Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Preventive Interventions to Address Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Populations that Experience Health Disparities
Notice Number:
NOT-OD-22-154

Key Dates

Release Date:

June 14, 2022

First Available Due Date:
October 05, 2022
Expiration Date:
September 08, 2025

Related Announcements

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

PA-20-184- Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)

PA-21-110 - Pilot and Feasibility Studies in Preparation for Substance Use Prevention Trials (R34 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-22-105 - Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-19-309 - Stimulating Innovations in Behavioral Intervention Research for Cancer Prevention and Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-20-052 - NCI Small Grants Program for Cancer Research for Years 2020, 2021, and 2022 (NCI Omnibus R03 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-035 - Cancer Prevention and Control Clinical Trials Grant Program (R01 Clinical Trial Required)

PAR-21-190 - Modular R01s in Cancer Control and Population Sciences (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-341 - Exploratory Grants in Cancer Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-160 - NIDCR Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

PAR-21-317 - NIDCR Behavioral and Social Intervention Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

NOT-HL-20-788 - Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Stimulating Intervention Research to Reduce Cardiopulmonary Impacts of Particulate Matter in Air Pollution among High-Risk Populations

PAR-20-150 - NIMHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-20-310 - Health Services Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-081 - Addressing Health Disparities among Immigrant Populations through Effective Interventions (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-287 - Effectiveness of School-Based Health Centers to Advance Health Equity (R01Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR-21-358 - Risk and Protective Factors of Family Health and Family Level Intervention (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Issued by

Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR)

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

Purpose

The purpose of this NOSI is to solicit projects on preventive interventions that address cardiometabolic risk factors in populations that experience health disparities.

Key Definitions

Populations that experience health disparities: Populations defined in section 464z-3(d)(1) of the Public Health Service Act, 42 U.S.C. 285t(d)(1) as “health disparity populations” based on higher overall rates of disease incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, or survival rates in the population as compared to the health status of the general population. NIH-designated U.S. health disparity populations currently include Blacks/African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, underserved rural populations, and sexual and gender minorities.

Preventive Intervention: For the purposes of this NOSI, preventive interventions include interventions for both primary and secondary prevention. As defined by the CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/pictureofamerica/pdfs/picture_of_america_prevention.pdf), primary prevention involves intervening before health conditions occur by altering risk factors through behavioral, social, environmental, or policy changes. Secondary prevention involves identification of health conditions before the onset of signs and symptoms through screening and intervening to reduce the risk of disease progression.

Cardiometabolic risk factors: For this NOSI, cardiometabolic risk factors are defined as factors associated with the circulatory, endocrine, immune and digestive systems that increase risk for cardiovascular disease and other chronic health conditions. Cardiometabolic risk factors associated with the leading causes of death and disability include hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, albuminuria, high body mass index, low levels of physical activity, and dietary risks. Preventive services to address these risk factors include screening for obesity, high blood pressure, abnormal blood glucose, and cholesterol, as well as behavioral or other preventive interventions to improve nutrition, physical activity, blood pressure, blood insulin and/or glucose, and weight or body composition.

Level of Influence: For this NOSI, levels of influence are the socio-ecological levels (e.g., individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, or societal) at which specific determinants operate to influence risk factors and subsequent health outcomes (see the NIMHD Research Framework, https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/about/overview/research-framework.html, for examples of health determinants at different levels of influence). To constitute an intervention at the interpersonal, organizational, community, or societal level, the intervention must directly alter determinants at that level, not just be delivered in a setting at that level or help individuals manage the consequences of determinants at that level. For example, an intervention to promote better nutrition among school-aged children by adjusting available food options in the school cafeterias would be an organizational-level intervention; an intervention providing nutrition information to students within the schools would be an individual-level intervention. A multi-level intervention is an intervention that impacts determinants at two or more socio-ecological levels.

