Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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45016 05/25/2009 at 06:14:35 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45017 05/25/2009 at 06:14:58 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45018 05/25/2009 at 06:16:09 PM Self     When are we going to drop this ideal that embryonic strem-cells are the answer to all health issues when even Dr. Oz from Oprah fame states that it should be a none issue because of the failures of embryonic stem-cells causing cancerous cells to develope more often then not. Why not start the funding of adult stems cell research AGAIN where numerous successes have occurred?

 
45019 05/25/2009 at 06:16:20 PM Self     We support stem cell research to hopefully cure Type I Diabetes and other life-threatening diseases.

 
45020 05/25/2009 at 06:16:53 PM Self     To whom it may concern:

As a Roman Catholic and as an American tax payer, I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. I support stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. However, human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes should never occur; certainly not under federal funding.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. I vehemently oppose a government that allocates tax payer contributions to fund research that destroys human life; it is not even logical to do so when options that do not destroy human life are available.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

God help our country.

In Him,

 
45021 05/25/2009 at 06:17:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45022 05/25/2009 at 06:18:55 PM Self     I am against embrionic stem cell research. I am for all that guards,nourishes and holds dear all human life in all it's stages.What a comforting feeling to know we are indispensible because we are a human beings. My fear is that man is allowing need, or the lack of money to decide when we are viable,or important and what our fate will be.

 
45023 05/25/2009 at 06:19:47 PM Self     Please make sure that the guidelines continue to allow stem cell research, using any cell lines that currently exist, can continue to go forward. Stem cell research is one of our time's most promising lines of research - it would be immoral to create rules to prevent it.

 
45024 05/25/2009 at 06:20:36 PM Self     This is an unnecessary use of tax dollars and immoral practice according to our foundation as a Christian nation. And, we were founded as a Christian nation in spite of what our president and certain citizens may say. It is documented in the library of congress. Read it for yourself. Embryos are not needed for stem cell research. Adult ones work fine. Put the tax dollars on adult stem cell research and trash this bill, not babies. How horribe!!!

 
45025 05/25/2009 at 06:20:58 PM Self     Dear NIH:

President Obama’s Executive Order 13505 represents a tremendous opportunity for the NIH to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly to provide time for public comment. However, I am worried that that the NIH proposal will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. I appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research and urge you to take the following into consideration:

[1] Develop final Guidelines that allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. These guidelines recommend independent oversight, voluntary and informed donor consent and no undue inducements. Most established hESC lines that are widely used in research today have been obtained in accordance with these principles. To ensure continued international collaboration, these principles should be applied to the evaluation of existing lines.

[2] Most existing U.S. lines have been derived in accordance with the core principles in the ISSCR’s guidelines and consistent with the established federal regulatory framework involving IRB oversight and approval. In some instances, additional specialized embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (ESCROs), and other oversight methods in other countries (referred to as SCROs in ISSCR Guidelines), have also provided oversight. Established policy has demonstrated that this self-regulatory structure has provided a sound ethical foundation for stem cell research. In developing the final Guidelines the NIH should consider this well-established framework of independent oversight and give weight to its determinations.

[3] Specifically, for funding eligibility purposes, the ethical provenance of existing U.S. cell lines should be judged based on the standards that prevailed at the time they were derived, provided the protocol under which donations were accepted, and any amendments, were approved by an IRB operating under federal regulations. Non-US lines should be eligible for funding within the US if the IRB and/or SCRO for the US institution receiving NIH funding determines that the protocol under which the underlying donation occurred met operative standards of the time and core ethical principles. In addition, new requirements that go beyond established U.S. and international practice should be applied prospectively only, and after a time period for affected parties, including IVF clinics, to adapt. We specifically ask the NIH to reconsider those aspects that go beyond existing ISSCR standards, including, for example, the proposed mandatory dual IVF consent the proposed guidelines would require, and the proposed requirement that the informed consent form is the sole source for ethical validation.

[4] It will be essential that investigators know with some certainty what lines are eligible for funding. I therefore urge the NIH to work with organizations such as the ISSCR to develop a list or registry of hESC lines available for NIH-funding or resources to support the oversight process. The ISSCR has in development a registry to document that hESC derivation was performed in accordance with ethical requirements, and make associated documentation available to reviewing IRBs and stem cell oversight bodies. Such a registry would reduce uncertainty and improve research efficiency. While that registry is being finalized, a useful and easy place to start in the meantime would be for the NIH to publish, on a Web site, the lines that are determined to be fundable based on IRB and SCRO determinations.

I work in an agency that over the past few years has funded researchers engaged in stem cell research. We have required that the stem cell lines used in the research we fund were ethically derived. On behalf of those researchers and stem cell researchers worldwide, I ask you to modify the current language to that proposed above.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the draft Guidelines.

 
45026 05/25/2009 at 06:21:01 PM Self     I am a diabetic and am hopeful for a cure in my lifeime.

Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45027 05/25/2009 at 06:21:28 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research has not show any link or correlation to successful treatment of any type of disease. By contrast, adult stem cell research has proven to be effective in treating disease. As a tax paying United States citizen, I do not believe that I should be forced by the Obama administration to pay for research that is both ineffective and that conflicts with my belief in the sanctity of all human life.

 
45028 05/25/2009 at 06:22:56 PM Organization Huntingon's Disease Society of America   Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. The final guidelines issued by NIH must build on the progress in research of the last decade, so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible.

My concern is that as drafted, Section IIB does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other thatn excess IVF embryos, such as somaticl cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). It is at least essential that the NIH continue to nomitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
45029 05/25/2009 at 06:26:03 PM Self     To whom it may concern, I am strongly opposed to taxpayer subsidized research which requires the destruction of innocent human life. Not only does this research destroy vulnerable and innocent human life, but it is often ineffective and even dangerous for the recipient. I have another concern that these regulations are not specific enough. They leave open the possibility that taxes may be used for cloning and experiments with human/animal hybrids. I am strongly opposed to both of these experiments.

Some progress has been made in the development of stem cell research without the destruction of life. This stem cell research which does not destroy human life has proven to be successful.

 
45030 05/25/2009 at 06:26:40 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45031 05/25/2009 at 06:27:21 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45032 05/25/2009 at 06:27:42 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45033 05/25/2009 at 06:27:58 PM Self     I think that Executive Order 13505 should not be passed. Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, states that the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), through the Director of the NIH, may support and conduct responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent permitted by law. This is wrong. We were not created to do these things. It is MURDER!!! I DON'T want my Tax Dollars spend on these studies.

 
45034 05/25/2009 at 06:28:27 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45035 05/25/2009 at 06:28:42 PM Self     Stem cells from embryos should not be used. It is killing life that God has created and only God can take it away. More help comes from adult stem cells and other sources. If we give into this like we did to abortion our human life will have negative consequences. We don't allow prayer in schools, we are considering letting under age children decide to have an abortion without parental consent. We need to be more respectful of life from the very beginning and maybe our world can be a better place.

 
45036 05/25/2009 at 06:29:11 PM Self     Only adult stem cells should be used for research. All human life should be sacred.

 
45037 05/25/2009 at 06:30:56 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the millions of American adults and children with serious medical conditions such as diabetes and MS.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore, for instance, how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45038 05/25/2009 at 06:31:05 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45039 05/25/2009 at 06:31:13 PM Self     I am opposed to stem cell research. The killing of embryos is immoral. I am also opposed to the idea of my tax dollars being used for this purpose. Respectfully,

 
45040 05/25/2009 at 06:32:39 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines - in Section II B - would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you

 
45041 05/25/2009 at 06:33:16 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45042 05/25/2009 at 06:33:35 PM Self     I am opposed to stem cell research. It is immoral. I am also opposed to the idea of my tax dollars being used for this purpose.

 
45043 05/25/2009 at 06:35:35 PM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. The proposed regulations will force taxpayers like me to fund research I believe is unethical because it requires the killing of human embryos.

Expanding funding to new human embryonic stem cell lines will divert federal funds away from promising research that is treating people now with non-embryonic stem cells and will also divert funds away from other sources of embryonic-like stem cells that have been generated without the use of human embryos

 
45044 05/25/2009 at 06:37:07 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45045 05/25/2009 at 06:37:17 PM Self     I object to embryonic stem cell research because it degrades and diminishes all human life. To disregard our humanity at any stage of life is a denial of biological and scientific facts. A baby is a baby even if is in the earliest stages of development. (1) It is wrong to be creating excess embryos in the first place. (2) Using these human embryos for experiments only add to the disregard for the sanctity of human life. (3) Promoting the experimentation of human embryos with our tax dollars makes it worse. (4) Adult stem cell research has already produced some positive results, but embryonic stem cell research has not even shone enough promise to generate significant private investment.

 
45046 05/25/2009 at 06:37:23 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45047 05/25/2009 at 06:38:42 PM Self     Embrionic stem cell research is not only unethical, it has not been proven to be successful. Adult stem cell research is the best and should be the only choice.

 
45048 05/25/2009 at 06:39:33 PM Self     Regarding: NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH GUIDELINES FOR HUMAN STEM CELL RESEARCH

The NIH should not fund research on human embryonic stem cells.

Deriving stem cells from an embryo results in the destruction of that embryo. This is the destruction of a human life and should be prohibited. I realize that the guidelines as drafted do not allow NIH funding of the actual derivation of the stem cells from embryos. However, allowing NIH funding of research on these embryonic stem cells will increase demand for the stem cells, encouraging increased destruction of embryos to meet that demand. Human life should never be sacrificed to advance research. As a taxpayer, I do not want to pay for research that requires that human embryos be destroyed.

The proposed Guidelines stipulate that the human embryonic stem cells eligible for NIH funded research come from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes. (II.B) I believe that any process that produces "unwanted" human embryos (that is, embryos that will likely never be implanted and nurtured to birth) should be stopped. It is irresponsible to create even one human embryo in excess of the parents' desired number of children.

