Updates for PAR-18-798 NIOSH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21)

Notice Number: NOT-OH-19-005

Key Dates
Release Date: April 10, 2019

Related Announcements
PAR-18-798

Issued by
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (NIOSH)

Purpose

This notice clarifies the main constructs of the evidence-based approach NIOSH uses to support research that addresses priority research areas and has the greatest likelihood of success.

Burden elements have been expanded to include a general statement of burden to better address emerging issues, comparison population data, trends, and burden in a specific geographic region.

Need elements have been expanded to include 1) a general statement of need to better address potential overlap with previous or existing research, 2) an expanded Methodological approach element, and 3) the Likelihood of success element previously listed under Impact.

Impact elements now include the Likelihood of the research to reduce burden.

The updated Note to Applicants sections that address the respective elements of Burden, Need, and Impact are provided in the following section.

Part 2. Section 1. Funding Opportunity Description

2. Approach

Burden (Updated March 2019)

Burden may be defined as risks from exposure to work-related hazards; occurrence of injuries, illnesses, and deaths due to work-related factors; and broad economic and social impacts including well-being. The extent of exposure can be assessed in terms of the number of workers exposed, the severity of the exposure, or both. The assessment of burden is based on several main constructs: magnitude of the problem; health impact severity; exposure to workers; societal costs; new or emerging issues; and relationship to work environment. For emerging issues the burden will be anticipatory burden. Researchers should estimate the potential burden using the same arguments for existing burden and identify any assumptions. Provide a rationale for extrapolating potential burden to the population at risk.

Note to Applicants

Address the following elements of burden (updated March 2019)

  • General statement of burden. Provide a general statement of the burden the proposed research will address. Is this an emerging issue? Does the proposed research address high overall burden in small population with large downstream impact? Does the proposed research address a burden in a particular sector or cross-sector that would have a significant economic consequence if that burden is not addressed? Have the most relevant indicators been selected? Are relevant comparison population estimates of burden provided to interpret the severity of burden to be addressed (e.g., overall numbers of injuries, illnesses, and deaths)?
  • Exposure/Hazard. How many workers are exposed or at risk? Are there disparities among worker populations? Is there a trend in exposure or risk? Does a new or emerging burden show an increasing trend? Does the project address a high burden in a specific geographic region?
  • Injury/Illness. How many fatalities or illnesses have occurred? What is the incidence or prevalence of the injury or illness? Are there disparities among worker populations?
  • Disability/Severity. How serious is the health outcome under study? Is there evidence of disability, years of life lost or disabled, reduction in quality of life, or days away from work?
  • Cost. What is the estimated cost such as medical expenses), productivity loss (such as absenteeism or presenteeism), lost wages, or disability payments?

Need

Note to Applicants

Address the following elements of need (updated March 2019)

  • General statement of need: Is there a general statement of need? What is the rationale for the proposed work to be conducted at this point in time? Does the proposed work build on previous or current NIOSH funded research (intramural or extramural)? Have the researchers addressed any overlap between previous or current research and this proposal?
  • Evidence of knowledge gap. Is there evidence that this activity will address a knowledge gap?
  • Likelihood of success. What is the probability of success? Is the proposed research feasible and likely to address the stated need? Feasibility includes available capacity, resources, and technical expertise, as well as anticipated time to completion. If relevant, are letters of support from collaborators, stakeholders, or critical data sources provided?
  • Methodological approach. Is the proposed research method well defined (basic/etiologic, intervention, translation, or surveillance) and appropriate to the proposed aims of the project? How does this methodological approach compare with other approaches that could be considered to fill the knowledge gap? Is the proposed research feasible and likely to address the stated need? Feasibility includes available capacity, resources, and technical expertise, as well as anticipated time to completion. If relevant, provide letters of support from collaborators, stakeholders, or critical data sources. Is a summary of the research strategy strengths and weaknesses provided?
  • Time fit. Is this the best time for undertaking this activity?

Impact (Updated March 2019)

Impact is a measure of the potential contributions of the project to worker health and safety on the basis of evident or anticipated end outcomes or well-accepted intermediate outcomes. Potential impact is expressed as potential reduction in burden or increase in intervention effectiveness. Some examples may include use of project outputs by peers and stakeholders; changes in stakeholder policies and procedures, practices, or behavior; follow-up research that resulted from the current project; invited presentations from peer and stakeholder groups; further dissemination of project outputs by stakeholders; and scientific awards or recognition by professional organizations. The assessment of potential impact is based on the potential of the proposed project to result in knowledge, policy, interventions, technologies, or solutions to occupational health problems.

Note to Applicants

Address the following elements of impact (updated March 2019)

  • General statement of impact: Include a a general statement of impact. Describe the potential reduction in burden that is likely to result if the proposed research is successful.
  • Likelihood of the research to reduce burden. If the proposed work is successful as described, are the results likely to reduce the stated burden on the study population? For emerging issues or basic etiologic research, will the planned results likely lead to plausible future actions to reduce burden?
  • Use or dissemination of research results by others. Is there potential for the proposed research to be used in setting standards, guidance, policy, or recommendations? Could the proposed research be adopted by manufacturers, trade associations, or others? Is there potential for dissemination of research results by external organizations? Is there potential for others to adopt technology, training programs/materials, intervention strategies, or new surveillance methods used in or resulting from the proposed research? Is there a potential for technology to be transferred into the marketplace? Is there potential for partners to assist in tracking progress of research translation efforts? Have relevant partnerships needed to set the stage for research impact been described and documented?
  • Follow-on research. Is the proposed research likely to generate information that leads to follow-on research that builds on the findings from this project? What type of follow-on research would be anticipated as a follow-up?

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

CDC/NIOSH welcomes inquiries on PAR-18-798. Please direct inquiries to:

Scientific/Research Contact

Bridgette E. Garrett, PhD
CDC/NIOSH/OEP
Telephone: 770-488-5715
BGarrett@cdc.gov

Peer Review Contact

Nina Turner, PhD
Scientific Review Officer, CDC/NIOSH/OEP
Telephone: 304-285-5976
Email: NTurner@cdc.gov