Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
47717 05/26/2009 at 06:45:12 PM Self     I do not agree with changes to stem cell research regulations. thank you

 
47718 05/26/2009 at 06:45:16 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions. As a student who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms on stem cell research. I am pleased to see that NIH has been directed to create the guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH is most able to draft effective guidelines that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

 
47719 05/26/2009 at 06:45:28 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47720 05/26/2009 at 06:45:30 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
47721 05/26/2009 at 06:45:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47722 05/26/2009 at 06:48:24 PM Self     Please reconsider your decision to extend Human Stem Cell Guidelines especially, "These draft Guidelines (that would)would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells."

I strongly oppose this type of research

 
47723 05/26/2009 at 06:48:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47724 05/26/2009 at 06:48:56 PM Self     We are definately opposed to using babies for stem cell research.

 
47725 05/26/2009 at 06:48:59 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidlines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of human life. Your Federal Register Notice states that it wishes to ensure "NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible". Research involving the destruction of human life can never be considered "ethically responsible". Research on humans that causes harm or death will always be reprehensible whether done on the prisoners of the Holocaust or on a human being at a very early stage of development.”

Stem cell research using other cells such as induced pluripotent stem cells has been promising and effective. From a purely scientific standpoint, funding this type of research makes more sense as well.

 
47726 05/26/2009 at 06:49:37 PM Organization Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 2430 N. Halsted Street, Chicago, IL 60614 The Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine endorses the comments submitted by COGR, FASEB and ISSCR.

*****, Ph.D., HCLD. ******, ****** Children's Memorial Research Center Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 2430 N. Halsted Street Chicago, IL 60614 Phone: (773) 755-6598 Fax: (773) 755-6385

 
47727 05/26/2009 at 06:49:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47728 05/26/2009 at 06:50:55 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
47729 05/26/2009 at 06:51:12 PM Self     The executive order issued by President Barack Obama last March that will allow virtually unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Funding that will create incentives for scientists to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research.

Former President Bush set a policy in place in 2001 that restricted federal funding only to stem cell lines that existed as of that date – thus discouraging “create and kill” behavior.

Obama’s proposed new policy would eliminate that restriction.

These new rules would also divert funding away from the much more promising (and ethical) area of adult stem cell research.

 
47730 05/26/2009 at 06:52:21 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47731 05/26/2009 at 06:53:18 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47732 05/26/2009 at 06:53:27 PM Self     The use of taxpayer dollars on research that will allow virtually unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research is morally reprehensible, as well as demonstrating scientific ignorance and a total lack of financial understanding. if embryonic stem cell research were going to produce cures, the drug companies would be investing heavily - they are not. they know it is a loser. not one single cure has been discovered based on embryonic stem cell research, while over 70 cures have been documented from adult stem cells. the embryonic cells are uncontrollable and not understood. in other words, this is another example if the government interfering in what it obviously does not understand, but in this case, legalized murder of the innocent is the result. this proposed policy is abhorent as well as utterly foolish, and a total waste of taxpayer money, and simply reflects on the either the ignorance or the intentional deceit of its authors. this entire policy change should be completely abandoned.

 
47733 05/26/2009 at 06:53:28 PM Organization American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20814 May 26, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7997 c/o Dr. Raynard Kington, Acting Director, NIH

Dear Dr. Kington:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the “Draft NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research,” published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2009.

The Guidelines are summarized as follows in the notice:

“These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. Funding will continue to be allowed for human stem cell research using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Specifically, these Guidelines describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would have been required during the derivation of human embryonic stem cells for research using these cells to be funded by the NIH. NIH funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, is not allowed under these Guidelines.”

In general, we support the intent of these Guidelines. Our main concern, however, is that the Guidelines are inadvertently more restrictive than the previous administration’s policy in some ways. This is a critical problem that must be addressed before the Guidelines are finalized.

This problem was discussed extensively in an article in the Washington Post on Monday, May 25. The Guidelines inadvertently make it harder to do some types of stem cell research than was allowed under the previous administration’s policy. We are certain that this was not the intention of the Obama administration. The retroactive application of the requirements in these Guidelines would render unusable some existing hESC lines because of how they were derived. Since many of these lines were developed in the private sector and are in common use now, it would be a waste of resources to have to go back and recreate them under the current requirements.

ASBMB thus strongly supports some sort of “grandfathering” mechanism that would allow these lines to continue to be used. One of the major benefits of grandfathering existing lines is the resulting many new cell lines representing far greater genetic diversity than the original few dozen lines permitted under the previous policy. This same reasoning would apply to those cell lines that have been extensively studied, regardless of source. However, regardless of the mechanism NIH chooses to allow existing lines to be usd, allowing the use of all extant lines must be addressed.

In addition, we also hope that as time goes on the Guidelines will be revisited with an eye to loosening up some of the restrictions on what stem cells can be used. We are confident that when embryonic stem cell research begins to pay off, the public climate will change to the point that a more liberal approach to what stem cell sources are allowed will be possible, provided that the research is conducted in keeping with appropriate regulations concerning informed consent and human subject protections.

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is a nonprofit scientific and educational organization with a membership of approximately 12,000 biochemists and molecular biologists who teach and conduct research at colleges and universities, in the private sector, and in the federal government. ASBMB publishes the Journal of Lipid Research, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry, one of the leading peer reviewed journals in the life sciences.

Thank you again for considering ASBMB’s views on this subject. Please let us know if we can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,

***** ***** American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

 
47734 05/26/2009 at 06:53:41 PM Self     I support embryonic stem cell research, and am glad some of the restrictions are being loosened.

 
47735 05/26/2009 at 06:53:59 PM Self     Please know that I am opposed to using my tax dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research. As a Catholic, I have no objection to the use of adult stem cells, which have been shown to be more effective. Use of embryonic stem cells is ineffective and dangerous.

Please stand up to Obama's order which allows our tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of life. Please also make certain to close any loopholes which might allow future funding for embryonic stem cell research.

Thank you.

