TECHNOLOGIES FOR GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

Release Date:  December 11, 1998

RFA: NS-99-003

P.T.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institute of Mental Health
National Center for Research Resources
National Eye Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute on Aging
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  February 15, 1999
Application Receipt Date:  March 18, 1999

PURPOSE

The purpose of this Request for Applications (RFA) is to solicit applications for
research grants to develop new technologies or refine established technologies
for gene discovery and gene expression analysis in the nervous system.  The
nervous system poses unique challenges to gene expression analysis because of its
extreme cellular heterogeneity and complex distributions of messenger RNAs within
individual cells.  In addition, the nervous system is unusual in the degree to
which it uses alternative splicing and RNA editing as mechanisms for regulating
the spatial and temporal specificity of gene function.  The development of
methods suited to the anatomical and molecular complexities of the nervous system
is therefore critical for quantifying gene expression in this system, and for
understanding how changes in gene expression may correlate with different
developmental, pathological, or functional states.  Methods of interest would
include, but are not limited to:  1) isolation of mRNA from single cells or small
cell populations, 2) creation of high quality cDNA libraries from small amounts
of tissue, 3) high throughput methods for quantifying the expression of large
numbers of genes, 4) methods for quantifying multiple spliced or edited variants
of a given transcript, 5) methods for comparing protein levels to corresponding
mRNA levels for a given transcript within a cell or tissue sample, and 6)
techniques for visualizing RNA distribution within cells and tissues.  The
development of these methods is expected to improve our understanding of nervous
system function in normal and disease conditions, and will aid in the diagnosis
and treatment of neurological disorders.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS-led national
activity for setting priority areas. This RFA, Technologies for Gene Expression
Analysis in the Nervous System, is related to several of the priority areas,
including mental health and mental disorders, alcohol and other drugs/ substance
abuse, heart disease and stroke, cancer, and maternal and infant health. 
Potential applicants may obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2000" at
http://www.crisny.org/health/us/health7.html.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applications may be submitted by domestic and foreign, for-profit and non-profit
organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals,
laboratories, units of State and local governments, and eligible agencies of the
Federal government. Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with
disabilities are encouraged to apply as Principal Investigators (PIs).

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

This RFA will use the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research project grant
(R01) and pilot project/feasibility study (R21) award mechanisms. Responsibility
for the planning, direction, and execution of the proposed project will be solely
that of the applicant. The total project period for an application submitted in
response to this RFA may not exceed 3 years. This RFA is a one-time solicitation.
Future unsolicited competing continuation applications will compete with all
investigator-initiated applications and be reviewed according to the customary
peer review procedures.  The anticipated award date is September 30, 1999.

FUNDS AVAILABLE

The participating institutes and centers (ICs) intend to commit approximately $5
million in FY 1999 to fund new grants in response to this RFA.  Budgets for R21
applications may not exceed $100,000 per year in direct costs.  The direct cost
per year for R01 applications may not exceed $500,000 without prior discussion
with the relevant program officer.  Because the nature and scope of the research
proposed may vary, it is anticipated that the size of each award will also vary. 
Although the financial plans of the ICs provide support for this program, awards
pursuant to this RFA are contingent upon the availability of funds and the
receipt of a sufficient number of applications of outstanding scientific and
technical merit.  At this time, it is not known if competing renewal applications
will be accepted and/or if this RFA will be reissued.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background

The nervous system offers unparalleled opportunity for studying how genes drive
cellular form and function.  First, the nervous system is unique among organ
systems in the complexity of cell types it contains.  Although most of the cells
of the nervous system can be grouped into two categories (neurons and glial
cells), these cells exhibit an astonishing variety of shapes and sizes. 
Moreover, groups of cells that appear morphologically similar can have very
different biochemical phenotypes and functional properties.  It is clear from
studies in many organ systems that the structures and functions of individual
cells are largely determined by the genes they express;  however, the precise
mechanisms through which gene expression regulates form and function are still
unclear in most cases.  Because of the diversity of cell types it contains, the
nervous system offers a particularly rich system in which to study this problem.