Background

The NIH Office of Disease prevention is coordinating the new trans-NIH research effort, ADVANCE: Advancing Prevention Research for Health Equity, which grew out of the ODP’s portfolio analysis of NIH research. In an examination of NIH-funded grants and cooperative agreements between fiscal years 2012 and 2017, the ODP found that only 8.5% of all projects focused on preventing the leading risk factors or causes of death and disability (e.g., poor nutrition, low physical activity, smoking), falling well below their burden on the nation’s health. An additional analysis of the NIH research portfolio showed that between fiscal years 2016 and 2019, only 3.6% of NIH-funded prevention projects included a randomized intervention to address a leading risk factor in populations that experience health disparities.

This NOSI focuses specifically on preventive interventions addressing cardiometabolic risk factors across the lifespan in populations that experience health disparities. Efforts to improve these risk factors should be based on research that identifies and addresses relevant determinants of health at individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and societal levels. As part of proposed prevention interventions, investigators should work in collaboration with appropriate community, service system, and/or healthcare partners to develop and evaluate interventions that are relevant, acceptable, and sustainable in community and service settings.

Proposed projects must include an intervention that addresses at least one cardiometabolic risk factor, alone or in combination with other types of risk factors (e.g., smoking, occupational risks), in one or more populations that experience health disparities.

Study designs are encouraged to include the following features:

  • Test new or adapted interventions, novel combinations of multiple interventions, and/or new strategies to implement evidence-based interventions.
  • Be adequately powered to identify intervention effects for the health disparity population(s) of focus and/or the impact of the intervention on reducing or eliminating disparities in health outcomes.
  • Address determinants at one or more levels of influence beyond the individual level and collect or obtain data beyond individual self-report to assess the mechanisms of action at the interpersonal, organizational, community, or societal level, as relevant.
  • Guided by a conceptual model identifying hypothesized pathways between the determinants of health being addressed, the risk factors to be modified, and health outcomes.
  • Designed to measure and test hypothesized pathways, using appropriate methods for examining the impact of multi-level or higher-level (i.e., interpersonal, organizational, community, or societal) mechanisms of action on health outcomes.
  • Use appropriate intervention study designs, such as parallel group- or cluster-randomized trial, a stepped-wedge group- or cluster randomized trial, a rigorous quasi-experimental design such as a group- or cluster-level regression discontinuity design or an interrupted time-series design, or a rigorous alternative. Pre-post designs that lack comparison conditions or sites (e.g., an intervention implemented in a single clinic or neighborhood) are strongly discouraged. Whenever participants are assigned to study arms in groups or clusters (e.g., families, clinics, schools, worksites, communities, counties, states) and observations taken on individual participants are analyzed for intervention effects, special methods are required for analysis and sample size. Methods consistent with plans for assignment of participants and delivery of interventions should be documented in the application. Additional information is available at https://researchmethodsresources.nih.gov/.
  • Assess health outcomes at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, or community level, or a combination.
  • Include changes in risk factors (e.g., improvements in nutrition or physical activity) as the primary health outcome, or as an intermediate outcome that impacts downstream outcomes (e.g., onset of a health condition, engagement in health care). Because cardiometabolic factors increase risk for a variety of health conditions, downstream health outcomes are not limited to cardiovascular diseases.
  • Involve collaborations with non-academic/non-research partners, as relevant to the project aim(s), setting(s), and population(s). Examples include, but are not limited to, public health or social service agencies; justice organizations; departments of housing, labor, transportation, and recreation; health systems; medical, dental, behavioral health, or other health clinics; school systems; businesses; and faith-based organizations. Multi-sectoral collaborations involving partnerships with multiple types of organizations in the public and private sector are strongly encouraged.
  • Employ a common set of tools and resources that will promote the collection of comparable data on SDOH across studies. In particular, studies are strongly encouraged to use SDOH measures from the Core and Specialty collections that are available in the Social Determinants of Health Collection of the PhenX Toolkit as relevant (www.phenxtoolkit.org).

