Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
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Comments Attachment
46116 05/26/2009 at 09:57:23 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46117 05/26/2009 at 09:57:26 AM Self     Please do not spend any more of our tax dollars on embryonic stem cell research. Please use the stem cells of those all ready born and do not destroy the lives of the unborn. Thank you

 
46118 05/26/2009 at 09:57:35 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
46119 05/26/2009 at 09:57:37 AM Self     Stem cell research using embryonic stem cells is both ethically and morally wrong. Situational ethics is no justification for such research as situational ethics would seek to justify anything no matter how reprehensible it might be, in the cause of "a higher good." Though many may seek to justify such experimentation on embryonic stem cells for "potential" benefits, the benefit is certainly not to the embryo "WHO" (emphasizing the personhood of the embryo)is killed in the process. From the moment of fertilization there is human life, and stem cell research snuffs out that life without any consideration given to that life. Such an act is equivalent to murder as it is premeditated and deprives an individual of life. Death row inmates and enemy prisoners, read Iraqi and Afghani prisoners, seem to have more rights than the unborn. Pursuing embryonic stem cell research is no different to the medical research that occured under Hitler in Nazi Germany.

Adult stem cell research however does not have the same ethical issues and shows more promise and is an avenue which could be pursued.

Do the right thing and ban embryonic stem cell research!

Signed,

A future mid-career family nurse practitioner and nurse educator

 
46120 05/26/2009 at 09:57:49 AM Self     I am opposed to any destruction of life. If any embryos should have been destroyed, it should have been the embryos that produced those that support such "Nazi Style" medical experimentation. I include abortion in this as well.

 
46121 05/26/2009 at 09:57:59 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Thank you very much.

 
46122 05/26/2009 at 09:58:26 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

God Bless

 
46123 05/26/2009 at 10:00:29 AM Self     I am a stem cell researcher at the University of *****. This note is to express my support for the change in policy put forth in President Obama’s March executive order regarding human embryonic stem (ES) cell research. I have been informed that the proposed NIH guidelines may impede current research efforts by disqualifying some currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would be detrimental to many ongoing research projects and would be a poor use of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies.

Alternatively, the final guidelines should allow NIH funding for any lines that have been derived with informed consent, without undue inducement, and with independent oversight by an Institutional Review Board.

Thank you for your consideration.

 
46124 05/26/2009 at 10:00:56 AM Self     Playing God now are we?? This is insane. We now have a president who for over 20 years attended a christian church and still has no idea what God's word says about those who place themselves in his shoes.

 
46125 05/26/2009 at 10:01:09 AM Organization Carmelite Monastery   We are opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force taxpayers to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and all already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non- controversial, ethical and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.We reject the new stem cell research regulations in full. Thank you.

 
46126 05/26/2009 at 10:01:13 AM Self     Dear President Obama,

I'll keep this short so I don't waste anyone's time: we've broken too many moral boundaries within the last decades, each breach promising to not lead beyond where it led. Every time we break these moral boundaries, there will be a group of people trying to push us further into moral depravity, and you've got to take a stand this time. Please don't let America become a place that we create human life and then destroy it for our own benefit. Please don't keep lowering that bar.

The channels of ethical problems proceeding from this will not be minute.

-Sincerely,

 
46127 05/26/2009 at 10:01:24 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46128 05/26/2009 at 10:01:59 AM Self     Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos.

 
46129 05/26/2009 at 10:02:10 AM Self     I do not believe this is right. There are other ways to help us with Diabetes.

 
46130 05/26/2009 at 10:02:23 AM Self     I think it is very important that the NIH "grandfather" the existing federally approved human embryonic stem cell lines, available through the National Stem Cell Bank. These are proven lines with years of research, used throughout the world by researchers with previously approved grant money. Why would you want to literally throw away the previous research and findings, and slow down stem cell research? I consider the lines to be the foundation for research completed and for future reference. These lines should remain federally funded. It is your responsibility to use the federal money wisely and I fail to see where discontinuing the federal funding of the existing National Stem Cell Bank cell lines would be a responsible decision.

 
46131 05/26/2009 at 10:02:46 AM Self     Dear Mr.President Obama,Please do not spend money on embryonic stem cell research!!!!!!Taking Life is not right,morally or constitutionally.Everyone has the RIGHT to LIFE!!!It is a proven fact that we do not need these,and it is a waste of time and time is important to find cures!I know I have Multiple Sclerosis!Please listen to what most Americans want.51% are Pro-life. Thank you,

 
46132 05/26/2009 at 10:03:39 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes. I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule. Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research. I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46133 05/26/2009 at 10:04:01 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46134 05/26/2009 at 10:04:28 AM Organization Put The Boots to ALS   Lets increase the funding and and attack this terrible disease

 
46135 05/26/2009 at 10:04:38 AM Self     Briefly I feel that thus far there have been no scientific advancements in the use of human stem cells. However there have been numerous advancedments in the research done on embronic stem cell research. In my opinion the funding of human embro research will eventually lead to attempts at genetically engineering the human body, no matter how many ethically responsible limits placed on such efforts. Our court system almost always goes along with such behavior. In my opinion NIH should not let research be done with human embryos.

