Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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18652 05/12/2009 at 08:14:42 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18653 05/12/2009 at 08:15:37 PM Self     I am against embryonic stem-cell research. Our country has already moved too far away from protecting the rights ("life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness")of its citizens. Embryonic stem-cell research will provide further impetus for abortions, that is, the killing of unborn babies. Let's use adult stem-cells in this research, which has already proven effective.

 
18654 05/12/2009 at 08:15:44 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18655 05/12/2009 at 08:15:55 PM Self     This is absolutely terrible. Not only does this support the destruction of human life in "the name of research", but it forces the American tax-payer to pay for something that a large portion of the United States is against! Why not use adult stem cells that are proven and already available?

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18656 05/12/2009 at 08:15:58 PM Self     I am adamantly opposed to my tax dollars being used to fund human embryonic stem cell research. Your draft guidelines force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. There are too many options for stem cell research and treatments which do not require the use of embryonic stem cells that have already been proven successful. Human cloning and the creation of human embryos for research purposes is totally and utterly unnecessary.

Adult stem cell treatments have been proven safe and effective, unlike the embryonic stem cell treatments which are exactly opposite: unsafe and ineffective, and even harmful to the patient, causing tumors and rejection complications which are sometimes fatal.

It is immoral and wrong, on all grounds, to use human embryonic stem cells in any sort of research or treatment, and I and my family strongly oppose our tax moneys being used to fund such a travesty.

 
18657 05/12/2009 at 08:16:19 PM Self     I don't believe in human stem cell research. It should be left alone. ONLY ADULT STEM CELLS SHOULD BE USED!!!! I believe that You are messing around with something that should be not done. That is GOD'S relm, not mankind.!!!!!

 
18658 05/12/2009 at 08:16:27 PM Self     There is no excuse for not using the full extent of our scientific knowledge and resources to find cures for the diseases that we now know could be helped through uncurtailed stem cell research. By placing limitations (due to political considerations or personal beliefs) on how to obtain stem cells and for what purposes they can be used, we have no idea of discoveries we are preventing, of the countless lives we are losing, now and in the future. The is no excuse not to move full steam ahead.

 
18659 05/12/2009 at 08:17:06 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18660 05/12/2009 at 08:17:29 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18661 05/12/2009 at 08:17:39 PM Self     We wish to voice our concern over the stem cell funding approved by President Obama. We are totally against any for of stem cell funding or any stem cell research in general. It's an unproved type of science in addition to killing a human being.

 
18662 05/12/2009 at 08:19:20 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18663 05/12/2009 at 08:19:20 PM Self     That the federal government would in any way sanction embryonic stem cell HUMAN EXPERIMENTATION is reprehensible. How dare you use human beings in this manner. It flies in the face of the most basic right to life to say nothing of experimenting on human beings without their consent. Shame on you.

 
18664 05/12/2009 at 08:19:21 PM Self     Because I believe all life, even at its most innocent and early stages has immense value, and there is concern that fetuses will be harvested for stem cell research, I am vehemently opposed to funding stem cell research with my tax dollars. It violates my freedom of religion and morality.

 
18665 05/12/2009 at 08:19:27 PM Self     I have a 6 year old that tells me everyday he hates Diabetes. Please allow the stem cell testing.

 
18666 05/12/2009 at 08:20:14 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18667 05/12/2009 at 08:20:38 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18668 05/12/2009 at 08:20:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18669 05/12/2009 at 08:20:42 PM Self     I recommend that these Guidelines be changed in the following ways:

1. The definition of HESC should be rewritten to refer specifically to inner mass cells obtained from blastocysts or progeny of these cells.

2. The section on the promise of HESC research should be written by a scientist based on the latest information about HESC.

3. Informed consent requirements should not be imposed retrospectively on HESC lines derived in the past.

4. The Guideline should focus only on HESC and should not refer to IPSC research, which have nothing to do with embryos.

5. The Guidelines should not restrict research not prohibited by current law or regulations, including use of HESC and IPSC in animals.

6. Separate guidelines should be developed for parthenogenesis- and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) derived HESC.

