Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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48016 05/26/2009 at 09:06:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48017 05/26/2009 at 09:07:18 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48018 05/26/2009 at 09:07:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48019 05/26/2009 at 09:08:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48020 05/26/2009 at 09:10:15 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48021 05/26/2009 at 09:11:03 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48022 05/26/2009 at 09:12:15 PM Self     I am opposed to the use of Federal tax payers money being used for the destruction of human embryonic stem cells. Please consider the following information and refrain from using my tax dollars for the destruction of human life. "The beginning of a single human life is from a biological point of view a simple and straightforward matter - the beginning is conception." Dr. Watson A. Bowes, University of Colorado Medical School It is obvious that the current experimentation and research using human embryonic stem cells results in the destruction of a newly developing human being. The research and experimentation necessarily and in premeditated fashion causes the death of a new human life. What is the justification at law for taking human life? Usually, a human life can only be taken when done in self-defense and when there is no other reasonable option. Taking the lives of these new embryonic human lives can hardly be justified as a self-defense measure.

 
48023 05/26/2009 at 09:12:33 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48024 05/26/2009 at 09:12:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48025 05/26/2009 at 09:12:59 PM Self     There has been ongoing research in the field of Embryonic Stem Cells without government funding. This research has failed to yield even the smallest success.

The research done on ADULT stem cells has produced several very promising results and possible cures for all kinds of ailments.

The Government should fund ADULT Stem Cell research and NOT get into the business of farming embryos for the purpose of research. It is wrong to destroy human life and the embryo is human life.

 
48026 05/26/2009 at 09:13:51 PM Self     I am opposed to any stem cell research that capitalizes on or empowers the abortion industry.

 
48027 05/26/2009 at 09:13:56 PM Self     I see many problems with the proposed Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. I basically oppppose forcing individual taxpayers to aid and support human embryonic stemm cell dubious reasearch....when God is their creator, and it is not man's right to play God. Science is not above ethical and moral life choices. We need to preserve and not destroy human emmbryos. I adopted my daughter Monika...who was saved in an abortion attempt. Please protect the innocent and care for the embryo, white, black, or red.. God created them. They all have a place in God's kingdom.

Also why or you pursuing embryonic stem cell research when the prospects of adult stem cell research are much more promising...and nobody's guilty of muurder there?????? There has been miraculous breakthroughs in treating juvenile diabetes with adult stem cells. Why not put your American funding $ there.... and everybody wins!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sincerely,

 
48028 05/26/2009 at 09:14:30 PM Self     This really means a lot to me as my husband is type 1 diabetic and my dad has multiple sclerosis. Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

 
48029 05/26/2009 at 09:15:35 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a full fledged member of the Parkinson’s community as I have been diagnosed with Parkinson's Desease and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

I and others with deseases that may benefit from stem cell reseach implore you to consider this matter carefully and not make decisions based input from those who have only superficial reasons for opposition.

 
48030 05/26/2009 at 09:16:14 PM Self     SERIOUSLY, this is insane that we even have to say STOP using the human embryo as medicine!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The Adult Stem Cell is works better and there is no controversy over the use. Have you really become so obsessed with yourselves and your ghoulish concept of advancement that you are blinded by the immoral act of using human embryo's to create the new penicillin?

Get over yourselves and move forward using some common sense....STOP IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
48031 05/26/2009 at 09:16:14 PM Self     Please stop using my taxes to support this research.

 
48032 05/26/2009 at 09:16:51 PM Self     There is no ethical or practical justification for human embryonic stem cell research. The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48033 05/26/2009 at 09:16:51 PM Self     I am opposed to any stem cell research that capitalizes on or empowers the abortion industry.

 
48034 05/26/2009 at 09:17:35 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
48035 05/26/2009 at 09:17:38 PM Self     I am an American citizen currently living in Canada and feel compelled to provide comments on the draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines for future regulation of embryonic stem cell research funded with public monies. I am encouraged that the NIH is concerned about best scientific practice as well as the moral implications that arise with ESC. Recent articles in scientific journals, however, and their coverage in the news has led me to be concerned about a few of the draft provisions. I am hopeful that ultimately scientists will be provided with the guidelines and support necessary for their critical and globally impactful research.

The National Institute of Health needs to carefully consider the question of retroactivity raised by Patrick L. Taylor in his Cell Stem Cell article “Retroactive Ethics in Rapidly Developing Scientific Fields,” published June 5, 2009. The potential benefits from performing research on existing stem cell lines should not be discarded on the basis of new ethics regulation requiring forms or documentation that, for practical or other reasons, simply cannot be completed for these older lines.

I also believe the National Institute of Health should allow funding for embryos developed outside the reproductive context, specifically for research purposes. IVF embryos, while essential, are not fully representative of the US or world population. Restricting NIH funding to IVF embryos would make it difficult for researchers to gain access to a variety of disease-prone genotypes, especially those associated with minority and economically disadvantaged populations that are underrepresented in the IVF pool. NIH stem cell funding (and the resulting medical advancements) should not be restricted to the genes of wealthy citizens.

Thank you for your consideration of these comments.

 
48036 05/26/2009 at 09:18:09 PM       Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

 
48037 05/26/2009 at 09:18:27 PM Self     I am strongly against such atrocities such as this. I believe that the government of the United States of America was created by the people, to effectively rule the people, however now with Obama in charge of this once godly country America will fall sooner then a balloon in a tack factory if America’s leaders continue with these abominations.

