Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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45817 05/26/2009 at 07:05:59 AM Self     Studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development. Some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. A better understanding of the genetic and molecular controls of these processes could provide information about how such diseases arise and suggest new strategies for therapy. Human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs. For example, new medications could be tested for safety on differentiated somatic cells generated from human embryonic stem cells.

 
45818 05/26/2009 at 07:06:29 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45819 05/26/2009 at 07:10:29 AM Self     It is morally wrong to create life for the purpose of destroying that life in the name of medicine.

 
45820 05/26/2009 at 07:10:37 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45821 05/26/2009 at 07:12:18 AM Self     Hello, My name is ***** and I am the husband of *****. My wife *****, was diagnosed with Primary Progressive MS almost 4 years ago. As of today there is a possiblity that I have MS as well. Not sure what type. I have a visit to our neurologist June 18. The reason for me stating this is because we are only a fraction of citizens that have MS. Multiple Sclerosis has robbed many including my wife of there independence. Not only could my wife and I benefit from the draft that would allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) for reproductive purposes and were no longer needed for that purpose. But think of the many hundreds of thousands across this country that could benefit. I ask that you please take this plea into consideration when considering a life of independence for many.

Thank You,

 
45822 05/26/2009 at 07:14:36 AM Organization Children's Hospital Boston   NIH Stem Cell Guidelines, MSC 7997 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda. Maryland, 20892-7997

May 14, 2009

To: National Institutes of Health

This comment is submitted on behalf of Children’s Hospital *****, with respect to the draft NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research. The Stem Cell Program of Children’s Hospital will be submitting a separate letter, addressing the scientific impact of the proposed guidelines. In addition, Children’s Hospital endorses and joins with the comment letter of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, dated May 21, 2009, and its specific comments and proposals. The changes suggested in that letter will not be repeated here.

First, we wish to express strong appreciation for the NIH’s leadership in proposing new and broader guidelines. Second, we wish to provide specific factual support in favor of grandfathering cell lines derived under IRB- and ESCRO-approved protocols, by describing the forms of ethical review implemented at Children’s Hospital.

It is important to note that IRBs and ESCROs are rigorous and reliable. IRB regulations have been in existence since 1981 and ESCRO committees (by that name) since 2005, although many institutions, including Children’s Hospital, had already set up special ethics review committees. While not mandated through regulations ESCROs have been well accepted and are in operation in many academic centers engaged in stem cell research. Leading organizations, most notably Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), but others as well, have worked hard to promote education for IRB and ESCRO members, and various bodies, including the ISSCR, the National Academies, IASCR, and CIRM, have helped build an ethical infrastructure of self-regulation that is thoughtful, balanced, sensitive, and supported widely.

Children’s Hospital’s IRB has been in existence since 1972. The human research protection program is accredited by AAHRPP. There are 23 IRB members of diverse backgrounds and the IRB meets twice a month. The IRB has established a culture of creditability, reliability, openness and transparency by strictly adhering to its published policies and procedures, by continuing education and discussion of new developments and policy challenges, and by its thoughtful yet critical review of each protocol on its own merits. Investigators appreciate and respond to the independent review process.

In preparation for introducing embryonic stem cell research at Children’s there were institutional discussions as to the best way to determine what activities constituted human subject research and what type of IRB review was required, in particular with respect to donor protection. Mechanisms were set up through the IRB office to make sure that investigators that received embryonic stem cells acquired them from sources and under protocols where there was appropriate IRB oversight and informed consent. Special forms for this purpose were developed. In addition when investigators at Children’s began to derive their own stem cells the investigators helped educate the IRB about how stems cells are derived, how they will be used and the precautions taken to assure privacy and confidentiality of the donors as well as how informed consent will be obtained. Every derivation was under an IRB-scrutinized and approved protocol – indeed, the approval processes initially took many many months of questions and refinements, so sensitive were both IRB members and investigators to implementing the best possible practice. Collaboratively a process was set up for appropriate IRB review and oversight and this process is currently being used.

