Notice of Special Interest: Advancing the Science of Geriatric Palliative Care
Notice Number:
NOT-AG-20-041

Key Dates

Release Date:

09/03/2020

First Available Due Date:
October 05, 2020
Expiration Date:
September 08, 2023

Related Announcements

  • PA-19-055 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-19-056 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
  • PA-19-091 – NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)
  • PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-20-195 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
  • PA-20-196 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)
  • PAR-19-070 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
  • PAR-19-071 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Issued by

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

All applications to this funding opportunity announcement should fall within the mission of the Institutes/Centers. The following NIH Offices may co-fund applications assigned to those Institutes/Centers.

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

Purpose

Background

As the population of older adults continues to increase, the prevalence of diseases and conditions common in aging is expected to rise. Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic lung diseases, dementia, and chronic kidney disease will likely continue to be the greatest contributors to morbidity and mortality, as well as the costliest conditions to healthcare systems. However, older Americans infrequently have just one chronic health condition. In 2017, over two-thirds of Medicare beneficiaries had more than one chronic condition, and over 17% had six or more chronic conditions. Disability and greater care needs associated with these conditions is leading to an increase in residence in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Healthcare costs will continue to grow, with health-related spending expected to reach nearly 20% of gross domestic product by 2027.

Serious illnesses resulting from the progression of chronic health conditions pose particular challenges for healthcare decision-making. While treatments with curative intent may forestall complications and relieve some symptoms, disease progression ultimately leads to increased disability and symptom burden that compromise quality of life. In addition, among patients with multiple morbidities, treatments for co-occurring conditions may antagonize each other (also known as therapeutic competition), and patients must evaluate trade-offs among multiple sub-optimal treatment options. As a result, patients' values, preferences, and goals become essential to inform care decisions.

Providing care that is consistent with a patient's values, preferences, and goals is a cornerstone of palliative care. Palliative care focuses on several objectives, including relief of symptoms and suffering, communication of prognosis and treatment options in the context of patients' goals, and coordination of care within and across healthcare settings. Palliative care is not synonymous with hospice or end-of-life care. Rather,  the latter are parts of the spectrum of care for serious illness that is addressed by palliative care, from diagnosis through terminal stages of disease. Moreover, palliative care does not necessarily entail withholding or curbing treatment. Relief of symptoms, enhancing quality of life, and other specific aspects of goal-concordant care may involve optimal medical or surgical treatment of disease. Furthermore, proactive approaches to disease management, such as prehabilitation strategies prior to surgery to improve functional recovery, can be consistent with goal-concordant care. However, without knowing patients' values and preferences, care may be inconsistent or even run counter to patients' goals.

Scope

This Notice of Special Interest (NOSI) encourages research grant applications focused on palliative care in geriatric populations. This NOSI covers studies in a variety of settings including hospitals (and specific sites within hospitals including specialty medical or surgical wards, intensive care units, and emergency departments), post-acute care settings, outpatient clinics and doctors' offices, patients' homes and other residential settings, long-term care facilities, hospices, and other healthcare or community settings. This NOSI encourages both prospective studies and analyses of existing datasets, health and medical records, claims data, or other sources. Leveraging ongoing cohorts, intervention studies, networks, data and specimen repositories, and other existing research resources and infrastructure is encouraged. Study designs may include observational approaches, quasi-experimental designs, and interventional studies.

Topics of interest among Institutes and Centers (ICs) participating in this NOSI are summarized below. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Scientific/Research contacts listed below to ensure that proposed aims are consistent with the mission(s) of the intended IC(s). Where IC topic areas overlap, applicants are especially encouraged to contact the respective IC representatives to discuss appropriate arrangements for dual assignment.