The nervous system is also unrivaled in the sophistication of the functions it
performs, which include sensory processing and integration, cognition, learning
and memory, reasoning, emotional expression, and coordination of autonomic and
motor functions.  Like cellular form, these higher-order functions are critically
dependent on gene expression.  All, for example, require that the brain be
properly wired during development.  This process in turn is controlled by
specific batteries of genes, which must be activated at precise times and places
to generate correct numbers of neurons with functionally appropriate connections. 
Even after the basic wiring pattern of the brain has been established, its
continued maintenance and function in adulthood and aging requires new gene
expression.  For example, the storage of memory requires the sequential
activation of several sets of genes, which in turn direct long-term changes in
the expression of other genes.  Understanding how the activation of sets of genes
controls developmental processes, neural plasticity, and intercellular
communication will stretch the boundaries of informatics and computational
biology.  Thus, improved technologies for analyzing gene expression in the
nervous system will have a major impact on other fields as well.

A final and extremely important reason for studying gene expression in the brain
is the insight it may bring to neurological and mental disease.  Many diseases
of the nervous system (including mental illnesses, dementias, and addictive
disorders) are now known to result from the mutations in either one gene or
several genes in combination.  As mutations in genes continue to be identified,
gene expression profiling in the context of time, place, and physiological state
will be critical in defining the functional consequences of those genetic
mutations.  In addition, the ability to determine the genetic profile of a cell
at various stages of disease progression will help reveal the molecular basis for
the differential vulnerability of brain cells and regions to dysfunction,
degeneration, and death.  These findings in turn will be key to disease
prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.

The time is particularly ripe now for understanding gene expression in the
nervous system because of two sets of technological developments.  The first is
the improvement in techniques and resources (e.g., genetic and physical maps) for
cloning and sequencing genes, which in turn has led to an explosion in the
identification of new genes and genetic mutations.  The second is the recent
development of techniques for monitoring the expression of many genes
simultaneously, so that one can quantitatively compare levels of expression in
cells under different physiological conditions.  These techniques will allow
powerful correlations to be made between the expression of particular groups of
genes and the functional (or dysfunctional) state of a cell.  Moreover, this
technology will permit more effective diagnosis and treatment of diseases, such
as stroke and schizophrenia, that have a complex genetic basis.

The aim of the current RFA is to encourage the refinement of these new
technologies for use in studies of the nervous system, and the development of
additional novel technologies.  This RFA is issued as one element of the Brain
Molecular Anatomy Project (BMAP), a multi-institute, interdisciplinary initiative
launched by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1998.  BMAP has two
components:  (1) gene discovery, and (2) gene expression analysis.  The gene
discovery component will use an expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing approach
to catalogue the full repertoire of genes that are expressed in the nervous
system under both normal and abnormal conditions.  The expression analysis
component will use high throughput methods to compare the levels at which genes
are expressed in the nervous system as a function of cell type, anatomical
location, developmental stage, and physiological state.  It is expected that both
these components of BMAP will be stimulated by the novel technologies solicited
in this RFA.

Objectives and Scope

Although many innovative methods have recently been developed for the analysis
of gene expression, the nervous system offers special challenges because of its
cellular heterogeneity and because of the complex distribution of mRNAs within
individual cells.  Additional difficulties are encountered when trying to analyze
gene expression in the developing nervous system, where small amounts of tissue
are available and cellular populations are spatially dynamic. Therefore, the NIH
seeks the development of new tools and the refinement of existing techniques for
examining gene expression in the nervous system.  It is hoped that these
techniques will be developed to a level where they can be used routinely and
inexpensively by many different laboratories.  Applications are solicited for
technology development in the following areas:

* Methods for microdissecting or otherwise removing defined cell populations or
single cells from the nervous system for the purpose of preparing high quality
RNA.

* Techniques for extraction of RNA from small amounts of tissue (including small
brain regions, embryonic tissue, single cells, or subcellular compartments) for
the preparation of high quality cDNA libraries.

* Strategies for preparing representational libraries or libraries that are
optimized to detect rare or unique sequences (eg., subtractive and differential
display-based libraries).

* Methods for obtaining amino acid sequences from small amounts of protein for
the purpose of identifying novel genes.

* High throughput methods for quantifying the expression of large numbers of gene
products (RNA and/or proteins) simultaneously in a single tissue or cell sample. 
Such methods could include (but are not limited to) expression array, RNA
amplification, RT-PCR, and SAGE technologies for RNA expression, and mass
spectrophotometric technologies for protein expression.

* Methods for detecting and quantifying multiple spliced or edited variants of
a given gene transcript within a single cell or tissue sample.

