Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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45916 05/26/2009 at 08:34:53 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is inferior (from everything I've read as a layman enthusiast in the area) to adult stem cell findings. So why would you support a Matrix-like mentality which grows (little) humans for the sake of research that's inferior on most counts?

Please make the ethical choice and recommend to elected officials funding be focused upon adult stem cell work.

 
45917 05/26/2009 at 08:35:24 AM Self     I ask that no federal funding be used for embryonic stem cell research. To date there have been no promising studies with these stem cells. However, there have been many breakthroughs with adult stem cells. Federal funding should go to research that is actually producing results. Let those who want to continue destroying embryonic stem cells get private sources of funding. With the government already carrying huge budget deficits, money should not be spent on something that has offered no promising results. Thank you for your consideration in this matter.

 
45918 05/26/2009 at 08:39:32 AM Self     The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45919 05/26/2009 at 08:40:33 AM Self     I believe that to spend money on an unknown is wasteful. The only success to date has been with "adult stem cells". Why not expand research on the adult stem cells. It is not only wasteful it is plumb stupid to pursue something which shows no promise while something else is available with promise. It is just that simple. I hope even the simple minded can understand this. Thank you.

 
45920 05/26/2009 at 08:40:55 AM Self     I am totally opposed to this harvesting of embryos for stem cell research. There are more acceptable alternatives and it's time we started having a little more respect for life.

 
45921 05/26/2009 at 08:41:07 AM Self     While I am not a doctor or a scientist, I have followed the stem cell debate for quite a while and I continue to be astounded that research money is still being funneled away from adult stem cell programs that absolutely work and given to morally repulsive embryonic stem cell research that has produced NO treatments or cures. I am offended that the most vulnerable patients, especially parents with children suffering with type I juvenile diabetes are being USED with the false promise of a cure with ESC, when treatments (that only time will be able to call cures) are already available with self-donor ASC that will not only mean treatment/cure but will not necessitate replacing insulin with anti-rejection drugs for life. This 'debate' is meant to confuse people who have not taken the time to wade through the facts. All the little polls "Are you in favor of stem cell research?" are not answerable. What kind of stem cells do you mean? Do you mean adult stem cells that already are in use to treat and cure a myriad of diseases, don't cause rejection, and don't mean creating life to kill it for its parts? Or do you mean pouring money into the hands of researchers who want to play games with human life in its earliest moments, to advance the idea that human beings can be USED for their parts in the name of a science that has not worked and will not work without catastophic results? PLEASE do not send us down a path with a totally unknown destination and do not use my tax dollars to do it!

 
45922 05/26/2009 at 08:41:09 AM Self    

Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research.

Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board.

Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds". The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation.

To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
45923 05/26/2009 at 08:41:11 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45924 05/26/2009 at 08:41:16 AM       Human adult stem cell research is OK.

Human embryonic stem cell research - DESTROYS HUMAN LIFE!!

Change the laws to protect human life - incluing Human embryos.

 
45925 05/26/2009 at 08:41:22 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45926 05/26/2009 at 08:41:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45927 05/26/2009 at 08:42:19 AM Self     I understand research and I'm all for it..but this is going too far...it isn't needed. If you believe in our Lord, our God who created us please do not vote for this! I can not support a candidate that would vote for this bill. Please Please do not vote for this.

 
45928 05/26/2009 at 08:42:27 AM Self     Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

 
45929 05/26/2009 at 08:42:47 AM Self     This proposed policy is absolutely unacceptable. It is absolutely unethical to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research. I believe it is unethical to destroy any human embryo for research, but to actually create them for that purpose alone is just unthinkable. It's more than a shame that the President of this great country (which was founded on Christian principles!) would propose such a morally wrong policy. We know that the area of adult stem cell research is much more promising and ethical, so I just cannot understand why this new policy is even being proposed...

 
45930 05/26/2009 at 08:42:56 AM Self     May 26, 2009

NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, MD 20892

Dear Dr. Kington and Stem Cell Guidelines Committee:

I urge the NIH to adopt alternative criteria that will allow federal money to be used with stem cell lines currently approved for NIH-funding. Eliminating federal support for use of these lines would seriously undermine current research programs. I recommend that the criterion for acceptable derivation be oversight of embryo and oocyte donation by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or its equivalent. The IRB should ensure that the informed consent process conformed to accepted regulations and guidelines at the time and place of donation. This alternative IRB criterion for informed consent continues support for current research programs and supports use of an expanded set of valuable stem cell lines.

