removed to help save or enhance someone's life! Thank you.

 
18996 05/12/2009 at 10:32:12 PM Self     Do not permit embryonic stem cell research which results in death of human embryos. Protect life where it exists; do not consider it a commodity. Without life, there is no potential, no future. Embryonic stem cells used as a "crop" or a commodity will not help humanity in the long run. Since we have a more viable alternative in adult stem cells,limit research to that which has already proven be a better alternative.

 
18997 05/12/2009 at 10:32:47 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18998 05/12/2009 at 10:33:02 PM Self     I can not believe that an organization who has spent all it's years dedicated to helping humans live is now going to destroy humans under the guise of " helping" what are you going to do next. start cloning body parts??? Just because you can does not mean that you should Do any of you have any morals left is is science your " new God" STOP AND ASK YOURSELF WHAT YOU ARE DOiNG

Save the wales..... haha save the humans as there has never been such an assault on their lives.

 
18999 05/12/2009 at 10:33:24 PM Self     I agree with the new NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines although some of the August 9, 2001 approved human embryonic stem cell lines would not qualify for NIH funding with the new guidelines. This concerns me and many other researchers that are currently working with these lines. It would have also been good to have limited and restricted funding NIH funding for parthenogenic and nuclear transfer lines because they could greatly increase our understanding of human development.

 
19000 05/12/2009 at 10:34:17 PM Organization JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner

 
19001 05/12/2009 at 10:34:29 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I don't see how anyone who claims to a Christian man of faith and belief could ever agree with these practices or the unbridled unleashing or abortion rights.

 
19002 05/12/2009 at 10:34:40 PM Self     President Obama, I am strongly voicing my opposition to your stem cell research as proposed. It is immoral to fund an industry which will create life in order to simply destroy it. The research is unproven and in fact has often ended with dangerous results. My taxpayer dollars, along with millions of other Americans, should not be used to fund abortions in any fashion. It is a completed lack of respect for human diginity and God. There is no provisions which would curtail or forbid human cloning, or human/animal cloning attempts, which should be opposed at all costs. Your efforts, and taxpayer dollars, should be spent on proven Adult stem cell research if at all. One can only pray you will change your nature and then begin to stand for morality. One can only pray you will actually come to respect the unborn and to see them as indeed a human person. Only and immoral person would reject that notion. One can only pray about these things and then unite to make our voices heard.

 
19003 05/12/2009 at 10:35:01 PM Self     As it has been abundantly demnstrated tht ADULT stem cells are superior to embryonic cells, and that the latter are cancer-prone, there is no need whatever to distroy a human life in the name of research.

 
19004 05/12/2009 at 10:35:17 PM Self     Human stem cell guidelines should protect the right to life of the unborn even if they are "unwanted" (adoption would put them in the "wanted" category). Adult stem cell research is promising and successful. The only option is Adult Stem Cell research on every level, it speaks for itself. It is wrong to misguide on the facts of the two types of Stem Cell research. Embryonic Stem Cell is fatal and unsuccessful and not a single reason exists to justify it Scientifically or morally.

 
19005 05/12/2009 at 10:35:37 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19006 05/12/2009 at 10:35:42 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

 
19007 05/12/2009 at 10:35:44 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

-Respect all life!

 
19008 05/12/2009 at 10:35:50 PM Self     Life inside a mother's womb should never be destroyed. This is murder, destroying life within a life. God hates murder and those who continue to support it will suffer the wrath of God. Rather you must turn to the righteousness of Jesus Christ to overcome sin. Stop murdering. Stem cell research is connected to murder.

 
19009 05/12/2009 at 10:35:55 PM Self     President Obama, I am strongly voicing my opposition to your stem cell research as proposed. It is immoral to fund an industry which will create life in order to simply destroy it. The research is unproven and in fact has often ended with dangerous results. My taxpayer dollars, along with millions of other Americans, should not be used to fund abortions in any fashion. It is a complete lack of respect for human diginity and God. There is no provisions which would curtail or forbid human cloning, or human/animal cloning attempts, which should be opposed at all costs. Your efforts, and taxpayer dollars, should be spent on proven Adult stem cell research if at all. One can only pray you will change your nature and then begin to stand for morality. One can only pray you will actually come to respect the unborn and to see them as indeed a human person. Only and immoral person would reject that notion. One can only pray about these things and then unite to make our voices heard.

