Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

Browse Comments Beginning With:
Record ID:
Entry Date:
On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



|First 100 Records   Back 1000 Records   Back 100 Records   Records 46016 - 46115 of 49015 Forward 100 Records   Forward 1000 Records   Last 100 Records|

ID Entry Date Affiliation Organization
Name
Organization
Address
Comments Attachment
46016 05/26/2009 at 09:25:00 AM Self     I agree and support the guidelines NIH has developed regardingstem cell research and hope that thru thier efforts a cure or better treament of diabetes, such as myself can benefit from.

 
46017 05/26/2009 at 09:26:24 AM Self     As an American citizen I feel it is critical that taxpayer dollars be spent wisely. Our country is spending too much money already on things that are not benefiting the American who is being taxed to pay for all these new programs. I would like to see that embyonic stem cell research be completely eliminated and focus on what we already know works.

 
46018 05/26/2009 at 09:26:39 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46019 05/26/2009 at 09:26:42 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46020 05/26/2009 at 09:27:06 AM Self     The destruction of human life at any level is in any society is not acceptable to any other than those proponents that would advocate the development of a policy of survival of the fittest and push for the "perfect" human race. As history through the regime of Adolf Hitler has aptly pointed out, the elimination of human life is necessary to promote the medical experiment and promotion for creating a better, stronger, healthier mankind. Only at the expense of others can that kind of policy benefit those that wield the power thus giving them the "choice" of who lives and who dies. A nation founded on the belief in the salvation of mankind through belief and faith cannot justify it's existence through the destruction of the foundation upon which it was built.

 
46021 05/26/2009 at 09:27:36 AM Self     All life needs to be treated as sacred, by individuals, companies and all government bodies. Embryos used for more or less productive research lessens the value of life. I oppose the NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. Thank you for this opportunity to let my voice be heard.

 
46022 05/26/2009 at 09:28:20 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46023 05/26/2009 at 09:28:25 AM Self     Please protect human embryos from destruction. I urge you to instead focus on adult stem-cell research, which already has provided dozens of therapies and treatments for humans.

 
46024 05/26/2009 at 09:28:29 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46025 05/26/2009 at 09:28:56 AM Self     I would pray that you oppose the funding for stem cell research. Not only is it morally wrong, but there is no proven research that this procedure would even work. As per Dr. Mehmet Oz who commented on the use of stem cells: "The problem with embryonic stem cells is that embryonic stem cells come from embryos, like all of us were made from embryos. And those cells can become any cell in the body. But it’s very hard to control them, and so they can become cancer.” So to those of us that have Biblical morals and do now wish to murder a human being, our tax dollars would be used to fund this horrific action. I oppose using embryotic stem cells in every manner. If a human being wants to use their own stem cells, that is another matter entirely.

 
46026 05/26/2009 at 09:29:05 AM Self     Aside from the morally-questionable use of embryonic stem cells, is there any scientific basis for furthering this campaign to use these setm cells versus adult stem cells? Maybe, just maybe, this is a campaign to further other agendas than the cure for Parkinson's, cancer and other life-threatening diseases. NUH, please get out of the business of politics and back to the science of real possibilities for cures for these horrendous diseases.

 
46027 05/26/2009 at 09:29:13 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
46028 05/26/2009 at 09:29:23 AM Self     Please, protect human life and stop the killing. Everyone deserves a chance to live.

 
46029 05/26/2009 at 09:29:25 AM Self     Use stem cells however desired, but do not "farm" the cells. Use opportunistic harvesting from unwanted zygotes, miscarriages, and abortions.

 
46030 05/26/2009 at 09:29:36 AM Self     I believe that life begins at conception and should be valued at every stage of development. Consequently, I am against federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research. I am against the use of human embryonic stem cells for research and medical purposes. I take exception to this statement found in the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research:

"Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos." This document is found at: <http://stemcells.nih.gov/policy/2009draft.htm>

I also disagree with the use of human embryos under former guidelines as also stated in this document:

"NIH currently funds ongoing research involving human embryonic stem cells as detailed under prior Presidential policy. Under that policy, Federal funds have been used for research on human embryonic stem cells where the derivation process was initiated prior to 9:00 p.m. EDT August 9, 2001, the embryo was created for reproductive purposes, the embryo was no longer needed for these purposes, informed consent was obtained for the donation of the embryo, and no financial inducements were provided for donation of the embryo."