Children’s Hospital established an ESCRO committee in 2005, as a successor to a committee established in 2004. Our ESCRO members include several community members, both lay and religious, and independent ethicists unaffiliated with CHB, as well as scientific and other specialists as suggested by the National Academies. To provide active full support, as well as link ESCRO judgments to funding compliance, administrative support is by both the Stem Cell Program and the Vice President of Research Administration. This organizational structure allows for design and implementation of tightly integrated processes. The processes and forms for review and documentation by the ESCRO were designed in collaboration with the IRB. There are ESCRO committee members on the IRB and IRB members also serve as ESCRO committee members. To promote best practices, Children’s joins with other Harvard-affiliated hospitals, and Harvard University itself in monthly meetings to compare policy and practices, discuss new challenges and issues, and promote continual learning.

It is our belief that diligent review by both IRBs and ESCROs, strict adherence to existing regulations, and thought provoking discussions regarding the risks and benefits of research adequately monitored the use of stem cells in the past and will continue to do so in the future.

We urge you to give this ethical review system significant weight by funding the lines that have been subject to its scrutiny and approval.

Sincerely,

 
45823 05/26/2009 at 07:14:57 AM Self     help to cure type 1 diabetes

 
45824 05/26/2009 at 07:17:51 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45825 05/26/2009 at 07:19:34 AM Self     It is troubling that more human life, even at so tiny a stage is going to be destroyed just for the purposes of "research". Why are our tax dollars going to be used in this area of research that is already taking place. How is it that a "civilized" society thinks it is okay to do experimentation on live humans. Life begins at conception. Science has proven this. Let us continue to do ethical adult stem cell research, and not destroy life

 
45826 05/26/2009 at 07:24:21 AM Self     Please protect human embryos from destruction. Please focus on adult stem-cell research, which already has provided dozens of therapies and treatments for humans.

 
45827 05/26/2009 at 07:25:07 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45828 05/26/2009 at 07:26:03 AM Self     I strongly oppose any experimentation with embryonic cells since this is tampering with God given LIFE. It is totally unethical; moreover, it is illogical and not worthy of testing, as it has been proven that cord blood cells and adult stem cells have been successfully used to cure and heal individuals of various diseases. Please do not tamper with this area.

Why don't we do more research in the area of cord blood? There are virtually no restrictions, and the supply is plenty. Please think about this. It is a wasted resource.

 
45829 05/26/2009 at 07:26:38 AM Self     I strongly do not want my tax money used for Human Stem Cell. I don't want you to spend my money in such a wasteful and unhuman way. Please don't! Respectfully,

 
45830 05/26/2009 at 07:32:04 AM Self     I oppose applying retroactive informed consent as a criteria for making stem cells available for research purposes.

 
45831 05/26/2009 at 07:37:37 AM Self     Using embryonic stem cells for research goes against my religious beliefs. If I would have to pay for this research with my tax monies, I would be compromising my religious convictions. Please do not pass this bill which would put many Americans in conflict with their religion. If we have to decide between God and state, we will choose God.

 
45832 05/26/2009 at 07:37:40 AM Self     I am a family physician who takes care of patients from conception until death. I still deliver babies and see the conception and birth of a child as miraculous. I teach in a Family Medicine residency program. The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45833 05/26/2009 at 07:38:10 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45834 05/26/2009 at 07:40:32 AM Self     I AM OPPOSED TO ANY FEDERAL FUNDING OF STEM CELL RESEARCH. THIS ADMINISTRATION HAS NO MORAL VALUES WHATSOEVER. I AM TOTALLY OPPOSED TO ANYTHING FROM NO-BAMA. HE SHOULD BE IMPEACHED.

 
45835 05/26/2009 at 07:40:37 AM Self     As you know, the section labeled “SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION” states embryonic stem cell research might lead to cures diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, burns, heart disease and arthritis. How can "the government" want to have taxpayer money involved in this when experts in stem cell research, including its inventors, Dr. James Thompson of Madison and Dr. Ian Wilmut of the U.K. have publicly said that embryo-destructive treatments are very unlikely to cure these problems? I STRONGLY object to the spending of tax money to destroy other humans. Is anyone awake at the wheel in Washington? It's a slippery slope that you are on.

 
45836 05/26/2009 at 07:40:58 AM Organization Heritage Baptist Church   Human embrios are clearly created in the image of God as all older living people. Human experimentation with damage to life is barbaric and unjustifiable. We condemned it in Hitler's Germany; it will be seen to be equally heinous in our generation. Adult stem cells have proven to be remedial in the treatment of disease. Why this insistance upon the destruction of innocent life for the greater good of humanity? It is a tremendous evil! No semantic gyrations can make it something acceptable.