 
47736 05/26/2009 at 06:54:04 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47737 05/26/2009 at 06:54:52 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47738 05/26/2009 at 06:55:47 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful such as adult stem cell or umbilical cord stem cells. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes

 
47739 05/26/2009 at 06:56:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47740 05/26/2009 at 06:58:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47741 05/26/2009 at 07:00:45 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

I encourage you to consider these comments on behalf of those whose lives and families have been affected by various diseases, and who could benefit tremendously from emerging research.

 
47742 05/26/2009 at 07:01:01 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47743 05/26/2009 at 07:01:45 PM Self     Having experienced Altzheimer's disease as a care-giver for over 15 years, I favor the widest use of stem cell research to save future generations from the devastating consequences of the disease. As an observer of research and drug developments concerning Alzheimer's over the same period of time, I request that the NIH proceed with all due dispatch, as over my fifteeen year experience, there was very little progress on drug or other therapy. Thank You.

 
47744 05/26/2009 at 07:01:47 PM Self     If this research (using embryonic stem cells) were so compelling, so likely to provide cures, private investors would be pouring money into the research. Michael J. Fox has a foundation that uses private funds. If embryonic stem cells was going to be the "cure" for Parkinsons then they would have found it already. After all, there’s a lot of money to be made on patents for cures and treatments for disease. Since the use of adult stem cells has already been found to be useful and beneficial, the scientific research should be concentrating in this area. Don't waste tax money we do not have on scientific research that has been made obsolete by adult stem cell research. I encourage you to STOP using and to NOT START using federal tax money for destroying embryos for questionable science.

 
47745 05/26/2009 at 07:01:51 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47746 05/26/2009 at 07:01:57 PM Self     Dear NIH,

I have read the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Notice my self, and have many objections.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commoditie

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. It is not right for my hard earned money to go toward a cause which I belieev and hold to be ethically wrong and morally unsound. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

I sincerely hope you listen to the "voice" of all the American people who have commented on this draft, and a balanced and fair decision made from there.

 
47747 05/26/2009 at 07:02:31 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47748 05/26/2009 at 07:03:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47749 05/26/2009 at 07:03:41 PM Self     I'm a citizen of this country that is personally concerned about this trend in "medicine" involving embyonic stem cell research - I'm disabled so I wonder if futher treatments are invented, where will they stem from? I will have to wonder, did these treatments being used on me come from "unwilling humans"? Are they "products" of babies, people "manufactured" who never got to live to see the potential they could have been because they became a treatment for my "use". Will I become an unwilling participant in the whole thing because I won't have a clue as to where this treatment all came from? When I think of these methods of "furthering" the "advances" of medicine, it makes me ill - no pun intended! Seriously, I don't wish to benefit from the ill fate of another, especially one who specifically is being marketed with that intent in mind, a medical product. How is this any different from illegally taking/stealing organs from people so that another can live? (I'm not speaking of organ donors who have died) I would really love to see the funds and efforts being wasted in this issue to go to adult stem cell research, which HAS had advances....Please let this embryonic stem cell issue die!

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47750 05/26/2009 at 07:05:05 PM Organization University of California, Santa Barbara 3227 Cheadle Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 I am writing on behalf of the University of California, Santa Barbara to provide comments on the Draft National Institutes of Health (NIH) Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2009. We have an active program in this area of research. The dominant funding sources for this work has been non-federal.

We have established a Center for Stem Cell Biology and Engineering on our campus to apply an integrated approach of science and engineering to realizing the potential of stem cell research. We welcomed President Obama's Executive Order 13505, Removing the Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, and applaud NIH for acting quickly to implement the President's Order so that this work can move ahead more quickly.

We appreciate the chance to comment and have some suggestions for you to consider in drafting the final guidelines.

1) We do not think that NIH should restrict the type of hESC research that it will support as narrowly as in the draft guidelines. Those guidelines would not allow funding for hESC research using cells derived from sources other than from embryos created for reproductive purposes, such as cells derived from parthenogenesis, somatic cell nuclear transfer(SCNT), and IVF embryos created for research purposes. This would restrict the ability to study specific diseases most effectively. We strongly urge the NIH to allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources in addition to discarded IVF embryos created for reproductive purposes, while still requiring appropriate ethical oversight and responsible derivation.

2)The guidelines should state very clearly that they apply to NIH-funded research, including in the titles of the sections. Section I of the draft guidelines states that the guidelines are intended to describe the circumstances under which human embryonic stem cells are eligible for use in extramural NIH-funded research. We suggest that the title of the document be changed from "NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research" to something like "NIH Guidelines for Federally- Funded Research on Human Embryonic Stem Cells." This more accurately captures the scope of the document. We also suggest changing the title for section II to, for example, "Guidelines for Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Use in Federally-funded Research," and the title of Section IV to "Other Research Ineligible for Federal Funding."

Thank you for the opportunity to provide these comments.

 
47751 05/26/2009 at 07:05:43 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47752 05/26/2009 at 07:06:03 PM Self     I am against embryonic stem-cell research. These new guidelines devote tax dollars to experiments with embryonic stem cells, from destroyed human embryos. But the only successful treatments and cures come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed.

 
47753 05/26/2009 at 07:06:06 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47754 05/26/2009 at 07:06:12 PM Self     It is my understanding that research using adult stem cells have provided more promising research progress than using human embryonic stem cells. If that is the case, then funding of this approach (adult stem cells) should be a priority over the funding of research using embryonic stem cells where there is such an ethical issue shared by much of the population and no important progress seems to have been made.

I suggest maintaining the annual appropriations ban on funding of human embryo research (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2009, Pub. L. 110-161, 3/11/09), otherwise known as the Dickey-Wicker Amendment, and apply MORE funding to research in the promising area of adult stem cells.

 
47755 05/26/2009 at 07:06:21 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research should NOT be legal! Not only is it immoral, but the science that supports it is shaky to say the least. Why doesn't anyone mention the fact that there have been no diseases cured by embryonic stem cells? I do not support the murder of innocent children. I do not support anyone who would even consider it. I did not serve in the military to see my country support genocide. I swore to fight all enemies, both foreign and domestic. I cannot remain silent. I will speak for those who have no voice. America was based on freedom, not the deaths of the innocent.