This document is found at: <http://stemcells.nih.gov/policy/2009draft.htm>

 
46031 05/26/2009 at 09:30:14 AM Self     Common sense comments related to the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. Let's not be guilty of murder. We as human beings have no right to take the life of the unborn. THey are the most help;ess of all human beings. Taking their lives just makes us monsters. Why would we even want to create so we can kill, when there is no evidence that embryonic stem cells cure anything. God said in scripture that "I knew you before you were created in the womb". We should not kill God's little people. They are not criminals. One day each person will have to stand before their creator and respond to this murdurous charge. What will be your defense? Please take every step to prevent this killing atrocity. Thank You.

 
46032 05/26/2009 at 09:30:49 AM Self     Stem Cell Research is necessary and must be continued.

 
46033 05/26/2009 at 09:31:04 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46034 05/26/2009 at 09:31:46 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46035 05/26/2009 at 09:31:53 AM Self     Don't waste our tax dollars on research that is fruitless. We are already getting results from adult stem cell research.

Stop embrionic stem cell research.

 
46036 05/26/2009 at 09:32:09 AM Self     I am deeply concerned on how little importance is being placed on a human life irrespective of the stage of the person's life (unborn, newborn, children, adults, and elderly).

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

Finally, shouldn't the National Institute of Health support all stages of life?

 
46037 05/26/2009 at 09:34:10 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46038 05/26/2009 at 09:34:30 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46039 05/26/2009 at 09:34:33 AM Self     I am highly opposed to embryonic stem cell research and disgusted by the thought of my tax dollars going to fund the destruction of innocent life.

 
46040 05/26/2009 at 09:35:07 AM Self     Let me simply state that I do not think that my tax dollars should pay for embryonicn stem cell research or any thing related to it. There are private monies that can deal with this.

 
46041 05/26/2009 at 09:35:26 AM Self     Embryos, even those 'left-over' from IVF, are still human embryos. Science is clear on this matter, just check into any approved Embryology textbook that is used in our schools today. Human Life begins at conception, and embryos are humans in a very early stage of physical development. These embryos should not be killed purposefully just for medical research. Adult stem-cells are more useful and are ethically viable, so applying tax-payer funding to research other than this medically proven method is negligent. Tax-payer money should be used for ethical and medically proven research that will result in real results for illnesses and disease.

 
46042 05/26/2009 at 09:36:32 AM Self     I am opposed to the use of Federal tax payers money being used for the destruction of human embryonic stem cells. Please consider the following information and refrain from using my tax dollars for the destruction of human life. "The beginning of a single human life is from a biological point of view a simple and straightforward matter - the beginning is conception." Dr. Watson A. Bowes, University of ***** It is obvious that the current experimentation and research using human embryonic stem cells results in the destruction of a newly developing human being. The research and experimentation necessarily and in premeditated fashion causes the death of a new human life. What is the justification at law for taking human life? Usually, a human life can only be taken when done in self-defense and when there is no other reasonable option. Taking the lives of these new embryonic human lives can hardly be justified as a self-defense measure.

 
46043 05/26/2009 at 09:37:12 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46044 05/26/2009 at 09:37:19 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46045 05/26/2009 at 09:37:44 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46046 05/26/2009 at 09:37:50 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes. The ends do not justify the means here.

 
46047 05/26/2009 at 09:38:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46048 05/26/2009 at 09:39:03 AM Self     Dear NIH: President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. My group has been involved mainly on the use mesenchymal stem cells on lung injury, these cells have a limited potential to regenerate the lung . I strongly believe that hESCs are a fundamental part of the future of regenerative medicine and cell therapies. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration: [1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines. [2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation. [4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations. Thank you for the opportunity to comment.

 
46049 05/26/2009 at 09:39:12 AM Self     I am strongly against President Barack Obama's executive order that will allow virtually unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Funding that will create incentives for scientists to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research.

