Notice of Participation of Additional NIH Institutes and Centers in PAR-20-153: Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA) (R25-Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
Notice Number:
NOT-HG-22-017

Key Dates

Release Date:

April 7, 2022

Related Announcements

PAR-20-153 - NIH Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) (R25 - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NOT-HG-22-006 - Notice of Participation of Additional NIH Institutes and Centers in PAR-20-153: Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA) (R25-Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NOT-HG-22-016 - Notice of Early Termination of NOT-HG-22-006, “Notice of Participation of Additional NIH Institutes and Centers in PAR-20-153: Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA) (R25-Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Issued by

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

National Eye Institute (NEI)

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

NIH BRAIN Initiative

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

Purpose

Purpose

This Notice reflects the participation of multiple other NIH Offices, Institutes and Centers (OICs) in the NIH Science Education Partnership Awards (PAR-20-153).

The SEPA program supports Pre-K to grade 12 (P-12) and informal science education (ISE) activities that: (1) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce and (2) foster a better understanding of NIH-funded biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its public health implications. The SEPA program targets two primary audiences: (1) SEPA formal or classroom-based projects that provide STEM content, pedagogical expertise, and problem solving skills to teachers, students, and families in communities not generally supported by advanced and innovative educational practices: (2) SEPA informal science education (ISE) activities that are conducted in outside-the-classroom venues as well as in science centers and museums, target both workforce diversity and improved public health literacy.

Applications that target P-12 or ISE topics that cannot be addressed by existing school, community, or ISE-based activities are encouraged.

Proposed projects:

  • May focus on any area of NIH-funded research
  • Must address broader impact issues, i.e., the potential to benefit society and contribute to the achievement of specific, desired workforce diversity and capabilities, societal, and health literacy outcomes.

The following sections of PAR-20-153 have been modified (changes in italics) to reflect the participation of multiple Offices, Institutes, and Centers (OIC) in this FOA.

Part 1. Overview Information

Components of Participating Organizations

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

National Eye Institute (NEI)

National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

NIH BRAIN Initiative (https://braininitiative.nih.gov)

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

Assistance Listing Number(s): 93.859; 93.867; 93.172; 93.866; 93.273; 93.855; 93.286; 93.865; 93.121; 93.847; 93.279; 93.242; 93.853; 93.361; 93.307; 93.213; 93.350; 93.313

Part 2. Full Text of Announcement

Section 1. Funding Opportunity Description

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) encourage individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in the biomedical and behavioral sciences, to pursue further studies or careers in research; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

The overarching goal of this R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs.

To assure the vitality and continued productivity of the research enterprise, the NIGMS provides leadership in training the next generation of scientists, in enhancing the diversity of the scientific workforce, and in developing research capacity throughout the country.

The SEPA program supports P-12 and informal science education (ISE) activities that: (1) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce and (2) foster a better understanding of NIH-funded biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its public health implications. The SEPA program targets two primary audiences: (1) SEPA formal or classroom-based projects, provide STEM content, pedagogical expertise, and problem solving skills to teachers, students, and families in communities not generally supported by advanced and innovative educational practices: (2) SEPA informal science education (ISE) activities, conducted in outside-the-classroom venues as well as in science centers and museums, target both workforce diversity and improved public health literacy.

Applications that target pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12) or ISE topics that are not be addressed by existing school, community, or ISE-based activities are encouraged.

Proposed projects:

  • May focus on any area of NIH-funded research
  • Must address broader impact issues, i.e., the potential to benefit society and contribute to the achievement of specific, desired workforce diversity and capabilities, societal, and health literacy outcomes.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support innovative educational activities with a primary focus on:

  • Courses for Skills Development: For example, advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, or specialized research or analytical skills such as biostatistics and datascience.
  • Research Experiences: Research experiences for P-12 teachers and students that will provide hands-on exposure to research methods and concepts that are not available through conventional teacher training or classroom activities.
  • Mentoring Activities: Programs that provide mentors and near-peer role models, in terms of age, gender, race, and ethnicity, for P-12 students.
  • Curriculum or Methods Development: For example, to improve biomedical, behavioral, or clinical science education, or to develop novel instructional approaches or computer and data science-based educational tools.
  • Outreach: Activities that enhance workforce diversity, community health and medicine knowledge through dissemination of educational resources and biomedical, behavioral and clinical research findings.