 
45049 05/25/2009 at 06:43:29 PM Organization     To whom it may concern:

I have been running the Gene Targeting lab of the University ***** since *****. I am currently waiting for a decision to fund my pending NIH R21 grant on the generation and use of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) reporter lines.

This grant, if approved will establish reporter hESC lines that will be extremely valuable in the molecular analysis of developmental pathways hESC use to differentiate into any kind of tissue. The reporter gene will faithfully indicate the activity of any endogenous gene of interest in hESC and will make it easy to determine cost effectively wether of not the desired differentiation step has taken place. It will therefore be extremely useful in 1) the screening of libraries of potential differentiation factors and 2) will make it possible to determine the activity of the gene of interest in the context of human 'engineered' tissue and in the context of an animal model, such as the mouse. If the any of the generated reporter hESC lines are approved for use in patients the reporter gene will also make it possible to track the differentiation status of any gene of interest in patients that had been treated with hESC.

I am very concerned that the guidelines for use of hESC that have been put together by the Obama administration will have the unintended consequence of making it impossible to work with already well established and federally 'fundable' hESC lines, such as the H1 and H9 lines from the Thomson lab that are now deposited at the NIH stem cell bank. These are lines I propose to work with in my grant application and I have them already in my freezer here in Philadephia. If I wiould not be able to use them this could either abolish chances that my grant gets funded or may unduly delay grant funding and the resulting work on these important, well characterized lines.

I fully support the proposal put forward by the ISSCR to deal with this urgent issue. The existing original hESC lines that have been funded so far by the NIH should not be held suddenly to a standard that had never been asked for in the past. Most of the existing literature is using these lines as reference lines and it is in my view extremely important that scientists can get continued federal funding for these lines, if only to have available to them 'hESC reference lines' (such as the H1 and H9 lines) that many stem cell scientists are familiar with.

Hopefully this extremely important issue will be dealt with soon so that undue delays in funding can be avoided.

Best regards,

 
45050 05/25/2009 at 06:43:46 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45051 05/25/2009 at 06:43:48 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45052 05/25/2009 at 06:43:58 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45053 05/25/2009 at 06:45:51 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of INNOCENT HUMAN life. **** Support SHOULD be directed to stem cell research and treatments that DO NOT destroy human life and are already proven successful.

There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems.

*** Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

I am a pharmacist and understand the issues clearly. I and my family firmly OPPOSE THE AFOREMENTIONED USE OF TAXPAYER MONEY.

Sincerely,

 
45054 05/25/2009 at 06:46:57 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45055 05/25/2009 at 06:47:11 PM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
45056 05/25/2009 at 06:47:34 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45057 05/25/2009 at 06:48:20 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45058 05/25/2009 at 06:48:54 PM Self     Dear Obama Administration- I highly oppse your Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines!! As a pro-life advocate I highly reject funding any of this research. I believe life begina at conception and the thought of reseach being done on human embryos is just sick. There should be a line that is not crossed in science- when it starts to disregard the preciousness of human life- that is when it needs to stop! Below are the main points I want to make.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Thankyou for reading this- I hope and pray that this changes some minds!

 
45059 05/25/2009 at 06:48:56 PM Self     I oppose embryonic stem cell research which requires the destruction of human embryos. Government support and taxpayer's money should not be appropriated for this purpose.

Moreover, embryo destructive stem cell research has been shown to be ineffective; the alternative of adult stem cells is ethical as well as effective.

The legalization by the U.S. Government of human embryos for research is appalling, as it may very well constitute the first step toward the creation of cloning and human-animal hybrids. We must stop this from going any further now. Just as we don't know which of our foods have been genetically manufactured today we may find ourselves, at some point,unable to discern whether a particular individual is human or not.

I urge you to uphold life.

 
45060 05/25/2009 at 06:49:22 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

I did not see any reference in sections III or IV about not allowing research involving the cloning of legally donated embryos. While I do not think any research should be done on embryos, there should still be ban on cloning embryos for research purposes.

 
45061 05/25/2009 at 06:49:27 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45062 05/25/2009 at 06:49:30 PM Self     It is best that stem cell research be done by private companies without government funds. While I do not have any opposition to stem cell research morally, I can understand why Christians would oppose it since they believe in ensoulment of fertilized eggs and since they pay taxes they should not be expected to pay for it. Besides, I believe that applied science is best left to private industry. The government should only do the kind of basic research that is not likely to lead directly to a patent and therefore not invite private investment.

 
45063 05/25/2009 at 06:49:46 PM Organization Kansas State Council Knights of Columbus   The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45064 05/25/2009 at 06:50:58 PM Self     All people have asked for for the past several years is hope, it is time to ignite the science with financial support and legislature to support their research in finding a cure. We need to imporve the quality of life for those individuyals that experiecne day in and day out the meantal and physical burden of this disease, the impact both emotional and financially to families (spouces, siblings, parents, children, and friends). As friends and family support people living with PD, we are asking for your support. We believe in our government and the time is of the essence. Our governemnt has the ability to act quickly and responsibily. PLease support this law and allow the necessary research to change the direction and future of our health and wellness. Friend of PD!