* Methods for comparing mRNA and protein levels for a given transcript within a
single cell or tissue sample.

* New techniques for visualizing RNA distribution within tissue and cell samples,
such as high throughput, multiprobe in situ hybridization, and high sensitivity
methods for visualizing the subcellular distribution of RNAs.  Also of interest
would be methods for real-time imaging of gene expression in vivo and in vitro.

As a secondary goal, this initiative is intended to encourage the development of
integrated analytical systems, including sample analysis systems and informatics
systems for data collection and analysis, where these are appropriate as
components of proposals aimed at the areas listed above.

BMAP will focus initially on the mouse, obtaining normative data about gene
expression in adult and developing animals.  (In view of the importance of
studying disease processes in humans, BMAP will also include human studies as
materials, resources, and opportunities arise.)  However, it is also recognized
that other species may offer unique advantages for developing methods to study
gene expression.  Thus, studies using species other than mouse will be considered
responsive to this RFA provided that a rationale is given for using the alternate
species.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

During the course of the grant period, it is anticipated that technologies will
improve and the rate of progress and focus of work supported by the grant(s) may
change.  During the course of the award period, the PIs may be invited to meet
with NIH program staff in Bethesda, MD, to review scientific progress.  Other
scientists external to and knowledgeable about these studies may also be invited
to participate.  Budget requests should include travel funds for the PI to meet
annually in the Washington, D.C. area, should such meetings be advisable.

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and their
subpopulations must be included in all NIH supported biomedical and behavioral
research projects involving human subjects, unless a clear and compelling
rationale and justification is provided that inclusion is inappropriate with
respect to the health of the subjects or the purpose of the research. This policy
results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (Section 492B of Public Law
103-43

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Guidelines for Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical
Research", which was published in the Federal Register of March 28, 1994 (FR 59
14508-14513) and in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 23, No. 11,
March 18, 1994, available on the web at:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not94-105.html.

INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of NIH that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 21)
must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported by the
NIH, unless there are scientific and ethical reasons not to include them. This
policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications submitted for receipt dates
after October 1, 1998.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Policy and Guidelines on the Inclusion of Children as Participants in
Research Involving Human Subjects" that was published in the NIH Guide for Grants
and Contracts, March 6, 1998, and is available at the following URL address:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not98-024.html

Investigators also may obtain copies of these policies from the program staff
listed under INQUIRIES. Program staff may also provide additional relevant
information concerning these policies.

LETTER OF INTENT

Prospective applicants are asked to submit, by February 15, 1999, a letter of
intent that includes a descriptive title of the proposed research, the name,
address, and telephone number of the PI, the identities of other key personnel
and participating institutions, and the number and title of the RFA in response
to which the application may be submitted. Although a letter of intent is not
required, is not binding, and does not enter into the review of a subsequent
application, the information that it contains allows National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) staff to estimate the potential review
workload and avoid conflict of interest in the review.

The letter of intent is to be sent to:

Dr. Gabrielle Leblanc
Division of Fundamental Neuroscience and Developmental Disorders National
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 816, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD  20892-9165
Telephone:  (301) 496-5745
FAX:  (301) 402-1501
Email:  GL54h@nih.gov

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

The research grant application form PHS 398 (rev. 4/98) is to be used in applying
for their grants. These forms are available at most institutional offices of
sponsored research and from the Division of Extramural Outreach and Information
Resources, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910,
Bethesda, MD 20892-7910, telephone 301/435-0714, email: GrantsInfo@nih.gov.

The RFA label available in the PHS 398 (rev. 4/98) application form must be
affixed to the bottom of the face page of the application.  Failure to use this
label could result in delayed processing of the application such that it may not
reach the review committee in time for review. In addition, the RFA title and
number must be typed on line 2 of the face page of the application form and the
YES box must be marked.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including the
Checklist, and three signed photocopies in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040, MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD 20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD 20817 (for express/courier service)

At the time of submission, two additional copies of the application must be sent
to:

Dr. Lillian Pubols
Scientific Review Branch
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 9C10, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD  20892-9165 (for express/courier service)
Telephone: (301) 496-9223
FAX: (301) 402-0182
Email: LP28E@nih.gov

Applications must be received by the application receipt date listed in the
heading of this RFA. If an application is received after that date, it will be
returned to the applicant without review.