 
46136 05/26/2009 at 10:05:22 AM Self     We support NIH's Draft Guidelines with the following addition:

-- Section II B should be modified to include NIH funding for research on pre-existing stem cell lines as long as those lines were derived: 1. With informed consent 2. Without undue inducement 3. With oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Internal Review Board (IRB)

We believe this addition to the NIH Draft Guidelines is critical for the progression of embryonic stem cell research for the cures and treatments of patients who have been desperately waiting.

We encourage the NIH to ignore opposition ramblings of untruths that would further restrict scientists and researchers, and focus instead on those patients whose hopes lie in your agency's hands.

Sincerely,

 
46137 05/26/2009 at 10:05:37 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46138 05/26/2009 at 10:05:47 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding upon the order of NIH. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos so that they understand that their options include permission for infertile couples to adopt them.

 
46139 05/26/2009 at 10:05:56 AM Organization Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research and Cures   On behalf of Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research and Cures (MCSCRC), we submit the following to the National Institutes of Health:

Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research & Cures (MCSCRC) is a nonprofit organization formed to educate the citizens of the State of Michigan, including public officials and policy makers, about the complex science, the biomedical potential and the current policies affecting stem cell research in Michigan, in order to promote informed decision making on this important issue.

MCSCRC includes patient advocacy organizations, business and civic leaders, nonprofit organizations, leading research and medical organizations, policy makers, human service organizations, opinion leaders, members of universities and individual residents from all walks of life and political affiliations.

In Michigan, significant strides have been made within the last three years, with 2008 culminating in the passing of Proposal 2 - a critical change in the State of Michigan Constitution which opened the door for embryonic stem cell research, and hope for patients and families in our state.

We enthusiastically support NIH funding of embryonic stem cell research, including all best safe, ethical, and legal steps needed to create stem cell lines.

In general, we support the current NIH draft guidelines, with the following addition:

-- Section II B should be modified to include NIH funding for research on pre-existing stem cell lines as long as those lines were derived:

1. With informed consent 2. Without undue inducement 3. With oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Internal Review Board (IRB)

Sincerely,

 
46140 05/26/2009 at 10:05:56 AM Self     I oppose experimentation on human stem cells, and the creation of such human stem cells for research purposes.From the moment of conception,the early human organism is complete and self-generating. It needs nothing but sustenance and a proper environment in which to grow. The early human organism is a genetically unique organism from the moment of sucessful conception. Any attempt to consider this organism as anything short of a fellow human creature falls completely short of any scientific explanation. If this organism is not a human organism, then what is it? Because the organism does not look like us, does this mean that the organism is not us at an earlier stage of development? Science knows that the early human is just that- an early human organism in the process of development. Any other approach is politics- and bad politics as proven by the Nazis, Stalin and others who selected certain groups of people and labeled them as less than human. Thank you.

 
46141 05/26/2009 at 10:06:00 AM Self     I am writing to comment on the new Regulations which will govern research on embryonic stem cells. I am opposed to your draft guidelines which will force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Also embryo-destructive cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical and have already been very successful in treating many diseases If scientists feel an absolute necessity to study embryonic stem cells then new induced pluri-potent stems cells (iPSCs), derived from reprogrammed adult cells are now available. These act like embryonic stem cells but do away with the necessity of killing an embryo. We must never forget that we all started life as embryos and that they are human beings. Any experimentation with embryos is reminiscent of the actions of the Nazis during WW2. Surely, we still believe that what these people did was unethical and must not be duplicated. I should also like to point out that the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic research that could lead to the creation of human clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. I appreciate this opportunity to make my opinion known to the N.I.of H. and I request that you give it due consideration.

 
46142 05/26/2009 at 10:06:45 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
46143 05/26/2009 at 10:07:00 AM Self     I am writing today to OPPOSE the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institute of Health in response to the President's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed guidelines will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite millions of dollars already expended on embryonic stem cell research the results have been complete failure because they have produced deadly tumors! WHY do legislators still seek to dump money into a proven deadly program? when science has produced astonishing advances (moving toward 100 healing successes) using adult stem cells and discovered ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing an individual. FUNDING SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS ! The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be killed to obtain embryonic stem-cells. These regulations would open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

 
46144 05/26/2009 at 10:07:02 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46145 05/26/2009 at 10:07:10 AM Self     Please allow the promising use of stem cell research for this devastating disease. It's easy enough to let those who oppose their use to avoid the advances developed through the use of stem cells. Please don't penalize the rest of us.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders.  I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest.  Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.  The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.  