I also urge the NIH to develop a registry or data-base of NIH-approved stem cell lines. This registry would save tax payer dollars by eliminating the need for each research institution to conduct its own reviews of stem cell lines.

Finally, I support the use of NIH-funds with stem cell lines derived through parthenogenesis and nuclear transfer as long as they meet standards for ethical derivation.

Yours truly,

 
45931 05/26/2009 at 08:43:00 AM Self     I am writing to ask you NOT to use my tax money to fund embryonic stem cell research. As you know, science has made it clear that there is absolutely NO NEED to use fertilized cells/infants for this research because adult stem cells are perfectly sufficient. The lack of regard for human life displayed by this regulation is abhorrent and unacceptable.

 
45932 05/26/2009 at 08:43:04 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45933 05/26/2009 at 08:43:23 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45934 05/26/2009 at 08:44:15 AM Self     The life of a person has a right to life, especially upon conception. Thus, everyone should respect each other as one would want to be respected. No life should be rendered as a research project, without consent. Stem cell research from the lives of embryos, so called is a violation of their right to life equally, as everyone is entitled to be respected. I am certain that those who are supporters of this project would not have consented to be a research project, which would have terminated their existence early without a word, literally. In conclusion, I think of myself and the right of choice for being a research project or not is a no brainer; no I do not consent to stem cell research.

 
45935 05/26/2009 at 08:44:38 AM Self     I am very much opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which unfairly force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.”

 
45936 05/26/2009 at 08:46:25 AM Self     "For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner."

 
45937 05/26/2009 at 08:46:37 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45938 05/26/2009 at 08:47:17 AM Self     Please support stem cell research for development of a cure for diabetes. I am 69 years of age & have had Type 1 diabetes for 60 years. I know how devastating the desease is to the individual, associated family & friends. and how costly it is to the nation as a whole. YOUR SUUPORT OF STEM CELL RESERACH IS ESSENTIAL

 
45939 05/26/2009 at 08:47:33 AM Self     Stop all funding for embryonic stem cell research, under any and all conditions.

 
45940 05/26/2009 at 08:48:44 AM Self     Politics aside, I believe that NIH has an obligation to ensure that all cures, medications derived by legal means, be investigated.

It takes significantly less time and money for embryonic stem cell research to come full circle, than it does via adult stem cell research. This is, literally, the difference between life and death.

I think there is a real and significant medical difference between an abortion (which is legal, and I am against) and using embryonic stem cells for research.

The US President has authorized federal money be used for embryonic stem cell research. Sadly, he passed the buck onto you all to make the 'in the weeds' decisions. I believe it's well beyond the range of authority that NIH gets to decide who will get funding based on where the embryos came from/how they were created. As long as the embryos don't come from some 'fly-by-night' facility, I believe your only moral obligation is to provide funds to those research facilities that use them.

 
45941 05/26/2009 at 08:49:01 AM Self     "For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration's expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration's Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner."

 
45942 05/26/2009 at 08:49:38 AM Self     Since this is an opinion investigation, I give my opinion. Even if I am searcher in Genetics, I am against the use of Human ESC for research. Scientific investigations concerning Human being can be performed with adult stem cells but the use of Human embryos as tools is clearly not acceptable on the ethical point of vue.

 
45943 05/26/2009 at 08:49:44 AM Self     I oppose all funding of human embryonic stem cell reserach. I am outraged that my tax dollars could be used for such unethical practices.

 
45944 05/26/2009 at 08:49:46 AM Self     These funds should not be used to create new human embryos specifically to destroy them for research.

 
45945 05/26/2009 at 08:50:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45946 05/26/2009 at 08:50:29 AM Self     I am a stem cell researcher at the University of *****. I would like to point out that the proposed NIH guidelines may have unintended consequences and greatly impede current research efforts by disqualifying some widely used and currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. The highly prescriptive consent language proposed in the guidelines may exclude cell lines that were derived in adherence to the relevant ethical standards. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would be highly detrimental to many ongoing research projects and be wasteful of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies.

