Listing of Comments on Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines
Entire Comment Period: 04/23/2009-05/26/2009

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On April 23, 2009, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) published draft stem cell guidelines for public comment in the Federal Register. The purpose of these guidelines are to implement President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13505 “Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells,” which was issued on March 9, 2009.

NIH received 49,015 comments by May 26, 2009, the closing date of the comment period, and have compiled these comments on this website. Any comments received via email or mail after the May 26 deadline are not included on this website. In reviewing the comments, NIH determined that 60 comments were inappropriate (i.e., contained SPAM responses or offensive language), and these comments have been excluded from this website. In addition, to protect the identities and personal information of individuals who submitted comments, NIH has removed personally identifiable information from the comments on this website even though individuals consented that the information provided could be made available for public review and posting.



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44016 05/25/2009 at 12:41:55 AM Self     I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of Heaven and Earth and all that is seen and unseen. We humans have no right to destroy that of which God has created. Stop abortion! Stop using destroyed bodies of the unborn for so called scientific research to find cure for diseases! Killing the unborn is inhumane and un-American! Please STOP.

I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

God blessed this nation in so many ways, we Americans need to love God in return. Protect and honor LIFE.

 
44017 05/25/2009 at 12:42:04 AM Self     I oppose killing human embryos. I believe it is unethical to destroy one human life to benefit another human life. As a taxpayer,I do not wish to be forced to fund embryonic stem cell research which is unethical. At the present time,there has been success in treating people with adult stem cells, and I want federal funds to be focused in this area, rather than theoretical experimentation using embryonic stem cells, which destroy human life.

 
44018 05/25/2009 at 12:42:26 AM Self     To the members of the National Institute of Health,

I do not want my tax money used to promote embryonic stem cell research. I OPPOSE using tax dollars for this and SUPPORT adult stem cell research.

EMBRYONIC stem cell research is unethical AND has 3 problems (tumor formation, immune rejection and stable differentiation). ADULT stem cells do not have these problems. Furthermore, ADULT stem cell have proven successful whereas EMBRYONIC stem cells need a lot more research and money in order to be successfully utilized.

I want to see stem cells help to cure many of the diseases that are taking so many lives. When we can use stem cells that are without so many problems of many kinds, why would we put our money (that we clearly do not have) into research that will cause so many problems?

Are we not too intelligent to be wasting money and time, when both are at a premium. And shouldn't both Democratic and Republican members of government stand up for what is ethical? I OPPOSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL RESEARCH.

Thank you,

 
44019 05/25/2009 at 12:43:52 AM Self     My comments on the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines are as follows: What do you people, our American elected & appointed officials think you are doing with putting your stamp of approval on altering life forms by cloning, by embryo stem cell research that kills a human life and with the rampant legislative approval of abortion. Morally everyone of these issues is a crime against God and the whole universe of life. For all of you (wanna-be Dr. Frankensteins) who in your own minds are so much more intelligent than the majority of the American people & very likely believe in evolution rather than creation, you had better hope you are right! Murder of the innocent, cloning of life forms & embryos destroyed just because it can be done will never be acceptable. You think it's important to save lives from the swine flu. How many millions of lives are willfully ended by our so called compassionate leaders by the horrible condoning of and legislation in favor of abortion & embryonic stem cell research. Hitler sought to create a perfect race. He was a god of sorts in his own distorted demonic mind experimenting with humans beings(cloning) among many more atrocities against God and humanity. Don't think for a moment that we want our tax dollars providing funding for any of these abominations. Daily I pray for your salvation our president and political leaders. So lost in the evil, it will be a miracle for you to see the truth, as it once was for me. One atrocity does not call for another. John 3:16 For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

 
44020 05/25/2009 at 12:46:42 AM Self     Adult stem cell research has proven to be effective in finding cures for many diseases. Please use tax-payer money on research that works, not embryonic stem cell research that destroys fetuses, and does not have the track record for cures.

 
44021 05/25/2009 at 12:47:10 AM Self     I will state this clearly and truthfully. I am an adult American and I have multiple sclerosis and I want to say to you that I am dead set against the notion of experimenting with & using embryonic stem cells to look for cures and/or treatments for my disease (or any disease). There are many other alternatives (that are working even now) e.g. adult stem cells. blood cord stem cells, umbilical cord cells. It is NOT our right! If anyone believes that this is a harmless act & that it will not go to the limit of what it can be just remember this, abortions used to only be performed and allowed in the 1st few weeks of a pregnancy - today they are performed even while the fully developed human child is coming through the birth canal! It's insanity!!! Does this country really believe that we will not have to answer to Almighty God for this?!