I fully support funding for ADULT stem cell research, which is proving to be more successful than embyonic stem cell research.

These new rules would also divert funding away from the much more promising (and ethical) area of adult stem cell research.

I am asking you to not support the funding for embryonic stem cell research.

 
46050 05/26/2009 at 09:39:17 AM Self     Please, Please oppose more funds for the human embryonic stem cell research. This will kill more babies.!!!

 
46051 05/26/2009 at 09:40:36 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46052 05/26/2009 at 09:40:44 AM Self     I fully support stem cell research

 
46053 05/26/2009 at 09:41:03 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46054 05/26/2009 at 09:41:11 AM Self     “I urge the NIH to adopt alternative criteria for the acceptable derivation of stem cell lines that will allow federal money to be used with stem cell lines currently approved for NIH-funding. Eliminating federal support for use of these lines would seriously undermine current research programs. I recommend that the alternative criterion for acceptable derivation be oversight of embryo donation by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or its equivalent for stem cell lines created before 2009. The IRB should ensure that the informed consent process conformed to accepted regulations and guidelines at the time and place of donation. This alternative IRB criterion for informed consent continues support for current research programs and supports use of an expanded set of valuable stem cell lines. Also, I support the use of NIH-funds with stem cell lines derived through parthenogenesis as long as they meet standards for ethical derivation. These lines are a valuable research tool.

 
46055 05/26/2009 at 09:41:19 AM Self     For the sake of humanity, embryonic stem cell research should not be allowed under any circumstances. While some debate at what point life begins, it is only prudent to err on the side of caution rather than plunge into fatal fetal error.

 
46056 05/26/2009 at 09:41:30 AM Self     I am opposed to the proposed guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. Taxpayers should not be required to support with hard-earned dollars the destruction of any human life. Stem cell research is valuable and should continue but only in ways that do not involve the destruction of human life.

 
46057 05/26/2009 at 09:41:34 AM Self     I am opposed to any and all HSC research. I do not want my tax dollars going to something that medically marginal at best and wasteful and morally repugnate at it's worst.

 
46058 05/26/2009 at 09:41:47 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46059 05/26/2009 at 09:41:50 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46060 05/26/2009 at 09:42:18 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46061 05/26/2009 at 09:42:38 AM Self     To subsidize the destrction of human embryos is repugnant to me. By all means use the after birth cord, by then the lose one is safe. Please consider carefully your decision.

 
46062 05/26/2009 at 09:42:58 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am a member of the scientific community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
46063 05/26/2009 at 09:43:22 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46064 05/26/2009 at 09:43:39 AM Self     I do not want my taxes to fund Human Stem Cell Research. It is immoral and distastful.

 
46065 05/26/2009 at 09:43:46 AM Self     America has lost her moral compass when she endangers the lives of humans in the womb or out of the womb for any cause no matter how noble or who thinks it is a good idea. Therefore I urge you to protect the lives of the living children in the womb and all people outside of it.

 
46066 05/26/2009 at 09:43:55 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46067 05/26/2009 at 09:44:12 AM Self Baylor College of Medicine   I write to thank the Obama Administration for reversing the ban on the federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research and to comment on the NIH proposed guidelines. All avenues of research involving stem cells should be pursued in order to increase our understanding of developmental biology and to allow the pursuit of breakthroughs in regenerative medicine that will ultimately benefit patients. To fully capture the promise of this emerging field, we need the federal government as a full partner in this research. It is only right that NIH can now be in a position to establish the ethical and regulatory framework under which new funding will support groundbreaking research. I also write to raise concerns about the draft guidelines as proposed. The proposed guidelines as written may have the unintended consequence of prohibiting funding for work with many existing stem cell lines.