Thank you for considering these concerns and suggestions

 
45947 05/26/2009 at 08:51:04 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

Additional Information

 
45948 05/26/2009 at 08:51:10 AM Self     Stop USING our most defenseless human beings for experimental stem cell research. We are a greedy, selfish society that seems to feed off the innocent & the helpless. I do not want my hard earned dollars to fund this greediness. I have the "right to choose" how my money is spent.

 
45949 05/26/2009 at 08:51:59 AM Self     God inspired the writers of the Bible to write Job 31:15 "Did not He who made me in the womb make him? And did not One fashion us in the womb?" From conception, birth and death mankind is only made in the image of God. It is wrong to use embryos for their stem cells, they are human life and also hold the image of God. Please do not go in this wrong direction for the benefit of medicine and mankind.

 
45950 05/26/2009 at 08:52:01 AM Self     This (human embryonic stem cell) research is totally unnecessary and should not make use of our tax dollars to fund research such as this. There is not 100% scientific proof that this does work, and there are alternatives available that can provide the same results, (adult stem cells).

 
45951 05/26/2009 at 08:52:37 AM Self     As a student who sees the great potential of stem cells for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions, I strongly support all forms of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH will draft effective guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased with the intent of the NIH’s draft guidelines to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from excess embryos at fertility clinics.

I do encourage that the guidelines include a “grandfather” clause to allow federal funding for existing stem cell lines that were created using the best ethical practices at the time of derivation. At present draft, there is uncertainty if current lines meet all the guidelines set forth in the current draft.

While recent scientific advances have been truly remarkable, such as the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, I still believe that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is meritous and ethical research. NIH should support SCNT and give it the benefit of the institution’s oversight.

Finally, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. With the proper support and resources, I believe stem cell research will help my generation meet the medical challenges of the 21st century. Thank you for reviewing my comments.

 
45952 05/26/2009 at 08:53:43 AM Self     I pray that God guides the research and hears the desperate crys from the family with loved ones having diabetes. I pray that God gives the medical leaders his blessings and we do not anger God.

 
45953 05/26/2009 at 08:54:04 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45954 05/26/2009 at 08:54:04 AM Self     I am totally against using tax dollars to fund embryonic stem cell research. "Making" babies just to kill them for research is morally wrong and inexcusable. The research on embryonic stem cells this far has not been as promising as that of adult stem cells. There have been major advancements in adult stem cell research and if more funding was available there is the potential for unlimited possibilities. Use the tax dollars for that!

 
45955 05/26/2009 at 08:54:35 AM Self     I oppose federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. There have been many advances made in the area of adult stem cell research and this is the route we should be going in research. We should not contnue down the unethical path of destroying human embryos and encouraging research on those embryos.

 
45956 05/26/2009 at 08:54:52 AM Self     I am adamantly opposed to any use of tax dollars to promote the false promise of embryonic stem cell research. Let private industry and markets address this. The govt. has no constitutional authorization for this and it should be stopped immediately. Stop pandering to those who line up at the govt trough.

 
45957 05/26/2009 at 08:56:06 AM Self     I plead with you to direct funding only to adult stem cell research, as it has proved itself useful already and does not result in the death of a fertilized human egg.

 
45958 05/26/2009 at 08:56:45 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45959 05/26/2009 at 08:56:58 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45960 05/26/2009 at 08:57:12 AM Self     Please do not experiment on Fetal Stem Cells. They are obtained without permission from "donor" and result in the "donor's" death. Because they have unique DNA they are persons and have a right to be born. That their parents have abandoned them is not a reason to experiment on them.

Tax dollars should be spent where there is moral certainty about permission. They should also be spent on therapies that have shown promise. Adult stem cells can be morally obtained and have shown promise. Don't ignore these experiments and spend the money elsewhere, where there is no reason to believe there can be success. Even Frankenstein's monster was made from dead body parts. You are killing the living if you use fetal stem cells from "extra" embryos.

Thankyou.