Examples of projects within the scope of activity of SEPA include:

  • Innovative and inquiry-based P-12 curricula that will increase student interest in STEM topics.
  • Understanding of the scientific research process to improve biomedical, behavioral, or clinical science education.
  • Virtual reality or artificial intelligence-based educational tools.
  • Community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects on important health prevention issues such as obesity, diabetes, opioid addiction and vaping
  • Citizen science or crowd-sourcing projects where non-scientists participate in scientific research either alone or in collaboration with scientists.
  • Maker Movement projects where students and teachers learn by "doing" or "making" inside or outside-the-classroom.
  • Veterinarian-based P-12 projects that will encourage students to consider careers in veterinary medicine or projects designed to educate students, teachers, and the community on the need for, and the ethical use of, animals in research.
  • Curriculum or methods development activities for P-12 teachers that provide instruction in novel approaches to STEM topics that challenge the current knowledge base of pedagogy and problem based learning.
  • Interactive digital media (IDM)-based projects where scientists partner with educators and developers to create learning resources for P-12 students, teachers, and the public. IDM applications may include, but are not limited to: interactive curricula; attitude changes towards game-based learning; new skills development; teamwork and group activities; public participation in scientific research (citizen science) projects; and behavioral changes in lifestyle and health.
  • Public service announcements, documentaries, films, radio, TV, and other media-based community health literacy resources.
  • Science center and museum-based exhibits, traveling exhibits, and public outreach activities e.g., science cafes and community health fairs, that will educate students, teachers, and the community on health-related topics.
  • Quantitative and computational skill-building educational resources for a data-science literate workforce.
  • Collaborations and leveraging with the following programs and other educational organizations:


New areas of high SEPA programmatic interest include:

  1. Educational activities, where participants have access to research-generated data, that will train students for informatics, bioinformatics, data science careers.
  2. Embedded math and reading content for projects targeting P-8 student participants.
  3. Adaptations of successful SEPA programs in new locations or with new populations.

Scientific Interests of Partnering NIH Institutes and Centers Are Delineated Below:

NHGRI will fund educational, outreach, research and clinical activities and experiences including developing programs that provide: early exposure to genomics; increased basic knowledge of genomics; and age-appropriate research experiences. Courses and activities should be in one or more of the areas relevant to NHGRI's research programs-genome sciences, genomic data science, genomic medicine, health equity in genomics, and ethical, legal, and social implications of genomics research. Programs should also complement the NHGRI Action Agenda Goal 1 to encourage individuals from diverse backgrounds including individuals from underrepresented groups in biomedical research to pursue genomics careers.

NINDS will support research educational activities that address or seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system in the healthy and diseased brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and informal science education activities the highlight knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease for all people. NINDS also encourages activities focused on understanding and addressing disparities in neurologic health and health outcomes in disparate populations. NINDS expects to support educational activities that encourage individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in the neuroscience field. Programs should align with the NINDS goals of the Strategic Plan for Training and Workforce Diversity.

ORWH is interested in projects that reflect its mission and programmatic interests. Some examples (not inclusive) are: (1) Innovative science and health education curricula that emphasize the biological and physiological differences between males and females. (2) Books, films, and other media featuring women scientists and engineers that would inspire girls to enter into STEMM careers. (3) Interactive games and role-playing opportunities that highlight the importance of a diverse team in solving scientific problems. (4) Resources for P- 12 teachers that inform how common childhood and adolescent diseases and disorders present differently in boys vs. girls.

NIMH will support research educational activities on topics spanning from basic neuroscience and behavioral science, translational application of brain and behavior relationships in healthy and diseased states, as well as mental health services and intervention activities. Proposed research activities should align with the priorities detailed in the NIMH Strategic Plan. NIMH expects to support educational activities that specifically engage individuals from a diversity of backgrounds and experiences. Such educational activities may cover, but are not limited to, topics such as addressing mental health disparities, reducing mental health stigma, or health outcomes in disparate populations.

NIAAA encourages research education applications across a broad spectrum of inquiry related to alcohol misuse and alcohol use disorder. NIAAA supports basic, translational, and clinical research on the causes, consequences, prevention, diagnosis, progression, and treatment of alcohol-related problems across the lifespan. NIAAA encourages meritorious alcohol research projects in the broad areas of neuroscience and behavior, organ damage and other health effects, epidemiology and prevention, and treatment, health services, and recovery. NIAAA also encourages applications on alcohol-related topics relevant to understanding and addressing minority health and health disparities across NIH-defined health disparity populations, and especially within American Indian and Alaska Native populations, along with applications that focus on the training of a diverse research workforce. More information about NIAAA’s mission and research priorities is available in the NIAAA Strategic Plan at https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/strategic-plan. For specific programmatic questions, please contact NIAAA point of contact as listed in this FOA.