 
45837 05/26/2009 at 07:42:11 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45838 05/26/2009 at 07:42:52 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Thanks,

 
45839 05/26/2009 at 07:45:26 AM Self     Money should go towards promising research which is stem cells from umbilical cords, adults and children.

 
45840 05/26/2009 at 07:45:34 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45841 05/26/2009 at 07:45:37 AM Self     As a parent and former Registered Nurse, I oppose all research involving the manipulation and/or destruction of human embryos. I am pleased that the proposed guidelines prohibit somatic cell nuclear transfer, parthenogenesis, and the creation of embryos for research purposes. However, informed consent for the donation of "leftover" IVF embryos does not make the destruction of those embryos ethical. We would never allow parents to consent to "donate" a child for a research experiment that would not benefit the child in any way and that would assuredly lead to his or her death. Likewise, we should only be horrified that parents could be permitted to consent to their embryonic children being dissociated and used as mere biological matter. First and foremost, sound morals and ethics prohibit the proposed practices, but I will also point out, that if this research were so valuable, there would be adequate private funds supporting it and federal funds would not be needed. Please stop using my taxes to support this research.

 
45842 05/26/2009 at 07:46:11 AM Self     am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45843 05/26/2009 at 07:46:18 AM Self     No one will be able to convince unbelievers that an embryo is a little life in the making..but imagine holding your own child and deciding before they are born...that you changed your mind. You don't want to be a parent. Most of us already have older children. I can't imagine not having them in my life now. I have a 2 mnth old baby girl. I can't imagine her not ever being born. Not seeing her smiling at me w/such love. AT 2 months old, knowing that I am one of the most important people in her life. That's what we should be to our offsprings. The one person they can depend on. Our most important responsibility is to protect them and how much more can we do that...by offering them the chance to be born and not tested on like some lowly animal.

 
45844 05/26/2009 at 07:46:23 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos.

Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos.

The proposed regulations create a financial incentive for the creation of more human embryos to be destroyed to obtain their embryonic stem cells.

The guidelines do not require any separation between an IVF doctor and an ESCR researcher. The guidelines say they "should" be separate, but only when practicable. The guidelines allow any IVF doctor to create more embryos than are needed for fertility purposes in order to generate more so-called "leftover" embryos for ESCR research using taxpayer funds.

Instead of preventing any future expansion of funding for ESCR on unethical experiments involving human clones and human-animal hybrids, these regulations open the door for such funding upon the order of NIH.

The guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos so that they understand that their options include permission for infertile couples to adopt them.

 
45845 05/26/2009 at 07:46:35 AM Self     My huband has had Type 1 for 41 years. I do no want my children to have the same fate. Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes. I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule. Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research. I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45846 05/26/2009 at 07:46:50 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45847 05/26/2009 at 07:46:52 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45848 05/26/2009 at 07:47:15 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45849 05/26/2009 at 07:47:39 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45850 05/26/2009 at 07:49:51 AM Self     Dear NIH Staff,

You know what we know: Embryonic stem cell research has already proven them to be a dead end in all ways imaginable. Please instead dedicate scarce taxpayer money to adult and other stem cell research, which have shown promising results.

"No" to further embryonic stem cell research, "Yes" to further other stem cell research. Thank you.

Sincerely,

 
45851 05/26/2009 at 07:50:20 AM Self     An embryo is a human being. Life begins at the moment of conception. Any embryologist , who is honest, will confirm this. Destroying an innocent human being to try to further potential benefit for others is immoral. To date there has not been one study that shows any positive benefit to embryonic stem cells. Their growth cannot be controlled and tumors develop. Many studies have shown a positive result with adult stem cells! They are plentiful but wasted.ime I deliver a baby millions of stem cells are wasted! This is politically and financially motivated and must be stopped.

 
45852 05/26/2009 at 07:51:54 AM Self     I do NOT want tax mony to pay for stem cell research that destroys human life!!!!!

 
45853 05/26/2009 at 07:52:17 AM Self     WHY THROW GOOD MONEY AFTER OLD?? WE ALREADY HAVE STEM CELLS THAT WORK WITHOUT USING EMBREOS. PUT THAT MONEY INTO SOMETHING THAT WORKS AND IS DOING WONDERS NOW!!!