Applications Not Responsive to the FOA

  • Projects that do not develop and/or test a preventive intervention to address cardiometabolic risk factors.
  • Projects without a focus on one or more NIH-designated populations with health disparities in the US.

Non-responsive applications will not be reviewed. Applicants are strongly encouraged to reach out to the relevant scientific contacts to discuss whether their applications are responsive.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is interested in interventions that address behavioral risk factors for cancer in populations that experience health disparities.These include many behaviors that also increase cardiometabolic risk, such as smoking, obesity, poor diets, and lack of physical activity. Since these risk factors often cluster together, NCI is particularly interested in interventions that address multiple behavioral risk factors (e.g., smoking and obesity; poor diets and sedentary lifestyles) and that operate at multiple levels (e.g., individual, family, community, built environment, policy) to address these risk factors in populations experiencing health disparities.

Additional areas of interest include, but are not limited to, interventions that propose to:

  • Identify mechanisms by which the health behavior interventions being tested may operate to reduce cancer risk;
  • Address social determinants of health contributing to health inequities in health behaviors implicated in cardiometabolic and cancer risk; strategies are encouraged that test social constructs (e.g., implicit and/or structural bias, covert, and overt racism) among diverse populations experiencing health disparities.
  • Develop and test strategies using a framework useful for developing behavioral interventions for chronic diseases, such as the Science of Behavior Change experimental medicine approach or the ORBIT model.

NCI will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or their subsequent reissued equivalents:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

R21

PAR-19-309- Stimulating Innovations in Behavioral Intervention Research for Cancer Prevention and Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022

R03

PAR-20-052- NCI Small Grants Program for Cancer Research for Years 2020, 2021, and 2022 (NCI Omnibus R03 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 20, 2022

R01

PAR-21-035- Cancer Prevention and Control Clinical Trials Grant Program (R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022

R01

PAR-21-190- Modular R01s in Cancer Control and Population Sciences (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

November 8, 2022

R21

PAR-21-341 - Exploratory Grants in Cancer Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 7, 2022


National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

NHLBI is interested in supporting applications that include multilevel Intervention studies focusing on the prevention or reduction of cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g., targeting diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, smoking, etc.) in NIH-designated populations that experience health disparities with a focus on the mechanism of action of the intervention.

NHLBI will only accept applications in response to PA-20-183 or the subsequent reissued equivalent:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Application Due Date

R01

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022


For PA-20-183, only mechanistic clinical trials will be accepted in accordance with NOT-HL-19-690. Applicants wishing to propose non-mechanistic clinical trials (i.e., efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, acceptability, and implementation) through separate FOAs with specific requirements may consider applying to one of the NHLBI clinical trial mechanisms described at https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/grants-and-training/clinical-trial-development-continuum and referencing this NOSI in a cover letter.

Potential NHLBI applicants requesting $500,000 or more in direct costs in any year (excluding consortium F&A) must consult NHLBI program staff and submit a letter of request to the NHLBI prior to submitting any applications, and follow the procedures of the NHLBI implementation of the NIH Policy on the Acceptance for Review of Unsolicited Applications that Request $500,000 or More in Direct Costs as described in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide.

Investigators planning to submit an application in response to this NOSI are strongly encouraged to contact and discuss their proposed research/aims and appropriateness for the R01 mechanism with an NHLBI program officer listed on this NOSI well in advance of the receipt date.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

Alcohol misuse is not only linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions but also associated with cardiometabolic risk factors that are the focus of this NOSI. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure and negatively influence glucose metabolism. Drinking levels and patterns have been correlated with diet quality and body weight gain. Combined heavy alcohol consumption, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle can increase the risk of negative health outcomes. The 2020–2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends against anyone initiating alcohol consumption for any reason. If adults of legal drinking age choose to drink, the Guidelines recommends that they should drink in moderation: up to one standard drink per drinking day for women and up to two for men. Binge drinking should be avoided.