As a ***** of the NIH *****, I am particularly concerned about the fact that the proposed guidelines do not address existing stem cell lines and could result in their ineligibility for federal funding. The overall hypothesis of the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program is that the origins of health and susceptibility to disease are, in part, the result of epigenomic regulation of the genetic blueprint. Specifically, epigenomic mechanisms that control stem cell differentiation and organogenesis contribute to the biological response to endogenous and exogenous forms of stimuli that result in disease. The NIH Roadmap program has funded this research with a particular focus on human stem cells. The consortium has already generated a whole genome nucleotide resolution DNA methylation map of WA01 (H1) ES cells and is in the process of generating more comprehensive reference epigenome maps from other human ES lines (currently NIH approved). Most of these would be ineligible for funding under the current draft guidelines, which would notably diminish the great value of having completely characterized reference epigenome sequences of these lines. It would also hinder further investigation of additional lines which would provide an important source for the scientific community.

 
46068 05/26/2009 at 09:44:22 AM Self     Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research. Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board. Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds." The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation. To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
46069 05/26/2009 at 09:44:53 AM Self     Dear Sir or Madam; Please do not destroy human embryos while doing embryonic stem cell research. As you know adult stem cells are sucessfully used to treat many diseases already. Please continue to do research with these stem cells as human beings need not be be destroyed to do so. If embryonic stem cell research had good potential to cure diseases, there would be many private firms pursuing this in the private sector. Because the potential is low. This is not the case. Please continue ethical research on adult stem cells as it is clearly the best choice for helping cure or treat many diseases. Now is not the time for partisan politics, even more so because human beings lives are being destroyed. The most innocent and helpless amongst us are being destroyed for this research to take place. This is not moral, ethical or sound medical practice. Thank You,

 
46070 05/26/2009 at 09:45:15 AM Self     An embryonic stem cell is a life. The blood of lives killed due to legislation you support, is on your hands, Mr. President. You will answer to God for all that you support which stands against His inspired Word found in Scripture. Read Jeremiah 1:5. God knew Jeremiah before He knit him in his mother's womb. God is the Creator of all life, therefore the right to end human life rests only in His hands. A concept that is repeated very clearly from Genesis to Revelation.

 
46071 05/26/2009 at 09:45:16 AM Self     I feel the new guidelines for embryonic stem cell research treat the most fragile of human life as a commodity with a limited shelf life (use by certain date or freeze). Tampering with creation will only undermine the sanctity of life and be detrimental to families relationships and society. My conscience objects to the use of federal tax dollars to allow creating, and then destroying and dipsoping of embryonic human beings.

 
46072 05/26/2009 at 09:45:30 AM Self     We welcome President Obama's decision to allow greater use of stem cell research. There is no doubt that the benefits gained by this research on behalf of the thousands of disabled people in the world will be breathtaking in the coming years. Good Lick!

 
46073 05/26/2009 at 09:45:34 AM       I oppose federally funded embryonic stem cell research. The fact that there have been successes in treating diseases with adult stem cells whereas there has not been the same success rate using embryonic stem cells has been the major factor influencing me to be opposed to embryonic stem cell research.

 
46074 05/26/2009 at 09:45:41 AM Self     ADULT stem cells WORK in their clinical application.

Embryonic stem cells DO NOT WORK in clinical application.

GOT IT!!!!!

 
46075 05/26/2009 at 09:46:04 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46076 05/26/2009 at 09:46:54 AM Self     President Barack Obama issued an executive order that will allow virtually unrestricted federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Funding that will create incentives for scientists to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research. Former President Bush set a policy in place in 2001 that restricted federal funding only to stem cell lines that existed as of that date – thus discouraging “create and kill” behavior. Obama’s proposed new policy would eliminate that restriction. These new rules would also divert funding away from the much more promising (and ethical) area of adult stem cell research. Please do not proceed with these new rules!

 
46077 05/26/2009 at 09:47:02 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46078 05/26/2009 at 09:47:13 AM Self     I am opposed to any specific allowance of fetal stem cell research because it results in the destruction of a human life at its earliest stages. Additionally, adutl stem cell research has proven far more promising in curing diseases than fetal stem cell research has and there is not the attendant life concerns with using adult stem cells. Please do not allow fetal stem cell research to occur. Let's focus on adult stem cells and promote a culture of life instead of a culture of death.

 
46079 05/26/2009 at 09:47:39 AM Self     I feel that stem cell research is invaluable, and there is really no substitute for the breakthroughs we may find with this research. It should be given the funding it deserves, which is a lot more than it currently has.