 
19010 05/12/2009 at 10:36:12 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I profoundly oppose my tax dollars being spent on the destruction of human life.

 
19011 05/12/2009 at 10:36:30 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Saying that embryonic stem cells are not embryos, but are just made from them is ridiculous and an insult to intelligence.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19012 05/12/2009 at 10:36:31 PM Self     As a grandmother of 17 and great grandmother of 7 (so far - there will, no doubt, be more!), I urge you NOT to engage in stem cell research that destroys or harms human life. Each human life is to be valued, guarded, and cherished. The population "implosion" has serious side negative side effects on our nation's future. Please return to the principle of "one nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all" - born and unborn . . . It is of primary concern for our future! Thank you.

 
19013 05/12/2009 at 10:36:44 PM Self     To Whom it May Concern -

For eight years I've watched with despair as life saving research has left the U.S. to be pursued overseas because of short-sighted policy decisions by this country's leaders. I was pleased and fully support President Obama's efforts to restore our country's preeminence in the field of stem cell research by permitting Embryonic Stem cell (ESC) research to receive taxpayer support. This nation has succeeded when it drives and leads innovation - I firmly believe that the field of stem cell research, and ESC in particular, will deliver cures for diseases such as type 1 diabetes and many others while creating new jobs in industries yet to be fully imagined. In short - I support the use of my tax dollars to carry on this life changing research, as described in the NIH's draft guidelines but would strongly like to see the guidelines further amended as I describe below.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19014 05/12/2009 at 10:36:46 PM Self     I believe that the results of embryonic stem cell research have been disappointing at best. Adult stem cells have performed well. Why are we wasting money on embryonic research? This is a scam. The people of our nation cannot afford this kind of wastefulness. Please pursue research that provides tangible results or shut it down.

 
19015 05/12/2009 at 10:36:55 PM Self     Embrionic Stem cell research is immoral. Anyone voting for or supporting such research is in favor of killing innocent life.

 
19016 05/12/2009 at 10:37:26 PM Self     I support life from conception, regardless of how it occurs, until natural death. I firmly oppose all forms of embrionic stem cell research, especially in light of the fact of all the success discovered with adult stem cell research, since embrionic stem cell research has not produced a single advance to day. I do not believe it will ever prove successful.

 
19017 05/12/2009 at 10:37:45 PM Self     I am saddened that our president has such a low value for the unborn and is so intent on dehumanizing the medical profesion with all of this stem cell reserch.

 
19018 05/12/2009 at 10:38:18 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19019 05/12/2009 at 10:38:55 PM Self     I am disturbed that our tax dollars are going to fund research that involves the destruction of live human embryos. Instead we should focus on research using adult stem cells, as that is more ethical and has already been shown to be a great medical resource.

 
19020 05/12/2009 at 10:39:07 PM Self     The NIH states their intention is to create guidelines that are "ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law." Following are some ideas on how to respond:

"Ethically responsible" Destruction of [a] human [being's] life for research purposes is not ethical, no matter what the perceived benefit may be. The basic tenets of ethical principles state that, "One must never do evil so that good may come from it." Destroying one human being to benefit another violates every moral principle known outside the third world and violates the moral and religious sensibilities of millions of taxpayers. How can one consider any research to be ethical if it only benefits those who are not morally offended? Hundreds of thousands of Americans are refusing to use vaccines produced from aborted fetal cell lines. Shouldn't public tax dollars be used in a manner that benefits ALL Americans?

"Scientifically worthy" Despite years of research and billions of dollars poured into embryonic stem cell research using private funds, to date, there has not been one single cure for any human illness using embryonic stem cells, while adult stem cells continue to provide cures for thousands of patients with over 70 diseases. For a list of some of these treatments, see: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/data/315/5810/328b/DC1/1

In addition, embryonic stem cells have consistently proved that fatal tumors form whenever they are manipulated for use in treatments and because they are not patient-specific, like most adult stem cell treatments, patients will have severe immune rejection problems.