 
44022 05/25/2009 at 12:49:30 AM Self     In the Draft National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Notice, insert the following verbiage between the fifth and sixth paragraphs of the section "SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION" :

"Clinical research documented by peer reviewed medical journals with non-embryonic stem cells derived from living adult tissues has shown dramatically more promise than embryonic stem cells and such cells have successfully been used to treat Parksinson's Disease, brain tumors, ovarian cancer, leukemia, breast cancer, non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, heart damage, Multiple Sclerosis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and other diseases. NIH funding priorities should be given to these proven areas of research and treatment."

Draft Guidelines Section II. B. should be revised to insert the word "not" between, "Human embryonic stem cells may," and, "be used in research using NIH funds, if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes"

In the same sentence, insert a period after the word "purposes" in the phrase as it currently reads: "...if the cells were derived from human embryos that were created for reproductive purposes."

 
44023 05/25/2009 at 12:50:28 AM Self     Although it is admirable that the NIH is not allowing human eggs to be fertilized simply to create embryos to use in research, I still have huge scientific and moral problems with the permission of funding towards research using human embryonic stem cells. I do not support my and my fellow US citizens' tax money going towards funding research that is highly controversial, has significant ethical questions and consequences, and has proven to be ineffective in all past scientific explorations. Human embryonic stem cells have shown to induce cancers when inserted into other humans, rather than the regenerative effects that have been so adamantly promised to the public. Adult stem cells, on the other hand, have been actually been used to cure many patients and has much more potential and should receive much more funding from the government. Please consider how unjust it is to use government money to go towards research that thousands of Americans consider immoral and unethical.

Thank you for your time.

 
44024 05/25/2009 at 12:51:51 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44025 05/25/2009 at 12:52:31 AM Self     It is imperative that embryonic stem cell research be approved to facilitate and expedite finding cures for devastating medical conditions such as Type 1 Diabetes. For many Americans with a personal connection to type 1 diabetes, the Administration’s expansion of the federal policy on embryonic stem cell research has renewed our hope for a cure. I am writing today to support the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) draft guidelines and suggest a change to ensure promising, ethically conducted research currently underway will be eligible for federal funding in the future. The Administration’s Executive Order on stem cell research restored scientific decision-making to its rightful place at the NIH. In these guidelines, the NIH has demonstrated its capacity to formulate a research framework that will unleash the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards. I would encourage the NIH, however, to grandfather into this policy stem cell lines that have received federal funding, as well as existing lines that were derived in an ethically-responsible manner according to the best practices at the time. Research on these stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding so that scientists can maximize the scientific advancements already achieved through research on these lines. Research should be vigorously pursued on all promising stem cell sources that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes. While embryonic stem cell research is still in its early stages, this research has already yielded impressive results in our continuing effort to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. Recent research suggests that embryonic stem cells can be differentiated to produce the insulin-producing beta cells that could reverse the course of type 1 diabetes. We do not yet know which stem cell sources may ultimately lead to a cure or be the most clinically useful or practical for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is clear, however, that the more knowledge we gain about embryonic stem cells, the better we can assess the full therapeutic potential of all stem cell sources. These draft guidelines allowing federal funding for embryonic stem cell research using excess embryos from fertility clinics will ensure that this research matures and its potential is more fully realized. I commend the NIH for allowing this important research to expand in a scientifically and ethically appropriate manner.

 
44026 05/25/2009 at 12:53:26 AM Self     As an American and a Christian I believe that from the moment of conception, we are dealing with a human person with intrinsic human dignity and rights. It is abhorrent to me to have my tax dollars used to create and destroy a human being in the name of progress.

There are other legitimate and scientifically viable means to do the same type of research by using stem cells that don’t involve the destruction of human life. This type of morally acceptable research is already going on and it should the only legitimate way of pursuing the promises of this field.

I have cared for several relatives with Alzheimer’s’ for many years and I fully understand the need for research and hope for a cure, but not at the cost of human life, especially since good alternatives are available.

Thank you for considering my views and please choose life.

 
44027 05/25/2009 at 12:54:11 AM Self     The Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines are a step in the right direction but do not go far enough and are inconsistent with the spirit of President Obama's declarations, which reflect the wishes of the majority of the American people. Fewer restrictions on research are needed to save lives. Stem cell research should be aggressively expanded.