Whether it be embryonic stem cells or adult bone marrow ones, I believe this is where the future of medicine lies.

I do think that the sanctions from where the cells must come from is a good idea though, and should be strictly monitored to keep from abusing human rights in the case of embryonic stem cells.

 
46080 05/26/2009 at 09:47:52 AM Self     Some think the beginning of life is at fertilization. Others not. If life begins at fertilization will laws and regulations make it not? If life does not begin at fertilization wil laws and regulations make it so? (Paraphrase of Thomas More in "A Man for all seasons.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.Such use is premature, at least. It will delay what Dr. Oz has claimed to be available in less than 10 years.

Dr.Oz on a recent Oprah program said explicitly, the debate is over. Embryonic stem cell therapy is dead. Adult stem cells will continue to provide therapy and will grow immensely. The audience signaled approval. Oprah was amazed. Michael Fox hoped for another 10 years.

 
46081 05/26/2009 at 09:48:04 AM Self     We are writing concerning the current proposal to have federally funded research that will require destryoning live human embryos for their stem cells. This is not acceptable. Further the even broader policy that is being discussed to create embryos through in vitro fertilization or cloning procedures and then detroy the embryo for stem cells is horrific and can not be. For money to be used for research is not the issue, it is the killing of live embryos that we oppose. Please work to draft a policy that will be acceptable to all groups that are concerned about life and life of the unborn. Thank you for your consideration.

 
46082 05/26/2009 at 09:48:25 AM Self     It has come to my attention that, following President Obama’s laudable lifting of the Bush “Presidential ESC Lines” funding restrictions, that the National Institute of Health has issued draft guidelines for future regulation of embryonic stem cell research funded with public monies. I applaud the NIH’s concern for both best scientific practice and the moral implications that arise with ESC. Recent articles in scientific journals, however, and their coverage in the news has led me to be concerned about a few of the draft provisions. I provide these comments as a non-scientist taxpayer interested in providing scientists with the guidelines and support necessary for the efficient and enlightened conduct of their research.

I urge the National Institute of Health to carefully consider the question of retroactivity raised by Patrick L. Taylor in his Cell Stem Cell article “Retroactive Ethics in Rapidly Developing Scientific Fields,” published June 5, 2009 (and released prior to that date on the internet). The potential benefits from performing research on existing stem cell lines should not be discarded on the basis of new ethics regulation requiring forms or documentation that for practical or other reasons simply could not be completed for these older lines.

I also urge the National Institute of Health to allow funding for embryos developed outside the reproductive context, specifically for research purposes. IVF embryos, while doubtless essential, are not representative of the US population. Restricting NIH funding to IVF embryos would make it difficult for researchers to gain access to a variety of disease-prone genotypes, especially those associated with minority and economically disadvantaged populations that are underrepresented in the IVF pool. NIH stem cell funding (and the medical advancements therefore achieved) should not be restricted to the genes of wealthy Americans.

Thank you for your time and attention.

 
46083 05/26/2009 at 09:48:27 AM Organization Genetics Policy Institute   Please see attached txt file.

File Link (.txt)
Comments of GPI in response to NIH Draft Guidelines
46084 05/26/2009 at 09:48:32 AM Self     Some think the beginning of life is at fertilization. Others not. If life begins at fertilization will laws and regulations make it not? If life does not begin at fertilization wil laws and regulations make it so? (Paraphrase of Thomas More in "A Man for all seasons.

The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.Such use is premature, at least. It will delay what Dr. Oz has claimed to be available in less than 10 years.

Dr.Oz on a recent Oprah program said explicitly, the debate is over. Embryonic stem cell therapy is dead. Adult stem cells will continue to provide therapy and will grow immensely. The audience signaled approval. Oprah was amazed. Michael Fox hoped for another 10 years.

 
46085 05/26/2009 at 09:48:43 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos. The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells. The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds. Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding upon the order of NIH. The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos so that they understand that their options include permission for infertile couples to adopt them.

 
46086 05/26/2009 at 09:49:38 AM Self     Our family strongly opposes permitting federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. We support ethical cures and treatments. How can taking life in its earliest stages be sensible? Human life is of great value, not to be lessened. Thank you.