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

The NCI is interested in studies that focus on advancing the science of geriatric palliative care in the context of cancer patients, cancer populations, and other persons affected by cancer. Examples of studies of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Analyze and compare biological, social, and psychological factors that place aging patients at risk for poor outcomes (e.g., decreased survival, serious adverse events) during and following cancer treatment.
  • Examine the trajectory of physical and functional abilities during cancer treatment.
  • Develop and refine interventions that improve older patients' tolerance of and adherence to cancer therapies.
  • Examine physician and patient factors that contribute to treatment decision-making (e.g., enrolling in cancer clinical trials, implementing dose reductions of cancer therapies).
  • Develop, test, and evaluate interventions that aim to deliver timely, effective, patient-centered palliative care to older adults diagnosed with cancer.
  • Develop, test, and evaluate cancer care delivery models for older adults with cancer, including those that allow for the provision of palliation simultaneously with active treatment, including clinical trial participation.
  • Identify and address the palliative care needs of special cancer patient populations who may be medically underserved by palliative care, including older adults with comorbid conditions and individuals being treated for less common cancers and hematologic malignancies.
  • Expand knowledge of the efficacy of interventions known to be effective at earlier places along the cancer continuum to manage common cancer symptoms at the end of life.
  • Develop and test tools, multilevel interventions, care delivery models, and health IT features that facilitate the communication of advanced care planning documents among primary, specialty, and acute care providers, and the development of shared understanding of the care plan and interdependencies involved among older adults, family members, caregivers, physicians, healthcare practitioners, and healthcare organizations who care for older adults with cancer.
  • Test the feasibility, acceptability, reach, and effectiveness of telehealth and eHealth palliative care services for older adults diagnosed with cancer, particularly those in medically underserved communities.
  • Develop interventions to build and strengthen cancer palliative care capacity among healthcare providers across the spectrum of healthcare delivery settings.
  • Develop feasible and effective approaches to collect patient-generated health data, including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from older adults with advanced cancers, including patients with limited health literacy and technology access.
  • Develop feasible and effective approaches to evaluate the quality of palliative care provided to older adults with cancer and comorbid conditions.
  • Develop and test methods in data collection and data analysis to address missing outcomes data in palliative care intervention studies of older adults with cancer (e.g., missing due to attrition, patient condition precluding completion of PRO measures), including use of proxy outcome evaluators and clinician-rating scales.
  • Examine prognostic understanding and awareness among older adult cancer patients from the initiation of palliative care to end-of-life, as well as how patients' prognostic understanding relates to family members' and caregivers' prognostic understanding and how patient and family beliefs relate to oncologist-provided prognoses.
  • Develop, test, and evaluate intervention approaches implemented across different healthcare systems and community settings that encourage palliative care interventions based on older cancer patients' health status, not age.
  • Develop, test, and evaluate intervention approaches (from initiation of palliative care to end-of-life) implemented across different healthcare systems and community settings that are based on older cancer patient's health status, not age.

Note: For this NOSI, NCI participates in the following FOAs:

  • PAR-18-559 - Cancer Prevention & Control Clinical Trials Grant Program (R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PAR-19-356 - NCI Clinical & Translational Exploratory/Developmental Studies (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)
  • PA-19-056 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
     

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

NIA is interested in studies that focus on palliative care in individuals and populations with age-related diseases, conditions, and/or special problems and needs associated with older age, such as multiple chronic conditions, polypharmacy, cognitive impairment/dementia, age-related disabilities, and other geriatric syndromes. For applications focused on behavioral interventions, including pragmatic trials and trials involving health systems interventions, NIA seeks applications aiming to develop interventions that: 1) are defined by their principles (mechanisms) and 2) ultimately can be delivered with fidelity in the community, in accordance with the NIH Stage Model.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Development and evaluation of healthcare models and approaches aligned with patient values, preferences, and goals in seriously ill older adults with multiple chronic conditions, Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, or other age-related conditions.
  • Development and evaluation of assessment tools in older adults with complex care needs (e.g., multiple chronic conditions, frailty/multiple age-related disabilities, cognitive impairment/dementia).
  • Development and evaluation of strategies to incorporate palliative care approaches for aging-related conditions by healthcare practitioners who are not palliative care specialists, or collaborative approaches between palliative care specialists and clinicians from other disciplines. (See also research objectives of other participating ICs for specific disciplines.)
  • Evaluation of decision support tools, palliative care consultation triggers, communication aids, and advance care planning approaches for seriously ill older patients and their surrogate decision-makers (when present) or for seriously ill, unbefriended older patients to achieve goal-concordant care, with particular attention to revisiting both shifting goals and differing family member perspectives.
  • Evaluation of discontinuing medications or other treatments in older adults with serious illnesses to reduce treatment complexity, mitigate drug interactions and other adverse effects, or achieve preferred treatment trade-offs, and explore barriers to such discontinuation among patients, their families, and clinicians.
  • Understanding the impact of single or multiple symptoms on function, disease outcomes, quality of life, and decision-making in seriously ill older adults, particularly with multiple morbidities. Symptoms may include pain, fatigue or increased fatigability, dyspnea, nausea/vomiting, constipation, pruritus, anorexia, sleep disturbance, delirium, anxiety, and depressive symptoms.
  • Development of pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic strategies to relieve symptoms (as in the previous bullet) in older adults through consideration of aging physiology, concurrent conditions or treatments, altered symptom perception, or other aging-related changes.
  • Understanding and addressing gender, ethnic, geographic, and socioeconomic disparities in access, delivery, and outcomes of palliative care for older adults and/or their caregivers.
  • Approaches to incorporating and analyzing patient-centered variables relevant to goal-concordant care in older adults that are not routinely captured in research or clinical care settings (e.g., functional assessment, values and treatment preferences, subjective well-being, social support, financial status, and cultural factors).
  • Addressing systemic challenges to conducting research studies of palliative care in older adults, such as barriers to care, high rates of disability and mortality, and adherence among patients, caregivers, family members, and clinicians.
  • Analysis of the effects of coverage policies of Medicare and other care funders on timely access to appropriate palliative care, and of the effects of care coordination, payment bundling, or other organizational and financing innovations on timely access to appropriate palliative care.
  • Development and evaluation of enhanced analytic methods for quasi-experimental and observational studies of palliative care strategies in older adults that address time-dependency, multimodal treatment, matching of control subjects, or other important parameters.