The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) will not accept any application in
response to this RFA that is essentially the same as one currently pending
initial review, unless the applicant withdraws the pending application. The CSR
will not accept any application that is essentially the same as one already
reviewed. This does not preclude the submission of substantial revisions of
applications already reviewed, but such applications must include an introduction
addressing the previous critique.

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by the CSR and
responsiveness by NINDS. Incomplete applications will be returned to the
applicant without further consideration.  If the application is not responsive
to the RFA, CSR staff may contact the applicant to determine whether to return
the application to the applicant or submit it for review in competition with
unsolicited applications at the next review cycle.

Applications that are complete and responsive to the RFA will be evaluated for
scientific and technical merit by an appropriate peer review group convened by
NINDS in accordance with the review criteria stated below. As part of the initial
merit review, a process will be used by the initial review group in which
applications receive a written critique and undergo a process in which only those
applications deemed to have the highest scientific merit, generally the top half
of the applications under review, will be discussed, assigned a priority score,
and receive a second level review by the appropriate National Advisory Council
or Board.

Review Criteria

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health. In the
written comments, reviewers will be asked to discuss the following aspects of the
application in order to judge the likelihood that the proposed research will have
a substantial impact on the pursuit of these goals. Each of these criteria will
be addressed and considered in assigning the overall score, weighting them as
appropriate for each application. Note that the application does not need to be
strong in all categories to be judged likely to have major scientific impact and
thus deserve a high priority score. For example, an investigator may propose to
carry out important work that by its nature is not innovative but is essential
to move a field forward.

(1) Significance: Does this study address an important problem?  If the aims of
the application are achieved, how will scientific knowledge be advanced?  What
will be the effect of these studies on the concepts or methods that drive this
field?

In particular, does this proposal address the development of a promising
technology tailored to the special technical challenges posed by the anatomical
and molecular complexities of the nervous system?  Alternatively, does the
technology offer increases in sensitivity, resolution, throughput volume,
scalability or cost effectiveness that are applicable to many tissue types,
including the nervous system?  If the aims of the application are achieved, how
will our ability to study gene expression in the nervous system be advanced?

(2) Approach: Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses
adequately developed, well-integrated, and appropriate to the aims of the
project? Does the applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider
alternative tactics?

(3) Innovation: Does the project employ novel concepts, approaches or methods?
Are the aims original and innovative? Does the project develop novel
methodologies or technologies?

(4) Investigator: Is the investigator appropriately trained and well suited to
carry out this work? Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience level of
the PI and other researchers (if any)?

(5) Environment: Does the scientific environment in which the work will be done
contribute to the probability of success? Do the proposed experiments take
advantage of unique features of the scientific environment or employ useful
collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of institutional support?

A major goal of this RFA is the timely and broad dissemination of data,
materials, and technologies for gene expression analysis in the nervous system. 
Thus, the initial review group will also be asked to comment on the degree to
which the proposed technologies will be readily exportable to the biomedical
research community, as well as the adequacy of plans for making available data
and materials acquired during the proposed project.  Any opinions expressed by
reviewers about this aspect of the proposal will be recorded as an administrative
note.

In addition to the above criteria, in accordance with NIH policy, all
applications will also be reviewed with respect to the following:

o The adequacy of plans to include both genders, minorities and their subgroups,
and children as appropriate for the scientific goals of the research. Plans for
the recruitment and retention of subjects will also be evaluated.

o The reasonableness of the proposed budget and duration in relation to the
proposed research.

o The adequacy of the proposed protection for humans, animals or the environment,
to the extent they may be adversely affected by the project proposed in the
application.

Schedule

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:    February 15, 1999
Application Receipt Date:         March 19, 1999
Peer Review Date:                 July 1999
Council Review:                   September 1999
Earliest Anticipated Start Date:  September 30, 1999

AWARD CRITERIA

Award criteria that will be used to make award decisions include:

* scientific merit (as determined by peer review)

* availability of funds

* balance among the projects in addressing different experimental approaches and
their complementarity to other ongoing efforts, and

* extent to which the proposed technology supports the goals of BMAP.