 
46087 05/26/2009 at 09:50:37 AM Self     Dear Sir,

I request that the use of embryonic stem cells do not be used to perform medical research. I also appose my tax dollars being used by my government to fund this.

I am a proponent of medical research to find cures for various diseases. I am aware that adult stem cells have done amazingly well in the research. I do support additional efforts at expanding research for adult stem cells.

 
46088 05/26/2009 at 09:50:44 AM Self     New ethical guidelines should not apply retroactively to stem cell lines currently used for research because:

THE LAW SHOULD NOT DEFINE WHAT IS ETHICAL OR JUST; ETHICS AND JUSTICE SHOULD DEFINE WHAT BECOMES LAW.

It is not Ethical or Just to destroy or set back scientific research currently underway that may ultimately and profoudly benefit humanity when retroactive application of such a law would serve no Practical Or Functional benefit in defining the past or going forward into the future. Instead, it would result in great Harm to humankind by imposing major setbacks. Decisions causing Harm to the avancement of medical research (where such decisions have no positive impact on actions of the past) is not Ethical or Just, and thus, should not become law.

 
46089 05/26/2009 at 09:50:56 AM Self     Please create guidelines to prohibit funding for embryonic stem cell research and any other research which kills the fertilized egg as a byproduct or side effect or as the main intent of any procedure or process involving stem cells.

Furthermore, with the recent advances of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, create guidelines which funnels all funding for stem cells into this type of usage.

With all of the advances of adult and Pluripotent Stem Cells, there is absolutely NO reason to fund embryonic stem cell research at the expense of killing the unborn. The justification is simply NOT THERE!

 
46090 05/26/2009 at 09:51:01 AM Organization Hadassah   I applaud these guidelines that establish a framework for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Please ensure that the final draft includes language stating that stem cell lines derived using the prevailing ethical standards at the time they were derived are eligible for federal funding. Also, please include language stating that stem cell lines derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer will be eligible for federal funding. Clear and well-crafted guidelines will lead to sooner therapies and cures for millions of deserving patients. Thank you.

 
46091 05/26/2009 at 09:51:03 AM Self     Please no embryonic stem cell research!

 
46092 05/26/2009 at 09:51:46 AM Organization American Academy of Neurology   The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), established in 1948, is an international professional association of more than 21,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals dedicated to providing the best possible care for patients with neurological disorders. The AAN believes that the use of human pluripotent stem cells (most frequently derived from embryos) in biomedical research may have enormous potential to benefit people affected by neurological disease throughout the world. The AAN applauds the recent efforts to lift restrictions on the federal funding on embryonic stem cell research and welcomes the opportunity to comment on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Draft Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research.

Though the AAN supports the overall intent of the Draft Guidelines to establish sound ethical parameters for stem cell research, further clarification is needed to ensure that research is not hindered. Specifically:

• Definition of human embryonic stem cells – The AAN agrees with the statement in the Draft Guidelines stating that “although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos.” Consequently, the AAN believes that the limitations on federal funding of embryo research would not be applicable to these lines.

• Guidelines pertain to extramural NIH-funded research – The AAN has no comment on the distinction between extramural and intramural research, but does suggest that final language should clarify that it is NIH’s expectation that other federal agencies funding human embryonic stem cell research adopt the same parameters.

• Prohibitions on sources of stem cells – The AAN recommends that final guidelines be revised to support for federal funding for stem cell lines derived from other sources such as somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and IVF embryos created for research purposes. These techniques for deriving stem cell lines have promising scientific potential that is beyond what is possible with embryonic stem cell lines derived from the IVF process and should be eligible for federal funding.

• Grantee must assure and maintain appropriate documentation of compliance – The AAN supports the continuation of an NIH-supported registry, which lists the stem cell lines eligible for federally-funded research.

• Failure to include a registry or similar ‘safe harbor’ for approved lines – The AAN recommends that the final guidelines include the continuation of an NIH-funded registry listing all lines eligible for research using NIH funds. If the final guidelines do not include this, the AAN recommends that the guidelines include a “safe harbor” that does not require each research institution to start from the beginning in reviewing a line, especially when they have been reviewed by another institution for NIH-funded research or are already in use by NIH for intramural research.