 
48038 05/26/2009 at 09:18:48 PM Self     This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

 
48039 05/26/2009 at 09:19:24 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48040 05/26/2009 at 09:20:00 PM Self     Our President has stated that he does not know when life begins and that the question is above his pay grade. If we must err, we must err on the side of life. We should not create new life in the form of human embryos only to destroy it in the name of research, especially when all the current research shows that adult stem cells, not embryonic stem cells, are the future of stem cell research.

 
48041 05/26/2009 at 09:20:02 PM Self     We ask that those who are able to would not allocate any more funds at all for'human stem cell research or treatment' thereof-we believe that it promotes the death of the unbornwhich in GOD'S EYES is murder and pray that you would not be involved or involve our tax payor's money in the slaughter of innocent life.

 
48042 05/26/2009 at 09:20:12 PM Self     I urge everyone to support forms of research that do not involve the destruction of human life at the earliest stages. There are viable alternatives that are showing promise in the treatment of patients, while embryo destrictive research has not. Please stop wasting money on research that is going nowhere, both scientifically AND ethically.

 
48043 05/26/2009 at 09:20:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48044 05/26/2009 at 09:20:32 PM Self     SAMPLE LETTER (NOTE: personalized information areas are highlighted in red.) To whom it may concern:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. However, I am worried that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing ethically created stem cell lines, create systemic redundancies that will waste scarce resources without added value, and unduly delay important scientific research. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration before finalizing federal rules:

1. HONOR EXISTING REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES Informed consent and independent regulatory oversight by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) represent the international standard used to measure the protection of tissue donors and research subjects. The NIH Guidelines should use the same standards when judging the acceptability of funding work on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from donated embryos rather than retroactively imposing new requirements based on ethical principles that are fully encompassed by existing federal regulations.

The federal regulations for the protection of human subjects at 45 CFR 46 are the gold standard for the protection of human research subjects, specifically, the informed consent and independent regulatory oversight of research tissue donors. The same standards should be used to judge the acceptability of funding research with cell lines derived from donated embryos, including the required elements of informed consent at 45 CFR 46.116 and 117. Most established hESC lines widely used in research today were created from embryos that were obtained in accordance with existing federal regulations and are consistent with the core principles outlined by The Belmont Report, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) regulations and the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Additionally, many of the hESC lines have to date been eligible for federal support and under the new rules such support will cease, making the proposed Guidelines more restrictive than those of the previous administration.

The established hESC lines serve as the scientific standard and were created in compliance with the existing regulations and guidelines requiring independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. To ensure continued scientific success and international collaborations, the principles and regulations used to ensure the ethical donation of human tissue should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines rather than creating new requirements that would be applied retroactively.

2. EXISTING SELF-REGULATORY PROCESS The NIH guidelines should support the strong existing federal regulatory framework provided by 45 CFR 46, rather than setting new and unique requirements for hESC research. The new guidelines should acknowledge that most existing domestic lines were derived in accordance with the core principles in the CIRM regulations and the ISSCR guidelines, and are consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving the protection of human subjects (donors) through IRB oversight and approval. The federal human research regulations support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy research by: o Requiring independent oversight by IRBs and the international equivalent that have extensive experience reviewing informed consent in the context of human tissue research; o Ensuring a process for voluntary informed consent including the review of consent procedures performed domestically and internationally; o Requiring no undue inducements to donors.

In some instances, oversight bodies called Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (ESCRO) committee, as recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) and required by CIRM, as well as other oversight methods in other countries, provide oversight of human pluripotent stem cell research. Established policies demonstrate that the self-regulatory structure provides a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines, the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

3. PROVENANCE BASED ON PREVAILING STANDARDS OF THE TIME The determination of the ethical and legal provenance of hESC lines should be based on the investigator’s documentation of IRB approval for the obtaining of the original tissue used for the derivation of the line. The IRB approval would be based on the usual determination that the embryos were collected in an ethically appropriate manner consistent with existing federal standards for informed consent.

For the purpose of determining eligibility for federal funding, the ethical provenance of existing domestic cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under applicable federal regulations. Many existing hESC lines, whether ineligible or eligible for federal funding during the Bush Administration, were derived from embryos donated by couples who were fully informed of their options and of the purposes of the research, and whose donations were overseen by an IRB. Nevertheless, many of those very same hESC lines will not be eligible for federal research support solely because the IRB approved consent forms donors signed do not comply with the specific new requirements promulgated in the draft Guidelines. As a result, there is serious risk that these lines, some of which are currently the gold standard for hESC research and that receive federal support, will be ruled ineligible for use in NIH-funded research under the proposed Guidelines.

The same risk applies to lines developed pursuant to the laws and regulations of various states and foreign countries, even if their requirements are substantially equivalent to those in the US. Non-US lines should be eligible for federal funding if the IRB and/or ESCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles.

In addition, new requirements that go beyond established US and international practice should only be applied prospectively and after a period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. The NIH should reconsider those aspects of the proposed guidelines that go beyond existing IRB, CIRM, NAS, and ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the establishment of the informed consent document as the sole source for ethical validation of the informed consent process. Such a standard is a new requirement not previously contemplated by CIRM rules, NAS or ISSCR guidelines and is not required by the federal regulations for the protection of human subjects in domestic or international research.