NIAAA is interested in research that aligns with overlapping priorities of this NOSI and the NIAAA Strategic Plan and addresses the unique health needs of the understudied populations that experience health disparities. Research areas of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Integrative interventions and whole person health approaches to address alcohol misuse together with cardiometabolic risk factors and achieve sustained effects.
  • Preventive alcohol interventions tailored to the unique challenges faced by health disparity populations that can reverse early signs and symptoms of chronic conditions.
  • Technology-based interventions that target alcohol misuse and other modifiable lifestyle behaviors to promote health and improve long-term health trajectories.
  • Strategies to integrate and improve the implementation of preventive interventions targeting alcohol and other cardiometabolic risk factors into healthcare and community systems and identify any unintended adverse effects of implementation.
  • Educational campaign interventions designed to increase public awareness about the negative health effects of alcohol consumption in the US population.
  • Educational interventions designed to improve dietary intake of individuals with alcohol use disorder.
  • Dietary interventions for preventing or attenuating alcohol-induced organ damage and alcohol withdrawal symptoms.
  • Interventions that evaluate the impact of alcohol control policy changes on preventing or reducing cardiometabolic risk factors in health disparity populations.

Please see NOT-AA-22-011 or the subsequent revised Notice for information about NIAAA Data-Sharing Guidance for Human Subjects Grants.

NIAAA will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or their subsequent reissued equivalents:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

R01

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022

R21

PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)

October 16, 2022

R34

PA-21-110 - Pilot and Feasibility Studies in Preparation for Substance Use Prevention Trials (R34 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022


National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Under this NOSI, NIAMS is interested in clinical trial applications testing the implementation of evidence-based diet and/or physical activity interventions— shown to be effective for the primary or secondary prevention of arthritis, other rheumatic, musculoskeletal, or skin diseases— in populations experiencing health disparities.

NIAMS will only accept applications submitted through this FOA or the subsequent reissued equivalent:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Application Due Date

R01

PAR-22-105 -  Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

  

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

Prevention is the first line of defense against cardiometabolic and other chronic diseases and their complications. Many metabolic risk factors are shared between multiple systemic and dental, oral, and craniofacial diseases. Prevention and detection of these risk factors may limit the physical, mental, and socio-economic burden associated with disease onset and progression, resulting in more easily controllable and potentially reversible diseases. Thus, it is essential to ensure that adequate screening opportunities are available and benefit all segments of the population, particularly the most vulnerable individuals.

Expanding screening opportunities to all population subgroups may involve diversifying the types of settings where screenings are offered or offering multiple screening opportunities within the same setting. Cross-cutting partnerships, such as robust medical-dental and community partnerships, increase opportunities to expand cardiometabolic risk factors screening to populations subgroups with limited screening opportunities or elevated disease risk.

Cardiometabolic risk factors screenings are routinely performed in conjunction with dental, oral and craniofacial screenings or procedures, although these screening activities are selective, may not always follow uniform approaches or best practices, and are aimed primarily at ensuring short-term patient safety, often with incomplete or inconsistent follow-up and medical referral for diagnostic confirmation and specialized care.

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, interventions that:

  • Seek to improve the provision and uptake of cardiometabolic risk factors screening in diverse dental settings, including those settings that serve populations that experience health disparities . This may include establishing robust multidisciplinary collaborations for identification of high-risk patients;
  • Compare the effectiveness of different cardiometabolic risk factors screening approaches in dental care settings;
  • Assess aspects of screening for cardiometabolic risk factors and referral by dental professionals;
  • Improve rates of referral following cardiometabolic risk factors screening;
  • Enhance cardiometabolic risk factors screening and referral using integrated Electronic Health Records and clinical decision support systems;
  • Assess novel screening approaches using new instruments, algorithms, or technologies; and
  • Seek to modify socio-behavioral factors linked to cardiometabolic risk factors.