 
44028 05/25/2009 at 12:54:47 AM Self     Please save our tax money for something that does not require messing with human life.

-I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44029 05/25/2009 at 12:56:22 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44030 05/25/2009 at 12:56:37 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research purposes.

 
44031 05/25/2009 at 12:57:29 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44032 05/25/2009 at 12:58:23 AM Self     I want to voice my opposition to human fetal stem cell research. Evidence shows unimpressive benefits, especially when weighed against the enormous downside.

 
44033 05/25/2009 at 12:58:27 AM Self     I totally agree with the draft NIH stem cell guidelines. Please ladies and gentlemen, make the right choice. You didn't fight against going to war, the cost was paid with human lives.Noe you have a chance to save many lives in the future. I pray you search your hearts, and don't use this cause for a political football.

sincerely,

 
44034 05/25/2009 at 12:58:54 AM Self     I totally agree with the draft NIH stem cell guidelines. Please ladies and gentlemen, make the right choice. You didn't fight against going to war, the cost was paid with human lives.Noe you have a chance to save many lives in the future. I pray you search your hearts, and don't use this cause for a political football.

sincerely,

 
44035 05/25/2009 at 12:59:07 AM Self     I totally agree with the draft NIH stem cell guidelines. Please ladies and gentlemen, make the right choice. You didn't fight against going to war, the cost was paid with human lives.Noe you have a chance to save many lives in the future. I pray you search your hearts, and don't use this cause for a political football.

sincerely,

 
44036 05/25/2009 at 12:59:17 AM Self     I totally agree with the draft NIH stem cell guidelines. Please ladies and gentlemen, make the right choice. You didn't fight against going to war, the cost was paid with human lives.Noe you have a chance to save many lives in the future. I pray you search your hearts, and don't use this cause for a political football.

sincerely,

 
44037 05/25/2009 at 01:01:23 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44038 05/25/2009 at 01:04:58 AM Self     Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44039 05/25/2009 at 01:07:29 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44040 05/25/2009 at 01:09:17 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44041 05/25/2009 at 01:11:14 AM Self     There have been NO substantial benefits in the area of embryonic stem cell research. I OPPOSE stem cell research of embryos particularly with my taxpaying money. What has been substantially beneficial includes adult stem cell research, umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, etc. I SUPPORT resources such as the adult stem cell research which has a proven track record of being the most effective method of successful results.

 
44042 05/25/2009 at 01:12:26 AM Self     Dear NIH,

I think as citizens of the United States need to come together bringing our knowledge and love for one another to find a cure for diseases and disorders using stem cells. We are wasting both time and lives by waiting for the government to make these decisions for us. As a country we need to work together to find the answers we are looking for regarding stem cells.

Our country has eager, talented, willing scientists waiting for the okay to move ahead and continue on with their findings from eleven years ago. We have the technology and equipment to get the job done now. As a country, we need to realize we aren't killing babies. They are four or five day old embryos that are no larger than a period. At this point they are 50-150 cells that are unspecialized. Eventually yes these cells have that possibility of making up a person, but at this stage these cells aren't.

If people consider these embryos as 'living fetuses' and they die for our research as we strive for a better understanding, I don't get what the problem is with that? If I was that embryo and I 'died' for science I would be okay with that if I was going to give my life for others.

Sincerely,

 
44043 05/25/2009 at 01:20:40 AM Self     I have read and heard all about the stem cell debate. It has come to my conclusion that the most success has been in using adult stem cells. I am always for saving the life of another, but not at the expense of someone else losing their life. I know many people believe that life only begins outside the womb. If that was the case, why does the Dr. always listen to the baby's heartbeat when you are pregnant? What is he checking for, unless it's to see if the baby is alive! Please search your heart and pray to the God of our father Abraham. Do you think he would want you to kill your own children or the children of someone else, in order to save another's life? God gives life and He takes it away. If we try to play God, we will receive His wrath. God isn't mocked. Please don't let this pass. Your children's safety and future could depend on it.

 
44044 05/25/2009 at 01:22:58 AM Self     I do not believe in stem cell research, of abortion for the study of it or growing them in a tube to be killed for research or anything else. That is murder any way you look at it. I believe our President is leading us down the path of human destruction and enjoying the power of doing so. PLEASE don't let him get away with this.