4. FEDERAL hESC REGISTRY A central NIH registry should serve as a single point for verification of hESC lines eligible for federal funding. Such a registry will provide certainty to all parties that the identified lines were derived according to ethical and legal standards. The evaluation of hESC provenance represents a major resource commitment for oversight committees. It is common for multiple institutions to evaluate the provenance of the same lines resulting in the use of scarce resources in a duplication of a labor intensive effort. The NIH should support a more efficient use of scarce resources, reduction in errors, and ensure consistency and certainty of investigators and compliance committees, by supporting initiatives designed to establish and share the provenance of existing and to be created hESC lines. I, therefore, urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the CIRM and ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The CIRM, for example, has a registry mechanism to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Ultimately, such a registry will reduce uncertainty, redundancy of review, and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being established, it would be useful for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be eligible for federal funding based on IRB and ESCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

Sincerely, *****, PhD

 
48045 05/26/2009 at 09:21:18 PM Self     science must always march forwards

 
48046 05/26/2009 at 09:21:31 PM Self     I strongly oppose this action and do not want such overturned.

 
48047 05/26/2009 at 09:22:09 PM Self     Human beings are not Created by God to be a source of cells and organs for the health care industry. A human being begins when sperm and egg unite and a nation that cannibalizes them for any reason does not deserve to survive.

 
48048 05/26/2009 at 09:22:33 PM Self     d. Information about what would happen to the embryos in the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research;

Please add the following:

"Embryonic stem cells are obtained by taking a five- to seven-day-old human embryo and extracting the inner cell mass. These cells can then be cultured and given growth factors to grow into specific types of cells. If such an embryo-which already contains the entire genetic inheritance of the human being that it will become-does not have its inner cell mass extracted, it will grow and mature as usual (into a fetus, baby, child, and adult). Therefore, the extraction of these cells constitutes the taking of a human life, and the use of embryonic stem cells is ethically wrong."

The above statement in quotes is verbatim from the pamphlet "What the Church Teaches - Human Stem Cell Research and Cloning." It is the 1st paragraph of the response to question 3: "What are the moral concerns with embryonic stem cell research?" This pamphlet is by Tara L. Seyfer, Copyright by "Our Sunday Visitor" and protected by Law(s).

 
48049 05/26/2009 at 09:24:24 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

Why don't private venture capitalists put their money toward human embryonic research? Is it because over 70 debilitating conditions have been helped by ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH?

Please do not spend one red cent of my hard earned tax dollars toward human embryonic stem cell research. Do not throw good money after unethical bad science. Use my tax dollars where the cures are helping people- use my tax dollars for ADULT STEM CELL RESEARCH.

 
48050 05/26/2009 at 09:25:08 PM Self     I believe that adult cells and other non-embroyonic cells have shown more promise then embroyonic stem cells according to scientific studies. So why become like Hitler's Nazi Germany and do experimetns on live beings--it is not only scientific unwise, it's morally wrong.

 
48051 05/26/2009 at 09:25:21 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
48052 05/26/2009 at 09:25:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48053 05/26/2009 at 09:26:09 PM Self     Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research. Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board. Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds". The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation. To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
48054 05/26/2009 at 09:27:28 PM Self     I support federal funding for stem cell research. I would like to see the NIH guidelines expanded to include ALL existing stem cell lines. I support federal funding for SCNT, as well.

 
48055 05/26/2009 at 09:27:30 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48056 05/26/2009 at 09:28:35 PM Self     I strongly oppose the use of federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. There has been more breakthroughs in the use of adult stem cells. I believe that life begins at conception and do not want my tax dollars used to create human life only to destroy that life for research. The facts support the use of adult stem cells.

 
48057 05/26/2009 at 09:28:45 PM Self     There is NO NEED to use embryos for stem cell research. Just use blood from the UMBILICAL CORDS of newborns!!!!!! DUH!

May God have mercy on those who kill innocent unborn children. Why is it unlawful to destroy an eagle's egg but not a human embryo??? Jesus is Lord.

 
48058 05/26/2009 at 09:28:51 PM Self     It has come to my attention that, following President Obama’s laudable lifting of the Bush “Presidential ESC Lines” funding restrictions, that the National Institute of Health has issued draft guidelines for future regulation of embryonic stem cell research funded with public monies. I applaud the NIH’s concern for both best scientific practice and the moral implications that arise with ESC. Recent articles in scientific journals, however, and their coverage in the news has led me to be concerned about a few of the draft provisions. I provide these comments as a non-scientist taxpayer interested in providing scientists with the guidelines and support necessary for the efficient and enlightened conduct of their research.

I urge the National Institute of Health to carefully consider the question of retroactivity raised by Patrick L. Taylor in his Cell Stem Cell article “Retroactive Ethics in Rapidly Developing Scientific Fields,” published June 5, 2009 (and released prior to that date on the internet). The potential benefits from performing research on existing stem cell lines should not be discarded on the basis of new ethics regulation requiring forms or documentation that for practical or other reasons simply could not be completed for these older lines.

I also urge the National Institute of Health to allow funding for embryos developed outside the reproductive context, specifically for research purposes. IVF embryos, while doubtless essential, are not representative of the US population. Restricting NIH funding to IVF embryos would make it difficult for researchers to gain access to a variety of disease-prone genotypes, especially those associated with minority and economically disadvantaged populations that are underrepresented in the IVF pool. NIH stem cell funding (and the medical advancements therefore achieved) should not be restricted to the genes of wealthy Americans.

Thank you for your time and attention.

 
48059 05/26/2009 at 09:29:47 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
48060 05/26/2009 at 09:30:57 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
48061 05/26/2009 at 09:30:58 PM Self     Using Embryonic stem cells for research and possible curing diseases is not necessary, as adult stem cells have been used very successfully to help many disease conditions.

Using embryonic stem cells requires starting a human being and then killing it for research. We find this an unnecessary and immoral way to do research.