 
45961 05/26/2009 at 08:58:09 AM Self     I agree with NIH guidelines that would prohibit funding for research using human embryonic stem cells derived from other sources, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and/or IVF embryos created for research purposes, and that would prohibit NIH funding of the derivation of stem cells from human embryos per the Dickey-Wicker Amendment.

I support wholeheartedly the use of adult stem cells for research.

 
45962 05/26/2009 at 08:58:21 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. May God have His had upon you lives and come live in you hearts as He directs your decisions.

 
45963 05/26/2009 at 08:59:26 AM Self     Please maintain the policy of only using existing embryonic stem cell lines. Detroying embryonic human life for medical experiments is barbaric. Please maintain an ethical line of not detroying defenseless human life. Thank you.

 
45964 05/26/2009 at 09:00:29 AM Self     It is wrong and unecessary to use humans for experimentation, it is taking advantage of their inability to defend themselves. humanity is not measured by our abilities at different stages of developement. Humanity is determined at conception and human life must be held in the highest respect.

 
45965 05/26/2009 at 09:00:31 AM Self     We (*****) strongly support research involving stem cells, including embryonic stem cells.

If there is a moral issue here -- it regards the development of new treatments that will better the lives of those already alive and yet to be born, rather than the cells of those who never will be.

Kindest thoughts,

 
45966 05/26/2009 at 09:00:57 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45967 05/26/2009 at 09:01:27 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45968 05/26/2009 at 09:02:31 AM Self     The moral and ethical issue alone should suffice as whether a particular act (embryonic stem cell research) should or should not be permissible. Under no circumstances and under no situation should innocent human children be tested, exploited, experimented on, or killed for the purpose of anything regardless if it is in the name of ‘progress.” Having said that, if you cannot see it for what the medical field has define it to be, human life, than at least take their advice that it is not necessary due to cross that bridge when in fact there are more effective and ethical ways to do what you are hoping for.

Please do not justify killing innocent human life, no matter how small or silent they may be, for ‘progress’ or ‘advancement as a society’.

 
45969 05/26/2009 at 09:02:36 AM Self     I am in complete disagreement with the use of Human Stem Cells either Embryonic or Adult.

 
45970 05/26/2009 at 09:02:39 AM Self     Government funded murder is what you are supporting. Scientists already know this and that stem cells will not help as some who have paid you have stated. Let a different country murder their babies for research. This is not the act of a Bible-believing leader.

 
45971 05/26/2009 at 09:02:56 AM Self     I am opposed to the use of Federal tax payers money being used for the destruction of human embryonic stem cells. Please consider the following information and refrain from using my tax dollars for the destruction of human life. "The beginning of a single human life is from a biological point of view a simple and straightforward matter - the beginning is conception." Dr. Watson A. Bowes, University of ***** It is obvious that the current experimentation and research using human embryonic stem cells results in the destruction of a newly developing human being. The research and experimentation necessarily and in premeditated fashion causes the death of a new human life. What is the justification at law for taking human life? Usually, a human life can only be taken when done in self-defense and when there is no other reasonable option. Taking the lives of these new embryonic human lives can hardly be justified as a self-defense measure.

 
45972 05/26/2009 at 09:03:11 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45973 05/26/2009 at 09:04:29 AM Self     My husband and I stongly believe that it is WRONG to take "human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose" and use them for stem cell research. There have been great success in using other human cells of adults, or of the umbilical cord etc. that do not require ending the life of human being. Right now you think you would limit it to the embryos that are extra, but we know from experience once a door is opened other embroys would be allowed, such as aborted babies. DO NOT ALLOW STEM CELL RESEARCH ON ANY EMBROYS.

 
45974 05/26/2009 at 09:06:03 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes

 
45975 05/26/2009 at 09:06:46 AM Self     Please don't destroy embryos, they are already humans, or they would be tadpoles. These are lives that just need the right environment to get going. Also, if you are considering destroying these, then there should be in NO WAY more of them "made" for experimentation.

 
45976 05/26/2009 at 09:07:09 AM Self     NIH, its Acting Director Dr. Raynard Kingston, and the NIH staff should protest the efforts by the Administration to allow Human Embryonic Stem Cell research and experimentation which results in the direct and premeditated destruction and killing of newly developing human lives. Instead, they should advocate for human adult stem cell research which continues to lead to health advances without requiring the destruction of newly developing human embryonic lives.