NIDCR will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or their subsequent reissued equivalents:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

UG3/UH3

PAR-21-160 - NIDCR Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

October 4, 2022

UG3/UH3

PAR-21-317 - NIDCR Behavioral and Social Intervention Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

October 4, 2022


National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

The mission of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to discover how the environment affects people to promote healthier lives. Examples of environmental exposures relevant to the mission of the NIEHS include, but are not limited to, industrial chemicals or manufacturing byproducts, e-waste, metals, pesticides, herbicides, and inhaled toxicants including indoor air pollutants from cooking and other sources. For this announcement, the NIEHS is interested in supporting research investigating intervention strategies to reduce environmentally induced cardiometabolic disorders and diseases.

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Studies investigating the impact of an intervention to reduce an environmental risk factor for adverse cardiometabolic health.
  • Studies evaluating the impact of an intervention in individuals with cardiometabolic risk phenotypes.
  • Neighborhood-level or community-level interventions (e.g., greenspace, traffic-related air pollution, food deserts).
  • Studies incorporating personal monitoring applications or tools to assess the efficacy of intervention strategies
  • Pilot studies exploring the impact of an intervention combined with exposure science tools or technologies
  • Studies using an “-omic” or other molecular approaches to examine the efficacy of environmental exposure interventions with cardiometabolic outcomes.
  • Studies focusing on dissemination and/or implementation of promoting preventive strategies to reduce adverse cardiometabolic health (e.g., reduction of personal exposures through modified behavioral and lifestyle factors).

NIEHS will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or their subsequent reissued equivalents:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

R01

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022

R01

NOT-HL-20-788 - Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Stimulating Intervention Research to Reduce Cardiopulmonary Impacts of Particulate Matter in Air Pollution among High-Risk Populations

October 5, 2022

R01

PAR-22-105 - Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

*NIEHS encourages applicants to reach out to the relevant scientific contacts to discuss whether their applications align with the goals of this FOA.

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

NIMHD is interested in supporting innovative, multidisciplinary, and collaborative interventions considering determinants from more than one domain or level of influence (see NIMHD Research Framework).Research must focus on one or more populations that experience health disparities (see definition above). Interventions may occur within the context of health care and/or community settings and focus on any age group. Multi-sectoral approaches (e.g., interventions involving housing, labor, education, or other sectors in addition to health care and public health) are of interest. Research projects must aim at attaining optimal multi-cardiometabolic risk factor control goals (based on recommended guidelines of prevention and care), and not just on mere improvement. Innovative and transformative adaptation of research strategies that are congruent with or effectively adapt to the population(s) of interest’s sociocultural and socioeconomic contexts and that promote agency, are a priority. Demonstration of sustainability and affordability of these interventions is also a priority.

Specific areas of research interest include the following topics for intervention studies, but are not limited to:

  • Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), new onset of hypertension during pregnancy, and pregnancy-related weight gain, especially in women/persons at highest risk
  • Diabetes mellitus and associated cardiometabolic abnormalities in women/persons with history of GDM and family history of diabetes
  • Smoking/tobacco cessation and control of other cardiometabolic risk factors (including anxiety and depressive disorders) during pregnancy
  • Smoking/tobacco use or smoking cessation among children and youth
  • Assessments and interventions on anxiety, depression and other behavioral/psychological/mental health conditions along with traditional cardiometabolic risk factors for any age group, including school-aged children and adolescents, and older adults
  • Assessments and interventions on sleep disorders, optimal dental/periodontal care, and optimal nutrition along with traditional cardiometabolic risk factors for any age group, including school-aged children and adolescents, and older adults
  • Cardiometabolic disease preventive strategies that leverage community and social contexts and are adaptable to challenging social circumstances, for example, seasonal or unstable employment, and short-term or long-term housing instability.
  • Preventive strategies that account for employment and/or workplace circumstances, for example multiple occupations or employment, irregular or night shifts, sick leave, and other work-related benefits (or the lack there of).
  • Strategies that adapt to or leverage community and social contexts (for example, farming and rural settings, employee wellness programs, schools-based health centers, faith-based organizations, community- or patients’ support groups, among others)
  • Preventive strategies focused on older adults, and especially those with multiple chronic conditions, including cardiometabolic risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease. Optimization of nutritional status and physical fitness while reducing risk of falls and injury, enhancing medication adherence and safety (when needed), while preventing or minimizing medication-related adverse events, reducing preventable hospitalizations/readmissions and visits to the emergency department, and incorporating patient-reported outcomes, are of interest.
  • Family-based studies focused on preventing cardiometabolic diseases or intervening on cardiometabolic risk factors. Studies may consider family decision-making processes, recommended health screenings, health/nutrition/sleep determinants, stressors, coping, and resilience strategies.