NEI will fund educational and research programs targeted at pre-K to grade 12 students and teachers to inspire and train a talented and diverse new generation of individuals to expand and strengthen vision workforce. The proposals dealing with innovative research to understand the eye and visual system, prevent and treat vision diseases, and expand opportunities for people who are visually impaired or require vision rehabilitation are highly encouraged.

NIMHD will support training activities that advance scientific understanding of the causes of health disparities and efforts to reduce health disparities and improve minority health. As part of its efforts to strengthen the national research capacity for minority health and health disparities research, the NIMHD is committed to educating underrepresented and otherwise diverse students, as well as programs to facilitate their inclusion in biomedical research at all stages of their education. To this end, NIMHD is interested in supporting programs that increase educational opportunities for individuals from health disparity populations, including underrepresented groups, to pursue scientific careers.

NINR supports nursing research, which advances the prevention, detection, and management of disease and disability for individuals and populations. Nursing research aims to tackle pressing health challenges and discover solutions to optimize health across clinical, community and policy settings through the lenses of health equity, social determinants of health, population and community health, prevention and health promotion, and systems and models of care. NINR encourages SEPA applications that focus on stimulating interest in nursing research and its holistic, contextualized perspective on health.

NCCIH will support research educational activities and experiences that are well aligned with the NCCIH Strategic Plan (https://www.nccih.nih.gov/about/nccih-strategic-plan-2021-2025) and provide exposure to research on nutritional, psychological, and physical approaches that may have originated outside of conventional medicine. These include natural products (e.g., dietary supplements, plant-based products, probiotics), mind and body approaches (e.g., yoga, massage therapy, meditation, mindfulness-based stress reduction, spinal/joint manipulation, acupuncture, music and arts-based approaches), and multicomponent therapeutic systems. NCCIH is interested in research educational activities that advances research on whole person health, taking a transdisciplinary approach that integrates the natural, social, and health sciences and transcends traditional boundaries. Programs should align with NCCIH’s Strategic Objective to support research training and career development opportunities to increase the diversity and number of well-trained scientists conducting rigorous, cutting-edge research on complementary and integrative health practices. Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the NCCIH programmatic contact listed below.

NIA is interested in projects that reflect its mission to support research on aging, the aging process, and diseases and conditions associated with growing older such as Alzheimer's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease Related Dementias (AD/ADRD). Applications are encouraged that reflect NIA’s programmatic interests in genetic, biological, clinical, epidemiological, neuroscience, behavioral, social, and economic research on aging, both basic and translational, as they relate to the health and well-being of older people. NIA will support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral, social, and clinical research workforce as they relate to aging. In addition to further diversifying the workforce in research, the NIA is committed to reducing health disparities among older adults through supporting projects that reflect the life course perspective. To that effect, NIA is seeking applications that offer (1) tailored learning opportunities, (2) an emphasis on explaining the relevance of aging, the aging process, and the science of aging to students' lives, and (3) opportunities to engage students with an interest in science and foster their development as future scientists who will diversify the research workforce on aging, enrich the questions asked, and expand the scope of interventions developed from the research.

NCATS focuses on understanding the translational process – the process by which biomedical research discoveries are turned into applications that improve human health. NCATS studies the translational process as a science, with a goal of making translation more efficient and effective to advance research across all diseases and conditions. NCATS conducts and supports research across the translational science spectrum from basic discovery to dissemination and implementation – that aims to develop solutions to common roadblocks that slow or stall the translational process.

NCATS encourages pre-K to grade 12 (P-12) research education applications that will provide an awareness in P-12 students of the field of translational science, its great potential to contribute to treatments and cures, and the expertise needed for careers in this field. Proposed projects should increase knowledge of translational science career paths and skills needed to conduct research within a team science environment.