 
18670 05/12/2009 at 08:21:08 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18671 05/12/2009 at 08:21:23 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
18672 05/12/2009 at 08:21:45 PM Self     I am strongly opposed to your draft guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research which force me and other taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I am morally opposed to such research and do not want my tax dollars to be used to destroy innocent huiman life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful, in essence adult stem cell research. You need to ensure that there is absolutely no case under which government support could be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Human embryonic stem cell research has clearly been shown to be ineffective and even dangerous with the formation of uncontrollable tumors and rejection problems. I cannot understand why we are not putting more money, time, and energy towards adult stem cell research. Adult stem cells are both ethical and effective in treating patients. We, the American people and taxpayers, should not fund this controversial research that destroys human life when we have other excellent options that do not destroy human life.

I understand that the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18673 05/12/2009 at 08:21:47 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18674 05/12/2009 at 08:22:00 PM Self     Dear President Obama:

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life, when we have options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately and my TAX DOLLAR NOT BEING SPENT ON EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH.

Respectfully,

 
18675 05/12/2009 at 08:23:09 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please protect innocent human life. Thank you for reading my comments.

 
18676 05/12/2009 at 08:23:19 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem cell research which forces me, a taxpayer, to pay for research requiring the destruction of human life. Do stem cell research and treatments that already are known to be successful and that do not destroy human life. There is absolutely no reason to do human cloning or create embryos for research. Embryo stem cell research has had absolutely no success, and has been found to be dangerous. Spend our money on adult stem cell work which is successful. Thank you.

 
18677 05/12/2009 at 08:24:01 PM Self     Dear President Obama; I find it very disturbing that my tax dollars should be spent in support of destroying human embryos for the purpose of research. Embryonic stem cells have never been shown to produce cures for any condition and, in fact, have demonstrated a serious threat of tumors and rejection when injected into another person's system. Adult stem cells are readily available without destroying a life and have proven to be reliabel and effective in fighting certain diseases. Please reconsider your position on this issue and decide to protect life, not destroy it.

Sincerely

 
18678 05/12/2009 at 08:24:17 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18679 05/12/2009 at 08:24:26 PM Self     Dear Mr. President,

Why should I be forced to pay for something in which I do not believe? More to the point, why should our country endorse and destroy human lives to save human lives when there are methods and technologies that do the same thing more effectively and do not result in murder. That is the choice that you apparently have made, and I can't stand it.

I entered into the era of your presidency thinking that even though I voted for your opponent, Mr. McCain, I should give you the benefit of the doubt and hope that you would be persuaded to actually CHANGE our country for the better and for every person, as you had promised. Almost 5 months in you have done nothing to prove to me that anything has "CHANGED" in protecting human life. I am now begging and pleading with you to realize that all people are humans regardless of when we were conceived. It shouldn't matter that it was 9 years ago or 9 months or even 3 months ago. ALL HUMAN LIFE is deserving of protection under our Constitution! Thank you

Respectfully Submitted,

 
18680 05/12/2009 at 08:24:32 PM Self     Frankly, I am appalled and disgusted at the line up of this administration -- all pro abortion and anti life individuals who apparently have no respect for our Creator, who does nothing without a purpose. What is the purpose of the Obama administration?

 
18681 05/12/2009 at 08:24:33 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. This kind of activity would be similar to genetic engineering attempted by the Nazis in Germany.

 
18682 05/12/2009 at 08:24:39 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
18683 05/12/2009 at 08:25:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18684 05/12/2009 at 08:26:14 PM Self     1. I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

2. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

3. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18685 05/12/2009 at 08:26:19 PM Self     I totally disagree with using my tax money on stem cell researh. I have moral obligations to myself that I cannot agree to this and as a taxpayer I shoild have some say so on how my tax money is used. No one should be forced to support this when they are against it.

 
18686 05/12/2009 at 08:26:26 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Having a daughter (diagnosed 32 years ago)and grand daughter(diagnosed four years ago) who have type one diabetes, I am very concerned about the new Human Stem Cell Guidelines. I feel many scientist have benn unable to work to their fullest capacities under the previous laws. I have hoping great successes with come with new research. I hope their will be a cure to diabetes within my lifetime.

 
18687 05/12/2009 at 08:26:37 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18688 05/12/2009 at 08:26:51 PM Self     I personally oppose one cent of my tax money to be used for stem cell research with aborted babies. The only breakthroughs have been with adult stem cells so I don't understand why you are encouraging the taking of innocent life for a diluted notion of an research breakthrough.

 
18689 05/12/2009 at 08:26:59 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18690 05/12/2009 at 08:27:05 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18691 05/12/2009 at 08:27:23 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which use my tax dollars to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. Government support should not be given to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund research that destroys human life when there are options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids.

 
18692 05/12/2009 at 08:27:44 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please do not fund stem cell research that destroys human life!