 
45065 05/25/2009 at 06:51:50 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45066 05/25/2009 at 06:52:36 PM Self     Any help on Hunington's Disease would be monumental. People who carry the Huntington's gene have to live with the fear of not know when they will be attacked. If if takes embryonic stem cells, please proceed.

 
45067 05/25/2009 at 06:53:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45068 05/25/2009 at 06:53:06 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45069 05/25/2009 at 06:53:42 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45070 05/25/2009 at 06:54:12 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45071 05/25/2009 at 06:55:00 PM Self     I am opposed to embryonic stem-cell research which results in the death of the newly formed embryo. There is no true scientific "progress" if the "progress" comes at the expense of innocent life. This research has become another way for some human beings to use and mistreat others for their own benefit. It is one group oppressing another and is unethical. The proposed "guidelines" cannot ensure violations, such as embryos created solely for research purposes or research involved in the breeding of animals that includes the introduction of human stem cells does not occur. I strongly support research that uses adult stem cells or ips cells. Send my tax dollars to this ethical stem cell research.

 
45072 05/25/2009 at 06:55:31 PM Self     We oppose destructive stem cell research,and we feel we need cures that we all can live with.

 
45073 05/25/2009 at 06:55:54 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45074 05/25/2009 at 06:56:43 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45075 05/25/2009 at 06:59:38 PM Self     The following comments are based on my experience for over 30 years as a biomedical research scientist who has followed the literature on stem cell research for over 20 years and as a research administrator who has been responsible for the training and ethical conduct of researchers at two leading research institutes in the U.S.

Executive Order 13505: Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells issued on May 9, 2009 states that the Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of NIH, may support and conduct ethically responsible, scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research.

I challenge the assumption that the Executive Order and these guidelines provide a basis for developing policies that are consistent with the NIH's own standards for the ethical use of human subjects. On the contrary, I believe the proposed policies contained herein undermine the purpose and intent of ethical guidelines to protect human subjects of research, that are based on the Nuremburg Code and 45 CFR 46.

Executive Order 13505 makes no attempt to address the moral status of the human embryo and ethical issues that surround their use in research. The only place that the status of the embryo is mentioned is in the Supplementary Information of the Draft Guidelines:

"Although human embryonic stem cells are derived from embryos, such stem cells are not themselves human embryos."

The fact that a human embryo must be killed to obtain the stem cells is brushed aside. But if these cells were of no more biological significance than any other body cell, there would be no controversy over their use, there would be no need for an executive order. The biological fact is that the human embryos that are killed to obtain the stem cells are distinct biological entities as evidenced their chromosomal (DNA) sequences and they have the potential, given the appropriate environment, to develop into an adult human being. By failing to acknowledge this biological reality deal with the moral status of the human embryo, the Executive Order does not provide an ethical framework to deal with their use as human subjects of research.

The only other context to treat the stem cells and the embryos from which they are derived is to treat them as property whose future is determined by the needs and wishes of their owners. That is exactly the case being made in these Guidelines. In section II- B. Eligibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived from Human Embryos:

"Human embryonic stem cells may be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes, were no longer needed for this purpose, --"

Given the fact that a human embryo that is still viable and can develop into a human being why are not the needs of the embryo to survive given any weight; or the needs of other potential mothers both of which could potentially be fulfilled by the adoption of the embryo for implantation. The fact that only the donors of the sperm and eggs will be allowed to determine the fate of their embryos indicates that the embryos are being treated as property not a human life.

Given the absence of any ethical framework that defines the moral status of the human embryo as a person, the guidelines themselves distort the meaning and application of the established safeguards for the conduct of research on human subjects as described in the National Institutes of Health's own policy statements. As stated in the Supplementary Information:

"Internal NIH procedures, consistent with Executive Order 13505 and these Guidelines, will govern the conduct of intramural NIH research involving human stem cells. Long-standing Department of Health and Human Services regulations for Protection of Human Subjects, 45 CFR part 46, establish safeguards for individuals who are the sources of many human tissues used in research, including non-embryonic human adult stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells."

However, if the embryo is to be treated as property and not a human being, then there is no need to follow regulations that apply to human subjects. All that is required is to insure that the due process of law is applied in the transaction between the owners and recipients of the embryos. Furthermore, these safeguards cannot apply to a human embryo because there is no possibility of consent by the victim, and there is not benefit to the human life at risk. The application of the 45 CFR part 46 to human embryos, which are biological entities that are independent of their parents, makes a travesty of the meaning of "informed consent". Since human embryos cannot consent and will not benefit from the intended research, the act of consent is a charade. This formality only gives the appearance of an ethical decision, but it does not protect the life of the victim and at best can only placate the conscience of those who are destroying a human life, and of the society and its politicians that claim to be moral. Furthermore, to pervert the use of 45 CFR part 46 in this way sets a precedence that can be used by future politicians, scientists, and medical professionals to take the life of any human. It would be better to just write the rules without referring to 45 CFR part 46.