 
44045 05/25/2009 at 01:23:55 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44046 05/25/2009 at 01:24:35 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44047 05/25/2009 at 01:27:27 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44048 05/25/2009 at 01:31:13 AM Self     I can only comment on my opinion of the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines. As a Registered Nurse, I believe the scientific community should explore all options in order to ease human suffering. The stem cells already exist so I feel they should be used for benefit instead of sitting in a freezer within a fertility clinic. I do not believe that new embryos should be created for such research. On this issue the line between moral and immoral is very fussy. There are many critics out there on this issue. To them I say, walk into a hospital, especially the ER on any given day. You will find the same issues there; we are trained to treat people for medical illnesses without judgment towards others. For example, one morning I was treating a very well mannered, tax paying, law abiding person, who was very sick. Then I received a call that a prisoner from the local federal prison needed me and that I was to stop what I was doing to attend to them. I was leaving the other patient to wait several hours before receiving treatment from another nurse. The prisoner was violent, hitting, kicking, spitting at, and cursing everyone in the room. I treated this patient with the same respect and compassion despite the fact that they did not give the same in return. In fact, I was left with multiple bruises and cuts as a reminder of this experience. I leave these types of situations asking, where is the line between what is moral or immoral in this situation? Did we do the right thing? Everyone has a different point of view on the matter. Just as with the stem cell research, where is the moral line? Who is to say that one life is more important than another? We have a responsibility to help those medically in need but is science over stepping its boundaries? My point of view as a patient with Multiple Sclerosis and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardic syndrome, two neurological diseases, I agree with the draft. The guidelines are going to push forward research in a responsible manner. It fills me with a renewed hope that some day there will be a cure for me and 500,000 other MS patients in the US. Since the beginning of time this debate has been going on, between medicine, science and religious organizations. What excites me the most is that people respect human life enough to debate the issue. It makes me proud of our country that as a whole we have respect for human life. In recent years, we have learned that in some places in the world, respect has been a retired virtue.

 
44049 05/25/2009 at 01:34:08 AM Self     we disagree with the killing of innocent children for stem cell research

 
44050 05/25/2009 at 01:34:26 AM Self     I read the whole document. It sounds like a lot of thought has been given to making the whole procedure ethical.

HOWEVER, the troubling part lies in section II.B.7.d. in the words "...what would happen to the embryo..." (a scenario not spelled out in this document, but understood to result in the cessation of viability).

Humans reproduce humans. So, whatever "happens" to that embryo is happening to a human being. THAT is what makes human embryonic stem cell research unethical. Humans are more than the sum of their cells--they are living beings. They should not be destroyed for the utilization of their cells.

Furthermore, after years of embryonic stem cell research, ZERO great breakthroughs have been achieved, whereas, with adult stem cells, around 70 cures or alleviations of maladies have emerged.

 
44051 05/25/2009 at 01:36:16 AM Self     Public funding on embrionic Stem Cell research is offensive to too many Americans. It also diverts funds from the very successful and helpful work being done with non fetal stem cells. Please DO NOT fund embrionic stem cell research with tax dollars.

 
44052 05/25/2009 at 01:45:18 AM Self     I dont agree that we should use cells from unborn, possibly aborted embryos! It will give license to have abortions in the name of stem cell research, When will we stop playing GOD!

 
44053 05/25/2009 at 01:45:28 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44054 05/25/2009 at 01:51:22 AM Self    

Please do not support embryonic stem cells as a true scientist would look at the research and tumors it yeilds when compared to the adult and cord blood cells that have shown promise and healing. It is a waste of taxpayor money to throw money in a direction that is not supported by science when others are very promising !!!

Is this agency scientific or only out to prove another agenda? Your agency name and reputation is on the line. There are more people watching than you think. Then maybe you are being run by another agenda of a national interest agenda? Let the literature and research speak!

 
44055 05/25/2009 at 01:56:11 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44056 05/25/2009 at 01:56:43 AM Self     As a taxpayer, I STRONGLY oppose to embryonic stem cell experiments and the destruction of human embryos (life). Instead, the solution should be found in Adult stem cells where there are successful treatments and cures.

 
44057 05/25/2009 at 02:01:39 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44058 05/25/2009 at 02:07:55 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44059 05/25/2009 at 02:09:05 AM Self     I fully support use of human stem cells in ethically responsible, scientifically worthy research to cure or treat disease. Reducing human suffering is among the highest of values.