• Detailed informed consent provisions – The AAN supports specific informed consent criteria in the draft guidelines for stem cell lines derived after the date of the final guidelines, with one clarification. The first criterion states that "all options pertaining to use of embryos no longer needed for reproductive purposes were explained to the potential donor(s)." Since all IVF clinics do not offer the same options to patients, the final guidelines should clarify the language to state that "all options offered by that IVF clinic be explained."

• Grandfathering research using current stem cell lines – The goal of the final guidelines should be to ensure that any stem cell line that has been responsibly derived be eligible for federal funding. There are many stem cell lines currently in use in research that were responsibly derived but may not meet all of the specific informed consent criteria in the draft guidelines or the stem cell line owners may not have documentation of all criteria. To prevent stem cell lines created prior to the adoption of the final guidelines from being excluded from federal research funding the AAN recommends the addition of a grandfather policy in the final guidelines. Specifically, the NIH should allow stem cell lines in existence before the effective date of the new guidelines to be eligible for federal funding if the grantee institution assures that the line was derived ethically. The following standards established in 2001 should apply: o The stem cells must have been derived from an embryo that was created for reproductive purposes; o The embryo was no longer needed for these purposes; o Informed consent must have been obtained for the donation of the embryo; o No financial inducements were provided for donation of the embryo. The method that an institution uses to provide such an assurance could include review by the institution’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). The AAN believes that IRB concurrence of ethical derivation of existing lines is sufficient to ensure strong safeguards.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments and for the consideration of these revisions in the final guidelines.

 
46093 05/26/2009 at 09:51:50 AM Self     Research shows that embryonic stem cells are not as "dependable" as adult stem cells - researchers have made encouraging advances with adult and skin stem cells. Killing a human life is intrinsically evil, and I strongly protest my tax money being used for embryonic stem cell research

 
46094 05/26/2009 at 09:51:59 AM Self     Stem cell research is astonishingly, breathtakingly important work which must receive full backing from the US government, both in monetary and legislatory form. No excuses, no caveats. To privilege the well-being of individual cells over living, suffering human beings is scientifically and morally indefensible.

We cannot allow those who would honor ancient dogma rather than help alleviate genuine human suffering to have the last word in a debate which hinges on genuine scientific understanding of the issue at hand.

 
46095 05/26/2009 at 09:52:26 AM Self     I want cures to be found for diseases as much as anybody. Destroying human embryos is wrong. Each embryo is a human person with dignity. If human embryos wind up discarded anyway, it should be allowed to happen by itself. Those embryos should be left alone. America is supposed to be a culture of life. Consideration should be given to adult stem cell research. Those cells can come from umbilical cord blood and other places on the human body. No embryos have to be destroyed. This kind of research can uield better results and deserves some looking into. Please start funding adult stem cell research and cut off embryonic stem cell research.

 
46096 05/26/2009 at 09:53:04 AM Self     I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

 
46097 05/26/2009 at 09:53:36 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46098 05/26/2009 at 09:53:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46099 05/26/2009 at 09:54:11 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
46100 05/26/2009 at 09:54:12 AM Self     Please protect human embryos. Please focus on adult stem-cell research, which has already produced many successful treatments for people. Even a doctor on Oprah told her and Michael J. Fox that adult stem cells have produced good results and embryonic stem cells tend to produce tumors. Also, human embryos can be adopted by couples unable to concieve. Please don't destroy them!!!

 
46101 05/26/2009 at 09:54:17 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos.

 
46102 05/26/2009 at 09:54:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46103 05/26/2009 at 09:54:59 AM Organization Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research and Cures   On behalf of Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research and Cures (MCSCRC), we submit the following to the National Institutes of Health:

Michigan Citizens for Stem Cell Research & Cures (MCSCRC) is a nonprofit organization formed to educate the citizens of the State of Michigan, including public officials and policy makers, about the complex science, the biomedical potential and the current policies affecting stem cell research in Michigan, in order to promote informed decision making on this important issue.