"In Accordance with Existing Law" Research which involves the deliberate destruction of human life violates every principle found in existing law, including the Code of Federal Regulations 45 CFR 46, (See http://www.dhhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/45cfr46.htm ) and the Dickey Wicker Amendment, which was signed into law under President Clinton and states:

SEC. 509. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act may be used for–

(1) the creation of a human embryo or embryos for research purposes; or

(2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and Section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Ac (42 U.S.C. 289g(b)) (Title 42, Section 289g(b), United States Code).

(b) For purposes of this section, the term "human embryo or embryos" includes any organism, not protected as a human subject under 45 CFR 46 (the Human Subject Protection regulations) . . . that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis, cloning, or any other means from one or more human gametes (sperm or egg) or human diploid cells (cells that have two sets of chromosomes, such as somatic cells).

In addition, the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to life for every human being. Embryos are human beings – and this is not an ideological fact – it is a scientific fact. Embryos do not start out as some other sort of life form – they are not carrots or puppies that evolve somehow through the development process. From the first moment of the union of the egg and sperm, the embryo has all DNA necessary to become a unique individual, including hair color, eye color, personality traits, etc. Thus, as a human individual, they are entitled to the same protection under federal law as other human beings.

 
19021 05/12/2009 at 10:39:31 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Controversial research that destroys human life should not be funded when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19022 05/12/2009 at 10:39:46 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. Our connection is a twelve-year-old daughter diagnosed with type 1 two years ago. We are writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. We would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. We commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner. Thank you for your consideration.

 
19023 05/12/2009 at 10:40:14 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19024 05/12/2009 at 10:40:41 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19025 05/12/2009 at 10:40:41 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
19026 05/12/2009 at 10:41:13 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19027 05/12/2009 at 10:41:54 PM Self     This is obscene as not ONE medical treatment has been effective using Embryonic stem cells while numerous treatments have proven effective using adult stem cells. This is obscene and you know it!

 
19028 05/12/2009 at 10:42:02 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. I can tell you that it is not above my pay grade when it comes to human life so i dont saying that you mr. obama and your cabnet are not doing what this country wants you to, do remember you work for us and we are a republic. one nation under GOD .

 
19029 05/12/2009 at 10:43:03 PM Self     President Obama, I am opposed to your guidelines for embryonic cell research which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring destruction of human life.

 
19030 05/12/2009 at 10:43:28 PM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. Please do not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
19031 05/12/2009 at 10:43:52 PM Self     To President Obama, the current Administration, and All in the House and Senate:

I am saddened, and angered, at the idea that this draft on NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines allows such funding on embryonic persons.

Please allow me to share with you a story. As a young girl in High School in the Early 1990's, I remember the beginnings of embryonic contraversies. (Although I am sure things have been progressing in these sciences before then, my young mind first caught on in the 1990's.) As I was setting the table for dinner, I was watching the news at the same time. ABC news in Baltimore, MD was reporting on the contraversies over creating embryos outside the womb to help the infertile, especially through surrogacy. The main point of contension: that the unwanted embryos would be discarded, or used for experimentation. All those naysayers were basically shouting this. The scientific and medical community, on the other hand, were saying these were far-stretched accusations. I'll be frank, I believed that the accusations were without warrant, and that those promises would be kept.

And now, less than 20 years later here we are. Now it seems, that, in the meantime, behind closed doors and privately funded, those promisees have not been kept. And regardless of the misquided altruism, where has it led? To treatments that have failed, and even left some with cancerous tumors.

But during the same time, there have been great successes with adult stem cells, in particular from the adult who may need them the most.

So why, may I ask, does this draft propose FEDERAL funding for 'research' with embryonic cell lines? When it 1) has not been effective, and 2) is morally unethical? And thirdly, there is that open door left for human/animal hybrid cloning?