 
44060 05/25/2009 at 02:16:15 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44061 05/25/2009 at 02:17:17 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44062 05/25/2009 at 02:26:29 AM Self     There has been so much progress with cord blood and adult stem cell research, that it makes no sense to experiment with embryonic stem cells which causes the destruction of a unique human life. I am against this type of research even if it held much promise for cures because it is immoral and unethical to destroy a human life for the purpose of helping another life. A just society must protect from harm and destruction the most vulnerable of all human life, the developing, tiny, but fully human new life.

 
44063 05/25/2009 at 02:32:50 AM Self     Please oppose any use of my tax dollars to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead please support adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44064 05/25/2009 at 02:32:51 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44065 05/25/2009 at 02:49:04 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44066 05/25/2009 at 02:53:27 AM Self     I oppose the use of federal funds (i.e. taxpayers’ money) for the research on human embryonic stem cells. Such research raises serious ethical concerns since it essentially means the murder of human life to obtain these cells, whereas adult & cord blood stem cells do not. It has been repeatedly shown that adult and cord stem cells are being used very effectively in various diseases or injuries, whereas embryonic stem cells have yet to show any positive results in humans.Indeed these cells may pose more of a threat to the patient since such cells multiply rapidly and may lead to cancerous-type growth. Funding for embryonic stem cell research will also divert federal funds away from the viable options of adult and cord blood stem cell research.

 
44067 05/25/2009 at 02:54:09 AM Self     Please STOP using embryos for scientific experiments--THIS IS NOT NECESSARY! Science has proven that adult stem cells are more effective in curing diseases. We MUST protect unborn life. ANY life in the womb is a creation of God and is SACRED.

 
44068 05/25/2009 at 02:55:16 AM Self     I am not a scientist. But every scientist I have heard speak about embryonic stem cell research says that it (ESC) is not only unproductive, it is dangerous! It is known to cause the formation of uncontrollable tumors - among other problems. Don't we have enough problems with tumors already? On the other hand it is well known that adult stem cells, which are taken from living adults and are non-controversial, have been highly effective in treating patients - notably in the area of degenerative diseases. http://www.xcell-center.com/?gclid=COjjhb3u1poCFQJ2xgodywKFFw (I found this website through Merriam-Webster online). Because embryonic stem cell research involves the harvest of stem cells from murdered innocents, because ESC research is unproductive, because adult stem cell research has been very effective, and because all human embryos - even those created "in vitro" are humans made in the image of God, and because killing these humans cheapens human life, I ask that any additional funds to stem cell research be used to continue adult stem cell research. Please do not continue to degrade humanity by using dead babies for scientific experimentation.

Sincerely,

 
44069 05/25/2009 at 03:10:28 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
44070 05/25/2009 at 03:13:17 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions. After losing my own father to this terrible disease in 2005 I can't help but think if he would still be alive today if stem cell research had been allowed when originally presented to congress.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research.

I commend NIH for taking this important action to support research that provides the potential for new treatments, and ultimately a cure, for diabetes.

 
44072 05/25/2009 at 03:17:14 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44073 05/25/2009 at 03:20:14 AM Self     I urge the NIH to rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. No tax dollars should be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead, I strongly support the direction of public funding toward adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, does harm to no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of illnesses.

The title of the executive order, which has prompted the guidelines, is itself problematic -- while the title refers broadly to "Human Stem Cells", it is quite clear that the subject of the order is nearly entirely human embryonic stem cells. It is a matter of vigorous debate whether there can possibly be "Responsible Scientific Research Involving" human embryonic stem cells. The title betrays an attempt to short circuit the debate, and obfuscate the real subject of the order. The NIH should recognize that the order does not display a neutral position on human embryonic stem cell research, and does not accurately reflect the will of the American populace. Short term gains in research funding may eventually lead to public backlash against the Institutes.

A particularly disturbing aspect of the Draft NIH Human Stem Cell Guidelines is that there is in practice no way of verifying any of the requirements set forth. Documents implying informed consent are of little value in this matter. Conflicts of interest cannot be identified in this way, and the language of the Guidelines is far too broad to encourage responsibility. For example, in section II.6, any attending physician who is also the researcher could simply claim that the division of roles was not "practicable."

The NIH is of course at the forefront of research involving human stem cells. The spectacular and widely reported results of adult stem cell research have contributed to the consternation of many well-informed and scientifically literate citizens -- there appears to be no defensible justification for human embryonic stem cell research, particularly while the moral and ethical debates are far from settled.