MCSCRC includes patient advocacy organizations, business and civic leaders, nonprofit organizations, leading research and medical organizations, policy makers, human service organizations, opinion leaders, members of universities and individual residents from all walks of life and political affiliations.

In Michigan, significant strides have been made within the last three years, with 2008 culminating in the passing of Proposal 2 - a critical change in the State of Michigan Constitution which opened the door for embryonic stem cell research, and hope for patients and families in our state.

We enthusiastically support NIH funding of embryonic stem cell research, including all best safe, ethical, and legal steps needed to create stem cell lines.

In general, we support the current NIH draft guidelines, with the following addition:

-- Section II B should be modified to include NIH funding for research on pre-existing stem cell lines as long as those lines were derived:

1. With informed consent 2. Without undue inducement 3. With oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Internal Review Board (IRB)

Sincerely,

 
46104 05/26/2009 at 09:55:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46105 05/26/2009 at 09:55:58 AM Self     I am a stem cell researcher at the *****. I strongly support the change in policy put forth in President Obama’s March executive order regarding human embryonic stem (ES) cell research. However, the proposed NIH guidelines may have unintended consequences and greatly impede current research efforts by disqualifying some widely used and currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. Although I strongly support the derivation of human ES cells following rigorous ethically standards, the highly prescriptive consent language proposed in the guidelines may exclude cell lines that were derived in adherence to the relevant ethical standards. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would be highly detrimental to many ongoing research projects and be wasteful of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies. Furthermore, the ability to expand the scope of available human ES cell lines for NIH-funded research will be greatly delayed if the strict consent form language is required, since most privately funded lines do not exactly adhere to the proposed language.

As an alternative approach, I suggest that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines that have been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with independent oversight by an Institutional Review Board or equivalent body.

A second suggestion is that the NIH or a designated body maintain a registry of approved lines to avoid unnecessary administrative efforts that could delay the research.

Thank you for considering these concerns and suggestions

 
46106 05/26/2009 at 09:56:14 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Thank you very much.

 
46107 05/26/2009 at 09:56:21 AM Self     If the controls are put in place to ensure the ethical harvesting of human embryotic stem cells, while safeguarding against the establishment of a profit center that would result in 'baby farming', then I absolutely would support stem cell research.

 
46108 05/26/2009 at 09:56:41 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
46109 05/26/2009 at 09:57:00 AM Self     I favor allowing the use of embryonic stem cells sourced from embryos that would otherwise have been terminated.

 
46110 05/26/2009 at 09:57:02 AM Self     Please do not make any changes to the Human Stem Cell Guidelines. I have heard so much saying that adult stem cells work just as well or better than from embryos. And human life at any stage should not be disposable. Thank you.

 
46111 05/26/2009 at 09:57:05 AM Self     TO: Department of Health and Human Services National Institute of Health

RE: National Institues of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

I am aware that on March 9, 2009 our President implemented Executive Order 13505 as it pertains to extramural NIH-funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH- will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this are is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law.

No matter how well it is written or what guidelines are implemented, I am opposed to the use of my money to experiment with embryonic stem cells from destroyed human embryos.

In the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, it is stated, "Studies of human embryonic stem cells MAY yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs".

There are thousands of babies born daily, the umbilical cord blood and the flesh from the circumised baby boys could be used for the experiments.

A very good friend and church member has heart disease, the hospital in my city was going to use his stem cells to repair his heart. However, he was not eligible due to something not being low enough. Had he been within the guidelines. The procedure would have been done.

Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This use of money will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. Your institute needs to put the patients first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

Thank you for allowing me to voice my opinion.

 
46112 05/26/2009 at 09:57:06 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Thank you very much.

 
46113 05/26/2009 at 09:57:11 AM Organization puttin the boots on als   More of the budget needs to be directed toward stem cell therapies. There are too many people losing loved ones while we wait for this to happen.

 
46114 05/26/2009 at 09:57:18 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
46115 05/26/2009 at 09:57:22 AM Self     I am opposed to your Draft Guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm No One and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Thank you very much.

 



Go to NIH Stem Cell Information Page