 
48062 05/26/2009 at 09:31:52 PM Self     I Strongly OPPOSE the creation of human embryos (HUMAN LIFE) just to destroy that life. Adult stem cells should and can be used instead!!!!!

 
48063 05/26/2009 at 09:32:17 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson?s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses

 
48064 05/26/2009 at 09:33:09 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48065 05/26/2009 at 09:33:22 PM Self     I disapprove of using human embryos to obtain stem cells. The taking of human life for research purposes is wrong and will lead us to even more abuses of human life in the future. There is no "Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells" which involves the taking of human life.

Even if the moral arguments are ignored, scientific progress to date does not justify embryonic stem cell research. Embryonic stem cells have resulted in no advancements in treating diseases and have even been shown to cause tumors, whereas adult stem cells are already treating more than 70 medical conditions. Adult stem cell research should be promoted, not embryonic research.

We, as the United States of America, must preserve our founding principles of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness". Approving embryonic stem cell research, with the resultant taking of human life, will seriously undermine our core values and our moral authority in the world.

I urge the disapproval of this whole effort.

 
48066 05/26/2009 at 09:33:54 PM Self     Pluripotent stem cells can be found in a number of tissues, including umbilical cord blood, and since pluripotent stem cells that have been genetically reprogrammed are equivalent to embryonic stem cells there is no need to use embryonic stem cells. Embryonic stem cells are taken from a developing embryo at the blastocyst stage, destroying the embryo, a developing human life. Furthermore, embryonic stem cells have not yet been used for even one therapy, while adult stem cells have already been successfully used in numerous patients.

 
48067 05/26/2009 at 09:34:15 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
48068 05/26/2009 at 09:34:44 PM Self     As someone who is paralyzed from a spinal cord ijury I have waited for years for the illogical ban on ESC research to be lifted. As one of the most promising medical developments in modern history it is inconceivable that ESC research would be restricted. Other countries in the world are moving forward with ESC research programs that are delivering results. British researchers recently anounces a treatment for the most common form of blindness using ESCs. While development of alternate sources of ESC should be persued, it should not be at the expense of patients by asking then to suffer unnecessarily while these alternate sources are perfected when the gold standard already exisits. The new guidelines should allow research on all exisiting stem cell lines as well as newly developed lines. These cells are currently being discarded which benifits no one. Please keep keep someone elses religion out of the decisions that will effect my health and life.

 
48069 05/26/2009 at 09:34:45 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48070 05/26/2009 at 09:34:52 PM Self     President Obama was quoted on March 9, 2009 as saying: “Promoting science isn't just about providing resources... It is about ensuring that scientific data is never distorted or concealed to serve a political agenda, and that we make scientific decisions based on facts, not ideology.” (Steven Thomma, McClatchy Washington Bureau, http://www.mcclatchydc.com/politics/story/63612.html)

As a quadriplegic from a 1980 spinal cord injury I have been following and supporting spinal cord research for years. Having a vested interest in stem cell research, I agree with President Obama that we should base our scientific decisions on facts. Allow me to outline a few such facts here.

1. Embryonic stem cells are designed for a rapidly growing embryo, and are unstable and unpredictable when implanted in adults. Many medical doctors and researchers oppose embryonic stem cell research and believe no treatments or cures will ever result because of serious medical problems, including tumor formation (teratomas) and tissue rejection. As of this date, not one human being has been effectively treated using embryonic stem cells.

2. Adult stem cells (including human umbilical cord blood cells) do not harm human life and do not have the medical problems presented by embryonic stem cells. They are already being used for over 73 human treatments. Adult stem cell research is pro-patient, pro-cure, and pro-science.

3. Human cloning should continue to be banned, as cloning results in abnormal genetic expression and tumor formation. Ethical problems include creating life to destroy it and exploiting women for their eggs.

In summary, as a quadriplegic desperately hoping and waiting for a cure, I believe we should pursue the most promising strategies that at the same time do not raise ethical concerns. Adult stem cells are already being used for human treatments, while embryonic stem cells have serious medical problems to overcome before they are safe and effective enough for human use. Supporting adult stem cell research means effective cures for patients, while supporting embryonic stem cell research means wasted taxpayer dollars lining the pockets of research institutions and biotech industry.

Thank you so much for offering me the opportunity to express my concerns.

 
48071 05/26/2009 at 09:35:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48072 05/26/2009 at 09:35:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

I also support conscience rights for health care providers and researchers. No one should be forced to submit to forced involvement with the killing of innocent human life at the cost of their religious beliefs and at the peril of their immortal souls.

 
48073 05/26/2009 at 09:36:06 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. I have Multiple Sclerosis and stem cells may be the means to a cure we have all been hoping and praying for. Thank you.

 
48074 05/26/2009 at 09:36:33 PM Self     Why do you insist on wasting good money on research that has been proven to be the utmost in foolishness? I speak of embryonic stem cell research, which is not only dumb technology, but proven to be downright DANGEROUS. Spend my money on something that makes good sense, PLEASE!!!!! I have read too many horror stories about all the terrible things happening to those poor uninformed patients. Why do you insist on holding back the GOOD things they COULD have, and giving research dollars for the BAD things! It makes no sense at all to me! It really is perverted thinking!!!!! There could be no other way to describe this farce foisted on the uninformed people of America!