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding.  It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived.  This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.  

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).  Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.  If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.  

 
46146 05/26/2009 at 10:07:58 AM Self     Stem cells are a promosing and valuable means to erradicate human suffering. Killing embyos for this purpose is not in our best interest. Stem cells from adults, and even from breast milk have shown promise.

I have relatives who have used stem cells, and I have endocrine system issues that could benefit from research, but please use adult stem cells for this!

Embryonic stem cell harvesting raises a slippery slope of harvest for profit, initiation of pregnancy for fetal termination and other social issues. Ultrasounds have shown that embryonic formation is far more advanced than was imagined a few years ago. Let's not have to possibly hang our heads in shame a generation from now when the work of fine organizations like NIH show even more about human development.

The destruction of human life before birth is the destruction of humanity, instead of the salvation of human persons.

 
46147 05/26/2009 at 10:08:02 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46148 05/26/2009 at 10:08:03 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46149 05/26/2009 at 10:08:08 AM Self     I am writing today to OPPOSE the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institute of Health in response to the President's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed guidelines will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite millions of dollars already expended on embryonic stem cell research the results have been complete failure because they have produced deadly tumors! WHY do legislators still seek to dump money into a proven deadly program? when science has produced astonishing advances (moving toward 100 healing successes) using adult stem cells and discovered ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing an individual. FUNDING SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO ALTERNATIVES TO THE USE OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS ! The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be killed to obtain embryonic stem-cells. These regulations would open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids.

 
46150 05/26/2009 at 10:08:12 AM Self     My father and grandfather had Huntington’s disease. As a child we understood the disability since there were so many family members who were afflicted. My mom would tell us “There will probably not be a cure in father’s lifetime; but for sure in yours.” I was diagnosed in 2002 through the “new” genetic testing. As a Huntington’s disease patient I have had the opportunity since 2002 to be a patient at the ***** research clinic. Every doctor, every nurse, any affiliated with the facility cares so much about all of us. They surely do not get paid enough for their 24/7 care they provide. I participated in the first round study for Dimebon in *****. I was on a 20 mg. drug for 10 days and I retained stability and cognitive skills. Here it is 2009 and there is still no approval. In my last clinic visit in May 2009, I am getting frustrated and depressed and asked to take Dimebon and there is still no FDA approval; but I can participate in another study in July. This I plan to do. I have been an advocate of stem cell research and any all related funding. I have also been an advocate of any other financial aid required to fast track all avenues for a cure. I have a 25 year old daughter who I really want to tell her there will be a cure in my lifetime. I also want to tell her she does not have to worry if she has the gene. Here it is 50 years later and the same concerns exist.

 
46151 05/26/2009 at 10:08:29 AM Self     I very much support stem cell research.

 
46152 05/26/2009 at 10:08:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46153 05/26/2009 at 10:08:53 AM Self     To whome it may concerne,

Please let it be known that I am opposed to the use of my tax dollars for stem cell research. More work needs to be done through adult stem cell research. Using stem cells from aborted fetuses is not good policy or practice.

Please turn this horrundus blunder around.

Very sincerly yours

 
46154 05/26/2009 at 10:09:02 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
46155 05/26/2009 at 10:09:15 AM Self     Please support stem cell research using adult stem cells. Do not destroy innocent human life by using embryonic stem cells.

THE JEWEL OF MY CREATION My Child! Before the dawn of Creation, I thought of you. Before the dawn of Creation, I thought of you, Before the mist blew through the heavens, I thought of you; Before the blue water cascaded down the mountainsides, I thought of you; Before the first minnow jumped in a brook, I thought of you; For you, my pet, are the jewel of My creation. Before the dawn of Creation, I had a plan for you. Your eyes are the color of a small sparrow's wing. Your skin is as dark as the coal in the earth; And again, your eyes are azure blue. Your skin is brown like My mother's. I had a plan for you from the dawn of Creation. For centuries the grass blew softly on the great prairies. Sometimes as softly as you breathe — And the grass was waiting for you; Yes, before the first crocus smiled at Me, I thought of your smile. I will remember you into Eternity. When the mist blows in the heavens no more, I will be with you; When the blue water cascades down the mountains no more, I will be with you; When the pine trees sprout forth no more. I will remember you; My beautiful. My beloved! What are they doing to you? My pet, My creation! What are they doing to you? You lie on the table alone. You breathe so hard; Will they not wash you with the blue waters of My mountains? Your breathing is becoming so still, Like the grass on the prairies in a great calm. My Child, I am thinking of you. My beautiful. My beloved! What are they doing to you? My pet. My creation! What are they doing to you? Your little fingers are so small and soft. Like a pussy willow's bud; The steel from the cold earth; Why do they press it to your soft new flesh with Such great force? My child, My thought is never removed from you. My child, My beautiful! What are they doing to you? With the suction, like a hurricane, they pull and tear you; Your little legs will never walk, until you run with Me. The salt in your mouth, when you were to sing for Me! The salt in your lungs, you who were to yell of your love for Me! Before the dawn of Creation, I thought of you, I love you. I will love you all of eternity.