 
45854 05/26/2009 at 07:52:27 AM Self     I ask you to continue the funding of adult stem cell research and do not divert those funds to embryionic stem cell research which has not proven to be reliable.

 
45855 05/26/2009 at 07:53:03 AM Self     I oppose the killing of human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the destruction of human embryos. Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research treating people now with adult stem cells and will divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of any human embryos. Also, the guidelines do not require full informed consent for the parents of the human embryos as to their options for their human embryos to be adopted by other infertile couples.

 
45856 05/26/2009 at 07:54:11 AM Self     Please help to stop the destruction of embryos - they are human, just in tiny (and sadly, frozen) form. Money and research should be redirected to cord and adult stem cells as those are the more beneficial sources. It is misguided to attempt to save/help others at the cost of another human.

Thank you for taking the time to read my note.

 
45857 05/26/2009 at 07:56:26 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45858 05/26/2009 at 07:57:09 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45859 05/26/2009 at 07:57:57 AM Self     I am against federal funding of all research involving the manipulation and destruction of human embryos.

 
45860 05/26/2009 at 07:58:07 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45861 05/26/2009 at 07:59:33 AM Self     I have read often that much success has been experienced with adult stem cell research, and very little with embryonic stem cells. I see no good reason to persue this course which bring so many moral and ethical hazards, and could easily encourage creation of human embryos specifically for the purpose of killing them.

 
45862 05/26/2009 at 08:00:20 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45863 05/26/2009 at 08:00:35 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately

 
45864 05/26/2009 at 08:00:59 AM Self     Please Do not expand and open up more ways to explot God's Process of Life. God gives and requires life. The Bible is th only Truth, Jesus is Lord!

 
45865 05/26/2009 at 08:01:53 AM Self     It is obvious that the current experimentation and research using human embryonic stem cells results in the destruction of a newly developing human being. The research and experimentation necessarily and in premeditated fashion causes the death of a new human life. What is the justification at law for taking human life? Usually, a human life can only be taken when done in self-defense and when there is no other reasonable option. Taking the lives of these new embryonic human lives can hardly be justified as a self-defense measure. Adult stem cell research has shown numerours cures. Why is the American taxpayer asked to spend money on killing humans when there has been no successful outcome? Why can't money be raised privately if these ventures hold so much promise?

 
45866 05/26/2009 at 08:02:49 AM Self     I have read the notice and additional documents; and, I understand you feel you have put in sufficient safeguards to "ensure" the morality of the use of the embryonic stem cells. But, because stem cells can be obtained through other methods, the use of "potential" life which destroys the life potential is unnecessary and appears to be a disregard for the preciousness and mystery of life itself. And, the tendancy of human beings is to violate any rules put in place, to find workarounds which do not overtly break the law, and to tend toward profit making. Also, when a step is taken that changes a mindset, the next step becomes closer regardless of how remote it seems at the time. So, what will be the response if it is determined that a later developed being (embryonic or fetus) has something we want to study or harvest. Where does this line of thinking end? The thing that sets us apart from other species has been our regard for life. It seems we are regressing in that this is even an argument under consideration.

 
45867 05/26/2009 at 08:04:50 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
45868 05/26/2009 at 08:05:52 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
45869 05/26/2009 at 08:06:23 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45870 05/26/2009 at 08:07:02 AM Self     "As a child of a parent suffering from Lewy's, I am pleased that Section II B of the draft guidelines appear to permit federal funding of some existing stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines that will be created from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that all current stem cell lines will be eligible for federal funding. I believe the final guidelines should allow federal funds for research using any existing stem cell lines that were created under ethical guidelines. This will allow research to build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding. Since new breakthroughs to create stem cell lines occur regularly, it is crucial that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ethical ways. "

 
45871 05/26/2009 at 08:07:17 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45872 05/26/2009 at 08:08:09 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45873 05/26/2009 at 08:09:55 AM Self     The destruction of human embryos is immoral. Please do not use American taxdollars to destroy them. Please allow God to guide your concience in this decision.

 
45874 05/26/2009 at 08:11:16 AM Self     It is inexcusable to reinstate this terrible lack of respect for human life. As you know there are alternative ways to this scientific research. I am strongly opposed to this.