 
48075 05/26/2009 at 09:36:48 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48076 05/26/2009 at 09:36:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force taxpayers to subsidize research that is ethically questionable, requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. Why not use our resources where there is proven benefit? There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

For further well-researched information on ethical concerns, refer to articles by Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D. See www.ncbcenter.org

 
48077 05/26/2009 at 09:36:52 PM Self     For Public Comment to NIH (May 26, 2009 deadline) I am strongly opposed to creating or killing human embryos for stem cell research or any form of human cloning, and am especially opposed to this being done at taxpayer expense. I would like to see funding for adult stem cell research, especially the induced pluripotent stem cells (ie. reprogrammed ordinary adult stem cells to have the versatility of embryonic cells) which can be tailor made as an exact genetic match to each patient, thus would not be rejected as foreign. Besides the moral objection to destroying human life (embryos), scientifically and economically it makes more sense to pursue research with non-embryonic sources. Embryonic stem cells are too genetically unstable and likely to form lethal tumors. Adult stem cells have already been used to treat people with Parkinson’s, spinal cord injury, juvenile diabetes, lupus, MS, sickle-cell anemia, heart damage, corneal damage, and other conditions. Also, on the topic of already frozen embryos, the ends still do not justify the means; no one has the right to destroy human life for a “greater good.” To experiment on human beings even at this level, could potentially open the door for threats in future to terminally ill patients, convicted prisoners, or others. Thank you.

 
48078 05/26/2009 at 09:36:55 PM Self     I am concerned about the NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. Please reconsider using embryonic stem cells, which destroy human life. Adult stem cells have been very successful, but embryonic stem cells have not produced any good results. Also, the regulations do not prevent research that could lead to creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. It is just wrong to create life for the purpose of experimentation.

These embryos left over from invitro fertilization could be adopted by parents who have been unsuccessful in having a baby of their own. I know a couple who have had 2 precious babies through the adoption of embryos. They are saving lives, while others are seeking to destroy the most innocent among us.

Please protect life, even at its most earliest stage. Thanks for allowing me to share my comments on this issue.

 
48079 05/26/2009 at 09:38:02 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48080 05/26/2009 at 09:38:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48081 05/26/2009 at 09:38:30 PM Self     Thank you very much for giving the public the opportunity to comment on such a critically important matter. I’ll divide my comments into two parts: short and long.

Short: PLEASE revise the NIH guidelines in order to not use my taxpayer money for research on stem cells derived from the highly morally objectionable practice of killing embryonic human beings.

Long: It’s really quite simple and logical! Embryos are children at one of the earliest stages of human development (approximately 5 days old; see http://www.ncbcenter.org/FrTad_MSOOB_1.asp). They clearly are not capable of criminal or other malicious acts and, therefore, are without doubt innocent human beings. Innocent human beings do not deserve to be killed. Yet that is exactly what happens when scientists destroy embryos and use their body parts (i.e., stem cells) to experiment. While the goal of such research is good (i.e., to seek treatments for a variety of illnesses), the ends definitely do not justify the means. It is completely unacceptable to consider one human life as less worthy of existence compared to another human life. All human beings in the United States have an equal right to life as stated in our country’s founding documents. Since embryonic stem cell research is dependent upon the killing of embryos, even though the guidelines do not directly require funding for the killing of the embryos, the guidelines do provide encouragement for the practice simply because the guidelines fund the results of the practice.

Secondly, even if that moral aspect was not present, logic continues to show how ridiculous it is to spend enormous amounts of time, money, and expertise on a useless search with stem cells taken from embryonic human beings. No viable treatments have been found by using embryonic stem cells, while a large and increasing number (73) of treatments have been proven with use of adult stem cells. (See http://www.stemcellresearch.org/facts/treatments.htm for list of successes with adult stem cells.) Why waste resources (including money paid by taxpayers) on embryonic stem cell research when the hope and promise of adult stem cell research is already seen? Focusing on embryonic stem cells is diverting much needed attention and progress away from the avenue that is most helpful (i.e., adult stem cells). The guidelines should not allow taxpayer money to be wasted on research using stem cells derived from the destruction of human embryos, but instead should be re-written to promote and support truly productive research using adult stem cells because those are not dependent upon deliberate killing of human life.

Furthermore, when embryonic stem cells are used, not only are attempted treatments unsuccessful, they are actually harmful. Tumors develop when embryonic stem cells are used in adult bodies because embryonic stem cells are created (by God) to produce a variety of cells only for the benefit of a developing embryonic body. Only adult stem cells are mature enough to consistently reproduce a specific cell type that can be used for a specific therapy. The uncontrollable nature of embryonic stem cells is yet another logical reason to abandon that research immediately, especially in light of all the successes proven with adult stem cells. The guidelines should not support research that is harmful to American lives.

The guidelines (see Summary, Paragraph 2) proposed by NIH identify their purpose as: “to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law.” As I have described above, the destruction of embryos to use their stem cells is not at all being “responsible” with resources (financial as well as time and talent of the researchers and other scientific/medical personnel and facilities), nor is it “scientifically worthy” since the attempts have been harmful to human subjects in the experimental treatments. And such research is definitely not ethical since it requires the killing of innocent human beings as a prerequisite. The guidelines should not allow taxpayer funding of research based on the prerequisite of killing human beings.

Perhaps it is a matter of pride and ego that causes politicians and scientists to continue pushing for embryonic stem cell research. That’s not real science! Real science is grounded in natural law, the laws inherent in the universe created by God.

This next section cites additional references to support and expand my comments.