 
45977 05/26/2009 at 09:07:57 AM Self     I have serious problems with any administration who lacks the intelligence to realize the hypocrisy of calling water boarding torture, but will use our tax dollars to pay for abortions at any stage and creating “for destruction” embryos. I’m no scientist, but from the articles I have read, the “research” has little if any practical application that cannot be done easier and less costly than embryonic stem cell research. Long story short this (in my opinion) is an issue of power. “I am so I can” mentality. Our President claims to be a Christian… I don’t see it.

 
45978 05/26/2009 at 09:08:09 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45979 05/26/2009 at 09:08:47 AM Self     I would like to encourage that this decision be made with concern for the will of the people involved, respect for life and God's plan.

 
45980 05/26/2009 at 09:08:53 AM Self     My daughter ***** was diagnosed with type 1 Diabetes October 2003 at age 3. Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

Thank you,

 
45981 05/26/2009 at 09:09:05 AM Self     It is my strong-held opinion that taxpayers should not be funding, via NIH, research using human embryonic stem cells, regardless of their source. Much research has been done using adult stem cells that is not only "promising" but has actually been successful in improving or curing approximately 80 different conditions. To continue to chase the wind due to financial benefits of those doing research on embryonic stem cells, is not only morally irresponsible, but financially irresponsible. There is nothing that prevents private donors from investing in research using human embryonic stem cells. If private donors or companies do not see the "promise" in investing in such research, it is unclear to me why the taxpayers should foot this bill. I am opposed to taxpayer funding of embryonic stem cell research on moral grounds as well as fiscal responsibility.

 
45982 05/26/2009 at 09:09:18 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45983 05/26/2009 at 09:09:38 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45984 05/26/2009 at 09:09:55 AM Self     I am a stem cell researcher at the University of *****. I strongly support the change in policy put forth in President Obama’s March executive order regarding human embryonic stem (ES) cell research. However, the proposed NIH guidelines may have unintended consequences and greatly impede current research efforts by disqualifying some widely used and currently NIH-eligible human ES cell lines. I strongly support the derivation of human ES cells following rigorous ethical standards; however, the new proposed guidelines may exclude cell lines that were derived in adherence to relevant ethical standards but do not have the exact language in the consent forms that the new guidelines would impose. The inability to continue the use of currently available human ES cells would not only be highly detrimental to many ongoing research projects, it would be wasteful of the millions of dollars that the NIH has invested in these studies. Furthermore, the ability to expand the scope of available human ES cell lines for NIH-funded research will be greatly delayed if the strict consent form language is required, since most privately funded lines do not exactly adhere to the proposed language.

As an alternative approach, I suggest that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines that have been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with independent oversight by an Institutional Review Board or equivalent body.

A second suggestion is that the NIH or a designated body maintain a registry of approved lines to avoid unnecessary administrative efforts that could delay the research.

Thank you for considering these concerns and suggestions

 
45985 05/26/2009 at 09:10:00 AM Self     I would like to voice my disapproval of using fetuses for stem cell research. If we Disrespect human life at such an early stage what is next.

 
45986 05/26/2009 at 09:10:05 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45987 05/26/2009 at 09:10:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45988 05/26/2009 at 09:11:22 AM Self     please do not allow the spending of tax dollars to support embriotic stem cell research

 
45989 05/26/2009 at 09:12:35 AM Self     Our family is opposed to embryonic stem cell research. A number of substantial advances have been achieved using chord blood stem cells and stem cells harvested from adults. Harvesting cells from the 'cultivation' of embryos is dangerous and inmoral. Please do not allow this.

 
45990 05/26/2009 at 09:13:16 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes and many other diseases.

 
45991 05/26/2009 at 09:13:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45992 05/26/2009 at 09:13:59 AM Self     We should not fund research that destroys human life! We should not allow research that destroys human life!

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life.

Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Why would one even think of producing human life, only to be destroyed to retain stem cells, when stem cells are attainable by numerous other methods, none of which even harm anyone, let alone kill them?! Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients.