 
45875 05/26/2009 at 08:11:46 AM Self     Medical advancement is imperative to the health and well-being of humans. It is a relief to know that this country will move forward using science and education to its fullest advantage. For years my family has walked for and financially supported the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund. Stem cell research is key to the search to end disease. Please move forward and fund this research.

 
45876 05/26/2009 at 08:12:49 AM Self     I do not approve of using my tax-dollars to fund unsuccessful, unethical embryonic stem cells from destroyed human embryos, especially when we can be using that same money to support adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. These new NIH guidelines are poor science and poor health care policy and are wasting money.

 
45877 05/26/2009 at 08:14:18 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes

 
45878 05/26/2009 at 08:14:38 AM Self     We are against the government spending money on stem cell research using any part of unborn babies.

 
45879 05/26/2009 at 08:14:42 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions. As a student who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms on stem cell research. I am pleased to see that NIH has been directed to create the guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH is most able to draft effective guidelines that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased with the intent of the NIH’s draft guidelines to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from excess embryos at fertility clinics.

I do encourage that the guidelines cover all basis by including a “grandfather” clause to allow federal funding for existing stem cell lines that were created using the best ethical practices at the time of derivation. At present draft, there is uncertainty if current lines meet all the guidelines set forth in the current draft and thusly might be excluded from federal funding.

While recent scientific advances have been truly remarkable, such as the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, I still believe that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is meritous and ethical research. Thusly, SCNT should be supported by the NIH and have the benefit of the institution’s oversight.

Finally, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. With the proper support and resources, I believe stem cell research will help my generation meet the medical challenges of the 21st century. Thank you for reviewing my comments.

 
45880 05/26/2009 at 08:15:08 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45881 05/26/2009 at 08:15:28 AM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45882 05/26/2009 at 08:15:59 AM Self     In the end of the draft it said We remain enthusiastic to work with the NIH to ensure that this research is appropriately regulated and able to fulfill its remarkable promise for enhancing human health. I also have this enthusiasm. So I highly support human embryonic stem cell research.

 
45883 05/26/2009 at 08:16:25 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from devastating diseases and conditions. As a student who sees the great potential of stem cell research, I strongly support all forms on stem cell research. I am pleased to see that NIH has been directed to create the guidelines for federal funding of stem cell research. I am confident that the NIH is most able to draft effective guidelines that will build on the progress in this field over the past decades so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. While ensuring ethical standards, the final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased with the intent of the NIH’s draft guidelines to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from excess embryos at fertility clinics.

I do encourage that the guidelines cover all basis by including a “grandfather” clause to allow federal funding for existing stem cell lines that were created using the best ethical practices at the time of derivation. At present draft, there is uncertainty if current lines meet all the guidelines set forth in the current draft and thusly might be excluded from federal funding.

While recent scientific advances have been truly remarkable, such as the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, I still believe that somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is meritous and ethical research. Thusly, SCNT should be supported by the NIH and have the benefit of the institution’s oversight.

Finally, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. With the proper support and resources, I believe stem cell research will help my generation meet the medical challenges of the 21st century. Thank you for reviewing my comments.

 
45884 05/26/2009 at 08:16:38 AM Self     I ask that you protect human embryos from destruction. I ask that you instead focus on adult stem-cell research, which already has provided dozens of therapies and treatments for humans.

 
45885 05/26/2009 at 08:17:21 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45886 05/26/2009 at 08:17:37 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45887 05/26/2009 at 08:18:22 AM Self     I do not agree with President Barack H. Obama issued Executive Order 13505. I believe it is a step in the wrong ethical direction.

 
45888 05/26/2009 at 08:18:42 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45889 05/26/2009 at 08:20:00 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

** Additional Information ** In March, the President issued an Executive Order that ended the blanket ban on federal funding of research using embryonic stem cell lines developed after August 2001. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) was than instructed to develop guidelines for federal funding of this research.

The purpose of the guidelines is to establish a policy and procedures under which the federal government will fund research in this area, and to ensure that such research is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law. You can view the NIH's draft guidelines online by clicking the following link: http://advocacy.diabetes.org/site/R?i=-50xlNBQ-y_kawrJPjBZoQ..