NIA-supported Research Centers may be particularly useful for accessing recruitment resources, analytic capabilities, specimens, specialized expertise, and other aging-related research resources. More information about each of these Center's programs can be found at their respective links: Alzheimer's Disease Research CentersCenters on the Demography and Economics of AgingClaude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence CentersEdward R. Roybal Centers for Translational Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences of Aging, and Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research. Coordination among all of NIA's Centers programs is facilitated through the NIA Research Centers Collaborative Network.

For this NOSI, NIA participates in all applications listed under Application and Submission Information below.

National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

NINR is interested in research to improve the care of individuals with advanced stage illness and their family caregivers. NINR’s research is focused on palliative and end-of-life care across a spectrum of conditions and across the lifespan. It includes the management of symptoms and the provision of physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and supportive palliative and end-of-life care for individuals and their caregivers within a variety of settings including the home and community, acute and long-term care, rural and remote settings, or hospice. NINR's studies of interest include, but not limited to, the following:

• Develop and test interventions for managing pain and other symptoms (e.g., fatigue, dyspnea, nausea, constipation, weight loss, decreased intake, distress, etc.)

• Investigate physical, psychosocial, spiritual, or supportive care interventions that improve outcomes and quality of care (e.g., symptom management, informed decision-making for goal-directed care, care coordination and transitions, and bereavement support)

• Employ interventions, strategies, and clinical tools to increase early engagement in the advance care planning process, improve individual-family-provider communication and shared goals of care (e.g., treatment preferences, values, clinical outcomes, and resources)

• Investigate culturally congruent, individual and family-centered palliative and end-of-life care interventions that include diverse and underserved groups and includes geographic, social determinants, or socioeconomic variations

• Test interventions that promote continuity of care across the end-of-life trajectory, including the development and evaluation of interventions to decrease care fragmentation and promote timely and appropriate transitions (e.g. to hospice)

• Develop and test interventions that enhance communication between individuals, caregivers, and health care providers or strategies that facilitate shared understanding of palliative or end-of-life care goals

• Develop new technologies, electronic health tools, or communication strategies to promote individual and family-centered decision-making during advanced stage illness or at the end of life

Interdisciplinary collaborations that include nurse scientists in the project team are strongly encouraged. Additionally, applicants are encouraged to engage the resources and expertise of existing Palliative Care Networks such as the Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group when appropriate.

For this NOSI, NINR participates in the following FOAs:

  • PA-19-055 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-19-056 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
  • PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-20-195 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)

Racial/ethnic minorities may have unique preferences, decision-making, self-care strategies, access and use of informal or complementary therapies, caregiving, and family and social networks that support geriatric care which affect their choice and use of palliative care. Minorities are less likely to use advanced directives and hospice care and are more likely to die in hospitals after undergoing aggressive care and accruing financial burdens. There also remains an overall distrust of the healthcare system and institutions, as well as underutilization of current palliative care services. Minorities are also more likely to have multiple chronic diseases and experience a greater impact on health-related quality of life based on these diseases, thus requiring more complex care, and they are more likely to experience racially discordant care. Less is known about geriatric palliative care among populations stratified by socioeconomic status independent of race/ethnicity, among those living in underserved rural residences, and among those of sexual and gender minority status.

NIMHD is interested in supporting research on one or more minority or health disparity populations (e.g., African Americans/Blacks, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, underserved rural populations, and sexual and gender minority populations) that focuses on understanding the mechanisms and pathways that contribute to disparities in palliative care by examining the interplay of factors from multiple levels (e.g., individual, family, community, clinician, and health systems). Research may propose using available secondary data, health system data, and/or collection of primary data.