As for this last statement, I can not simply stand by and hear again, "Oh that's ridiculous. We would never fund that, of course that's unethical, no one wants to do that." You see I am no longer a naive teenager. I am now a thirty-something mother of three, who has had to come to terms with the fact that some of the very 'illness preventing vaccines' my children have received have been made using abortive fetal tissue.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/238012/fetal_tissue_and_the_production_of.html

But there is still part of me that is naive, I suppose, or rather I should say, patriotic. This part of me asks,"If we live in a country that wants to end gun deaths, and captial punishment. A country that wants to end domestic violence and wartime tortures, why is it that the same country kills there unborn for 'medical and elective' reasons; and creates human beings outside of the most scientifically perfect place, where evolution has placed it, in the mother's womb?

It seems, that having been born in 1977, I was already born into that 'Brave New World.' Abortion was made legal in 1973, and such destruction and American Genocide has pushed ahead at full steam. Logic, even when illogical still follows itself. If murdering a child in the womb is legal, and funded, why not crreate childdren outside the womb, and why not use all these various human persons at ther various stages no longer called human due to 'viability' for research and cures?

But how does a country admit its wrong? How do we fix such evils? Not by going full steam ahead. No. We stop by stopping. Can it be that simple? Fund the ethical adult stem lines that contain no contraversy or health problems like rejection and tumors. And maybe, jusy maybe, spend all the money used to fund abortions on helping mothers bring their babies to term, no matter what the circumstances, and following those mothers and children with continued help. Say, we were wrong. Many well intentioned people were wrong. Say we are sorry. Say we are ready for a real change, a real hope. What a thought. What an America.

So these are my thoughts. The thoughts of one American Mother. I hope they will be considered.

 
19032 05/12/2009 at 10:44:01 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is completely unnecessary because it has never been proven to be effective in stark contrast to the successful use of adult stem cells! More importantly, killing embryos is nothing less than the willful extermination of a human life...after all, it is not animal or vegetable...it is in fact humnan - we all started out that way as an individual embryo! This practice if approved puts this Administration further down the raos of complete disrespect for human life created by God...I implore you to halt this country's moral slide down the slippery slope of disregard for the sacredness of "all God's children"!

 
19033 05/12/2009 at 10:45:03 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19034 05/12/2009 at 10:45:25 PM Self     I am opposed to government spending on destruction of empryos. I will always be opposed. I will always vote opposed. You are sealing the deal in a repulican come back with your extremist law making. How is it that you don't wonder why you where not aborted or used as human legos. Why did you talk down about the deficit and then multiply it so many times over? Why did you say you would not take campaign contributions and then take more than anyone? You are the bait and switchenist of the bait and switchers. If our country faces something really big, we will fall big, because you have spent one foot in the graive. You have spent peoples money that don't exist yet, and then you want to abort them so they won't. "I'm gonna get a mut like me" BS BS I will note vote for you. Ever. Every girl I know that has had an abortion has an emotional scar that will never heal. Mothers who have abortions are mothers of dead babies. You say that only "left over" embryos will be used. But we all know that the amount of "left over" embryos will suddenly skyrocket. Bait and switch, thats what you do. "Here your pregnant" "Opps I don't want it" Bait and switch. The American people know how to switch, and integrity is the bait.

 
19035 05/12/2009 at 10:45:54 PM Self     We strongly oppose your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force us as taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful!! There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be INEFFECTIVE and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

Your proposed regulations DO NOT not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole MUST be closed immediately!

It is sad that a so-called Christian president would take the stand you have taken on this issue.

Please reconsider your stand on this issue.

Thank you.

 
19036 05/12/2009 at 10:47:47 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19037 05/12/2009 at 10:48:20 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. I am praying that the one true God will revel himself to all of you in a mighty way and show you the error of yours ways. How can you believe in your heart abortion which is a proven destrucion of human life and now embronic stem cell research can benifit our world. But even in your unbelief of the conception of life how can you think it is ok to take my tax dollars for these uses. Examine your heart and get on your knees and pray for guidance.

 
19038 05/12/2009 at 10:48:26 PM Self     Embryonic stem cells are valuable because they are pluripotent.