INQUIRIES

Inquiries concerning this RFA are encouraged. The opportunity to clarify any
issues or questions from potential applicants is welcome.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Gabrielle Leblanc, Ph.D.
Division of Fundamental Neuroscience and Developmental National Disorders
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 816, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD  20892-9165 (for express/courier service)
Telephone:  (301) 496-5745
FAX:  (301) 402-1501
Email:  GL54h@nih.gov

Hemin R. Chin, Ph.D.
Division of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Research
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10C-26
Rockville, MD 20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-1706
FAX:  (301) 443-9890
Email:  hemin@nih.gov

Richard DuBois, Ph.D.
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6148, MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD 20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0758
FAX:  (301) 480-3659
Email:  RichardD@ncrr.nih.gov

Maria Y. Giovanni, Ph.D.
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-0484
FAX:  (301) 402-0528
Email:  myg@nei.nih.gov

Elise Feingold, Ph.D.
Division of Extramural Research
National Center for Human Genome Research
38 Library Drive, Room 614, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 496-7531
FAX:  (301) 480-2770
Email:  Elise_Feingold@nih.gov

Bradley C. Wise, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Neuropsychology of Aging Program
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 3C307, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-9350
FAX:  (301) 496-1494
Email:  bw86y@nih.gov

Robert W. Karp, Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 402, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD 20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-2239
FAX:  (301) 594-0673
Email:  rkarp@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Deborah Henken, Ph.D.
Center for Research for Mothers and Children
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B01, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-5541
FAX:  (301) 480-0303
Email:  dh50g@nih.gov

Nancy Pilotte, Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10A-19
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6975
FAX:  (301) 594-6043
Email:  np22f@nih.gov

Rochelle Small, Ph.D.
Division of Human Communication
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 6120 Executive
Boulevard, Room 400C, MSC 7180
Bethesda, MD  20892-7180
Telephone:  (301) 402-3464
FAX:  (301) 402-6251
Email:  rochelle_small@nih.gov

Annette Kirshner, Ph. D.
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Box 12233, MD EC-23
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-0488
FAX:  (919) 541-5064
email:  kirshner@niehs.nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Ms. Tina Carlisle
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 1004, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD  20892-9165
Telephone: (301) 496-9231
FAX: (301) 402-0219
Email: carlislt@ninds.nih.gov

Ms. Diana S. Trunell
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 7C-08
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-2805
FAX:  (301) 443-6885
Email:  dtrunell@mail.nih.gov

Ms. Joellen Harper
Office of Grants Management
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6210, MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD  20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0836
FAX:  (301) 480-3777
Email:  jh41m@nih.gov

Ms. Kathleen Moy
Grants Management Branch
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-5884
FAX:  (301) 496-9997
Email:  klm@nei.nih.gov

Ms. Jean Cahill
Grants Management Office
National Human Genome Research Institute
Building 38A, Room 613, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 402-0733
FAX:  (301) 402-1951
Email:  Jean_Cahill@nih.gov

Mr. Joseph Ellis
Grants Management Officer
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2N212, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-1472
FAX:  (301) 402-3672
Email:  ellisj@exmur.nia.nih.gov

Ms. Linda Hilley
Office of Planning and Resource Management
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 504, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-4703
FAX:  (301) 443-3891
Email:  lhilley@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Mr. E. Douglas Shawver
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 8A17, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-1303
FAX:  (301) 402-0915
Email:  Shawverd@exchange.nichd.nih.gov

Gary Fleming, J.D., M.A.
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 8A-54
Rockville, MD 20857
Telephone: (301) 443-6710
FAX:  (301) 594-6847
Email: gf6s@nih.gov

Ms. Sharon Hunt
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400B, MSC 7180
Bethesda, MD  20892-7170
Telephone:  (301) 402-0909
FAX:  (301) 402-1757
Email:  sh79f@nih.gov

Mr. David Mineo
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Box 12233, MD EC-22
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Telephone: (919) 541-1373
FAX:  (919) 541-2860
email:  mineo@niehs.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Nos.
93.854, 93.242, 93.389, 93.867, 93.172, 93.866, 93.273, 93.865, 93.173, 93.279,
and 93.113.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public Health Service
Act, Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law 99-158, 42 USC
241 and 285) and administered under PHS grants policies and Federal Regulations
42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Part 74.  This program is not subject to the
intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems
Agency review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant recipients to provide a smoke-free
workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products. In addition, Public
Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in certain
facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which regular or
routine education, library, day care, health care, or early childhood development
services are provided to children. This is consistent with the PHS mission to
protect and advance the physical and mental health of the American people.


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