NIH's own Directives for Human Experimentation refers to The Nuremberg Code of ethical principles for human experimentation which states "The voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential." Since it is not possible for the embryo to give consent any more than is it possible for a newborn to consent the responsibility is left to the parents. But unlike the newborn there is no possible benefit of the research for the embryo itself, only its death that is being decided by the parents.

Finally, the guidelines fail to establish the necessity for the destruction of a human life to obtain embryonic stem cells to achieve "scientifically worthwhile" ends. The Nuremberg Code of ethical principles for human experimentation, which is adopted by the US National Institutes of Health research states that research that may cause human suffering:

"The experiment should be such as to yield fruitful results for the good of society, unprocurable by other methods or means of study, and not random and unnecessary in nature."

To justify the use of human embryos these guidelines give a distorted picture of the status of stem cell research in order to give the appearance that the requirements of the Nuremburg Code are being met. This document lists of scientific and threapeutic objectives that are proposed for embryonic stem cells. However, it fails to mention that there are biologically sound alternative means and methods to achieve these objectives. Given the proven ability of adult stem cells to fulfill much of the expectations of stem cell therapies and the recent advances in the technology that allows somatic cells to be deprogrammed to have the functional and physical characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells, there is no justification for use of human embryonic stem cells for human research at this time. The past two decades of research, including studies using established human embryonic stem cell lines, have proven that the non-embryonic alternative methods are more likely to "yield fruitful results for the good of society". In conclusion, the Executive Order itself gives no moral framework or justification for killing human embryos to obtain stem cells. The embryos are being treated as property. Therefore the application of ethical guidelines (45 CFR part 46) that are intended to apply to persons is not only inappropriate but undermines the value and future application of the safeguards of human dignity.

 
45076 05/25/2009 at 07:00:18 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45077 05/25/2009 at 07:00:36 PM Self     I am adamant in my opposition and in funding embryonic stem cell research. So, President Obama submitted a draft for embryonic stem cell research, wow! And, this is just a draft, huh! Why doesn't he draft his impeachment? I am pro-life, and would never accept research on aborted babies! What's next human cloning, another Obama?

President Obama's needs to do some soul searching! Somehow he is determined to send everyone to HELL! May God forgive him.

I feel so upset that he (Obama) thinks he has that kind of authority. Sorry for rattling on, but some of his decisions are really upsetting me.

 
45078 05/25/2009 at 07:01:14 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45079 05/25/2009 at 07:01:52 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45080 05/25/2009 at 07:02:31 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45081 05/25/2009 at 07:03:26 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

Please take this opportunity to stand up to President Obama's order that allows more of your tax dollars to be spent on the destruction of human life.

 
45082 05/25/2009 at 07:04:00 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45083 05/25/2009 at 07:05:26 PM Self     Please do not allow funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization for reproductive purposes. This is a blatant disgregard for a human life. Adult stem cells are much more viable for research purposes and do not take a life in the process. We will be held accountable by God for the destruction of His creation.

 
45084 05/25/2009 at 07:07:04 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45085 05/25/2009 at 07:07:15 PM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life, are capable of doing the job effectively and without producing tumors and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

 
45086 05/25/2009 at 07:07:29 PM Self     All support should go to Adult Stem Cell research that has actually been proven successful unlike embryonic stem cell reasearch. Taxpayers should not have to help any practice that destorys any human life. Embryonic stem cells have been proven to be unsafe. In the words of someone else "The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately. " Why fund embryonic reasearch when not only it is unsucessful but is opposed by many? Why not support adult stem cell research when it has helped people?

 
45087 05/25/2009 at 07:07:33 PM Self     I am totally convinced that stem cell research should be the top priority of our National Health System. I have personally known young people who have benefited enormously by stem cell transplants and maintained a good quality of life for as many as ten years after diagnosis with fatal diseases.

Thanks you for your affirmitive attention to this vital matter.

 
45088 05/25/2009 at 07:08:11 PM Self     I believe that life begins at conception,and that any form of experimenting with an embryo or fetus is the same as killing. I am against my tax money supporting this type of experimentation. It's too close to Hitler's disreguard for and experimentation with human life. Noone should have the right to be so callus with human life.

 
45089 05/25/2009 at 07:08:15 PM Self     I am opposed to your guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. These guidelines would for me, the taxpayer, to pay for research that requires the destruction of innocent human life.

 
45090 05/25/2009 at 07:08:42 PM Self     I am opposed to the use of public funding for purposes that a sizable portion of the citizenship find morally reprehensible. We cannot force Americans to violate their consciences by having America fund embryonic stem cell research. We must not use taxpayer monies to fund experimentation with human embryo stem cells for that reason.