Medical experimentation has been used as a pretext for acts of atrocity too often in history. It is well known that vivisection has been justified at various times because the victims were prisoners, disabled, mentally ill, Jewish, Black, or otherwise deemed less than human. It is a great poverty of justice that our country now includes on that list, humans at their earliest and most vulnerable stage. NIH researchers may or may not agree with that characterization, but it is a common and deeply felt conviction of a large fraction of Americans. Accepting public funds for human embryonic stem cell research has the potential to create a public relations disaster for the NIH. That would truly be unfortunate, as I believe the country's support of the NIH should be greatly strengthened.

 
44074 05/25/2009 at 03:32:06 AM Self     I oppose taxpayer funded embryonic stem cell experiments and in favor of adult stem cell research.

 
44075 05/25/2009 at 03:44:49 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44076 05/25/2009 at 03:48:23 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for > embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer > to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent > human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research > and treatments that harm no one and are already producing > good results. In no case should government support be > extended to human cloning or the human embryos for research > purposes. >

 
44077 05/25/2009 at 03:53:58 AM Self     Hello, I am strongly opposed to the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole should be closed immediately. Thank you,

 
44078 05/25/2009 at 04:15:48 AM Self     I am in opposition of my tax dollars subsidizing stem cell research with human embryos; it's a human life, for God's sake! Please use stem cell search that harms no human life only!

 
44079 05/25/2009 at 04:18:47 AM Self     I support any and all stem cell research. Science advances best when unfettered but unnecessary regulation. It's fine for others to have their religious views but they should not be allowed to foist those views on others.

 
44080 05/25/2009 at 04:24:02 AM Self     I support the position of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to improve the new federal stem cell research funding guidelines.

 
44081 05/25/2009 at 05:09:13 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44082 05/25/2009 at 05:29:36 AM Self     I am against using tax funding to pay for the killing of human embryos. Life begins at conception and any research done to destroy life is wrong. Please consider the ethical implications of this. I would love to discuss if anyone is interested

 
44083 05/25/2009 at 06:00:49 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44084 05/25/2009 at 06:08:11 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. -Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life. -The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44085 05/25/2009 at 06:09:19 AM Self     In light of the advancement of Human Stem Cell research up to this point in time the use of embryonic stem cells in the research can now be considered archaic (In addition to it being unethical.)

 
44086 05/25/2009 at 06:17:51 AM Self     Stem cell research holds much promise in the search for a cure and better treatments for the nearly 24 million American adults and children with diabetes, as well as those with many other serious medical conditions.

This research will allow scientists an opportunity to better explore how to control and direct stem cells so they can grow insulin-producing beta cells found in the pancreas. Creating new beta cells could mean a cure for type 1 diabetes and could provide a powerful tool for controlling type 2 diabetes.

I strongly support the draft guidelines on embryonic stem cell research. They demonstrate the ability of NIH to create a research framework that will allow for the potential of embryonic stem cell research while maintaining the highest safety and ethical standards.

As this process moves forward, however, I hope that NIH will consider adapting the guidelines to ensure they include funding not only new stem cell lines, but current stem cell lines that have been developed using prevailing ethical practices. Research on these current stem cell lines should be eligible for federal funding as part of the final rule.

Given the enormous promise of stem cells for diseases such as diabetes, it is important to allow federal funding for all forms of stem cell research, including research on embryonic stem cells, and that NIH continue to adapt as our scientists learn more about the promise of stem cell research

 
44087 05/25/2009 at 06:27:46 AM Self     Do not fund embryonic stem cell research.

The only successful treatments and cures come from adult stem cells, taken from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, fat tissue, and other body tissues. Thousands of patients have had their health improved and their lives saved with adult stem cells. Dozens of diseases and injuries including cancer, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease have already been treated using adult stem cells, and more treatments are being developed.

 
44088 05/25/2009 at 06:30:39 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44089 05/25/2009 at 06:44:35 AM Self     -I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

-Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

-The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44090 05/25/2009 at 06:45:00 AM Self     Not only to I believe it is murder to experiment on human embryos and destroy them for their stem cells, I have yet to find evidence that it shows any promise for medical cures. However, there has been great success using adult stem cells, which does not take innocent life. To take funding away from adult stem cell research and put it toward research that is inneffective and crosses moral boundaries is stupid and wasteful and just plain wrong. I urge this agency to adopt guidelines that protect precious human life and focus on adult stem cell research. Thank you.

 
44091 05/25/2009 at 06:47:21 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I am a member of the Parkinson’s community and have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44092 05/25/2009 at 06:49:00 AM Self     I strongly feel that research that has been done up to this time should not be stopped just because it does not conform to President Obama's new guidelines after restrictions were lifted. The projects already underway were started under great scientific standards of their day and to have to start over, essetially, is a great waste of time and money. Since researchers put alot of themselves into their work, this frustration might even cause some people to stop working on this altogether.