Examples of NCATS’ translational science programs include, but are not limited to:

  • Developing methods and technologies aimed at creating more predictive models to assess toxicity and efficacy of new drugs when used in humans (e.g., Tissue Chip for Drug Screening Program, 3-D Tissue Bioprinting, use of induced pluripotent stem cells, incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) into the drug development process)
  • Increasing the number and success rate of potential new therapeutics for treating rare diseases, coupled with continued support of ongoing research to understand the
    • clinical manifestations, and molecular and physiological aspects of rare diseases
    • Addressing health disparities and promoting health literacy and equity, including areas related to rural health, telehealth, and telemedicine; education and engagement of diverse populations in clinical research studies; dissemination and implementation science and community engagement across all stages of clinical and translational research

In addition to the specific research areas listed above, projects that contribute to developing a general understanding of areas of preclinical and clinical research, regulatory science, biostatistics, epidemiology, health disparities, dissemination and implementation science, bioinformatics, community engaged research, and diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility in research would also foster the development of future translational scientists. Programs should also align with the NCATS Strategic Plan Goal #3: “Develop and foster innovative translational training and a highly skilled, creative, and diverse translational science workforce,” and NIH’s Interest in Diversity

NIBIB will fund educational, outreach, and research activities that provide: early exposure to biomedical engineering and appreciation of its capacity to improve human health and health equity; increased understanding of engineering concepts and their applications in medicine and biology; age-appropriate experiences that engage participants in the design, building and testing of tools and methods to address questions and problems in human biology and disease; enhanced understanding of and interest in biomedical engineering as a career path; and career opportunities and guidance to make the biomedical engineering career pathway more accessible for students from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in engineering and to prepare students for careers in biomedical engineering. Courses and activities should be in one or more of the areas relevant to NIBIB’s Scientific Programs.

NIDA will support applications related to addiction sciences, including, but not limited to: cellular and molecular neuroscience, neuroimaging, genetics, medication and treatment development, development of new and improved strategies to prevent substance use and its consequences, neuroimmune signaling, neuropathology in brain systems, cognitive processes, population neuroscience, HIV and drugs of abuse (including basic discovery science research as well as applied research on delivery of HIV and substance use prevention and treatment services to persons who use drugs), medication development, epidemiology, identifying the biological, environmental, behavioral, and social causes and consequences of substance use and addiction across the lifespan, and implementation science, including secondary data analysis. In all these and related areas of addiction sciences research, NIDA encourages an emphasis on understanding and addressing health disparities which are experienced by vulnerable populations

NIAID will support innovative science education activities related to our institute’s areas of focus: HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, allergy, immunology, and transplantation research including the development of therapies, vaccines, diagnostics, and other advanced technologies (including but not limited to data science and bioinformatics). The pursuit of NIAID’s research mission requires innovation, collaboration, and broad-mindedness. Programs that transcend individual diseases or immunological conditions form an important part of our research agenda.

NIAID seeks to further promote diversity in research training and education programs by developing programs that ultimately support the increased participation and retention of investigators from nationally underrepresented backgrounds as defined in the Notice of NIH’s Interest in Diversity, NOT-OD-20-031. By supporting educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research workforce, NIAID strives to increase the pool of current and future research investigators from diverse backgrounds, including from groups underrepresented within NIAID mission areas, and facilitate the career advancement and/or transition of participants to the next step in their scientific careers.

NIDCR will support innovative research educational activities in research areas relevant to the NIDCR mission to advance fundamental knowledge about dental, oral, and craniofacial health and disease, and to translate these findings into prevention, early detection, and treatment strategies that improve overall health for all individuals and communities across the lifespan. NIDCR expects educational, outreach and research activities to emphasize participation of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in dental, oral, and craniofacial research. Applications that include partnerships with dental schools are also encouraged.

NIDDK will be interested in education programs with focus in areas of some of the most common, costly, and chronic conditions, including diabetes and other endocrine disorders, metabolic abnormalities, digestive diseases, diet and nutrition, liver diseases, kidney diseases, urologic diseases, and hematologic diseases.

NICHD’s mission is to lead research and training to understand human development, improve reproductive health, enhance the lives of children and adolescents, and optimize abilities for all. Of high priority are research education projects for underserved preK-12 students that are inclusive of mentors, near-peer role models, and students with disabilities (physical, cognitive, and/or intellectual) and chronic disorders, as well as diverse in age, gender, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, language preference, socioeconomic (SES) status, and rural/urban residence. Programs should also align with NICHD’s Strategic Plan (https://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/strategicplan).

Proposed projects should increase knowledge of basic biomedical, behavioral, social, pre-clinical and clinical, human developmental, neurobiological, epidemiology, demography, health disparities, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and/or translational and implementation science career paths and skills needed to conduct research within a team science environment that also encourages community engagement in health and medicine knowledge.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to reach-out to the NICHD Scientific Contact for further guidance.

NOTE: SEPA funding does not support large scale STEM or ISE projects where the total cost of the project will exceed the total amount of the requested SEPA award, e.g., "seed money" for a project larger and longer term than the proposed SEPA project.