 
47756 05/26/2009 at 07:06:41 PM Self     I strongly oppose federal funding for human embryonic stem cell experiments. All funding should be used for adult stem cell research.

 
47757 05/26/2009 at 07:06:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47758 05/26/2009 at 07:07:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47759 05/26/2009 at 07:07:35 PM Self     DON'T CREATE HUMANS TO DESTROY THEM FOR THEIR CELLS!

 
47760 05/26/2009 at 07:07:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47761 05/26/2009 at 07:07:53 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47762 05/26/2009 at 07:07:59 PM Self     I strongly support federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research and was delighted by the new Executive Order relating to it. Embryonic stem cells offer powerful tools for research and potentially for diagnostic and therapeutic treatments for some of the most significant human diseases and ailments - such as Alzheimer's disease, ALS, autoimmune diseases --- and to deprive the scientific community of these tools would greatly hamper our ability to cope with these increasingly critical threats to human health, safety and enjoyment of life. I am also very encouraged by the fact that the NIH has opened up the proposed guidelines for public comment. However, there are problems with the guidelines as currently proposed that would impede the progress of research and that I therefore think should be changed.

In particular, although section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research” provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, if such standards are appliedretroactively they would prevent the use of existing stem cell lines derived in accordance with the ethical requirements in place at the time of derivation (see Taylor, Cell Stem Cell, 2009). This policy would greatly reduce the value of research already conducted with the existing lines, and would delay the application of federal funds to hESC research until new lines had been derived. Both of these results would be detrimental to scientific progress. I therefore urge the NIH to include a provision to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously derived with appropriate oversight and in accordance with ethical standards at the time of derivation to be used for federally-funded research.

In addition, the requirement for researchers who wish to use hESC lines in federally-funded research to provide evidence independently that the line conforms to the NIH guidelines, and thus be re-authorized each time, imposes an unnecessary administrative burden that would waste taxpayer money. One way in which the NIH could avoid such duplication of effort and reduce confusion would be to establish a registry of hESC lines that are available for use in federally-funded research. This registry could be set up in collaboration with other organizations such as theISSCR. In the future, I also urge re-examination of more broad-ranging legislation such as the provisions in the Dickey-Wicker amendment and the use of federal funds for other forms of line generation such as SCNT. I believe that it would be appropriateto allow line derivation from embryos generated specifically for the purposes of research or by other methods. With appropriate oversight and regulation in place, research on such lines has the potential to have a substantial positive impact on our understanding and treatment of human disease.

 
47763 05/26/2009 at 07:08:00 PM Organization Respect Life Committee of St. Joseph Church 427 E. Broadway Alliance, Ohio 44601 Because we believe our government is accountable to "we the people," we wish to express our strong objection to the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines that propose using our tax money to fund experimentation on human embryo stem cells. Executive Order 13505 does not in fact encourage policy and procedures that are ethically responsible or scientifically worthy. It is not ethical to destroy innocent human life, and an embryo is certainly and scientifically human life that if not interrupted, has the ability and right to fulfill its destiny of the Natural and God-given Law. Tax supported research should only be used to find cures that do not infringe on the rights of our fellow humans, no matter their stage or dependency in life. To do otherwise would be a grave injustice to all human life and would set our nation upon a course of self-destruction that would spiral out of control. The use of embryos in research is neither ethical nor justifiable as scientifically worthy when there are alternatives that have already been scientifically proven superior and viable. To deduct funds from those alternatives would be unethical, impractical, and irresponsible. We urge the NIH to reconsider this serious path about to be taken. Respectfully, St. Joseph Church Respect Life Committee Alliance, Ohio

 
47764 05/26/2009 at 07:08:42 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47765 05/26/2009 at 07:08:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47766 05/26/2009 at 07:09:06 PM Self     Information published points out that using adult stem cells for research has had much positive results, whereas research using embryonic stem cells has had poor results. Please use funding for the adult stem cell research and do not waste it on the embryonic stem cells as it would simply be tht - wasted. Please put the patients first, as well as the proven science.

 
47767 05/26/2009 at 07:09:22 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47768 05/26/2009 at 07:09:41 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47769 05/26/2009 at 07:11:07 PM Self     I strongly oppose using tax dollars to support stem cell research. We should use research funds for much more promising and ethical ADULT stem cell research. There IS another way; we don't HAVE to use human embryos!

 
47770 05/26/2009 at 07:11:10 PM Self     I am a member of the Center for Inquiry, a non-profit organization devoted to promoting science and reason as the basis of public policy. I have read the NIH guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research and urge the NIH to promote the widest range possible of research in this field because of its potential for improving health and curing diseases.

Your present guidelines are admirable in expanding the number of embryonic stem cell lines eligible for federal funding and maintaining research using adult stem cells. At a minimum, these guidelines should be maintained, especially because a large majority of Americans polled report that they support federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

The present guidelines, however, do not go far enough. I would like to see the guidelines expanded to allow federal funding of all avenues of stem cell research. Research on human embryonic stem cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and adult stem cells needs to continue in parallel. All are part of a research effort that seeks to expand our knowledge of how cells function, what fails in the disease process, and how the first stages of human development occur. It is this combined knowledge that will ultimately generate safe and effective therapies. This research should be funded with federal money in order to promote the development of innovative and potentially lifesaving medical treatments as quickly as possible.

While approving the present guidelines is an excellent first step, I urge you to continue to monitor developments in the field and update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you for your attention.

 
47771 05/26/2009 at 07:11:23 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research involving the destruction of innocent human life.

Destroying an embryo is the killing of an innocent human life, which can be easily proven. What would have happened to us as citizens, if we (including supporters of embryonic stem cell research) had been destroyed at the embryonic stage, beginning stage of our life? Surely, our lives would have been eliminated, and as a result we would not be alive today. The issue of embryonic stem cell research reminds me of NAZI doctors who conducted experiments on innocent human lives.