The American Diabetes Association strongly supports the draft guidelines but is concerned that, as written, they may prevent stem cell lines in existence before the guidelines go into effect, from being eligible for federal research funding. The Association is urging NIH to consider amending the guidelines to allow current stem cell lines derived using prevailing ethical practices to be considered for federal funding and that NIH be open to review other sources of stem cell lines (excluding reproductive cloning) in the future.

 
45890 05/26/2009 at 08:20:11 AM Self     To Whom It May Concern:

I write to show my support for the comments submitted by Harvard University in response to the Draft NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research. The changes suggested in Harvard’s response are essential to maximally remove the barriers to responsible stem cell research, as described in President Obamaís Executive Order #13505.

Having served for ***** years on the *****, Harvard’s IRB for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and its Stem Cell Institute, I am particularly concerned that the Draft NIH Guidelines’ consent form-based restrictions will needlessly limit support for work with existing cell lines. The wishes of the donors who enabled the creation of those lines will be violated, and no purpose served. The Common Rule consent standards were applied, and were appropriate.

With best regards,

 
45891 05/26/2009 at 08:20:25 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic cell research, which force me as a tax payer to subsidize research requiring destruction of human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should goverment support be extended to human cloning or other morally reprehensible creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45892 05/26/2009 at 08:20:38 AM Self     Please don't do this. Please uphold human life. I am all for finding cures but it is a slippery slop we're on that could lead to the advancement of abortions, euthanasia and the likes

 
45893 05/26/2009 at 08:20:50 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45894 05/26/2009 at 08:21:57 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45895 05/26/2009 at 08:22:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45896 05/26/2009 at 08:23:52 AM Self     President Obama obviously thinks that by his "struggling" with forcing already beleaguered taxpayers to fund the heretofore totally failed embryonic stem cell research, it makes it okay, since his heart is in the right place and that it is the "ethical" thing to do, After all, according to him, the restrictions against widespread killing of human beings for the "common good" is merely "rigid ideology"! Because of the liberal. leftwing stranglehold the Democrats have in *****. along with their willing cohorts in "Big media" who have long been staunch supporters of totally failed embryonic stem cell use, we who value human life seem to have to stand helplessly by and watch "junk science" have its way in destroying the first stages of life in the name of embryonic stem cell research, (and in adding insult to injury, force us to pay for it) which totally ignores countless qualified experts as they report a flood of articles about the progress with adult stem cells. For example, we have seen headlines such as, "Doctors transplant windpipe with woman's stem cells"; the use of a patient's own stem cells to treat heart failure"; and "Mother-of-two becomes first transplant patient to receive a whole organ transplant grown from her own stem cells." The amazing flexibility of adult stem cells has launched the scientific community i nto a new era of almost daily discoveries. Although ethical alternatives are light years ahead for the research that destroys innocent human life, the Obama administration insists on revisiting a failed and co ntroversial technique -- embryonic stem cell (ESC) research. WHY? Is it because of his fierce "pro-death" agenda! OR because he wishes to emphasize his power to overturn everything that President Bush held to? While adult stem cells are already successfully treating patients, the over-hyped and underperforming totally failed ESC has the "Pro-Death community staunchly behind them. The outrageous agenda of forcing the Pro-life community to pay for this research is like a slap in the face to those of us who value human life. We face some serious challenges in the next four years!

 
45897 05/26/2009 at 08:23:58 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45898 05/26/2009 at 08:24:38 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45899 05/26/2009 at 08:25:44 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45900 05/26/2009 at 08:26:10 AM Self     I urge you not to force Americans to pay for EMBRYONIC stem cell research. These studies have not proven effective, and they have not bornd fruit. They destroy life in its most vulnerable stage.

Instead, I implore you to spend tax money to focus on research on ADULT stem cells and stem cells obtained after the birth of a new baby. These areas have truly brought about some exciting potential for helping cure diseases. More importantly, they do not destroy any life.

 
45901 05/26/2009 at 08:27:47 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

My daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when she was 4 1/2. She is now 19 and we see this research as her chance for the cure. Please work hard.