 
18693 05/12/2009 at 08:28:00 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18694 05/12/2009 at 08:28:09 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18695 05/12/2009 at 08:28:21 PM Self     I am oposed to this.

 
18696 05/12/2009 at 08:28:25 PM Self     Yes!!! This is great!! Let's move forwards too the future of medicine. If we can save or prolong life, I say...Let's do it.

 
18697 05/12/2009 at 08:29:06 PM Self     comments directed to the draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines.

1. There should be no destruction of life, no matter how small.

2. There are worthy research studies that determine adult stem cells (safely derived from consenting adults) do the job of helping diseased patients, safely. Human embryonic stem cells research, which destroys small lives, have not shown promising results. They have only shown that these embryonic cells cause uncontrollable tumor growths in the patients they are implanted in, and high rejection rates. Just ask the scientist doctor, who interviewed Michael J.Fox on the Oprah show.

3. The possibility of research that would invent human clones and human-animal entities, must be stopped immediately. These are highly controversial and offensive practices that should not be pursued.

4. I do not want my tax dollars going into these kinds of research that I oppose so strongly. You must listen to the community and do the right thing.

 
18698 05/12/2009 at 08:29:16 PM Self     Please put me on record as opposing the use of federal funds to do research on human embryo stem cells.

Thankyou

 
18699 05/12/2009 at 08:29:17 PM Self     There is no reason to use embrionic stem cells when adult stem cells have already been proven to cure people. The adult stem cells have brought cures, and from what I've heard, the embrionic stem cells have only produced tumors and no cures for anyone.

Also, there are stem cells in fat. Using the stem cells that come from fat can not only cure diseases like multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's, but can also help cure obesity in people whose fat problem is based on more than just food.

There are also umbiblical cord blood stem cells. Many families are saving the stem cells from cord blood when a baby is born into their family, in case the child gets sick in future years. Then the stem cells will be there for the child.

There is no reason to use embrionic stem cells when there are other options that have been proven to work better. Putting money into embrionic stem cells will take money away from other options that are much more promising, or proven useful. This is actually depriving patients of cures. Is that fair?

 
18700 05/12/2009 at 08:30:09 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18701 05/12/2009 at 08:30:11 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18702 05/12/2009 at 08:30:11 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18703 05/12/2009 at 08:30:34 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18704 05/12/2009 at 08:30:46 PM       I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18705 05/12/2009 at 08:31:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18706 05/12/2009 at 08:32:12 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18707 05/12/2009 at 08:32:25 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18708 05/12/2009 at 08:33:05 PM Self     Adult stem cells are fine with us, but embryonic stem cells are linked to abortion. Abortion is murder and we ask that you do not permit funding to destroy innocent human life. About 4500 babies are terminated each day. We are against stem cell research using embryonic stem cells.

 
18709 05/12/2009 at 08:33:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18710 05/12/2009 at 08:34:27 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
18711 05/12/2009 at 08:35:33 PM Self     I am a registered nurse of 40 plus years so I have seen and experienced many changes in the Medical world. I am saddened and deeply grieved that our President has issued an executive order to allow virtually unrestricted federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. Funding that will create incentives for scientists to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research. It will enable the abortion industry to greatly increase their profits and even encourage abortions to provide the trafficers of fetal body parts to have unlimited access to fetal body parts for gain.You know this is going on right here in "civilized America." It is a known fact that we DO NOT Need embryonic stem cells--we know that adult stem cells are working fine. I do not want my tax dollars paying for this create and kill behavior. I strongly urge you to put restrictions in place. Obama's proposed new policy would eliminate all restrictions and allow this "create and kill" industry full freedom.

 
18712 05/12/2009 at 08:36:23 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18713 05/12/2009 at 08:36:41 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18714 05/12/2009 at 08:36:52 PM Self     I strongly object to your submitting funds that comes from taxpayers for embryonic stem cell research. You are walking a fine line when you continue to force your agenda against life. Remember, what you reap, you will sow. Again, you can mock the Lord just so long. If you do not repent and correct these mistakes against life and promote continuously your culture of death, the consequences will be unbearable for you. Turn from your arrogance and humble yourself before the Lord Jesus before it is too late!!!

 
18715 05/12/2009 at 08:37:06 PM Self     Please consider this as a response to The National Institutes of Health (NIH) requesting public comment on draft guidelines entitled ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (Guidelines). The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH-funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells.