In addition to the destruction of innocent human life, embryonic stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous. There is not a single effective treatment using embryonic stem cell research, while there are more than 70 treatments using adult stem cell research that does not require the destruction of human life. Therefore, we should not fund embryonic stem cell research especially when we have other ethical option, adult stem cell research, effective in treating patients.

A government has the duty to protect every human life regardless of their race, sex, religion or developmental stages of life. Therefore, I am strongly opposed to draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research.

 
47772 05/26/2009 at 07:12:09 PM Self     I urge you not to use any of our tax dollars for embryonic stem cell research. Simple busines math will dictate that so far little progress has been made. Embryos are created individuals and should never be destroyed for research.

Great progress has been made using adult stem cells and this is the type of research you should increase. From a business point of view, it has been well worth the dollars spent. This effort has been blessed because no lives were taken to do so.

 
47773 05/26/2009 at 07:14:15 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have Parkinson’s and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47774 05/26/2009 at 07:14:17 PM Self     Please allow federal funding for all ethically derived stem cell lines no matter when they were begun.

 
47775 05/26/2009 at 07:15:16 PM Organization Cardiovascular Innovation Institute, University of Louisville Louisville, KY Dear NIH,

We are pleased with the recent Executive Order issued by President Obama regarding the modification of restrictions for NIH funding of human embryonic stem cell research. We applaud the President’s comments expressing the hope this research could bring to alleviate human suffering while tempering expectations of immediate results. At this time, it is unclear what the long-term clinical applications of these and other stem cells will be, therefore it is vital to provide federal funding to allow exploration of this incredible biological system.

Although we are excited by the forth-coming changes, we feel there are some issues with the proposed guidelines which should be addressed. It has been suggested the newly proposed consent guidelines may not allow NIH funding for the human embryonic stem cells approved for funding under President Bush’s Executive Order. Many scientists with an interest in stem cells decided not to pursue this line of research or even left the country because of the potentially precarious state of funding in the United States. For those willing to take the risk, some were able to take advantage of private or state funding which built separate facilities and supported work on non-NIH approved cell lines. However this simply was not an option for the majority of us. It would be an ironic twist if those scientists who performed human embryonic stem cell research with NIH funding under the Bush administration’s guidelines were now penalized and prevented from using the previously approved cells upon which their work is based. Though the formerly so-called presidentially approved cell lines may not conform to all of the currently proposed consent guidelines, they do conform to the best practices of the day including those of the NIH. Therefore, we strongly urge the NIH to include in the human embryonic stem cell guidelines authorization for federal funding of the previously NIH approved cell lines.

We are also concerned by the complete rejection of consideration for funding human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) strictly for the purposes of research. We understand and agree this research carries with it many ethical concerns and potential pitfalls, however these technologies just might unlock the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem cells. It is possible induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) may be able to substitute for embryo-derived stem cells in general and those with genetic defects specifically. Yet in spite of the phenomenally rapid improvement in iPS induction technology, it is still unclear these cells are stable, non-tumorigenic, embryonic stem cell equivalents. We support this work but also suggest the NIH should allow federal funding for derivation of disease-specific embryo-derived stem cells with oversight modeled after the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilization and Embryology Act.

In conclusion, we reiterate the importance of continuing federal funding for research utilizing the human embryonic stem cell lines approved under President Bush’s Executive Order. The state of human embryonic stem cell research in the United States under the previous administration has been described as having one hand tied behind its back. It is our contention the current administration’s funding guidelines only loosen the bindings and do not truly free us to use both hands. We recognize there are ethical considerations for creating embryos solely for research, but suggest oversight can be provided to minimize societal concerns and prevent frivolous research. We are excited by President Obama’s support of human embryonic stem cell research and encourage an expansion of NIH funding not only for embryonic work, but of stem cells from all sources.

 
47776 05/26/2009 at 07:16:21 PM Self     To Kill one embryo is aganist God's law, the words embroy already killed is a lience to kill, who will over see that these human rights of the unborn are protected? - President Bush's policy on ESCR was to allow funding for research that involved embryonic stem cells taken from human embryos so long as the cells were obtained from embryos already killed-Obama's policy opened the floodgates for funding more embryonic stem cell research that creates an incentive to create and kill human embryos. Where does the killing stop? Our tax dollars should not be used for this research, The hand of God will punish all who go aganist God's law, this is a grave sin. These policy will put our country in grave harm when we go against God's law. Please protect all life. Do what is right accourding to God's Laws

 
47777 05/26/2009 at 07:17:02 PM Self     Please protect human embryos from destruction and concentrate on adult stem-cell research.

 
47778 05/26/2009 at 07:17:12 PM Self Parkinson Patient   Stem Cell research is the only hope for millions of the world citizens suffering from countless leech diseases and disorders. I am a Parkinson patient and have been following Stem Cells Research for while. The research is my only hope because If no cure for my sickness in the next couple of years, Certainly, I do not wish to spend my life in my current situation for ever.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thank you

 
47779 05/26/2009 at 07:17:25 PM Self     I am a professional research scientist, director of a human embryonic stem cell research center, and author of a methods manual for human embryonic stem cell techniques. I have been working with hESCs since 1998 and have published a number of research, review and perspective articles on stem cells. I have received NIH support for hESC research, served on NIH review boards, and have directed hESC training courses for the NIH for more than 5 years. I also serve as a member of the ***** Foundation Ethics and Regulatory Board, a group specifically focused on regulating foundation-supported hESC research in China. I have founded an "embryo bank" for donated embryos, written informed consent documents, and obtained IRB approval for my research.

With that information as background, I want to express my enthusiasm for the change in NIH guidelines, which, with few exceptions, will considerably improve the potential for stem cell-based improvements in medical care in the U.S.