 
46156 05/26/2009 at 10:09:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46157 05/26/2009 at 10:09:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46158 05/26/2009 at 10:10:33 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46159 05/26/2009 at 10:11:03 AM Self     I do not feel that my tax money should be spent on research that the private sector should be doing. Embryonic stem cell treatment has not proved to be very successful so far. Only the adult stem cells have shown promise. What I feel money should be spent on is a data base that will make the donors more readily accessable to those needing the stem cells. My daughter gave stem cells so I know there is activity in the adult stem cell program.

 
46160 05/26/2009 at 10:11:44 AM Self     It is morally unacceptable to kill human embyros.

 
46161 05/26/2009 at 10:12:25 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46162 05/26/2009 at 10:14:09 AM Self     This is wrong and unnecessary - I resent my tax money going for this as well as abortions in other countries. If people would take responsiblity for their actions we would not need to be talking about abortions!

 
46163 05/26/2009 at 10:14:27 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46164 05/26/2009 at 10:15:07 AM Self     I stand firmly on opposing the use of my taxpayer dollars for failed research requiring the destruction of human embryos. Instead, urge congress to support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46165 05/26/2009 at 10:15:09 AM Self     There are other ways to obtain stem cells - we do not need to use embryos for this purpose.

 
46166 05/26/2009 at 10:15:12 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46167 05/26/2009 at 10:15:15 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America's over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
46168 05/26/2009 at 10:15:25 AM Self     I don't think there is much debate that self preservation and species preservation are inherent instincts in the animal kingdom. I am opposed to your draft guidelines embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of a member of my species. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes as it is contrary to those very instincts that have allowed our species to survive thus far.

 
46169 05/26/2009 at 10:15:32 AM Self     The logic and rational behind creating life (embryonic stem cells) only to kill the embryo to advance medicine is counter-productive and fundamentally wrong. Scientifically, an embryo is the beginning of a human being. Human beings deserve protection and certain rights under law. As with abortion, so with stem cells, the real question is...is it just an embryo or fetus, or is it really a human being? Since it is a human being, it is absolutely wrong to destroy for the selfish pursuit of advanced medicine. We have many other humane ways to advance it. Thank you for your time,and remember it is always good to remember that both you and I at one time were an embryo.

 
46170 05/26/2009 at 10:15:38 AM Self     As a taxpayer, I do not want my money to go towards stem cell research on embryros. And no cloning, please. Stay with the successful adult stem cell program. thank you.

 
46171 05/26/2009 at 10:15:40 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46172 05/26/2009 at 10:15:50 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America's over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
46173 05/26/2009 at 10:16:12 AM Self     Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research.

Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board.

Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds". The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation.

To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
46174 05/26/2009 at 10:16:17 AM Self     As one of Concerned Women for America's over 500,000 members, I am writing today to oppose the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize unethical research that destroys human embryos. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells which are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated, and taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
46175 05/26/2009 at 10:16:56 AM Self     I am writing today to express my opposition to the draft guidelines proposed by the National Institutes of Health in response to President Obama's Executive Order issued on March 9, 2009. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to subsidize research that destroys human embryos, research that is ethically and morally objectionable to me. Despite the millions of dollars spent on destructive embryonic stem cell research in California and elsewhere, the results have been an abject failure because embryonic stem cells tend to become deadly tumors. Science has surpassed this unethical research, producing astonishing advances with adult stem cells and discovering ways to make embryonic-like stem cells without killing anyone. Funding should be directed to alternatives to embryonic stem cells that are ethical and more efficient, effective, and are actually successfully treating patients. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. These regulations also open the door to cloning and human/animal hybrids. Embryonic stem cell research is destructive and outdated. Taxpayer monies should be used for ethical research that can actually treat patients.

 
46176 05/26/2009 at 10:17:18 AM Self Iosco County Right to Life   The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46177 05/26/2009 at 10:17:20 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

Additional Information

In March, the President issued an Executive Order that ended the blanket ban on federal funding of research using embryonic stem cell lines developed after August 2001. NIH was than instructed to develop guidelines for federal funding of this research.

The purpose of the guidelines is to establish a policy and procedures under which the federal government will fund research in this area, and to ensure that such research is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. You can view the NIH’s draft guidelines online by clicking here.