NIMHD will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or their subsequent reissued equivalents:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

R21

PAR-20-150 - NIMHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022

R01

PAR-20-310 - Health Services Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

November 17, 2022

R01

PAR-21-081 - Addressing Health Disparities among Immigrant Populations through Effective Interventions (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

R01

PAR-21-287 - Effectiveness of School-Based Health Centers to Advance Health Equity (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October5, 2022

R01

PAR-21-358 - Risk and Protective Factors of Family Health and Family Level Intervention (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

R01

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (R01 Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022


NIMHD encourages applicants to reach out to the relevant scientific contacts to discuss whether their applications align with the goals of this FOA.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

The NINDS is interested in applications within the NINDS mission (NINDS Disorders Index: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/health-information/disorders). Research areas include, but are not limited to: projects proposing to test, adapt, or examine new strategies to implement evidence-based interventions that prevent or reduce cardiometabolic risk factors (i.e. high blood pressure, high body mass index, dietary risks, and low levels of physical activity) associated with stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, vascular cognitive impairment, epilepsy, migraine, nervous system infections, spinal cord injury, headache, Parkinson's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders, brain trauma, and neurodevelopmental disorders. The NINDS supports intervention research focused on identifying, monitoring, and targeting biological, environmental, social, community, structural, and healthcare system factors that lead to, or are associated with, disparities (or inequities) in neurological diseases and care across the lifespan. This announcement encourages Health Equity and SDOH theory-driven proposals that test conceptual frameworks, leverage care-settings that serve populations that experience health disparities, and address the needs of multiple stakeholders. Applicants are encouraged to incorporate community engagement strategies into their study designs.

Examples of NINDS relevant cardiometabolic risks factors of interest:

  • Central obesity, or increased waist circumference.
  • Raised triglycerides.
  • Reduced HDL-cholesterol.
  • Raised blood pressure, or hypertension.
  • Raised fasting plasma glucose.

Examples of proposed prevention projects include, but are not limited to:

  • Primary and secondary prevention stroke – studies of agents, devices, or strategies to reduce uncontrolled HTN to prevent recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), or to prevent the first stroke in high-risk populations.
  • Applications proposing to study mechanisms and management of dietary risks or glycemic control to reduce the burden of chronic neurologic illnesses and injury, including trauma and neurotrauma, in aging.
  • Applicants addressing aging-specific cardiometabolic factors regarding predisposition to, management of, and/or outcomes from, chronic neurologic disorders, chronic pain, and injuries.
  • Dietary interventions to increase adherence to Mediterranean, DASH and plant-based diets or to increase consumption of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, and less trans and saturated fats.
  • Interventions that evaluate the impact of smoking cessation in prospective policy intervention studies on preventing or reducing recurrent stroke in populations that experience HD.
  • Prevention interventions proposals designed to understand mechanisms that reduce the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) on cardiometabolic risk factors (i.e. hypertension, diabetes, or obesity) that contribute to chronic neurological diseases. For example, examining interventions that address food insecurity or limited access to healthy nutrition in high-risk pediatric populations.