First, the positive: I am very pleased with the imposition of stricter ethical guidelines for determining which hESC lines can be funded with federal dollars. The new guidelines for informed consent are reasonable, and should not preclude donations. This is a great improvement over the previous administration's fuzzy, situation-dependent regulations. The proposed guidelines bring much needed clarity to the process. Although I would have preferred to have the derivation of cell lines funded by NIH, I realize that the Dickey-Wicker amendment precludes this; and, in truth, derivation of lines is relatively inexpensive and scientists should be able to raise private funding to generate lines; I would hope that the emphasis would be on making disease-specific lines for research, and ethnically diverse lines for drug development. If I had a private foundation, that is where I would put the emphasis.

There are some aspects of the new guidelines that concern me.

The new guidelines, strictly enforced, would preclude the use of some of the most well-studied hESC lines. I am less concerned with this than others may be, because if a specific cell line that has been well-used, such as the WA09 line, is unique in some important quality, all hope for hESC-based therapy is in vain; this is because the value of hESC therapy is in the reproducibility of their characteristics, as a group, not as a single cell line.

The new guidelines would also devalue other resources that have been developed without federal funding. An example is the embryo banks, which have been created in good faith under current ethical standards. I don't believe that any such banks have adequate informed consents in place. I am starting a new bank with the stricter guidelines, but I hate to see the 1000 embryos now banked for research be wasted- for the sake of the donors, who hoped to see some good come from their embryos.

I am concerned about the exclusion of pathenotes from funding. These embryos are not strictly "created for research" and are already proving to be valuable for studies of genetic imprinting and epigenetic regulation of pluripotence and differentiation. I work on parthenogenetic hESC lines, and would prefer that NIH allow their support.

I also think that SCNT should have some place in this process. We don't yet know that iPSCs will be safe and effective, and it would be a shame to give up alternative methods at this early stage when we know so little about efficacy.

In summary, I applaud the new era of openness and high ethical standards for hESC research. I hope that the NIH will renew or even expand its hESC training programs-not just for selfish reasons but because so many young researchers need to learn how to work with these cells...it can't be learned from books, and there are so few labs who have sufficient expertise. The training courses include training in ethics as well as techniques, and we desperately need for the new generation to understand the need for restraint and empathy.

 
47780 05/26/2009 at 07:17:44 PM Self     Please do resume testing on stem cells! There is so much to be learned and the lines we have for testing are old, obsolete and not of much use at all for research anymore. There is such a great opportunity to learn from testing efforts. Please let science be placed above religious views that do not represent everyone.

 
47781 05/26/2009 at 07:17:46 PM       I oppose the new NIH guidelines for federally funded human ESCr. Science tells us that these embryos are living human beings. No government has the authority to destroy another human being's life. Our country will be strong if its values are strong. Science exists for the good of human beings, not the other way around. No human being's life should be sacrificed to science.

 
47782 05/26/2009 at 07:18:02 PM Self     The guidelines should forbid the use of any biologival, living material which would result in a living human being if it were allowed to develop normally. The guidelines should clearly support the fact that each person has the right to life in our country and the life of one human being is not at the disposal of another. The use of embyonic fetal cells would be a step toward the use of some human beings to service the medical/biological needs of other groups of human beings and this should al;ways. under any circumstance be unlawful.

 
47783 05/26/2009 at 07:18:06 PM Self     I am deeply troubled that the National Institutes of Health plans to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is inhumane that some members of Congress want an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos specifically to use for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities. Please oppose any use of my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead, please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions. As a former pre-doctoral IRTA at the NIH *****, I am hopeful that the policy writers at the NIH will arrive at the most ethical and scientifically sound solution for stem cell research, one that avoids destruction of human embryos. Human life at its earliest stages of growth and development is after all, human.

 
47784 05/26/2009 at 07:18:18 PM Self     May 26, 2009

I am a stem cell researcher at the University of *****. I support the change in policy put forth in President Obama’s March executive order regarding human embryonic stem (ES) cell research. However, the proposed NIH guidelines may have unintended consequences and greatly impede current research efforts by disqualifying some widely used and currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. Although I strongly support the derivation of human ES cells following rigorous ethically standards, the highly prescriptive consent language proposed in the guidelines may exclude cell lines that were derived in adherence to the relevant ethical standards. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would be highly detrimental to many ongoing research projects and be wasteful of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies. Personally, I have been supported by the NIH for the past several years and built extremely valuable transgenic ES cell lines after years of painstaking work. These master transgenic human ES cell lines are now distributed to the scientific community through the National Stem Cell Bank. The proposed guideline would unintentionally disqualify those resources for which the NIH and the scientific community have invested over the years. Furthermore, the ability to expand the scope of available human ES cell lines for NIH-funded research will be greatly delayed if the strict consent form language is required, since most privately funded lines do not exactly adhere to the proposed language.

As an alternative approach, I suggest that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines that have been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with independent oversight by an Institutional Review Board or equivalent body. A second suggestion is that the NIH or a designated body maintains a registry of approved lines to avoid unnecessary administrative effort that could delay the research.

Thank you for considering my concerns and suggestions.

Sincerely,

*****, MD, PhD *****

 
47785 05/26/2009 at 07:18:44 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47786 05/26/2009 at 07:18:46 PM Self     Please do not fund stem cell research as it has been proven countless times that it does NOT work. Adult stem cell has provided at least, to my knowledge, 72 cures. Embryo stem cell has been relentless and not only controversial but 0 cures up to this date Monday, May 26, 2009. Let's not waste any more money and, instead, work more on adult stem cell. Thanks!!!!!!!

 
47787 05/26/2009 at 07:19:07 PM Self     . I urge the NIH to include a provision to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously derived with appropriate oversight and in accordance with ethical standards at the time of derivation to be used for federally-funded research.