 
45091 05/25/2009 at 07:09:51 PM Self     This is your chance to participate in the democratic process and tell the Obama Administration not to fund stem cell research that destroys human life! While composing your comments please consider making the following points: -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
45092 05/25/2009 at 07:10:15 PM Self     I am against using embryonic stem cells for research since a human life is killed by using them. Embryonic stem cells have not helped cure any disease while adult stem cells are being sucessfully used in treating diseases. I object to having my tax dollars go for embryonic stem cell research.

 
45093 05/25/2009 at 07:10:16 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45094 05/25/2009 at 07:11:37 PM Self     I believe you need to see the evidence of adult stemcells at ***** and leave the rest alone.

 
45095 05/25/2009 at 07:12:31 PM Self     Please do not use any of our tax dollars on Embryonic Stem Cell Research. No know success from Embryonic Stem Cell has been found. Adult cell can be used. There have abeen successful info. from them.

 
45096 05/25/2009 at 07:13:39 PM Self     Raynard Kington, M.D., Ph.D. May 25, 2009 Acting Director, NIH

Dear Dr. Kington, I applaud President Obama’s Executive Order 13505, Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells, to support ethically responsible and scientifically worthy stem cell research. The NIH deserves credit for producing draft Guidelines quickly. I am concerned, however, that in places overly specific guidelines will not serve as recommendations for good, ethical practices, but rather as requirements for specific documentation.

Comments on section II B 7: The draft sets out standards for ethical donation in section II B 7, but the specific language is overly rigid. For example, the draft says “a statement that donor(s) understood alternative options pertaining to use of the embryos” must be “in the written consent form for donation.” Such a mandate conflates the quality of the discussion with the documentation of the discussion. Highly prescriptive requirements for language on the consent forms do not enhance comprehension or the quality of consent. The draft guidelines do not account for more concise documentation and different, possibly better procedures that could be developed if the guidelines expressed operating principles rather than prescriptions. I am also concerned that that the NIH guidelines in current form will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines ethically created over the last eight years. Final guidelines should allow the NIH to fund research utilizing established hESC lines derived in accordance with core principles for ethical responsibility in place before the new NIH guidelines will be issued. This would permit continued funding of research with lines derived prior to 9 pm EDT on August 9, 2001 that have been in use for research using federal funding, and some new lines derived between that date and the present that were derived under core ethical principles such as those expressed in the federal Common Rule and the ISSCR Guidelines for the Conduct of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research:

• The donation procedures had to be under the independent oversight of a body such as an IRB with extensive experience reviewing informed consent in the context of human tissue research • Voluntary, informed consent was obtained from the donor of the embryo • No undue inducement was made to the donors of the embryo for their donation

Continuity of research is critical to advancing stem cell science and fulfilling the promise of regenerative medicine. I support use of conditions for informed consent procedures expressed in section II, part B, but I believe items 1-7 merit review so that the core principles, rather than specific requirements for documentation, are the intent and effect of the guidelines.

Comments on sections IIB and IV B: The Draft Guidelines (in sections IIB and IV B) also preclude funding for hESC research using cells derived from sources other than from embryos created for reproductive purposes, such as cells derived from parthenogenesis, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and IVF embryos created for research purposes. I urge the NIH and other scientific institutions of the federal government to consider amending the guidelines to allow funding for research using human pluripotent stem cells derived from other sources in a context of appropriate ethical oversight and responsible derivation.

Comments on section section II C I: With regard to section II, C, I support the creation and maintenance of a human embryonic cell line registry to guide researchers who wish to use human embryonic stem cell lines that are cleared for use with federal funds. NIH is best suited to maintain this registry. The maintenance of the NIH registry since 2001 demonstrates NIH’s ability to provide clear, timely and unambiguous information on cell lines acceptable for use with federal resources.

I am grateful for this opportunity to comment on the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research.

Sincerely yours,

 
45097 05/25/2009 at 07:14:31 PM Self     Please do not use embryos for stem cell research. There are many other avenues to pursue research on diseases to make it unnecessary to destroy an embryo for this purpose. Fifty million fetuses, and live births have been destroyed in the past 30 years - let's not add to it the horror of killing a potential human being for stem cell research. Thanks!

 
45098 05/25/2009 at 07:14:42 PM Self     Do you really want to open this Pandora's box? Where will this lead to? No one can be sure what sort of human animal will result. Are we willing to destroy tiny humans to experiment for possible, unknowable causes?