There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45993 05/26/2009 at 09:14:50 AM Self     I do NOT agree with embryonic stem cell research. I do, however, agree with adult stem cell research, where some success has even been found. Due to that success, I see no need in opening the door to embryonic stem cell research (where no success has been found anyway). As we all know, once the door is open, more and more will be allowed, until we further de-value the human life that those embryos represent. The answer must be NO where embryonic stem cell research is concerned! I DO NOT want my tax dollars funding such research!

 
45994 05/26/2009 at 09:14:54 AM Self     I am against embryonic stem cell research. I think there are other more viable and less morally objectionable ways to solve health problems other than killing innocent human beings.

 
45995 05/26/2009 at 09:15:26 AM Self     I oppose the proposed legislation regarding federally funded empbryonic stem cell research. Use of adult stem cells has been proven effective. We are on the brink of moral decay and need to respect that life is created by God, not man. To say "mankind" suggests a higher plane, a place where our country has now slithered off from. Sincerely, US Taxpaying Citizen

 
45996 05/26/2009 at 09:15:29 AM Self     I believe that passage of this legislation would lead to the conception of human beings to be used for spare parts.

 
45997 05/26/2009 at 09:17:24 AM Organization     On behalf of my very good friend *****, who was just recently diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson's, a mother of 3, athlete, teacher, and just awesome person. We NEED to find a cure NOW. You can help.

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
45998 05/26/2009 at 09:18:03 AM Self     The draft of the NIH Human Stem Cell guidelines calls for funding for research which is both "ethically responsible" and "scientifically worthy." Human embryonic stem cell research does not meet either of the above criteria. Human embryonic stem cell research involves the destruction of a human being with his or her own DNA. Thus, they must be treated with the respect afforded to all human beings and must not be exploited for scientific purposes. Neither is embryonic stem cell research scientifically worthy. While hundreds of successes have been documented for adult stem cell research, not a single success has resulted from embryonic stem cell research. Thus, embryonic stem cell research should not be pursued in these guidelines. Instead, the guidelines should pursue adult stem cell research, which is "ethically responsible" and "scientifically worthy."

 
45999 05/26/2009 at 09:19:00 AM Self     Bottom line is it is objectionable to force Americans to fund something they find morally wrong. Unless a consensus can be reached, funding for this research should come only from the private sector. We should have a say in what our taxes are used for.

 
46000 05/26/2009 at 09:19:03 AM Self     The destruction of human life at any level is in any society is not acceptable to any other than those proponents that would advocate the development of a policy of survival of the fittest and push for the "perfect" human race. As history through the regime of Adolf Hitler has aptly pointed out, the elimination of human life is necessary to promote the medical experiment and promotion for creating a better, stronger, healthier mankind. Only at the expense of others can that kind of policy benefit those that wield the power thus giving them the "choice" of who lives and who dies. A nation founded on the belief in the salvation of mankind through belief and faith cannot justify it's existence through the destruction of the foundation upon which it was built.

 
46001 05/26/2009 at 09:19:17 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46002 05/26/2009 at 09:19:41 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is morally and ethically wrong. It is also poor use of funds since all the successes have been with adult stem cells and cord blood.

 
46003 05/26/2009 at 09:20:07 AM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
46004 05/26/2009 at 09:20:31 AM Self     Please do not use our tax dollars to pay for any medical experimentation that could be deemed unethical…Specifically regarding embryonic-destructive stem cell research. Let’s keep the ethics in scientific research as high as possible and only use donations from those who are of legal age & able to consent for themselves.

 
46005 05/26/2009 at 09:20:42 AM Self     I do no t wish my taxes to pay for something( embryonic stem cell therapy) that has been proven to work better than adult stem cell therapy.

 
46006 05/26/2009 at 09:21:28 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
46007 05/26/2009 at 09:21:35 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
46008 05/26/2009 at 09:22:10 AM Self     I find President Obama to be the ultimate hypocrite. He has arrogantly stated on numerous occasions that he believes that it is somehow the job of his administration to restore science to its rightful place in the world, and yet the scientific evidence regarding this issue CLEARLY supports using adult, not embryonic, stem cells. It seems that when the scientific evidence conflicts with his personal agenda and his unduly elevated sense of self, he, not science, must reign supreme.