 
47788 05/26/2009 at 07:19:33 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47789 05/26/2009 at 07:20:29 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47790 05/26/2009 at 07:20:33 PM Self     I am deeply troubled that the National Institutes of Health plans to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is inhumane that some members of Congress want an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos specifically to use for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities. Please oppose any use of my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead, please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47791 05/26/2009 at 07:20:45 PM Self     The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. It is a fact that the only successful treatments and cures have come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 
47792 05/26/2009 at 07:20:56 PM Self     As a type 2 Diabetic. I am controlling with pills and proper eating and excersise. But My days on pills may be comming to an end. my body is slowly shutting down the capabllity of producing insulin. I do not look forward to shots, so much so I anm trying anything to avoid them. I understand with stem cell research we may be able to reverse this before I need to do so. I also realize that big drug company's want us all hooked on their product(s) for profit. I do not catre for this . Please make things right before I am to old to enjoy the rest of my life. I am a young 55. My fiance' asked me if I could promise her 20 more good years. I said I dont know, it's up to others and out of my control. Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes. Thanks so much for your time.

 
47793 05/26/2009 at 07:20:57 PM Organization     Embyrionic Stem Cell research is totally UNNECESSARY!!!

Embryrionic Stem Cells can be derived form Human hair! These experiements were done by a Japanese researcher in Japan and duplicated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin and one of our Universities in Southern California. Therefore there is no need to destroy human life in the form of living Human Embryos. Adult Stem cells are readily available in each human body and they not suseptable to Rejection problems when foreign bodies are introduced into a patient.

Also lastly, huge investments in futile and destructive Embyionic Stem Cell research draws financial research dollars away from the far more productive research on ADULT stem cell research on therapies that really help living people. So far over 70 health conditions have been improved with the use of Adult Stem Cells.

Stop the Killing of potential American Citizens!!

 
47794 05/26/2009 at 07:21:59 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47795 05/26/2009 at 07:22:07 PM Self    

I support such groundbreaking technologies as somatic cell nuclear transfer, and that it needs to be supported. Having a 10 year old niece who is a quadriplegic.Seeing the life she is living now, we must as become up to date with other countries that are doing groundbreaking embryonic stem cell programs.We need to give our scientists the support they need to move forward and find cures for the many who could be helped or cured.

The new guidelines are so cautious and conservative they would disqualify funding for almost all the embryonic stem cell lines made since 1998, when the field began. We owe the brave men and women scientists who worked in a terrifically hostile political climate-their courage, and their work, deserve to be supported now.

The economy of the world depends on cure research. Last year, America alone spent $2.3 trillion on medical care costs-more than all federal income taxes put together ($1.8 trillion)-and 75% of that mountain of money went to pay for chronic (incurable) illness and disability.

Every family deserves the best medical care science can provide We as Americans should set the standards as high as possible.

 
47796 05/26/2009 at 07:22:30 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. Therefore, a "grandfather clause" is needed to insure that every stem cell line already approved under the previous stringent guidelines will be eligible. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
47797 05/26/2009 at 07:23:56 PM Self     The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. It is a fact that the only successful treatments and cures have come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 
47798 05/26/2009 at 07:24:07 PM Self     I specifically object to the section of[Federal Register: April 23, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 77)] [Notices] [Page 18578-18580] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr23ap09-42] that states, " These draft Guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose." These embryos are humans and should be accorded the dignity of not being used for experiments. In addition I object to my tax dollars being used for such heinous experimentation. Hasn't the human race seen enough of this kind of thing?

 
47799 05/26/2009 at 07:24:19 PM Organization Empire State Stem Cell Board NYSTEM, Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health, Box 509, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 Dr. Raynard Kington NIH Acting Director NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7997

Dear Acting Director Kington:

On behalf of the Empire State Stem Cell Board (the “ESSCB” or the “Board”), (FN1) we thank you for the opportunity to comment on the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Draft Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research (74 Fed. Reg. 18,578-80 (Apr. 23, 2009)) (“Draft Guidelines”).

The ESSCB was created in 2007 for the purpose of awarding grants for basic, applied, translational and other research and development activities that will advance scientific discoveries in fields related to stem cell biology. New York State has committed $600 million over eleven years to be spent on stem cell research, making it the second largest state funded program in the country. To date, $118.7 million in research funding has been recommended for award.

The ESSCB has spent considerable time analyzing pivotal ethical issues surrounding the conduct of stem cell research, including usage of embryos in research and informed consent. The ESSCB’s deliberations have been guided in part by the federal Common Rule (45 C.F.R. § 46), as well as ethics guidelines promulgated by prominent consensus bodies, such as the National Academies of Science (NAS) and the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). Consideration of these standards has had the two-pronged effect of ensuring that the ESSCB’s policies adhere to the highest of ethical principles and of fostering essential public-private collaborations with institutions that have based their policies on these widely-recognized standards.

The ESSCB commends the Obama Administration for creating policies that promote the very important science of stem cell research. Stem cell research represents one of the most revolutionary areas of medical research today, holding out the possibility of creating treatments – and even cures – for countless diseases.

While the NIH’s Draft Guidelines represent a significant improvement on previous federal policy, the ESSCB respectfully requests that the NIH reexamine its proposed policies as discussed below prior to issuing final guidelines.

First, the ESSCB urges the NIH to reconsider its limitation of NIH funding of human embryonic stem cell research only to cell lines derived from embryos that were created for reproductive purposes and were in excess of clinical need. (Draft Guidelines § II.B). The Dickey-Wicker Amendment, which the ESSCB will not comment on in this letter, does not prevent the NIH from funding research on stem cell lines derived from embryos that were created for research purposes with non-NIH funds. Further, the ESSCB believes that, given the proper constraints, research using embryos that were specifically created for research can be ethical and that a blanket restriction is unwarranted. The proposed restriction will impede significantly the progress of science by disqualifying from federal funding eligibility disease- or individual- specific cell lines that were otherwise ethically derived. Accordingly, we advocate that the NIH allow funding for research using cell lines that were derived from embryos that were created for research purposes.