As a mother, daughter and sister of a first degree relative with an autoimmune condition that seems likely to be helped through stem cells in the future; adding a new delay to 'improve' research is clearly not the way to go.

Please amend the rules to include research that was started under the Bush administrations' guidelines and open NEW research to today's more inclusive rules.

Let's not throw out the baby with the bathwater!

 
44093 05/25/2009 at 06:51:06 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44094 05/25/2009 at 06:52:45 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44095 05/25/2009 at 06:54:08 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. I have a brother-in-law who has been successfully treated for cancers using adult stem cells. There are many, many such cases. However, despite all the supposed well-meaning people claiming embryonic stem cells "will lead to cures for all kinds of probelsm", NONE have actually happened--ZERO!!! Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes. Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, already proven effective in treating many patients. Federal funding of controversial research that destroys human life is not justifiable, especially when we have other options that do not destroy human life. Also, it is my undestanding that the proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to creating clones and human-animal hybrids. This is unacceptable.

 
44096 05/25/2009 at 06:54:12 AM Self     Stem cell research seems to have the potential to lead to the biggest advancements in disease treatment, and should be pursued.

It seems such a waste that unwanted embryos left over from fertility treatments be thrown out instead of used in the advancement of scientific knowledge. Why is it so infrequently pointed out that, logically, if one is against stem cell research, one should also be against IVF because it inevitably leads to the destruction of excess embryos.

My concern is for the people who are already here suffering from devastating illnesses, not for the group of cells in a petri dish that has the potential to become a human being.

 
44097 05/25/2009 at 07:04:41 AM Self     The People?s taxpayer dollars should not be used to fund programs using and destroying Human embryionic stem cells for scientific research. Creation is not ?for sale.? We should not be going down this path and there are so many other PROVEN worthy causes for taxpayer dollars such as adult stem cell research.

Let?s stick with ?Good? causes for taxpayer dollars and abandon controversial exploits of the marginal few.

May God Bless you and your work.

 
44098 05/25/2009 at 07:16:21 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44099 05/25/2009 at 07:18:33 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44100 05/25/2009 at 07:28:13 AM Self     I am opposed to your draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Support should be directed to stem cell research and treatments that do not destroy human life and are already proven successful. There is no case under which government support should be extended to human cloning or the creation of human embryos for research purposes.

Embryo-destructive stem cell research has shown to be ineffective and even dangerous, forming uncontrollable tumors and causing rejection problems. Adult stem cells are non-controversial, ethical, and most importantly, effective in treating patients. We should not fund controversial research that destroys human life when we have other options that do not destroy human life.

The proposed regulations do not prevent future funding for embryonic stem cell research that could lead to the creation of clones and human-animal hybrids. This loophole must be closed immediately.

 
44101 05/25/2009 at 07:30:47 AM Self     I believe that federal dollars should not be used for medical research.

Private monies from many sources have proven to adequate in the past.

Let us please resist government intervention into medical research.

 
44102 05/25/2009 at 07:35:32 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44103 05/25/2009 at 07:36:23 AM Self     THE RESEARCH I HAVE READ TELLS OF SUCCESS USING ADULT STEM CELLS. IF USING EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS HAS BEEN SUCCESSFUL, WHERE ARE THE RESULTS PUBLISHED? PLEASE DO NOT APPROVE FUNDS FOR UNPROVEN WORK.

 
44104 05/25/2009 at 07:43:19 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44105 05/25/2009 at 07:47:51 AM Self     Please rethink this action. Adult stem cell research has proven much more reliable and viable than using embryonic stem cells. My real concern is that we are funding the wrong research.

 
44106 05/25/2009 at 07:49:18 AM Self     Adult Stem Cell are a success and are healing people.

Embryonic stem cells have zero success and are taking money away from Adult Stem Cell Progress.

Please stop the experimentation of embryonic stem cell.

 
44107 05/25/2009 at 07:51:07 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans facing the challenges of living with many diseases and disorders. I have been following progress in this field with great interest and understand the importance that it holds for people living with chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis. I am encouraged to see the field of human embryonic stem cell research expanded through the issuance of these guidelines and the change in federal policy around funding for this important scientific field. Much progress has been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress. I am pleased that these draft guidelines — in Section II B — would appear to permit federal funding of studies using stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and using new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made. I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos. Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses. Thank you.