For PA-20-183, only mechanistic clinical trials will be accepted in accordance with NOT-NS-18-011. Applicants wishing to propose other clinical trials (i.e., efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, acceptability, and implementation) through separate FOAs should consider reviewing submission guidelines listed on the NINDS clinical trials website. A letter of intent and communication with NINDS program staff prior to submission of an application is strongly encouraged.

NINDS will only accept applications submitted through these FOAs or the subsequent reissued equivalent:

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

R01

PA-20-183- Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required).

October 5, 2022

R01

PA-20-184- Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required).

October 5, 2022


Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)

The ODP is the lead office at the NIH responsible for assessing, facilitating, and stimulating research in disease prevention. In partnership with the 27 NIH Institutes and Centers, the ODP strives to increase the scope, quality, dissemination, and impact of NIH-supported prevention research. The ODP co-funds research that has strong implications for disease and injury prevention and health equity and that includes innovative and appropriate research design, measurement, and analysis methods. The ODP has a specific interest in projects that develop and/or test preventive interventions. The ODP does not award grants; therefore, applications must be relevant to the objectives of at least one of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers (IC) listed in this announcement. Please contact the relevant IC Scientific/Research Contact(s) listed for questions regarding IC research priorities and funding. ODP only accepts co-funding requests from NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs). For additional information about ODP, please refer to the ODP Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2019–2023.

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

The Office of Research on Women’s Health focuses on research that is relevant to the health of women across the life course and advancing science where the consideration of sex and/or gender influences on health are integrated across the biomedical research enterprise, as highlighted in the 2019-2023 Trans-NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research. In the context of this FOA, ORWH is interested in advancing rigorous research on preventive interventions relevant to the cardiometabolic risk factors, both biological and social and their intersection, in populations of women that bear a disproportionate burden of health risks, disease prevalence and poorer cardiometabolic outcomes.

Application and Submission Information

This notice applies to due dates on or after October 5 5,2022and subsequent receipt dates through September 8, 2025. 

Submit applications for this initiative using one of the following funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this notice.

 

Activity Code

FOA

First Available Due Date

Participating ICs

R01

PA-20-183 - Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022

NHLBI, NIAAA, NIEHS, NIMHD, NINDS

R01

PA-20-184- Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)

October 5, 2022

NINDS

R21

PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)

October 16, 2022

NIAAA

R34

PA-21-110 - Pilot and Feasibility Studies in Preparation for Substance Use Prevention Trials (R34 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022

NIAAA

R01

PAR-22-105 - Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

NIAMS, NIEHS

R21

PAR-19-309 - Stimulating Innovations in Behavioral Intervention Research for Cancer Prevention and Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022

NCI

R03

PAR-20-052 - NCI Small Grants Program for Cancer Research for Years 2020, 2021, and 2022 (NCI Omnibus R03 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 20, 2022

NCI

R01

PAR-21-035 - Cancer Prevention and Control Clinical Trials Grant Program (R01 Clinical Trial Required)

October 5, 2022

NCI

R01

PAR-21-190 - Modular R01s in Cancer Control and Population Sciences (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

November 8, 2022

NCI

R21

PAR-21-341 - Exploratory Grants in Cancer Control (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)

October 7, 2022

NCI

UG3/UH3

PAR-21-160 - NIDCR Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

October 4, 2022

NIDCR

UG3/UH3

PAR-21-317 - NIDCR Behavioral and Social Intervention Clinical Trial Planning and Implementation Cooperative Agreement (UG3/UH3 Clinical Trial Required)

October 4, 2022

NIDCR

R01

NOT-HL-20-788 - Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Stimulating Intervention Research to Reduce Cardiopulmonary Impacts of Particulate Matter in Air Pollution among High-Risk Populations

October 5, 2022

NIEHS

R21

PAR-20-150 - NIMHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 - Clinical Trial Optional)