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life

 
18716 05/12/2009 at 08:37:10 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I am taking this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of our tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life!

 
18717 05/12/2009 at 08:37:24 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

ALWAYS OPPOSE STEM CELL RESEARCH/FUNDING AND ABORTION/ABORTION FUNDING AS NO ONE WOULD VOLUNTEER FOR THESE PROCEDURES THEMSELVES.

 
18718 05/12/2009 at 08:38:22 PM Self     I am opposed to ESCR primarily because it doesn't work and involves the unnecessary killing of the unborn.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18719 05/12/2009 at 08:39:08 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

I need a cure for my son, *****, age 12, who was diagnosed at age 10. He participated in a clincal trial for the ***** and we used his own cord blood we collected. He stayed in the "honeymoon phase" for two years. But now we need more research, his pancreas is not functioning all the way. He gets eight shots a day and 6 finger sticks. Isn't it time for my son to no longer suffer and get a CURE. It is so important not just for Type 1 diabetics, but others as well.

I myself have multiple sclerosis, and my husband has diabetes too. Please, HELP!

 
18720 05/12/2009 at 08:39:23 PM Self     Life begins at conception says American Medical Ass., do not destroy life with embrionic stell cell research that has produced no results. This takes $ away from adult stem cell research which is leading to positive results.

 
18721 05/12/2009 at 08:40:25 PM Self     Research on stem cells should be restricted to adult stem cells, the research for which shows much promise = unlike embryonic stem cells - this is just the pro-abortion agenda preying on peoples emotions to keep abortions legal.

Also shown as promising are umbellical cord stem cells, harvested at birth, the research of which has also been stifled to promote the abortion agenda.

Do not use our tax dollars to pay for murder!

 
18722 05/12/2009 at 08:41:09 PM Self     if a woman gave birth then decided she didn't want the baby, would you allow a doctor to kill it? i'm guessing no unless you are a pagan. so why would you allow the same woman to kill a baby in her womb? murder is murder. if law makers especially the president allow it then they should be held accountable for murder.

 
18723 05/12/2009 at 08:41:34 PM Self     I agree with and echo the following comments by Catholic Medical Association comments:

DATELINE March 10, 2009 – The Catholic Medical Association (CMA) protests President Obama’s March 9, 2009, executive order providing taxpayer funding for research that destroys the lives of human embryos. This decision demonstrates a disregard for human life, for the beliefs of millions of Americans, and for the lives and health of those suffering from devastating diseases and injuries. CMA President Louis C. Breschi, M.D., stated, “It is very unfortunate that, at a time when ethical options are showing greater promise than ever, and when the nation’s economy is suffering, President Obama would direct more taxpayer dollars into scientific research that is unethical, ineffective, unworkable, and unnecessary.”

John F. Brehany, Ph.D., CMA’s executive director, explained further: “President Obama’s radical new policy is unethical because human beings—at the embryonic stage of life—are being destroyed in the name of curing disease. It is ineffective because human embryonic stem cell research has no demonstrated success in treating diseases, despite receiving hundreds of millions of dollars in federal, state, and private funding. Basing therapies on human embryonic stem cells is unworkable because it will require obtaining human eggs from thousands of women—a painful, dangerous, and expensive process. And finally, destroying human embryos is unnecessary. Not only have adult stem cell (ASC)therapies demonstrated real-life success in treating dozens of diseases, but new induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) techniques have created cells with all the properties of embryonic stem cells—without destroying human lives to obtain them.”

President Obama’s action belies the language of consensus, high ideals, and scientific objectivity in which it is wrapped. For, at the same time he overturned the executive order limiting federal funding to those embryonic stem cell lines created before August 9, 2001, President Obama also revoked, without comment, a June 20, 2007, executive order (no. 13435) encouraging the National Institutes of Health to promote research into clinically effective alternative sources of stem cell lines— sources that do not depend on destroying human life. Finally, while President Obama claimed that he would reject “cloning for human reproduction,” he failed to acknowledge that he actually supports human cloning—for therapy and research. His policy provides taxpayer funding for a new industry dedicated to creating and destroying human lives in labs. The Catholic Medical Association is the nation’s largest professional organization of Catholic physicians. To learn more about the CMA and its publications, go to www.cathmed.org.

 
18724 05/12/2009 at 08:41:45 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18725 05/12/2009 at 08:42:30 PM Self     I am against any type of public funding regarding executive order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH-funded research. The human embryonic stem cells used in research are usually obtained from aborted fetuses. I am against all types and purposes of abortion, regardless of the intent with which scientific studies are performed and deemed potentially beneficial to society. Please stop this order from being initiated. Thank you.