This first reference shows “real science” at work in ethical and morally acceptable ways that are also productive:

“Can pluripotent stem cells (the most highly flexible variety), be obtained from sources other than human embryos, and without crossing any moral lines? Absolutely. There are an expanding number of ways to derive such cells. For example, in March of 2006, German scientists published a paper in the journal Nature describing a new way to derive pluripotent stem cells. They removed special cells called germ cells from the testicles of mice, and transmuted them into pluripotent stem cells. Shortly afterwards, a biotech company in California called PrimeCell Therapeutics reported the same results in humans. No embryos were required at any point in the process. Another example: In August of 2006, scientists from Japan published results in the journal Cell indicating that by adding a combination of four different protein factors to adult mouse cells, they could change them into pluripotent stem cells. This kind of direct conversion of adult cells into embryonic-type cells is called dedifferentiation or reprogramming, and is a very promising direction for future research. These kinds of novel approaches do not depend upon the destruction of young humans. Another important source for obtaining pluripotent stem cells would be from certain mature body tissues including the bone marrow and the umbilical cord. Normally, stem cells from bone marrow and umbilical cord are not pluripotent, but multipotent (somewhat restricted in their possibilities for differentiation). However a growing number of researchers are finding that there may be a rare subpopulation of genuinely pluripotent cells that are also present in these adult sources. That is to say, stem cells as flexible as the ones that come from embryos may be naturally present at very low levels in bone marrow and umbilical cord, or at least may be derivable from such sources.” (Source of first reference: http://www.ncbcenter.org/FrTad_MSOOB_15.asp.)

This second reference discusses the slippery slope of weighing one human life as more or less valuable than another human life, as well as the moral and ethical confusion that takes hold of people in desperate situations and clouds their thinking:

“President Obama, on March 9, 2009, signed an important executive order that vastly expanded federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research and crossed a significant and troubling ethical line. This decision, and the rhetoric during the signing, encouraged scientists and researchers to enter the moral quagmire of taking some human lives in order to benefit others. During his signing speech, in order to support his decision, the president invoked the name of Christopher Reeve and other patients desperate to find cures for their ailments.

Desperation, however, rarely makes for good ethics.

[story about father and sons is located at this point in the source article but omitted from this excerpt]…We must be similarly concerned in our society when scientists and desperate patients are tempted to put their hand onto our embryonic children in a bid to alleviate suffering or even to save themselves. Sadly, the President’s stem cell decision encourages this kind of unethical behavior by an emotional appeal to patient desperation. The President’s ethical mistake is further compounded by the fact that remarkable and powerful scientific alternatives exist, such as cellular reprogramming on the one hand, or the use of adult/umbilical cord stem cells on the other, neither of which requires ever laying a hand on a human embryo.

His stem cell decision also manifests a troubling shift towards a more widespread and systemic form of oppression within our society. The President is offering Americans the prospect of using the powers of science to oppress, or more accurately, to suppress the youngest members of the human family to serve the interests of older and more wealthy members. He is offering Americans the prospect of reducing fellow human beings to cogs and commodities in the assembly line of the medico-business industrial complex.

Many Americans, however, seem only vaguely aware of what has transpired in the President’s decision. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas once commented on the way that oppression can subtly arise in our midst: ‘As nightfall does not come at once, neither does oppression. In both instances, there's a twilight where everything remains seemingly unchanged, and it is in such twilight that we must be aware of change in the air, however slight, lest we become unwitting victims of the darkness.’

Some would suggest that perhaps the darkness is already upon us. But a few moments of twilight may still remain, in which Americans can turn back the moral darkness that threatens our society and our future.” (Source of second reference: http://www.ncbcenter.org/FrTad_MSOOB_46.asp.)

As I near the conclusion of my comments, I re-iterate my urgent plea not to use my taxpayer money to support the immoral research that is dependent upon the destruction of human embryos, the youngest members of our human family. To quote the NCHLA (National Committee for a Human Life Amendment, in their form for submitting comments): “The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.”

Two final notes: As I read through the proposed guidelines published in the Federal Register, I found them potentially misleading with complex (and repetitive) technical and legal language that can confuse (and weary!) people who might not notice the distinction between funding the process of destruction of the embryos versus funding the use of the stem cells resulting from that process. Many, if not most, people who oppose taxpayer funding of either the process or use of the results of the process might not mention that distinction in their comments. I urge you not to overlook the intent of those people simply because they did not mention the distinction. When it is clear that comment writers oppose the destruction of the embryos and don’t want their taxpayer money used for that process, please give them the benefit of the doubt and realize that they most likely also oppose the use of taxpayer money for research on stem cells derived through that process. Please don’t negate their comments if they don’t specifically address that point.

Additionally, I must say something about the many factors (e.g., informed consent of the parents, i.e., “donors”, of the embryos) listed (see requirements for documentation described in numbers 1 through 7 in “B. Eligibility…” section of the guidelines, page 18579 of the Federal Register for April 23, 2009) as those necessary before the cells may be used for research. Those requirements sound potentially good, but I strongly doubt that in day-to-day reality those requirements would be implemented properly. So often, rules and laws that protect human life are inadequately enforced by people who have other motives. For example, look at the cases where Planned Parenthood centers have been shown to circumvent the laws about reporting statutory rape when a minor girl indicates she is pregnant by an adult man who should be reported but the Planned Parenthood employee instead coaches the girl how to obtain an abortion without that criminal report being made. Or cases where medical staff are legally permitted by conscience protection laws to refrain from participation in abortions or dispensing contraceptives but are discriminated against when they do try to exercise their conscience rights. It is highly unlikely that in all cases of parents who sign consent forms for their embryonic children to be donated for research that the parents will be fully informed of all the ramifications of their decision and that they would not be unduly influenced to make the decision hastily. The currently proposed guidelines are not enough for enforcing the informed consent that they describe.