The draft guidelines would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. The guidelines also describe the conditions and informed consent procedures that would be required when obtaining embryonic stem cells for research that could be funded by the federal government.

The American Diabetes Association strongly supports the draft guidelines but is concerned that, as written, they may prevent stem cell lines in existence before the guidelines go into effect, from being eligible for federal research funding The Association is urging NIH to consider amending the guidelines to allow current stem cell lines derived using prevailing ethical practices to be considered for federal funding and that NIH be open to review other sources of stem cell lines (excluding reproductive cloning) in the future.

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46178 05/26/2009 at 10:17:41 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46179 05/26/2009 at 10:17:57 AM Self     Adult stem cell research has proven to have many medical benefits with unlimited availability, effectiveness, and safe procurement without any ethical controversy. I strongly disagree that funding embryonic stem cell research is "ethically responsible and scientifically worthy." Therefore, I oppose the use of NIH funding for the purpose of embryonic stem cell research.

 
46180 05/26/2009 at 10:18:01 AM Self     To all it may concern:I beg of you on behalf of all human embryos,to not allow funding of Americans tax dollars for this inhuman unethical,research. Adult stem cell research has had the only proven results in all tried research. Please, I humbly beg you to reconsider. This country would most benefit from adult stem cell research.Adult stem cell research would not kill innocent life and would only help any case. Thank You.

 
46181 05/26/2009 at 10:18:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46182 05/26/2009 at 10:19:05 AM Self     I wanted to express my favorable opinion regarding a company called Advanced Cell Technology and their efforts regarding stem cell research. While I am opposed to the direct use of stem cells in which harm to the embryo occurs, I do support this particular company due to the technology that they've obtained which allows the extraction and use of stem cells without any direct harm to the fetus. This technology and details can be obtained by investigating the company. Their call symbol is ACTC, Advanced Cell Technology. As a doctor, this is a subject that is very important to me. I do believe that there are enormous possibilities with this research, but do not want any direct or invasive procedures that would directly harm the fetus. This is to much to explain in a general comment, but again, I encourage you to look into it, this company is the only one out there with this technology.

 
46183 05/26/2009 at 10:19:05 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Our organization has followed the progress in this field witti great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. \Ne are pleased that these draft guidelines - in Section H B - would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. We also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and we recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways.

 
46184 05/26/2009 at 10:19:07 AM Self     Experimenting on human embryos is wrong. The end does NOT justify the means. My tax dollars should NOT be used for this immoral purpose.

I DO support adult stem cell research. It has already produced measureable/effective/positive results and it does NOT destroy a human life.

 
46185 05/26/2009 at 10:19:08 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46186 05/26/2009 at 10:19:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46187 05/26/2009 at 10:19:36 AM Self     In regard to the new policies being drafted for tax payer funded embryonic stem cell research, I would ask that The National Institute of Health consider three things. First, what are we destroying? What kind of research is getting results? And what will history make of our decisions?

Dealing with the first question, what exactly is it that is being debated in embryonic stem cell research? Are we destroying a human being in the earliest stages of development or are we just manipulating masses of cells? Biology classes across the country teach that the embryo is created after fertilization. At that point, the embryo has 100% human DNA. The 2002 National Academy of Sciences acknowledged in Scientific and Medical Aspects of Human Reproductive Cloning that the embryo is a "developing human from fertilization". There is no other step in development where we can conclude, “Now, this is a human”. Fertilization is that step. We are not just discussing a mass of cells. To destroy an embryo is to discriminate against their size and inability to voice their right to life. Yes, an embryo is small and it does not look much like us, but given the time to be nurtured, each person reading this was once at that stage, also. The inability of an embryo to voice their disagreement with the policies being debated concerning them is like any other people group that is unjustly eradicated. We must be their voice.

My second question is what is getting results in stem cell research? On your own web pages the potential for embryonic stem cells is mentioned, but never the fact that there has not been one successful treatment using them. On the other hand, adult stem cells are working in over seventy treatments . Their pluripotent abilities are being now being realized and would solve the whole ethical stem cell issue debate! What is working? Adult stem cells. What is not working? Embryonic stem cells. Tax payer money should be spent wisely on projects that are ethical and that are getting results. With private investors interested in the successes of adult stem cell research, it seems like the only people foolish enough to invest in embryonic stem cell research are those in charge our tax money.

My third question is what will history make of us? As one looks down the corridors of history many failed and foolish attempts at progress in medicine are to be found, but some even fall into the category of sinister. Eugenics was at one time touted to be the scientific answer to problems of disease, overpopulation, and poverty. With forced sterilization used against those of color, the mentally handicapped, and even the poor it falls into a class so horrible that the American Medical Association does not even like to admit they supported such unscrupulous science. Will the potential of curing people with diseases at the expense of other people in their earliest stages be seen as a blight on our generation?

