Disposition of applications, incomplete application, nonresponsive, resubmission, non-compliant modular applications, successful applications, peer review

2.4.4 Disposition of Applications

All incomplete applications, non-compliant modular applications, and applications determined to be nonresponsive to FOA requirements will not be reviewed. If the FOA remains open with subsequent submission dates, the applicant may resubmit a corrected or complete version of an investigator-initiated application for consideration in the next review cycle. One resubmission application may be submitted for an appropriate due date up to 37 months after the application due date of the initial application. Any application on the same topic proposed as a resubmission more than 37 months from the initial receipt date will not be accepted; it must be formatted and submitted as a new application.

Following the initial review, the summary statement will be available to the PD/PI and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs) of the applicant organization with the Signing Official (SO) user role in the eRA Commons. If an application does not result in funding, there may be an opportunity to respond to the reviewers' comments and resubmit the application. Applicants just receiving their summary statements should consult the NIH Next Steps page for detailed guidance. Applicants seeking advice beyond that available online may want to contact the NIH Program Officer listed at the top of the summary statement.

The ICThe NIH organizational component responsible for a particular grant program or set of activities. The terms "NIH IC," or "awarding IC" are used throughout this document to designate a point of contact for advice and interpretation of grant requirements and to establish the focal point for requesting necessary prior approvals or changes in the terms and conditions of award. Director or designee is the official who has the authority to make final award decisions from among those applications receiving a favorable initial review and Council recommendation. If an application has been recommended for further consideration but is not expected to be funded in the current cycle, the application may be held by NIH for one or more additional cycles and will compete with other applications submitted for that cycle. If an application is unsuccessful, the applicant may subsequently submit one revised version of the application for review in a future cycle.

Some of the ICs publish paylines as part of their funding strategies to guide applicants on their likelihood of receiving funding. Application scores can only be compared against the payline for the fiscal year when the application will be considered for funding, which is not necessarily the year when it was submitted. At the beginning of fiscal years when the agency awaits an actual budget, there may be a delay of several months to determine paylines. If the application is assigned to an ICThe NIH organizational component responsible for a particular grant program or set of activities. The terms "NIH IC," or "awarding IC" are used throughout this document to designate a point of contact for advice and interpretation of grant requirements and to establish the focal point for requesting necessary prior approvals or changes in the terms and conditions of award. that does not announce a payline, the Program Officer listed at the top of the summary statement may be able to provide guidance on the likelihood of funding.

Successful applicants will be notified of additional information that may be required or other actions leading to an award. The process leading to an award, including the business management review performed by the GMO, is described in Completing the Pre-Award Process below.

For unsuccessful applicants, the NIH will send a centralized, automated correspondence to the applicant organizations to notify of NIH's intent not to fund the indicated applications.

The decision not to award a grant, or to award a grant at a particular funding level, is discretionary and is not subject to appeal to any NIH or HHS official or board.