 
48082 05/26/2009 at 09:38:47 PM Self     It is paramount in advancing stem cell research that embryonic stem cells harvested such that the embryos must be destroyed sets a precedent which militates against the right to life. Premise within this argument: Where the certitude of life is scientifically supported and or philosophically uncertain, the interest of life should be given the benefit of protection despite the life enhancement potential of embryonic stem cells. This precedent will encourage life-respecting research across the board, and a method for harvesting stem cells from embryos that will not cause their death. Everyone wins in the mid to long run. The sooner such a policy takes force, the sooner safer, more ethical, and legally sustainable methods of stem cell research will be discovered and established.

 
48083 05/26/2009 at 09:38:53 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
48084 05/26/2009 at 09:39:16 PM Self     I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
48085 05/26/2009 at 09:40:21 PM Self     From my understanding when listening, researching, adult stem cells have been the big winner in regards to possibilities for helping patients with certain illnesses, maybe even to help cure.

I request than NO embryo stem cells be used as all are tiny human beings and killing them for scientific reasons is not only against the Bible, but also very unethical.

 
48086 05/26/2009 at 09:40:23 PM Self     “While I support the overall thrust of these guidelines, it will be crucial for continued progress that scientists be allowed to use NIH funding for continuing research with existing human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines. Therefore, I would strongly advocate for a formal exemption to allow such funding for as many existing lines as possible, even in cases where there is insufficient documentation of the conditions under which they were derived. Of greatest priority will be the exemption of all of the currently approved hES lines.”

 
48087 05/26/2009 at 09:40:47 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research,which for me as a tax payer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one, and are already producing good results.In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryo for research purposes.

 
48088 05/26/2009 at 09:41:12 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48089 05/26/2009 at 09:41:25 PM Self     I am against providing an incentive for the creation of extra embryos in in-vitro fertilization treatments. Given that human adult stem cells can be reprogrammed with great success and have shown incredible use in treating a host of diseases, why can't we pursue this tact? I don't know a single republican or democrat that wouldn't support such measures. Why stubbornly persist with embryonic stem cell research when it is both unnecessary and horribly divisive?

 
48090 05/26/2009 at 09:41:35 PM Self     Adult stem cells work beautifully. Embryonic stem cells are deadly. Please don't waste money of embryonic stem cell research; poor science. Thank you.

 
48091 05/26/2009 at 09:43:36 PM Self     I am a stem cell researcher at the University of *****. I strongly support the change in policy put forth in President Obama’s March executive order regarding human embryonic stem (ES) cell research. However, the proposed NIH guidelines may have unintended consequences and greatly impede current research efforts by disqualifying some widely used and currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. Although I strongly support the derivation of human ES cells following rigorous ethical standards, the highly prescriptive consent language proposed in the guidelines may exclude cell lines that were derived with fully informed consent. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would be highly detrimental to many ongoing research projects and be wasteful of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies. Furthermore, the ability to expand the scope of available human ES cell lines for NIH-funded research will be greatly delayed if the strict consent form language is required, since most privately funded lines do not exactly adhere to the proposed language.

As an alternative approach, I suggest that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines that have been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with independent oversight by an Institutional Review Board or equivalent body.

A second suggestion is that the NIH or a designated body maintain a registry of approved lines to avoid unnecessary administrative efforts that could delay the research.

Thank you for considering these concerns and suggestions

 
48092 05/26/2009 at 09:44:39 PM Self     I want the limits on forcing taxpayers to fund embryonic stem cell research to be overturned. Human embryos deserve “respect” as a form of human life. Alternative methods of stem cell research as Mr. Obama is well aware, having signed the bill to continue study of alternative stem cell research (behind closed doors and without media coverage). There are numerous problems with the embryonic stem cell guidelines set forth that go beyond forcing taxpayers to fund the destruction of human life for dubious research. These guidelines must include a clear and authoritative statement, that it will never fund research that relies on the creation of human embryos for strictly for research purposes.

 
48093 05/26/2009 at 09:45:26 PM Self     I object to the use of human embryos for stem cell research. My objections are both moral and scientific. The embryos have no way to give informed consent, a basic right given to all humans involved in research. And the result of this immoral practice has very poor practical results.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

Please give more serious consideration to the moral and scientific/practical realities of this type of research.

 
48094 05/26/2009 at 09:45:41 PM Self     I am very concerned about embryonic stem cell research. Under NO circumstances should embryos be used for this. It is immoral to destroy human life. There is no reason to do so when adult stem cells have been proven to be effective in treating patients. I also have grave concerns about it opening the door to cloning.

 
48095 05/26/2009 at 09:46:04 PM Self     Although the following is a pre-prepared response, I believe it accurately and effectively describes my position and sentiment towards the current draft. I would like to thank you in advance for taking the time to read this.

Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research.

Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board.

Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds". The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation.

To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
48096 05/26/2009 at 09:46:10 PM Self     While private investors put their funds into stem cell research and treatments that harm or kill no one, knowing that these are producing good results, is the government going to spend hard-earned taxpayer money to fund immoral and ineffective research?!?

I am strongly opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force U.S. taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the killing of innocent human persons. No matter how small, a person is a person! To call this ethical research is a lie.

Again, support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that kill or harm no one and are already producing good results. Embryonic stem cell research causes not only the destruction of embryos--the killing of little humans--but harm to those receiving treatments using them!

Furthermore, in no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
48097 05/26/2009 at 09:46:16 PM Self     I have read the guideline proposal. I disagree that using federal funds for research on human embryos which results in their destruction and can not possibly benefit them personally can ever be ethical. I anticipate many more years of paying taxes and ask that my money be used on scientifically worthy projects, such as iPSCs.