Second, the Board strongly encourages the NIH to align its provisions, particularly in the area of informed consent, with the widely-accepted principles embodied in the Common Rule (voluntary informed consent, independent oversight of the informed consent process and the avoidance of undue inducements) rather than create novel requirements. In addition, we respectfully suggest that the NIH harmonize their policies with the NAS and/or ISSCR Guidelines.(FN2) This harmonization should include endorsement of the value of the special expertise and scope of ethical review provided by stem cell review oversight committees (commonly called SCROs, or ESCROs where the scope of review involves embryonic stem cells). It should also include adoption of the ISSCR’s policy of allowing usage of biological products where obtaining re-consent to donation is prohibitively difficult and the initial consent is reviewed by an oversight body for compliance with prevailing ethical standards. (See ISSCR Guideline 11.2).

Third, the Board is concerned that certain stem cell lines that were created in compliance with widely-accepted ethical standards may not be eligible for federal funding where they do not meet the new, unique standards currently proposed by the NIH. This would disqualify from funding many lines that have served as the basis for a significant amount of valuable research. Accordingly, the Board respectfully requests that the NIH’s guidelines provide a mechanism pursuant to which a cell line imported from another jurisdiction or institution, or created prior to the effective date of the guidelines, may be used in research so long as it was “acceptably derived.” (Cf. NAS Guideline 1.6(b)).(FN3)

Similarly, the Board believes that the NIH should continue to fund research on the stem cell lines that were approved for use in federally-funded research following the Bush Administration’s policy announced on August 9, 2001. (Cf. NAS Guideline 1.5(a) (allowing use of the lines)). While the Board acknowledges the serious ethical questions regarding the derivation of some of these lines,(FN4) it nevertheless believes that, in light of the substantial research that has been conducted on these lines to date, they should be eligible for federal funding.

Finally, the ESSCB believes that some of the provisions in the draft guidelines are ambiguous and should be clarified in the following manner:

? Section II.B.4 requires “a clear separation between the prospective donor(s)’s decision to create human embryos for reproductive purposes and the prospective donor(s)’s decision to donate human embryos for research purposes. (Draft Guidelines § II.B.4). We believe that the term “separation” is ambiguous and could be subject to a range of interpretations. Therefore, we request that the NIH clarify that this provision does not preclude the initial consent for creation of an embryo for reproductive purposes from containing an authorization to allow embryos in excess of clinical need to be used in research.

? Section II.B.2 mandates that “no inducements were offered for these donations.” (Draft Guidelines § II.B.2). While the Board believes that this phrase is intended to prohibit payments or other inducements to donors for the donation of their embryo to research, it may be read expansively to prohibit usage of embryos that were created with gametes whose donors were provided with inducements in the course of reproductive processes. We recommend that this requirement be amended to read “no inducements were offered for the embryos to be donated for research purposes.”

We thank you again for the opportunity to comment on this very important matter, and welcome further occasion for discussion or consultation.

Sincerely,

*****, M.D. ***** *****, Empire State Stem Cell Board

(FN1) - The ESSCB voted 18-1 in support of this letter. *****, who dissented from this vote, will submit a separate letter containing his comments.

(FN2)- We note that the ESSCB has found the ISSCR Guidelines particularly insightful and instructive in several ways, including their emphasis on the dynamic process that should occur when obtaining informed consent.

(FN3)- According to the NAS Guidelines, “Acceptably derived” means that the cell lines were derived from gametes or embryos for which (i) the donation protocol was reviewed and approved by an IRB or, in the case of donations taking place outside the United States, a substantially equivalent oversight body; (ii) consent to donate was voluntary and informed; (iii) donation was made with reimbursement policies consistent with these Guidelines; and (iv) donation and derivation complied with the extant legal requirements of the relevant jurisdiction. (NAS Guideline 1.6(b)).

(FN4)- See, e.g., *****, Informed Consent and Federal Funding for Stem Cell Research, *****. Rep. 40-47 (2008).

 
47800 05/26/2009 at 07:24:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47801 05/26/2009 at 07:25:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47802 05/26/2009 at 07:25:04 PM Self     The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. It is a fact that the only successful treatments and cures have come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 
47803 05/26/2009 at 07:25:19 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47804 05/26/2009 at 07:25:33 PM Self     The Nazis did human experiments, but they used adult prisoners. Evidence of this can be seen in the films at the Holocaust Museum in Washington (just south of the Washington Monument). Those who participated in the experiments, when caught, ultimately were tried and convicted of “Crimes Against Humanity”. Now, over 60 years later, researchers again want to do experiments using human beings, only this time, they want to use younger subjects-human embryos. And they want to use my money, via taxes. What makes using human embryos worse is the fact that many cures are being found using adult stem cells. Also, the money being used for unethical research, could be used for practical, ethical research; for example, the Iococoa Foundation is getting positive results in finding a cure for diabetes that does not use embryonic stem cells. NO MONEY FOR DESTRUCTIVE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH!

 
47805 05/26/2009 at 07:25:45 PM Self     I oppose the killing of the human embryo. This regulation will force taxpayers like myself to pay for a proceedure which I feel is immoral and unethical.

There is evidence that current stem cell research is providing success in the areas of disease control. There is no need to sacrifice the lives of unborn children for questionable research.

 
47806 05/26/2009 at 07:26:37 PM Self     The perceived need to destroy human embryos for research is based on bad science. New science provides a better stem cell solution without destroying human embryos. This makes the purposeful destruction of human embryos not only unethical, but also completely unnecessary.

Research dollars should be used to explore further the benefits of adult stem cells, which have already been used to treat dozens of diseases and disorders without destroying a single human life. We should also be studying iPSC, a new, ethical alternative method of stem cell research. Embryonic stem cells have yet to offer a cure for anything.

This debate should be over. Good science has shown us alternatives to destroying human embryos. Let's shift our focus and research efforts there.

 
47807 05/26/2009 at 07:26:48 PM Self   Would just like to point out that whereas adult stem cells are ALREADY being used to cure people, embryonic stem cells have neither cured anyone nor yet are useable. Two rat studies found that an implant of embryonic stem cells caused the growth of cancerous tumors. Another issue is that there are other technologies which are already showing promise even though they are much newer than embryonic stem cell research which has been going on for decades. Like using skin cells and "backing up" the DNA to FORM stem cells. I hope you will consider backing off on funding embryonic stem cell research (which has ethical problems for a large number of Americans) and more focusing on adult stem cells and the newer technologies... no ethical problems and better results already.