Research education programs may complement ongoing research training and education occurring at the applicant institution, but the proposed educational experiences must be distinct from those training and education programs currently receiving Federal support. R25 programs may augment institutional research training programs (e.g., T32, T90) but cannot be used to replace or circumvent the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) programs.

See Section VIII. Other Information for award authorities and regulations.

Section VII. Agency Contacts

Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Tony Beck, PhD
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Email: beckl@mail.nih.gov

Ebony Madden, PhD (NHGRI)
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Phone: 301-503-5620
Email:
ebony.madden@nih.gov

Jessica Faupel-Badger, PhD, MPH
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Phone: 301-594-3900
Email:
badgerje@mail.nih.gov

Lanay M. Mudd, PhD., FACSM
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
Phone: 301-594-9346
Email:
lanay.mudd@nih.gov

Neeraj Agarwal
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Phone: 301-435-8155
Email:
agarwalnee@nei.nih.gov

Maria Carranza, PhD
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Phone: 301-480-3572
Email:
NIAtraining@nih.gov

Roya Kalantari, PhD
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Phone: 301-594-5945
Email:
AITrainingHelpDesk@niaid.nih.gov

Zeynep Erim, Ph.D.
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Phone: 301-451-4797
Email: erimz@mail.nih.gov

Laura Kwako, PhD
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Phone: 301-451-8507
Email:
laura.kwako@nih.gov

Elizabeth Powell, PhD
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Phone: 301-443-0786
Email:
elizabeth.powell3@nih.gov

Albert Avila, PhD
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Phone: 301-496-8804
Email:
aavila@nida.nih.gov

Judith Arroyo, PhD
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-402-170
Email:
jarroyo@mail.nih.gov

Kathy Mann Koepke, PhD
Eunice Kennedy Shr
iver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Telephone: (301) 435-6855
Email:
KMK@nih.gov

Lauren Ullrich, PhD
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Phone: 301-451-7964
Email: lauren.ullrich@nih.gov

David Banks, PhD, MPH, MSSW, RN
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Phone: 301-496-9558
Email: david.banks@nih.gov

Xenia Tigno
Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)
Phone: 301-480-1145
Email: tignoxt@mail.nih.gov

Jay Churchill, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Phone: 301-443-3621
Email: churchillj@mail.nih.gov

Leslie Frieden, PhD
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Phone: 301-496-4263
Email: leslie.frieden@nih.gov

Lawrence Y. Agodoa, M.D.
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Phone: 301-594-1932
Email: lawrence.agodoa@nih.gov

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Christy Leake
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Email: Christy.Leake@nih.gov

Deanna L. Ingersoll
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Telephone: 301-435-7858
Email: Deanna.Ingersoll@nih.gov

Neena Amit Gohil
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Phone: 301-451-8313
Email:
neena.gohil@nih.gov

Debbie Chen
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
Phone: 301-594-3788
Email:
debbie.chen@nih.gov

Karen Robinsonsmith
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Phone: 301-451-2020
Email:
kyr@nei.nih.gov

E C Melvin
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Phone: 301-594-3912
Email:
e.melvin@nih.gov

Lauren Early
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Phone: 301-443-2434
E-mail: lauren.early@nih.gov

Pamela G. Fleming
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Phone: 301-481-1159
Email:
pfleming@nida.nih.gov

Paula Acevedo
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Phone: 301-435-2860
Email:
paula.acevedo@nih.gov

Kathryn (Katie) Ellis,
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Phone: 301-451-4791
Email: kellis@mail.nih.gov

Priscilla Grant, JD
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Phone: 301-594-8412
Email: grantp@mail.nih.gov

Chief Grants Management Office
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Email: ChiefGrantsManagementOfficer@ninds.nih.gov

Rita Sisco
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Phone: 301-443-2805
Email: siscor@mail.nih.gov

Randi Freundlich
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Phone: 301-594-5974
Email: freundlichr@mail.nih.gov

Diana Rutberg, MBA
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
Phone: 301-594-4798
Email: rutbergd@mail.nih.gov

Margaret Young
Eunice Kenney Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Phone: 301-642-4552
Email: margaret.young@nih.gov

Tommy Gunter
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Phone: 301-451-3447
Email: Gunterto@mail.nih.gov

All other aspects of this Funding Opportunity Announcement are unchanged.


 

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

Ebony Madden, PhD
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Phone: 301-503-5620
Email: ebony.madden@nih.gov