 
48098 05/26/2009 at 09:46:30 PM Self     Please use common sense. There are already over 70 successful cures using adult stem cells. Why waste time, money, and most importantly HUMAN LIFE? Please stop this madness. No more embryonic stem cell research - especially with tax payer's money!!!

 
48099 05/26/2009 at 09:46:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48100 05/26/2009 at 09:46:36 PM Self     Though this is brief, I simply cannot find a valid reason why stem cell research should not be funded, and further, should be banned. Please, let's focus our energy and attention on how to better equip humankind with the power to reach our full potential. I believe researching the potential of stem cells will help us achieve this, in a variety of ways.

 
48101 05/26/2009 at 09:46:39 PM Self     Using embryonic stem cells for medical research is morally wrong. Human life begins at conception, and ending an innocent human life cannot be justified for any reason.

Adult stem cells, as well as placental and cord blood stem cells, are already yielding treatments for various diseases. All funding and efforts should go into these legitimate and effective forms of alleviating human suffering.

 
48102 05/26/2009 at 09:46:45 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. We are not scientists, but we are members of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. We are pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B --would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. We also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and we recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
48103 05/26/2009 at 09:47:35 PM Self     In the event that federally funded research is proposed for an area which has significant ethical ramifications, then the federal government should desist in those activities until a law is passed by the Congress explicitly allowing such behaviors. While there may be some scientific benefit to embryonic stem cell research, the ethical issues surrounding "donating" a human embryo for such purposes raises significant concerns for a sizeable component of the population. In the absence of a "National Emergency" where it is believed that millions immediately (sic) will perish without this research, the only reasonable course of action is structured debate and analysis as provided by the US Constitution through the Congress. These guidelines should therefore be placed on hold until such actions are taken.

 
48104 05/26/2009 at 09:48:01 PM Self     I oppose all embryonic stem cell research that would kill the embryos or further their production for further studies.

 
48105 05/26/2009 at 09:48:33 PM Self     I just want to throw my name in the hat AGAINST human embryo stem cell research. Adult stem cells have already been proven to provide positive improvements for various health issues and they are readily available without destroying human life. An embryo is living and human. There are grave moral implications to its destruction. I am for a culture of LIFE not a culture of DEATH. Please take this into consideration. Why not spend the money on something that already is working and doesn't compromise moral and ethical standards?

 
48106 05/26/2009 at 09:48:34 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic cell reseach. Support should be directed to stem cell research that harms no one.

 
48107 05/26/2009 at 09:48:49 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48108 05/26/2009 at 09:49:11 PM Self     The use of human embryos in the area of stem cell research is unethical and unnecessary. It is unethical because it tampers with life—and no experimentation is worth that, no matter what the results may yield. It is unnecessary because there have already been and continue to be many developments in adult stem cell research. To use taxpayers’ dollars to fund an enterprise that raises such moral questions is to violate the rights of American citizens, forcing some of us to participate in an act that is against our conscience. Please let the funding go to the research that has already proven useful and does not violate our consciences.

 
48109 05/26/2009 at 09:49:14 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48110 05/26/2009 at 09:49:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48111 05/26/2009 at 09:51:09 PM Self     As a student who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms on stem cell research. I am pleased to see that NIH has been moving so quickly to create these guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH is most able to draft effective guidelines that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased with the intent of the NIH’s draft guidelines to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from excess embryos at fertility clinics.

I do encourage that the guidelines cover all basis by including a “grandfather” clause to allow federal funding for existing stem cell lines that were created using the best ethical practices at the time of derivation. In the current draft, it is not clear if some newer lines meet all the guidelines set forth in the current draft and thus might be excluded from federal funding.

While recent scientific advances have been truly remarkable, such as the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, I still believe that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is meritous and ethical research. SCNT is a technique that can not only be used to create new lines, but to discover important aspects of early human developmental biology. SCNT should be supported by the NIH and have the benefit of the institution’s oversight.

Finally, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. With the proper support and resources, I believe stem cell research will help my generation meet the medical challenges of the 21st century. Thank you for reviewing my comments.

 
48112 05/26/2009 at 09:52:17 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
48113 05/26/2009 at 09:52:35 PM Organization Cadott Medical Center 508 North Main Street Cadott WI 54727 The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48114 05/26/2009 at 09:52:43 PM Self     I am very troubled to learn that the National Institutes of Health plans to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is inconceivable that some members of Congress want an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos specifically to use for stem cell research. Creating new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

Additionally, research which involves the deliberate destruction of human life violates every principle found in existing law, including the Code of Federal Regulations 45 CFR 46, (See http://www.dhhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/45cfr46.htm ) and the Dickey Wicker Amendment, which was signed into law under President Clinton and states:

SEC. 509. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act may be used for-- (1) the creation of a human embryo or embryos for research purposes; or (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and Section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Ac (42 U.S.C. 289g(b)) (Title 42, Section 289g(b), United States Code). (b) For purposes of this section, the term "human embryo or embryos" includes any organism, not protected as a human subject under 45 CFR 46 (the Human Subject Protection regulations) . . . that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis, cloning, or any other means from one or more human gametes (sperm or egg) or human diploid cells (cells that have two sets of chromosomes, such as somatic cells).

I request that you oppose any use of my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead, please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
48115 05/26/2009 at 09:52:49 PM Self     I would like to enter the following comments concerning the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. 1.I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

2. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

3. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 



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