 
46009 05/26/2009 at 09:22:36 AM Self     I am opposed to this type of stem cell research. It will involve the murder of human beings to acquire the stem cells. Stick with the research with adult stem cells as human life is not destroyed when acquiring the stem cells.

 
46010 05/26/2009 at 09:22:54 AM Self     I urge the NIH to adopt alternative criteria for the acceptable derivation of stem cell lines that will allow federal money to be used with stem cell lines currently approved for NIH-funding. Eliminating federal support for use of these lines would seriously undermine current research programs. I recommend that the alternative criterion for acceptable derivation be oversight of embryo donation by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) or its equivalent for stem cell lines created before 2009. The IRB should ensure that the informed consent process conformed to accepted regulations and guidelines at the time and place of donation. This alternative IRB criterion for informed consent continues support for current research programs and supports use of an expanded set of valuable stem cell lines. Also, I support the use of NIH-funds with stem cell lines derived through parthenogenesis as long as they meet standards for ethical derivation. These lines are a valuable research tool.

 
46011 05/26/2009 at 09:22:58 AM Self     I have taught Biology, and Physiology for many years and this knowledge backs up my strong belief that a deliberate abortion not only causes death to a human being but also has harmful effects on the mother of the child. This deliberate immoral action is not justified for any experimental cause that may or may not ever be helpful to anyone. The whole of our society will be effected for the continued assult on human life.

 
46012 05/26/2009 at 09:23:52 AM Self     Hello. My name is *****, Ph.D. Starting in ***** and continuing until *****, my research was in the development of serm-free media for the growth of rodent and human cells of lympocyte origin. As a consultant to *****, I developed “AIM V” a serum-free medium for the expansion of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells (and later used for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL)) used for the treatment of human cancer, primarily melanoma. During that time I worked with the FDA and ***** at the NIH in Bethesda, and I am aware of FDA guidelines for development of media used for these treatments. My comments to the “National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research” are as follows:

1. The definition of human embryonic stem cells given is too specific and uses words (such as “prolonged”) which are undefined and vague. The guidelines defines human embryonic stem cells (HESC) as “cells that are derived from human embryos, are capable of dividing without differentiation for a prolonged period in culture, and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers.” A better definition would be…” normal (non-cancerous) cells that are derived from human embryos, capable of cell growth and differentiation according to the composition of the cell growth medium and the physico-chemical parameters to which they are exposed.” 2. The guidelines provide no scientific reasons, nor moral or legal justifications for the prohibition of HESC that are not derived from in vitro fertilizated (IVF) blastocysts. This avenue of research (namely future studies that prepare and use non-frozen/thawed HESC) should be left open until it is verified that blastocytes do not undergo genetic or other changes as a result of freeze/thawing.

 
46013 05/26/2009 at 09:23:55 AM Self     I strongly urge you to oppose using my taxpayer dollars for failed research requiring the destruction of human embryos. Instead, I urge you to support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions. Not only is it horrible to contemplate government destroying life, but encouraging the harvesting of it for destructive research and using our hard-earned tax dollars to do so. If embryonic stem cell research were so compelling, so likely to provide cures, private investors desperate for profits in this struggling economy would be pouring money into the research. After all, there’s a lot of money to be made on patents for cures and treatments. But private investors know that embryonic stem cell research is a horrible political hoax being perpetrated by extremists on the left on people suffering from serious diseases. The president’s policy diverts money from real research, real science, and real cures for political purposes. Thank you for your time, and for your work in furthering research for cures and prevention of many diseases and conditions.

 
46014 05/26/2009 at 09:24:08 AM Self     I have been diabetic for 27 years and I know what it is like living in fear everyday, wondering if you are going to have a stroke, heart attack, (which I did at 48), blindness, or kidney disease. I want a cure found for the children that have this disease so they do not have worry about the same things I did as growing up. Please support stem cell research for all 24 million of us Americans so we can live a happy, normal life without diabetes

 
46015 05/26/2009 at 09:24:11 AM Self     I do not wish my tax money to pay for embryonic stem cell research. I wish for adult stem cell research to be explored more efficiently.

 



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