 
47808 05/26/2009 at 07:26:52 PM Self     The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. It is a fact that the only successful treatments and cures have come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 
47809 05/26/2009 at 07:26:59 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47810 05/26/2009 at 07:27:01 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47811 05/26/2009 at 07:27:09 PM       No! to the NIH draft guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research. Our country's moral values would be even further eroded. We need to preserve respect for every human being, even the littlest.

 
47812 05/26/2009 at 07:27:17 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
47813 05/26/2009 at 07:27:38 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately!

-Furthermore by using mt tax dollars for these areas of resea5rch, you are making me complicit in them. You may not have any qualms about being a murderer, but it sure bothers me. May God have mercy on you.

For Life,

 
47814 05/26/2009 at 07:27:45 PM Self     Dear Gentleperson,

As a physician and father of seven wonderful children who began their lives as embryonic individuals, I write to present my comments in opposition to the DRAFT National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research presented over the April 17, 2009 name of Dr. Raynard S. Kington, Acting Director, NIH

Of course, as one who adheres to the Hippocratic Oath, my opposition to the proposed Guidelines is based primarily on their inherent and unwarranted devaluation of human life, which, in this context, is to be killed in the name of “science.” There are many more reasons to oppose these Guidelines.

Throughout the Guidelines, cells derived from the intentional killing of little human beings are described in terms of their “use.” When they are deemed, by their parent or donor owners, to no longer be useful to provide an implanted embryo, intrauterine fetus, and born child, they are relegated to be killed and used in the name of “research.” Echoes of the testimony provided at the Doctors Trials at Nuremberg in the late 1940’s (and of the Tuskegee Study) are now sounding loudly in America. Is anyone in Washington listening? One is reminded that the secret of Schindler’s List was that Oskar Schindler found ways to portray the usefulness of born human beings to bureaucrats of the Third Reich. In so doing, he saved many otherwise slated for death or lethal “research” at the hands of physicians and scientists. Pragmatic Utilitarianism is not only impractical but, neither then and there nor here and now, is it anything but barbarism.

In my second paragraph I noted that my unfailing objection is rooted in the immoral and unethical action of directly killing one human being for some reputed “higher purpose.” When that “higher purpose” is based on smoke, mirrors, and fantasy, the entire enterprise becomes incredible and demeans its proponents. Human embryonic stem cell research has been carried on for over 10 years in the U.S., largely but not entirely funded by non-public dollars. At this time, before EO 13505, our country was spending more on this destructive research each year than the rest of the world combined!

In spite of this level of funding for this period, no human clinical trials have even begun, although one—very cautious and very small—has now been approved by the FDA. The scientific reasons are, no doubt, known to the author(s) of the Guidelines: human embryonic stem cells have not been controllable and are prone to form a variety of tumors; additionally, human embryonic stem cells always carry a genome distinct from any putative patient. Although this latter impediment may be addressed with immunosuppressive drugs, when balancing that regimen against the currently demonstrated effectiveness of cell therapies employing the patient’s own stem cells (without immunosuppression) or those employing donated but matched adult stem cells (with immunosuppression), the risks of using embryonic stem cells tips the scales against them.

It would appear, from my reading of the Guidelines, that Dr. Kington has made an unwarranted and unsupportable interpretation of the Dickey-Wicker Amendment, here presented as currently in force.

Dickey-Wicker Amendment (enacted on March 11, 2009 as part of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009,) SEC. 509. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act may be used for-- (1) the creation of a human embryo or embryos for research purposes; or (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and Section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Act [1](42 U.S.C. 289g(b)) (Title 42, Section 289g(b), United States Code). (b) For purposes of this section, the term "human embryo or embryos" includes any organism, not protected as a human subject under 45 CFR 46 (the Human Subject Protection regulations) . . . that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis, cloning, or any other means from one or more human gametes (sperm or egg) or human diploid cells (cells that have two sets of chromosomes, such as somatic cells).

To present these Guidelines as approving funding of research using human embryonic stem cells that were “derived” i.e. obtained by killing an embryonic human being, is disingenuous at best if it is meant to be within the actions approved by Dickey-Wicker. To consider this further, these Guidelines are meant to divorce themselves from the actual killing—presumably not funded by NIH—how can the “Eligibility” provisions not be interpreted as a wink and a nod to those who, although, perhaps, not directly funded by tax dollars, must meet specific NIH requirements so that their unfunded killing actions are allowed to generate a funding stream by using the products of the killing? If the “eligibility” provisions are not a clear attempt to tacitly approve actions contrary to the language and intent of Dickey-Wicker what are they?

Penultimately, these Guidelines become patently incredible when they promote the immoral, unethical, and increasingly outdated and unworkable destruction of human beings by providing the accurate definition of human embryonic stem cells as “cells derived from human embryos (that) are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture, and (that) are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers.” Contrast that definition with the same Guidelines definition of human induced pluripotent stem cells: “cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture and (that) are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers.” Since the defined characteristics, as presented in the Guidelines, are indistinguishable, and since one involves the killing of a human being without their foreknowledge or consent, the reasonable reader must ask why Executive Order 13505 was issued and why these Guidelines were drafted?

It is clear the answer to that question is that President Obama is enthralled by the notion that human embryos are human enough to be used but not human enough to be protected. It follows that President Obama is here engaged in fulfilling a campaign promise to require taxpayer funding of increasingly irrelevant “research” which requires the killing of little human beings. As such the Executive Order and these Guidelines are morally corrupt. They devalue human life and demean and degrade ethical scientific inquiry.

*****, M.D., M.S.

 
47815 05/26/2009 at 07:27:49 PM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life. And it is a waste of energy to do so when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
47816 05/26/2009 at 07:29:27 PM Self     The new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. It is a fact that the only successful treatments and cures have come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. We need to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 



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