***** Concerned Private Citizen

 
18726 05/12/2009 at 08:42:47 PM Self     I agree that we should not be using embryonic stem cells for research. Why do this when adult stem cell research has been proven to work? This is an offense against God and man.

 
18727 05/12/2009 at 08:43:01 PM Self     I'll make this short. All life no matter how small deserves to live of it's own accord. Take the time to research other avenues for cures, prevention of disease, extending life, etc. Don't KILL STEM CELLS! Nuff said.

 
18728 05/12/2009 at 08:43:45 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I am taking this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of our tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life!

 
18729 05/12/2009 at 08:44:02 PM Organization JDRF   For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18730 05/12/2009 at 08:44:43 PM Self     In this time of extreme financial crisis for our Country how can we, as a Nation, invest in fetal stem cell research? This type of Stem Cell has not been proven to work. As a matter of fact the use of fetal stem cells have caused tumors in the recipients. Does anyone ever wonder why the large Pharmaceutical companies have not invested heavily or at all in this type of cell therapy? They have not, because the results prove the use of fetal stem cells do not produce results that are curative.

Please, note that our investments should be placed in Adult Stem Cell research as there have been a number of useful and applicable results from this therapy. Invest in things that work such as adult stem cell research and help those who need cures that are proven without adverse and dangerous results.

I would appreciate a written response to this submittal, thank you.

 
18731 05/12/2009 at 08:45:02 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18732 05/12/2009 at 08:45:10 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidlines for EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of human life. Support should be direted to stellcell research and treatments that do not destropy human life and are already proven successul.

As a practicing Catholic, I cannot support any law, or proposed law, that leads to the destruction of human life.

 
18733 05/12/2009 at 08:45:28 PM Self     There is a paucity of science supporting embyonic stem cell research. Much success has occurred with adult stem cells which can be reverted to embryonic stages.

Cord blood is also a source for stem cells. Embryoes are undifferentiated and as seen in a young boy with spinal cord problems, it was shown that he developed malignant tumors following treatment with embryonic stem cells. In point of fact, one of the tumors had a foot at it base.

There is no ethical or moral justification for tampering with the human embryo, unless you are striving for eugenics and Joseph Mengele style research.

In science, just because you can do something does not mean that you should. Scientific data can be hyped as was seen with the battle over AIDS and which researcher: Robert Gallo or Montaigne would make the first discovery.

Science should never be political. Witness Tuskegee. Just because science can do it, it is not always ethical or moral to do so.

Science knows that the embryo is life, that is why many unscrupulous scientists want to play God. As I stated, the embryo is undifferentiated and when introduced can develop to create a teratogenic result.

This is not just a religious argument. From a secular humanistic perspective, this is to push an existential approach to science. You will be promoting social Darwinism, much as the Nazi scientists did in their experiments.

PETA is working to stop animal experiments as cruelty. How much more cruel is it to destroy human life? What type of chimera might you create?

Scientists are famous for fudging their data. The scientist from South Korea, who fudged his data comes to mind. Science is not "pure". Many will fudge data to keep the funding coming.

We need some accountability. The idea of sacrificing the one for the whole is a fascistic, communistic idea.

What will come next? More human experimentation? How slippery is this slope becoming?

Looks like Margaret Sanger may get her wish. But, her concept of the subhuman species created the whole racial divide. Are we moving to designer babies? Rod Serling was a profit. We may next move to reshape all of us into some beautiful species.

What will happen to the March of Dimes, Special Olympics, etc. Will you next experiment on the Down's syndrome child.

Let us rid ourselves of all ugly people, then. You can start with Congress. Many of them are overweight, and it is quite a kennel club.

It is very smug to act so high and mighty. The elitists feel they know what is best. So did Hitler, Stalin, Castro another kennel club.

Once again, just because you can do something, does not mean you should. Especially with all the success of adult stem cells.

Don't hide the TRUE science. Adult stem cells are proven, you don't need to touch the embryoes. So the argument is OFF the table.

 
18734 05/12/2009 at 08:45:51 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18735 05/12/2009 at 08:46:38 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. I have read that stem cell research that destroys embryos has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, and forms uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. However, adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. I do not want my tax dollars funding research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. Embryos are tiny babies--not guinea pigs or science rats. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Sincerely,

***** (mother of 4 precious fine young children who were once little embryos)

 
18736 05/12/2009 at 08:47:19 PM Self     I would rather move out the USA, before I see an inoccent life destory by my tax dollars.