October 16, 2022

NIMHD

R01

PAR-20-310 - Health Services Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

NIMHD

R01

PAR-21-081 - Addressing Health Disparities among Immigrant Populations through Effective Interventions (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

NIMHD

R01

PAR-21-287 - Effectiveness of School-Based Health Centers to Advance Health Equity (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

NIMHD

R01

PAR-21-358 - Risk and Protective Factors of Family Health and Family Level Intervention (R01 -Clinical Trial Optional)

October 5, 2022

NIMHD

 

Applicants must select the IC and associated FOA to use for submission of an application in response to the NOSI. The selection must align with the IC requirements listed in order to be considered responsive to that FOA. Non-responsive applications will be withdrawn from consideration for this initiative. In addition, applicants using NIH Parent announcements (listed below) will be assigned to those ICs on this NOSI that have indicated those FOAs are acceptable and based on usual application-IC assignment practices.

  • PA-20-183 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-20-184- Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)
  • PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide and the funding opportunity announcement used for submission must be followed, with the following additions:

  • For funding consideration, applicants must include “NOT-OD-22-154” (without quotation marks) in the Agency Routing Identifier field (box 4B) of the SF424 R&R form. Applications without this information in box 4B will not be considered for this initiative.

Applications nonresponsive to terms of this NOSI will not be considered for the NOSI initiative.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to the contacts in Section VII of the listed funding opportunity announcements with the following additions/substitutions:

Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Jennifer Alvidrez, PhD
Office of Disease Prevention
Telephone: 301-827-0071
Email: Jennifer.alvidrez@nih.gov

Susan Czajkowski, Ph.D.
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240.660.0159
Email: susan.czajkowski@nih.gov

Alison Brown, PhD, MS, RDN
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Phone: 301-435-0583
E-mail: alison.brown@nih.gov

Nicole Redmond, MD, PhD, MPH
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Phone: 301-435-0379
E-mail: nicole.redmond@nih.gov

I-Jen Castle, Ph.D.
Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 301-827-4406
Email: i-jen.castle@nih.gov

Andras Orosz, Ph.D.
Division of Metabolism and Health Effects
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 301-443-2193
Email: orosza@mail.nih.gov

Shahnaz Khan, MPH
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Phone: 301-451-9893
E-mail: khanshah@mail.nih.gov

Lorena Baccaglini, DDS, MS, PhD, NE-CPhT
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Telephone: 301-435-7908
Email: lorena.baccaglini@nih.gov

Melissa M Smarr, PhD
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Phone: 984-287-4507
E-mail: melissa.smarr@nih.gov

Larissa Aviles-Santa, MD, MPH
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-827-6924
E-mail: avilessantal@mail.nih.gov

Erica L. Littlejohn, PhD
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Phone: (301) 435-2719
E-mail: Erica.Littlejohn@nih.gov

Elena K Gorodetsky, M.D., Ph.D.
Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)
Phone: (301) 594-9004
E-mail: egorod@mail.nih.gov

Peer Review Contact(s)

Examine your eRA Commons account for review assignment and contact information (information appears two weeks after the submission due date).

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Dawn Mitchum
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240.276.5699
Email: Dawn.Mitchum@nih.gov

Francesca Hunter
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Phone:301-402-3127
Email: francesca.hunter@nih.gov

Judy Fox
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 301-443-4707
Email: jfox@mail.nih.gov

Sahar Rais-Danai
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Phone: 301-594-5032
E-mail: sahar.rais-danai@nih.gov

Diana Rutberg, MBA
National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Phone: (301) 594-4798
E-mail: dr258t@nih.gov

Jenny L Greer
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Phone: 984.287.3332
E-mail: jenny.greer@nih.gov

Priscilla Grant, JD
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-594-8412
E-mail: pg38h@nih.gov

Chief Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Email: ChiefGrantsManagementOfficer@ninds.nih.gov