One must ask the question why anyone would pour money into a type of research that is so controversial, with no successful results, at the expense of many who are voicing their opposition? Why? Is it because if one could find a cure with embryonic stem cells, then money could be made with it being patented? One can not patent an individuals cells, so no profits would be made from cures from adult stem cells. Is the almighty dollar really worth the wasted time and money spent on trying to find a cure with embryonic stem cells when adult stem cells produce results one could only dream about with embryonic stem cells. I ask you to look beyond the the emotional appeal of potential and provide policies that reward research with results produced in an ethical manner. Death of the innocent is never ethical, let us not pretend we can make policies that say otherwise.

 
46188 05/26/2009 at 10:19:50 AM Self     I believe we have no right to chose between life and death. I also believe that we have no right to "play" with human embryos. God created life to be fullfilled. Not to destroy it or to do experiments with.

We need to work on the younger generation to teach them the importance of life and the importance of doing the "right" thing.

Sincerely,

 
46189 05/26/2009 at 10:20:01 AM Self     My comments on the subject of stem cell research are as follows: I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding upon the order of NIH. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos so that they understand that their options include permission for infertile couples to adopt them.

 
46190 05/26/2009 at 10:20:08 AM Self     I am 70 years old and learned last year that I have Parkinson's and was told there is no cure for this terrible disease. With all the tools we have in the USA I am hoping that through stem cell research we can find a cure.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson's community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses All Americans need your help Sincerely,

 
46191 05/26/2009 at 10:20:42 AM Self     Please accept my comments on the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines:

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which forces me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to Adult stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and that have ALREADY BEEN PROVEN SUCCESSFUL!!! There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46192 05/26/2009 at 10:21:01 AM Self     I am sickened by this so called research. I am tired of paying for research that I as a taxpayer do not believe in. It is time for the "free" public to vote on such things. Especially concerning Human Stem Cell research. I am firmly against it and will be sure to see what representatives go along with this.

 
46193 05/26/2009 at 10:21:18 AM Self     As a member of a family affected by Huntington's Disease and a carrier of the gene mutation, I want research toward a cure to progress as rapidly as possible. However, my first hand knowledge of our human propensity to devalue people who are unproductive or who cannot speak for themselves makes me very wary of using any human being as a means to my healing. I believe the embryo is a person and so should not be destroyed or made a silent part of a research system. The restrictions in Section II.B. do not address this fundamental question.

For these reasons, I oppose the use of embryonic stem cells in research, and support increased funding for research into human induced pluripotent stem cells.

 
46194 05/26/2009 at 10:21:27 AM Organization University of Michigan Center for Stem Cell Biology   May 25, 2009

The Honorable Raynard Kington Acting Director, The National Institutes of Health 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892

Dear Dr. Kington, As ***** of the University of ***** Center for Stem Cell Biology, and as somebody who has been involved extensively in efforts to improve stem cell policies at the state and federal levels, I would like to comment on the draft NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research, which appeared in the Federal Register on April 23, 2009. The guidelines were drafted in response to Executive Order 13505, Removing Barriers to responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells.

I was involved in drafting the comments that have already been submitted by the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) and by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), and support the comments made by these scientific societies. Rather than recapitulating those letters in their entirety, I will briefly summarize the key points:

1. The NIH has done a good job of crafting guidelines that represent a reasonable compromise based on where the science currently stands. As long as these guidelines are modified in a few key ways as a result of the comment period (see details below), this policy will accelerate medical research while being respectful of the ethical concerns of those opposed to research involving human embryos. This policy is a dramatic advance over the Bush administration policy.

2. One key concern is that the retroactive application of the informed consent standards in the draft policy will make most existing human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines ineligible for NIH funding. This would be an enormous impediment as it would force researchers to abandon work on most of the “NIH approved” hES cell lines that researchers were forced to use for the past 8 years under the Bush administration policy. This would delay the development of this field. It would also force researchers to destroy more embryos simply to derive new lines that follow the letter of the new informed consent standards, even though existing lines were derived ethically. As a result, it is critical to develop a mechanism that will permit the grandfathering of hES cell lines that were ethically derived prior to the creation of a new NIH policy, even if they do not explicitly meet all of the informed consent standards in the new policy. Unless this is done, most of the 700 lines that NIH has estimated currently exist will not be eligible for NIH funding.

To achieve this, I would propose that any existing hES cell line that was derived a) with informed consent, and b) without undue inducement (i.e. embryos cannot be bought or sold), and c) with oversight and approval by an independent ethics advisory committee (such as an Institutional Review Board) would be judged to have been ethically derived and eligible for NIH funding.