 
44108 05/25/2009 at 07:56:06 AM Self     Human Embryo research means a human in the earliest stages is killed, destroyed, in order to do research. We already have marvelous results in adult stem cell research and therefore there is no need to destroy an embryo. Why would we fund something that we would have to kill in order to see results? Such a study is highly immoral and unethical. Have we forgotten of a time in history when we said "never again" after WWII? God says "Thou shalt not kill".

 
44109 05/25/2009 at 07:56:55 AM Self     Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for millions of Americans suffering from many diseases and disorders. I am not a scientist, but I have been following progress in this field with great interest. Significant strides have been made over the past decade, and the final guidelines issued by NIH must build on this progress so that cures and new therapies can get to patients as quickly as possible. The final guidelines should not create new bureaucratic hurdles that will slow the pace of progress.

I am pleased that these draft guidelines -- in Section II B -- would appear to permit federal funding of stem cell lines previously not eligible for federal funding and for new lines created in the future from surplus embryos at fertility clinics. However, as drafted, Section II B does not ensure that any current stem cell line will meet the criteria outlined and thus be eligible for federal funding. It will be important for the final guidelines to allow federal funds for research using all stem cell lines created by following ethical practices at the time they were derived. This will ensure that the final guidelines build on progress that has already been made.

I also believe that the final guidelines should permit federal funding for stem cell lines derived from sources other than excess IVF embryos, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Sections II B and IV of the draft guidelines do not permit such federal funding and I recommend that the final guidelines provide federal funding using stem cell lines derived in other ways. If not, it is essential that the NIH continue to monitor developments in this exciting research area and to update these guidelines as the research progresses.

 
44110 05/25/2009 at 07:59:56 AM Self     It is amazing to me that President Obama can comment that Americans do not support killing any group of people and still support embryonic stem cell research. That is a contradiction in terms. Embryos are living beings! Research is making much greater strides with umbilical cord blood, but we don't hear much about that for some reason. Doctors, including researchers, should remember the Hippocratic oath they took and refuse to participate in embryo stem cell research.

 
44111 05/25/2009 at 08:01:24 AM Self     I oppose the draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research. The taxpayers should not be forced to pay for the destruction of innocent human life. Everyone knows the success of adult stem cell research - why not put the moey there where people are really being helped? Note the wonderful progress on Type 1 diabetes along with several others medical marvels.

 
44112 05/25/2009 at 08:02:28 AM Self     I am very much in favor of stem cell research. My sister in law has ALS and if this type of research has a possibility of finding a cure or lowering the suffering she has to endure than we as human being should favor it.

 
44113 05/25/2009 at 08:03:02 AM Self     The draft is oxymoronic in its intent. The document itself states

"The purpose of these draft Guidelines is to implement Executive Order 13505, issued on March 9, 2009, as it pertains to extramural NIH-funded research, to establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in this area, and to help ensure that NIH-funded research in this area is ethically responsible, scientifically worthy..."

However, destroying human life cannot be "ethically responsible" by definition. Embryonic stem cell (ESC) research has not generated a single cure after lengthy research while over 70 proven adult stem cell (ASC) treatments offer great promise without ethical dilemmas.

Saying one thing and doing another is fast becoming a hallmark of the legislation supported by the current administration. However, NIH is non-partisan body and I urge it to eliminate ESC funding in all forms in order that resources can focus on proven technologies such as ASC research.

May science and morality prevail.

 
44114 05/25/2009 at 08:04:56 AM Self     The National Institutes of Health should rescind its guidelines proposing to use federal funds for stem cell research that requires destroying live human embryos. It is especially troubling that some supporters of this research are urging the NIH to endorse an even broader policy, encouraging the deliberate use of in vitro fertilization or cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell research. Such creation of new life solely to destroy it would mark the final reduction of human beings to mere objects or commodities.

My tax dollars should not be used to promote destructive embryonic stem cell research or any form of human cloning. Instead support should be directed to adult stem cell research, which is ethically sound, harms no one, and is already helping suffering patients with dozens of conditions.

 
44115 05/25/2009 at 08:05:16 AM Self     I am opposed to the NIH draft guidelines for embryonic stem cell research, which force me as a taxpayer to subsidize research requiring the destruction of innocent human life. Funding should instead be directed to stem cell research and treatments that harm no one and are already producing good results. In no case should government support be extended to the destruction of human embryos for research purposes.

 



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