Pluripotent stem cells can now be found elsewhere with no harm done to anyone.

Stem cells extracted from embryos have been proven unsafe for treating patients. It is a fact that due to the uncontrollable tumors which developed using stem cells taken from embryos, testing on humans had to be halted.

The valued pluripotent stem cells that are taken from other sources (such as amniotic fluid) do NOT cause tumors.

Even if one does not believe that destruction of embryos is unethical, why advocate using stem cells that cause tumors, particularly when safer, infinitely more promising alternatives are available?

Safe alternatives, and ethical methods of research should be our first priority, not the amount of revenue to be made for the government, investors, and drug companies. The distinction between EMBRYONIC and ADULT stem cells needs to be clarified for the public. American taxpayers need to be informed of the futility in using the types of stem cells that are dangerous to patients, and of the ethics involved in the practice of destroying embryos in order to extract these stem cells. First, do no harm.

 
19039 05/12/2009 at 10:48:32 PM Self     am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
19040 05/12/2009 at 10:48:35 PM Self     President Obama,

I would like to register my concern for changes in laws that would allow funding for the destruction of human life in order to use embryonic stem cells for research. I am opposed to my tax dollars being spent for this type of research! I believe that adult stem cell research is very promising and could be used for all research.

I do not understand why you as a Christian want to reverse all safeguards to protect life? Please consider leaving the restrictions that were put in place under President George Bush's administration that protect the unborn babies from becoming research material.

I understand that there is no conclusive scientific evidence to support the need for embryonic stem cell research over the already existing adult stem cell use.

Thank you for your attention and serious prayerful consideration of this matter.

 
19041 05/12/2009 at 10:48:53 PM Self     so called stem cell research is unethical and morally wrong and when you take an egg and sperm and new life starts - and people play with it , like it is nothing . also money used for this nonsense - like millions of dollars could be used for adult stem cell - research - which is already used and it works

 
19042 05/12/2009 at 10:49:16 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
19043 05/12/2009 at 10:50:44 PM       For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19044 05/12/2009 at 10:51:46 PM Self     I do not approve of my tax dollars being spent on embryonic stem cell research. It is a practice which is both ethically and financially irresponsible. Ethically, because it creates and destroys human life without giving credence to its existence, and financially, because no major breakthroughs have been made using embryonic stem cell research thus far. I oppose the U.S. government spending my money in order to kill human life and dabble in unproved science. Please, put this money in adult stem cell research, where cures are being found and life is being renewed, and not terminated.

Sincerely,

 
19045 05/12/2009 at 10:52:20 PM Self     Embryonic stem cells have a notorious tendency to create TERATOMAS, which are rapidly growing and usually benign yet lethal tumors. Thousands of patients could be given abnormal cells, which would not be discovered until it was too late.

There is a history of successful alternative treatments that are reasonable and do not have the moral and scientific problems associated with embryonic stem cell research.

 
19046 05/12/2009 at 10:52:27 PM Self     I wholeheartedly support the government's proposed funding for research in stem cells.

 
19047 05/12/2009 at 10:52:32 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19048 05/12/2009 at 10:52:59 PM Self     We object to the Federal Government funding research using human embryonic stem cells, human cloning or creation of embryos for research.

ADULT STEM CELLS have been very effective in treating a good number of illnesses and diseases, without the side effects of tumors, etc. that occur with embryonic stem cells.

Use TAX MONEY wisely for Adult Stem Cell research, or let Private Funding be used.

 
19049 05/12/2009 at 10:54:20 PM Self     I strongly disagree with embyronic stem cell research. This type of activity encourages the artificial growth of human beings with the idea of harvesting their parts for research and development. It quite reminds me of WWII German/Hitler methods of using living human beings for any and all kinds of experimental and tortuous research. Given the fact that adult stem cell work has yielded a tremendous amout of help to the medical community, I belive it is best to proceed with adult material. Fetal research is unnecessary and barbaric. Very little evidence can be cited to support the efficacy of fetal stem cells versus adult cells of the same type

 
19050 05/12/2009 at 10:54:21 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
19051 05/12/2009 at 10:55:11 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 



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