3. To avoid the confusion that will be created if individual institutions are required to independently assess the provenance of hES cell lines and their eligibility for NIH funding, NIH must create a registry of lines that are eligible for NIH funding. This would dramatically streamline the entire enterprise by not forcing individual institutions to redundantly make their own determinations. There are various mechanisms by which this could be done. One possibility would be for NIH to create its own committee to create and curate the registry. Another possibility would be for NIH to partner with a scientific society such as ISSCR to do this. Some additional possibilities are described in ISSCR’s letter that would allow NIH to approve funding for any line that was derived with IRB (or the equivalent in other countries) approval.

4. It will be important for this policy to evolve as the science evolves. This principle was explicit in President Obama’s Executive Order. For example, it may not currently be an impediment for NIH not to fund work using parthenogenic lines, but it may become necessary to review this aspect of the policy if breakthroughs are made in the future that make parthenogenically-derived lines uniquely valuable for addressing important scientific or clinical problems. Whatever process NIH elects to employ to review this policy over time, it is critical that the process be based upon sound science and that the process be insulated from efforts to impede the science based only upon predetermined political or religious ideologies that do not consider the facts concerning this science. One potential approach would be to empower the National Academy of Sciences to make annual recommendations to NIH for how the policy should be modified.

It is almost never possible to retroactively apply informed consent standards to studies conducted in the past because our ideas regarding such standards are constantly evolving. It is ethically wrong for us to abandon knowledge collected in the past or cell lines that were created in the past according to the highest ethical standards of the time, simply because we have become somewhat more sophisticated about the language of informed consent.

The history of medical research is filled with examples of research or therapies whose morality and legality were once debated, but which are now considered mainstream practices that save or improve thousands of lives. This includes blood transfusion, organ transplantation, in vitro fertilization, and other practices. Many in society tend to be uncomfortable with new medical technologies until there is an opportunity to see that such technologies can be implemented safely and to the benefit of patients. Today, almost everybody would agree that organ transplantation is a good thing despite efforts decades ago to prohibit this work and despite the ongoing belief by some in our society that organ transplantation is immoral. We must ensure that stem cell research can proceed in an ethical manner so that it too has the opportunity to save lives. When that occurs, patients will have the opportunity to accept or decline treatments made possible by stem cell research based on their own moral and ethical perspectives. The majority of people in our society, and the vast majority of patients who might one day benefit from this research, appreciate our efforts to pursue the opportunities created by stem cell research with the urgency they deserve.

Sincerely,

 
46195 05/26/2009 at 10:21:39 AM Self     Our daughter, *****, was diagnosed with diabetes type 1 when she was 10 years old. She is 15 now and has been managing her insulin and blood sugar levels with the help of an insulin pump. However, if there is ANY research that offers a path to a future cure, this MUST be pursued and funded!

The following is edited from the ADA website wording: Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46196 05/26/2009 at 10:22:07 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
46197 05/26/2009 at 10:22:21 AM Self     I oppose the destrcution of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning. It is murder. To take babies created by 'in bitro fertilization' and who are in the embryonic stage of growth, and use them in experiments is murder. It is a cruel and horrific act. Calling it science just masks the fact that human babies are being killed. Please let me know how you could justify this. Thank you in advance for your answer.

 
46198 05/26/2009 at 10:22:27 AM Self     We believe that destroying embryos is the taking of human life in its earliest stage. Please pray about and reconsider this, President Obama!

 
46199 05/26/2009 at 10:22:38 AM Self     I oppose the destrcution of embryonic stem cells for body parts and cloning. It is murder. To take babies created by 'in bitro fertilization' and who are in the embryonic stage of growth, and use them in experiments is murder. It is a cruel and horrific act. Calling it science just masks the fact that human babies are being killed. Please let me know how you could justify this. Thank you in advance for your answer.

 
46200 05/26/2009 at 10:22:55 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46201 05/26/2009 at 10:23:20 AM Self     Stem cell research is critical for the advanacement in discoveries of devastating disease processes. I have two nephews who are at risk for a congential neurological disorder, Huntington's Disease (HD). HD has already robbed me of my father, a grandmother, and an aunt. My sister is becoming less and less of a person as time passes. She is no longer able to work, drive, cook, clean, things we all take for granted. She can't walk unattended and will need to be pushed in a wheelchair to her son's highschool graduation. Please make stem cell research a number one priorty in combating diseases such as HD Thank you