 
45099 05/25/2009 at 07:15:02 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45100 05/25/2009 at 07:16:39 PM Self     The current NIH draft guidelines are a dramatic improvement over the restrictive 2001 funding policy for embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, but they could be even better. The draft guidelines will expand hESC research by increasing the range of available cell lines for NIH-funded research. The issue is which lines can be used in NIH research. That, in turn, depends on whether they were derived from embryos that were donated in an acceptable manner. First, the draft guidelines are redundant. The federal “Common Rule” regulations for the protection of tissue donors apply to all federally funded research and have been voluntarily adopted by most institutions for all research under their auspices. These regulations include a comprehensive system of independent oversight by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), and documentation of proper standards and procedures for informed, voluntary consent free of any undue inducements. The draft guidelines set out a parallel set of requirements, but with terminology and procedures that require new interpretations and possibly new forms of oversight and documentation. Many existing hESC lines – whether approved or not by the Bush Administration -- were derived from embryos donated by couples who were fully informed of their options and of the purposes of the research, and whose donations were overseen by an IRB. Despite this, if their consent forms do not have the precise words listed in the draft guidelines, there is a risk these lines will be ruled ineligible for use in NIH-funded research. The same risk attaches to lines developed pursuant to the laws and regulations of various states and foreign countries, even if their requirements are substantially equivalent to those in the U.S. It is my belief that the following points conform to President Obama’s goal of expanding research on human embryonic stem cell research with an ethical process mandated by the Federal government that has demonstrated effectiveness for years.

1. The informed consent process for deriving the lines as described in the guidelines is basically the same that is already used for the donation of human tissue under the Common Rule, which requires voluntary informed consent, an appreciation of alternatives, and information about any risks or benefits. The draft guidelines, however, risk creating confusion because they use slightly different words and procedures. I recommend that any line derived from materials originally donated in accordance with the Common Rule be acceptable for use in NIH-funded research. The same standard should be applied to existing lines and to lines that are derived in the future. Similarly, the same standard should apply to lines derived here and abroad.

2. As a practical matter, the vast majority of lines already in existence were originally derived from embryos donated in accordance with the Common Rule. As is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that this occurred. And again, as is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that lines derived abroad come from materials originally donated in an acceptable manner.

3. The same considerations should apply to embryos already donated but from lines have not yet been derived, that is, the lines that are derived from them in the future should be usable in NIH-funded work provided the original donation was done in accordance with the Common Rule.

4. ESCROs and SCROs will be optional, with some institutions choosing to eliminate them entirely, and others maintaining them as a source of advice.

5. This proposal takes advantage of the fact that IRBs are already required to assure that cell lines and tissues have been obtained in an appropriate manner. This proposal avoids the redundancy and confusion inherent in the draft guidelines' approach.

In sum, the NIH should abandon the effort to create what is, essentially, a new, parallel system of governance for hES cell research alone. Instead, it should insist that hES cell work comply with the same regulatory standards and procedures that apply to donations from human research subjects. Treating embryonic stem cell research rules as a subset of human tissue research rules (including those for non-embryonic sources of stem cells) makes it more likely that they will be understood and properly implemented. And this approach will relieve barriers to responsible hES cell research while better respecting those who donated sensitive biological materials in order to advance this promising field of research.

 
45101 05/25/2009 at 07:16:46 PM Self     The current NIH draft guidelines are a dramatic improvement over the restrictive 2001 funding policy for embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, but they could be even better. The draft guidelines will expand hESC research by increasing the range of available cell lines for NIH-funded research. The issue is which lines can be used in NIH research. That, in turn, depends on whether they were derived from embryos that were donated in an acceptable manner. First, the draft guidelines are redundant. The federal “Common Rule” regulations for the protection of tissue donors apply to all federally funded research and have been voluntarily adopted by most institutions for all research under their auspices. These regulations include a comprehensive system of independent oversight by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), and documentation of proper standards and procedures for informed, voluntary consent free of any undue inducements. The draft guidelines set out a parallel set of requirements, but with terminology and procedures that require new interpretations and possibly new forms of oversight and documentation. Many existing hESC lines – whether approved or not by the Bush Administration -- were derived from embryos donated by couples who were fully informed of their options and of the purposes of the research, and whose donations were overseen by an IRB. Despite this, if their consent forms do not have the precise words listed in the draft guidelines, there is a risk these lines will be ruled ineligible for use in NIH-funded research. The same risk attaches to lines developed pursuant to the laws and regulations of various states and foreign countries, even if their requirements are substantially equivalent to those in the U.S. It is my belief that the following points conform to President Obama’s goal of expanding research on human embryonic stem cell research with an ethical process mandated by the Federal government that has demonstrated effectiveness for years.

1. The informed consent process for deriving the lines as described in the guidelines is basically the same that is already used for the donation of human tissue under the Common Rule, which requires voluntary informed consent, an appreciation of alternatives, and information about any risks or benefits. The draft guidelines, however, risk creating confusion because they use slightly different words and procedures. I recommend that any line derived from materials originally donated in accordance with the Common Rule be acceptable for use in NIH-funded research. The same standard should be applied to existing lines and to lines that are derived in the future. Similarly, the same standard should apply to lines derived here and abroad.

2. As a practical matter, the vast majority of lines already in existence were originally derived from embryos donated in accordance with the Common Rule. As is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that this occurred. And again, as is done for other tissue-research, IRBs can provide the necessary assurance that lines derived abroad come from materials originally donated in an acceptable manner.