 
45902 05/26/2009 at 08:28:17 AM Self     Overall, the new draft guidelines represent an important advance that I strongly support. However two changes are important: 1. Even though section II. B titled "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research" is generally good, changing the requirements for already-existing lines that were originally ethically derived to require re-consenting is not reasonable. All existing cells lines with originally acceptable IRB approval should be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Specifically, it is sufficient that they were derived with informed consent without undue inducement, and with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, e.g., an Institutional Review Board. 2. Please try to replace section II C titled "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds" to reduce the administrative burden and confusion between investigators and institutions. The NIH should establish its own registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. As suggested by others, when a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to this NIH-run registry, allowing researchers to identify and request only the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines. These changes will make the otherwise outstanding new guidelines practical to accelerate human stem cell research. Thank you.

 
45903 05/26/2009 at 08:28:24 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos.

 
45904 05/26/2009 at 08:28:27 AM Self     I do not favor the use of embryonic stem cells in research for many reasons. While embryonic cells may hold promise, the issue has been so politically charged to the point that research on other stem cells has been neglected. As a parent of a chemistry researcher, I have been informed that significant finds have been made in other areas of stem cell research while embryonic stem cell research has yet to produce a major breakthrough - yet all the focus is on embryonic. I find this deceptive, immoral, unethical, and a waste of my taxes. IF embryonic research continued to be restricted, the proper attention would be focused on the more meaningful stem cell research, likely producing fantastic results that would promote better global health. I believe the movement to engage only embryonic research is a manipulated distractiion of politically motivated groups whose ultimate goal I can only guess. I don't believe embryonic stem cell research is necessary or useful at this time.

 
45905 05/26/2009 at 08:29:09 AM Self     -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

Sincerly,

 
45906 05/26/2009 at 08:29:55 AM Self     So few people are aware of the real success that doctors and scientists have had with adult stem cells. The thrust has always been toward embryonic stem cell research. We are all kidding ourselves if we think that approval of embryonic stem cell research will not increase the number of abortions in this country. Abortions will increase, not because of some Frankenstein-like experiments, but because women teetering on the edge between "should I or shouldn't I" will now have what she feels is a 'moral' end to her baby's life. "If I have this abortion, at least some good will come of it."

Please keep important and vital funds going into adult stem cell research.

 
45907 05/26/2009 at 08:30:22 AM Self     This is to inform you that I am completely opposed to the use of my federal tax dollars for embryonic stem cell research as has been proposed by the Obama administration. This decision is immoral and against the wishes of millions of American citizens. The overwhelming scientific and medical conclusion is that each human life begins at conception when the sperm fertilizes the egg. Sex, hair and eye coloring, and many other human attributes are already determined at conception. Hopefully, NIH and its proposed Guidelines will not overlook this scientific evidence and testimony.

Thank you.

 
45908 05/26/2009 at 08:31:26 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45909 05/26/2009 at 08:32:12 AM Self     Two critical changes need to be made to the current draft guidelines. First, I believe that a major flaw exists in section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research". While this section provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, it does not recognize the existence of hundreds of stem cell lines currently in use in research labs across the United States. While these existing lines were derived according to the most ethical standards recognized at the time of derivation, they may not meet in every detail the new, more rigorous standards set forth in the NIH draft guidelines. To prohibit their eligibility for federal funds under this new policy would do great harm to the field of stem cell research. Federally funded researchers would be forced to stop their work and wait for a yet unknown number of new embryonic stem cells that comply with the new NIH guidelines to be derived. Such a halt to research would be detrimental to the scientific community's progress and devastating to patients around the world who might benefit from this important research.

Therefore, I urge the NIH to include a provision within Section II to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously and ethically derived to be eligible for use in federally funded research under these guidelines. Instead of requiring previously derived cell lines to comply with either the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) guidelines or the guidelines by the International Society of Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), I ask the NIH to consider a different standard. I recommend that the final guidelines allow NIH funding for any lines derived prior to the implementation of the new policy that had been derived: a) with informed consent, b) without undue inducement, and c) with oversight by an ethics advisory committee, such as an Institutional Review Board.

Second, I also urge the replacement of section II C, "Prior to the Use of NIH Funds". The requirement that each recipient of federal funds ensure the compliance of the cell lines to be used would be administratively burdensome and unnecessarily restrict research. Under the draft guidelines, each investigator who wishes to use a cell line in his or her research must provide assurances that the cell line complies with the NIH Guidelines. This repeated reauthorization of the same cell lines seems unnecessary. It is also possible that different institutions might judge the eligibility of the same cell line differently. This lack of uniformity threatens the free flow of scientific investigation.