 
18737 05/12/2009 at 08:47:20 PM Self     Hello, Mr. President Obama,

I hope all is well with you and your family, Amen.

I realized you believe in PRO CHOICE, BUT, you have no right to impose your beliefs to the American Public.

NOW AS A CHRISTIAN AND A CATHOLIC, WHY WOULD I SUPPORT YOUR IDEA OF KILLING BABIES FOR YOUR STEM CELL RESEARCH TO BEGIN WITH. THIS IS IMMORAL, BARBARIC, SATANIC AND QUITE DISGUSTING.

I was but only 20 years old when I had my only child and daughter to this day, who have and still is SERVING THE UNITED STATES NAVY SINCE *****, UNTIL THE PRESENT TIME, WHO IS ALREADY 30 YEARS OLD SINCE *****.

SHE, *****, ONCE AND NOW, *****, WOULD NOT BE ON THIS EARTH HAD I BELIEVE IN ABORTION, SINCE SHE IS A DAUGHTER OUT OF WEDLOCK AND BY CHOICE, SINCE I LEFT HER FATHER BEFORE A MARRIAGE CAN TAKE PLACE.

We know we love each other, but we also did not want to kill a child concieved out of love, JUST BECAUSE WE ARE NOT MARRIED, since by my choice I did not want marriage, but I want my child, a child I now have and I came originally from a country where any woman pregnant should get married even if it is a shotgun wedding.

NOT ME, I want my daughter alive but it would have been a mistake to get married because of the pregnancy.

SO, NOW, HERE YOU ARE HAVING ANY AND I MEAN ANY LIFE REGARDLESS OF SEX AND RELIGION AND ETHNICITY BE KILLED, KILLED FOR A STEM CELL RESEARCH.

THAT IS KILLING LIFE.

GO ON WITH YOUR PRO CHOICE, BUT DO NOT KILL JUST TO KILL.

Take care and God bless us all and God loves us for always, no matter what.

GOD FORGIVE SINCE HE SENT HIS ONLY SON TO REDEEM US AND HE DIED FOR OUR SINS.

JESUS ~ JESUS ~ JESUS ~ AMEN

***** Originally from the ***** Been in the U.S. SINCE *****

VERY PATRIOTIC TOWARDS AMERICA AS NOW MY COUNTRY, I LOVE. MY HEART WILL ALWAYS BE *****, BUT MY HEART AND MY BRAIN NOW, IS ALL FOR WHAT IS BEST AS AN AMERICA. AMEN!!!

 
18738 05/12/2009 at 08:47:52 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18739 05/12/2009 at 08:47:53 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
18740 05/12/2009 at 08:48:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18741 05/12/2009 at 08:49:04 PM       I am opposed to this new law to use federal taxpayers money for stem cell research.

 
18742 05/12/2009 at 08:49:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
18743 05/12/2009 at 08:50:21 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18744 05/12/2009 at 08:50:27 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
18745 05/12/2009 at 08:51:27 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
18746 05/12/2009 at 08:51:34 PM Self     Too whom it may concern: I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. We should re-direct support to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no need for the US government to support human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. As there are sufficient opportunities for us to use normal cells to provide all the benefits sought after, we should devote such resources to this kind of research.

 
18747 05/12/2009 at 08:52:08 PM Self     Studies of embryo-destructive stem cell research show that such research is not only ineffective, but also dangerous, often causing uncontrollable tumors and even rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly effective in treating many different diseases in patients. There has been no documentation of even one disease cured by embryonic stem cells. They are too unreliable. The U.S. government should not engage in funding controversial research that destroys human life when there are other highly effective options that do not destroy human life.

 
18748 05/12/2009 at 08:52:36 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions. You can send us an email at advocacy@jdrf.org.

Thank you!

JDRF Government Relations

Additional Background: In March President Obama

 
18749 05/12/2009 at 08:52:46 PM Self     My life, your life, no ones life is worth killing an embryo. PERIOD.

 
18750 05/12/2009 at 08:53:49 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner

 
18751 05/12/2009 at 08:53:59 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to the MANY stem cell research and treatments that DO NOT destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Adult stem cells are proven effective. Support research there. Do not support embroyonic stem cell research, whose proponents are only arguing for to legitimize other political aims such as abortion.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page