Research topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Identifying values, preferences, and goals for race/ethnic minorities or other health disparity populations' patients, families, and caregivers and how these affect palliative care outcomes.
  • Understanding the role of individual, family, culture, clinician, health system, and social factors that impede or strengthen palliative care.
  • Understanding how to effectively address health determinants from environmental, cultural, social, and system levels within patient-centered approaches.
  • Improving and exploring new and existing palliative care indicators/variables able to distinguish the quality, values, preferences, and goals that are particular to minority or health disparity populations, such as functional assessment, symptom burden, quality of life, values and treatment preferences, subjective well-being, social support, financial status, cultural factors, and other biological or psychosocial variables.
  • Understanding and strengthening patient-clinician interactions, communication, medical decision-making, and continuity of care. For example, assessing ways to improve awareness and knowledge of care options, address patient preferences, minimize clinician biases, address trust barriers, address system barriers, increase coordination of care, and manage expectations.
  • Understanding the context of care settings (e.g. hospital, clinic, community, and home-based settings), how these effect health outcomes, and what influences the patterns of choice, utilization, and quality of the settings.
  • Understanding the role and use of self-management, cultural, traditional, and spiritual approaches among minority and health disparity populations within palliative care.
  • Understanding attitudes and preferences regarding advance care planning among minorities and health disparity populations, as well as compliance with advance care planning by clinicians and healthcare systems.
  • Understanding how advance care planning models can be improved to address barriers, attitudes, values, and goals for minority and health disparity populations, clinicians, and healthcare systems.

For this NOSI, NIMHD participates in the following FOAs:

  • PA-19-055 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-19-056 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

The NHLBI is interested in studies that focus on how to better integrate and implement palliative care into the management of patients with heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS) diseases. Studies that focus on HLBS patients with biologic, physiologic, functional, clinical, and/or psychosocial issues that accompany older age or HLBS patients with multiple chronic conditions would be appropriate for this NOSI.

Questions that could be addressed in response to this NOSI could include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • How can patients with HLBS disease and families at high risk of having unmet palliative care needs be identified?
  • What components of palliative care are most important for improving HLBS patient and family outcomes, and what are the most effective ways to implement these components?
  • How can palliative care be integrated early in the course of disease for patients with COPD, heart failure, and other chronic cardiopulmonary diseases, and does early integration improve patient outcomes and quality of life?
  • How can common burdensome symptoms in cardiorespiratory diseases, such as cough and shortness of breath, be better addressed?
  • How can shared decision making, advanced care planning, and communication about goals of care (including code status and use of instruments such as POLST forms) be improved and implemented in the management of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, heart failure, and other chronic cardiopulmonary diseases?
  • What care models of ICU-based palliative care are most effective for acute respiratory failure and acute decompensated heart failure patients and their families, and how is this influenced by the ICU structure and/or culture?
  • How can high-quality palliative care be delivered by general cardiologists, heart failure specialists, primary care physicians, nurses, social workers, and other clinicians integrated within the heart failure team?
  • How can high-quality palliative care be delivered by nurses, hematologists, social workers, and clinicians integrated within teams specializing in the care of individuals with sickle cell disease and improve the lives of patients and families?
  • How can palliative care approaches for patients with inherited bone marrow failure diseases or myelodysplastic syndromes, including the delivery and surveillance of chronic transfusions, be improved to meet the needs of patients and their caregivers?
  • Can the management of chronic HLBS diseases be improved by increasing patient-physician communication using mobile apps?
  • How can palliative care be used most effectively to improve the quality of life for patients experiencing chronic incurable blood diseases, chronic graft versus host disease, or other morbidities post-hematopoietic stem cell transplants?
  • How can difficulty clearing airway secretions and aspiration risk be best managed in adults with terminal illnesses?
  • How can sleep disturbances during treatment or at the end of life be improved?
  • What are the innovative strategies that can address barriers to care and help facilitate sustained delivery of evidence-based palliative care for patients with HLBS diseases?
  • What is the optimal timing for palliative care consultation in planning long-term goals for patients with life-threatening HLBS diseases and their families?
  • How can palliative care options best be incorporated into clinical decision support, shared decision making, and discussions between patients, families, and clinicians? What patient decision aids and/or tools can be used to facilitate enhanced patient-reported outcomes?

Note: NHLBI will only accept applications in response to PA-20-183 and PA-20-185. For PA-20-183, only mechanistic clinical trials will be accepted in accordance with NOT-HL-19-690. Applicants wishing to propose non-mechanistic clinical trials may consider applying to one of the NHLBI clinical trial mechanisms described at https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/grants-and-training/clinical-trial-development-continuum.

Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH)

2019-2023 Trans-NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research includes goals and objectives that aim to increase and improve women's health research supported by NIH. Goal two of the strategic plan is to "develop methods and leverage data sources to consider sex and gender influences that enhance research for women's health." Consistent with this goal, the ORWH is interested in supporting research studies that focus on advancing the science of geriatric palliative care in understudied, underrepresented, and underreported women such as racial and ethnic minority populations of women, women with complex health needs such as the co-occurrence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease, or obesity; women of low socioeconomic status (SES), women residing in rural or underserved urban areas, women in migrant and immigrant populations, women experiencing homelessness or living in overcrowded congregate housing, or women incarcerated or under community supervision. Interests include research to understand the mechanisms and pathways that contribute to disparities in palliative care in these populations by examining the interplay of factors from multiple levels (e.g., individual, family, community, clinician, and health systems). Research may propose using available secondary data, health system data, and/or collection of primary data.

For this NOSI, ORWH participates in the following FOAs:

  • PA-19-055 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-19-056 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Application and Submission Information

This notice applies to due dates on or after October 5, 2020 and subsequent receipt dates through September 8, 2023. 

Submit applications for this initiative using one of the following Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) or any reissues of these announcement through the expiration date of this Notice. Note that not all Institutes/Centers in this Notice participate in all of the FOAs below. Applicants should verify that the target Institute/Center to which they intend to apply participates in the FOA through which they will apply.

Applicants must select the IC and associated FOA to use for submission of an application in response to this NOSI. The selection must align with the IC requirements listed in order to be considered responsive to that FOA. Non-responsive applications will be withdrawn from consideration for this initiative. In addition, applicants using NIH Parent Announcements (listed below) will be assigned to those ICs on this NOSI that have indicated those FOAs are acceptable and based on usual application-IC assignment practices.

  • PA-19-055 - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-19-056  - NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
  • PA-19-091 – NIH Research Project Grant (Parent R01 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)
  • PA-20-194 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Required)
  • PA-20-195 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
  • PA-20-196 - NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21 Basic Experimental Studies with Humans Required)
  • PAR-19-070 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
  • PAR-19-071 - Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

All instructions in the SF424 (R&R) Application Guide and the FOA used for submission must be followed, with the following additions:

  • Applicants should include “NOT-AG-21-041” (without quotation marks) in the Agency Routing Identifier field (box 4B) of the SF424 R&R form. Applications without this information in box 4b will not be considered for this initiative.

Applications nonresponsive to terms of this NOSI will not be considered for the NOSI initiative.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to the contacts in Section VII of the listed funding opportunity announcements with the following additions/substitutions:

 Scientific/Research Contact(s)

Diane St. Germain
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240-276-7082
Email: dstgermain@mail.nih.gov

Basil Eldadah, M.D., Ph.D.
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Telephone: 301-496-6761
Email: eldadahb@nia.nih.gov

Jeri L. Miller, Ph.D. 
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Telephone: 301-594-6152
Email: jmiller@mail.nih.gov
 

Nancy L. Jones, Ph.D.
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Telephone: 301-594-8945
Email: jonesna@mail.nih.gov

Lora Reineck, MD, MS 
Division of Lung Diseases
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) 
Telephone: 301-435-0222
Email: lora.reineck@nih.gov 

Patrice Desvigne-Nickens, MD
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Telephone: 301-435-0504
Email: desvignp@nhlbi.nih.gov

Nahed El Kassar, MD, Ph.D.
Division of Blood Diseases and Resources
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Telephone: 301-827-8268
Email: nahed.elkassar@nih.gov

Susan Shero, MS, RN
Center for Translational Research and Implementation Science 
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Telephone: 301-496-1051
Email: sheros@nhlbi.nih.gov

Chyren Hunter, Ph. D.
Office of Research on Women's Health
Office of the Director (OD)
Phone: 301-496-7849
Email: chyren.hunter@nih.gov

Peer Review Contact(s)

Examine your eRA Commons account for review assignment and contact information (information appears two weeks after the submission due date).

Financial/Grants Management Contact(s)

Sean Hine
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Telephone: 240-276-6291
Email: hines@mail.nih.gov

John Bladen
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Phone: 301-402-7730
Email: bladenj@nia.nih.gov

Ronald Wertz
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Telephone: 301-594-2870  
Email: wertzr@mail.nih.gov

 Priscilla Grant, J.D.
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Telephone: 301-594-8412 
Email: pg38h@nih.gov

Anthony Agresti
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Telephone: 301-435-0186 
Email: agrestia@nhlbi.nih.gov


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