To avoid bureaucratic and legal confusion, I ask the NIH to establish an NIH registry of human embryonic stem cell lines available for federally funded research. When a cell line is first used in federally funded research, assurance documentation should be submitted to an NIH-run registry. The registry would allow researchers to review the cell lines that meet the NIH guidelines and then apply to use those stem cells lines.

 
45910 05/26/2009 at 08:32:34 AM Self    

Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

Sincerely,

 
45911 05/26/2009 at 08:32:40 AM Self     Dear Sirs,

Please do not fund embryonic stem cell research which I oppose for many reasons.

It is a travesty of care because it 1) destroys a life for 2) is unproven science.

It is supplementing an elite medical marketing scheme which will only benefit those with enough money to pay for the "cures" by destroying unborn, the poor and unprotected.

Basically, the lobbyists have pushed hard for this research because they hold patents on the expected "cures".

To me, this is the equivalent of the Nazi atrocities.

Sincerely,

 
45912 05/26/2009 at 08:33:20 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45913 05/26/2009 at 08:33:25 AM Self     Please focus your attention and energies and monies on furthering the successful use of adult stem cells rather than on destroying embryos.

 
45914 05/26/2009 at 08:34:00 AM Self     The guidelines are devoting my tax dollars to experiments with embryonic stem cells, from destroyed human embryos. The only successful treatments and cures come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed. The new NIH guidelines that you are purposing are very poor science and very poor health care policy, and would divert dollars away from real treatments. Any federal dollar used for embryonic stem cell experimentation is a dollar not used for adult stem cells. This will delay adult stem cell treatments and cures. This new policy puts the health of Americans in danger. Patients need to be first, and put federal funds toward the real treatments and real promise of adult stem cells.

 
45915 05/26/2009 at 08:34:00 AM Self     I strongly support federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research and was delighted by the new Executive Order relating to it. Embryonic stem cells offer powerful tools for research and potentially for diagnostic and therapeutic treatments for some of the most significant human diseases and ailments - such as Alzheimer's disease, ALS, autoimmune diseases --- and to deprive the scientific community of these tools would greatly hamper our ability to cope with these increasingly critical threats to human health, safety and enjoyment of life. I am also very encouraged by the fact that the NIH has opened up the proposed guidelines for public comment. However, there are problems with the guidelines as currently proposed that would impede the progress of research and that I therefore think should be changed.

In particular, although section II. B, "Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem cells for Use in Research” provides a reasonable standard for the eligibility of human embryonic stem cell lines derived in the future, if such standards are applied retroactively they would prevent the use of existing stem cell lines derived in accordance with the ethical requirements in place at the time of derivation (see Taylor, Cell Stem Cell, 2009). This policy would greatly reduce the value of research already conducted with the existing lines, and would delay the application of federal funds to hESC research until new lines had been derived. Both of these results would be detrimental to scientific progress. I therefore urge the NIH to include a provision to allow human embryonic stem cell lines previously derived with appropriate oversight and in accordance with ethical standards at the time of derivation to be used for federally-funded research.

In addition, the requirement for researchers who wish to use hESC lines in federally-funded research to provide evidence independently that the line conforms to the NIH guidelines, and thus be re-authorized each time, imposes an unnecessary administrative burden that would waste taxpayer money. One way in which the NIH could avoid such duplication of effort and reduce confusion would be to establish a registry of hESC lines that are available for use in federally-funded research. This registry could be set up in collaboration with other organizations such as the ISSCR. In the future, I also urge re-examination of more broad-ranging legislation such as the provisions in the Dickey-Wicker amendment and the use of federal funds for other forms of line generation such as SCNT. I believe that it would be appropriate to allow line derivation from embryos generated specifically for the purposes of research or by other methods. With appropriate oversight and regulation in place, research on such lines has the potential to have a substantial positive impact on our understanding and treatment of human disease.

 
45916 05/26/2009 at 08:34:53 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research is inferior (from everything I've read as a layman enthusiast in the area) to adult stem cell findings. So why would you support a Matrix-like mentality which grows (little) humans for the sake of research that's inferior on most counts?

Please make the ethical choice and recommend to elected officials funding be focused upon adult stem cell work.

 



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