3. The same considerations should apply to embryos already donated but from lines have not yet been derived, that is, the lines that are derived from them in the future should be usable in NIH-funded work provided the original donation was done in accordance with the Common Rule.

4. ESCROs and SCROs will be optional, with some institutions choosing to eliminate them entirely, and others maintaining them as a source of advice.

5. This proposal takes advantage of the fact that IRBs are already required to assure that cell lines and tissues have been obtained in an appropriate manner. This proposal avoids the redundancy and confusion inherent in the draft guidelines' approach.

In sum, the NIH should abandon the effort to create what is, essentially, a new, parallel system of governance for hES cell research alone. Instead, it should insist that hES cell work comply with the same regulatory standards and procedures that apply to donations from human research subjects. Treating embryonic stem cell research rules as a subset of human tissue research rules (including those for non-embryonic sources of stem cells) makes it more likely that they will be understood and properly implemented. And this approach will relieve barriers to responsible hES cell research while better respecting those who donated sensitive biological materials in order to advance this promising field of research.

 
45102 05/25/2009 at 07:16:47 PM Self     I am a Catholic who recently underwent IVF. ***** was very responsible and gave us much paperwork to read and sign, including what my husband and I wished to do with any "unused" embryos. We requested to freeze our embryos for a later time. If in the event that we did not use any of them, our next course of action requested was to donate to infertile couples. We feel that fertility was the intent of the embryos--and not to be used for laboratory research (realizing that without research, we would not have been able to have these options presented to us)—-and therefore were the only acceptable options to us. Similarly, we are planning to donate the cord blood of our newborn to the public cord blood bank. We feel this is the area of research that should be explored by the scientific community first, before harvesting embryos for research purposes--especially since there is not undeniable proof that embyonic stem cells corner the market in helping eliminate dreaded genetic and other illnesses. Perhaps in the future we will have a greater understanding of how embryonic stem cells might be far superior to other types of stem cells and we can reconcile the morality issues. But given the information we have currently, I feel it is irresponsible for us as a nation to open up embryonic stem cell research with the use of federal funds at this time until we have exhausted the exploration of the morally more acceptable use of cord blood and adult stem cells. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
45103 05/25/2009 at 07:16:58 PM Self     As a young adult growing up during this time of moral ambiguity, I implore that you think twice before deciding what is best for the taxpaying citizens of this country, especially when we are able to discern our beliefs for ourselves. Stem cell research in and of itself is not wrong, but destroying unborn embryos is sickening, unethical, and appalling, and therefore must be stopped. Let those who choose to donate do so; you will find that voluntary support for such a disgusting project is much less than it seems now. The reasons for the fall of many a great empire or civilization are always a disregard for ethics, the murder of innocents (especially children), and other wrongful practices. In conclusion, I strongly urge you to think twice before committing this nation to a practice that no one with a conscience wants a part of. For the sake of my generation, all unborn children, and the entire nation, DO NOT force the American public to pay for embryonic stem cell research. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 
45104 05/25/2009 at 07:18:47 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45105 05/25/2009 at 07:19:10 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45106 05/25/2009 at 07:20:04 PM Self     I urge you to oppose the use of your taxpayer dollars for failed research requiring the destruction of human embryos. Instead, I urge you to support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45107 05/25/2009 at 07:20:54 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45108 05/25/2009 at 07:21:40 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

Sincerely,

 
45109 05/25/2009 at 07:21:46 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes

 
45110 05/25/2009 at 07:22:05 PM Self     Please do not hold up any form of research that may benefit any progress in finding cures or relief from debilitating and terminal illnesses!Put Yourself in my shoes,I have c.o.p.d. severe emphysema,on oxygen24/7 and feel like I,m drowning.there are so many people with so called "incurable diseases" that are waiting and hopeing! Thank you.

 
45111 05/25/2009 at 07:22:18 PM Self     For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future.

The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines.

Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes.

We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
45112 05/25/2009 at 07:22:49 PM Organization The Burnham institute for Medical Research   Funding for research using human embryonic stem cells that were derived from embryos created by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and using adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells is an essential commitment toward the exciting progression into a modern "regenerative medicine". I agree that this area of research needs strict conditions and procedures for stem cell derivation . I agree that guidelines to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy, and conducted in accordance with applicable law, need to be followed. I also agree that studies of human embryonic stem cells may yield information about the complex events that occur during human development and can be instrumental to treat some of the most serious medical conditions, such as cancer and birth defects, which are due to abnormal cell division and differentiation. Likewise, human embryonic stem cells may also be used to test new drugs and to generate cells and tissues that could be used for cell-based therapies.

I agree on all the points of the guideline established by NIH

 
45113 05/25/2009 at 07:23:36 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
45114 05/25/2009 at 07:23:47 PM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
45115 05/25/2009 at 07:24:08 PM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 



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