 
46202 05/26/2009 at 10:23:20 AM Self     To the staff at NIH: I, like millions of Americans, do not want to have my tax dollars used for research on human embryos, even those embryos that are no longer wanted by their parents. I certainly would support tax-dollar use for Adult Stem Cell Research. I urge you to carefully consider the commonly given reasons for rejecting embryonic stem cell research such as (1) the serious problems with use of human embryos for Embryonic Stem Cell Research (ESCR) (i.e., a complete lack of any medically useful results after years of research; tumor-formation in these lines, lack of viability, etc.), (2) the very significant time and financial cost, as well as the cost of human-life, already invested in ESCR by other research groups, with no positive results or potential for positive results yet identified, (3) the obvious ethical/moral issues surrounding the use of human embryos for research (e.g., would you allow research on abandoned children whose parents gave up their parental “rights”?; if ESCR is acceptable, why not human cloning experiments?; if an embryo can become a fully-formed, fully-functional human, shouldn’t it have the same rights as all other humans?), and (4), the greatly proven, medical success, and morally acceptable use of adult stem cells as an alternative to ESCR.

In addition to the above reasons, there is another, equally important consideration for rejecting research on human embryos. I say this with great respect and humility in asking that you give much consideration to the following: There is a God in heaven who watches the ways of man. How will you answer to Him when He asks you why human embryos were used as objects rather than allowed their God-given dignity and right to life? Proverbs 9:10a says “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom…”

Thank you for allowing me this opportunity to voice my opinion.

 
46203 05/26/2009 at 10:23:34 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46204 05/26/2009 at 10:23:39 AM Self     Dear NIH: President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration: [1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines. [2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations. [3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation. [4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
46205 05/26/2009 at 10:24:52 AM Self     It is appalling to force people to pay to kill little helpless babies. Embryos should not be used in scientific experiments! This puts most Americans, according to resent poles that the majority of Americans are pro-life, in a morally compromising situation. To in effect compel Americans to go against their moral beliefs, with the only other option of jail. What happened to the right of religious freedom? To the right of life? The founding fathers are turning in their graves at the way the United Stated has strayed from the constitution and the rights of ALL HUMAN BEINGS to HEALTH, HAPPINESS, and LIFE!

 
46206 05/26/2009 at 10:24:58 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions. As a student who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms on stem cell research. I am pleased to see that NIH has been directed to create the guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH is most able to draft effective guidelines that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased with the intent of the NIH’s draft guidelines to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from excess embryos at fertility clinics.

I do encourage that the guidelines cover all basis by including a “grandfather” clause to allow federal funding for existing stem cell lines that were created using the best ethical practices at the time of derivation. At present draft, there is uncertainty if current lines meet all the guidelines set forth in the current draft and thusly might be excluded from federal funding.

While recent scientific advances have been truly remarkable, such as the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, I still believe that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is meritous and ethical research. Thusly, SCNT should be supported by the NIH and have the benefit of the institution’s oversight.

Finally, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. With the proper support and resources, I believe stem cell research will help my generation meet the medical challenges of the 21st century. Thank you for reviewing my comments.

 
46207 05/26/2009 at 10:25:51 AM Self     I do not approve of federal dollars to be used for embryonic stem cell research. who do they think they are destroying God babies for research which has not shown any progress. Ault stem cell research is showing progress. That would be the way to go.

 
46208 05/26/2009 at 10:26:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46209 05/26/2009 at 10:26:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46210 05/26/2009 at 10:26:50 AM Organization MLD Foundation   We represent several hundred families with a rare genetic neuro-metabolic terminal condition called metachromatic leukodystrophy. We recognize that embryonic stem cell research is both a scientific/medical and ethical issue for the families. As such, we request the precision of this policy remain intact.

Specifically, 2B "derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes" is a key focus that limits the scope of this policy to "left over" embryos.

We believe that 2B needs to be expanded to state that these embryos are only allowed to be used if they were fertilized in a test tube and that NO harvesting of embryos from the womb is to be allowed.

We disagree with the political statement in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section. "Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos." We feel that once an embryo they are always an embryo and with today's technology, or certainly tomorrow's technology they could be sent on their way to continue make a viable child. This should be strictly prohibited. The fine line of life is conception. These cells and the embryos should be treated with the ultimate of respect for the life they represent - the life from which they came and the life they are destined to save.

We request that sections 2B 1,2,4,5, & 6 remain intact, without modification other than for clarifications.

 
46211 05/26/2009 at 10:27:05 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46212 05/26/2009 at 10:27:17 AM Self     Stop killing humans, please! Please! In the name of God, return this country to respecting life.

 
46213 05/26/2009 at 10:27:26 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46214 05/26/2009 at 10:27:28 AM Self     Please register my opposition to the use of federal tax-payer monies to fund research on human embryonic stem cells.

 
46215 05/26/2009 at 10:27:51 AM Self     I oppose the waste of my tax money on embryonic stem cell research. Use the money on something worthwhile, like ADULT stem cell research, which is providing actual cures.

 



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