HAZARDOUS MATERIALS WORKER HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING

Release Date:  August 12, 1999

RFA:  ES-99-009

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  September 10, 1999
Application Receipt Date:  November 19, 1999

PURPOSE

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) invites
applications for cooperative agreements to support the development of model
programs for the training and education of workers engaged in activities
related to hazardous materials and waste generation, removal, containment,
transportation and emergency response.

The major objective of this solicitation is to prevent work related harm by
assisting in the training of workers in how best to protect themselves and
their communities from exposure to hazardous materials encountered during
hazardous waste operations, hazardous materials transportation, environmental
restoration of contaminated facilities or chemical emergency response.  A
variety of sites, such as those involved with chemical waste clean up and
remedial action and transportation related chemical emergency response may
pose severe health and safety concerns to workers and the surrounding
communities.  These sites are often characterized by the multiplicity of
substances present, the presence of unknown substances, and the general
uncontrolled condition of the site.  A major goal of this program is to assist
organizations with development of institutional competency to provide
appropriate model training and education programs to hazardous materials and
waste workers.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS led national
activity for setting priority areas.  This RFA, Hazardous Materials Worker
Health and Safety Training, is related to the priority areas of occupational
health and environmental health.  Further information regarding the updating
of þHealthy People 2000þ can be obtained from the Web site at
http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/pubs/hp2000/default.htm.  Potential applicants
may also obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2000" (Full Report: Stock No. 017-
001-00474-0) through the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402-9325 (telephone 202-783-3238).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must be domestic nonprofit organizations that demonstrate expertise
and experience in implementing and operating training and education programs
for workers.  Such organizations must demonstrate the ability to reach and
involve in training programs target populations of workers.  Any nonprofit
organization providing worker health and safety education and training may
apply.  Minority individuals, disabled persons and women are encouraged to
apply as Principal Investigators, as well as Historically Black Colleges and
Universities (HBCUþs) and other minority institutions and organizations.

Nonprofit organizations are corporations or associations whose net earnings
may in no part lawfully accrue to the benefit of any private shareholder or
individual.  Proof of nonprofit status must be provided with the application
for assistance.

Awardees may use services, as appropriate, of other organizations, public or
private, necessary to develop, administer, or evaluate proposed worker
training programs.  All provisions of the National Institutes of Health Grants
Policy Statement will apply to awards made by NIEHS for this program. This
information is available at http://www.nih.gov/grants/policy/nihgps.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

Awards will be made as cooperative agreements (U-45) for a period of up to
five years from FY 2000 through 2004. Funds for these awards will include $20
million from the EPA (for hazardous waste operations and emergency response),
$3 million from the EPA (for minority worker training) and $3 million from the
EPA (for brownfields training), which are transferred to NIEHS through
Interagency Agreements.

The administrative and funding instrument used for this program is a
cooperative agreement U45, an "assistance" mechanism (rather than an
"acquisition" mechanism) in which substantial NIH scientific and/or
programmatic involvement with the awardee is anticipated during performance of
the activity. Under the cooperative agreement, the NIH purpose is to support
and/or stimulate the recipient's activity by involvement in and otherwise
working jointly with the award recipient in a partner role, but it is not to
assume direction, prime responsibility, or a dominant role in the activity. 
Consistent with this concept, the dominant role and prime responsibility for
the activity resides with the awardee(s) for the project as a whole, although
specific tasks and activities in carrying out the studies will be shared among
the awardees and the NIEHS Program Administrator.

The cooperative agreement is an assistance instrument similar in most ways to
a grant.  It differs in that in addition to the standard stewardship role, the
NIEHS program administrator is expected to have a continuing substantive role
in one or more technical aspects of the program.  The type and degree of this
substantial programmatic involvement is specified in the terms and conditions. 
The awardee will have lead responsibilities in all aspects of the program,
including any technical modifications to the curriculum, conduct of the
training, and quality control.

Annual renewal will be based on availability of funds, NIEHS staff review of
progress toward achieving training objectives, compliance with the terms and
conditions of awards and submission of copies of all training and educational
materials used under the award to NIEHS.  The awards will include funding for
targeted training to specific populations that have been identified in the
respective authorizing statutes for this program.

FUNDS AVAILABLE

Superfund authorization expired in 1994 and since that time the WETP has been
operating under the authority granted by annual appropriations. The FY 1999
appropriated level for this program is $26 million. The NIEHS is uncertain at
this time about the status of reauthorization of this Program, and, therefore,
as to future funding levels. Nonetheless, actual amounts will be appropriated
each year according to the Federal budget process. Because the funding level
of this Program may vary from year to year, actual award levels for approved
and funded applications will be based on Program balance and the availability
of funds, in addition to the scientific merit considerations of the review
process.

Projected funding of $26 million at the currently authorized levels for FY
2000 will be awarded to support model programs for targeted training.  During
FY 2000, NIEHS plans to fund between 15 and 20 cooperative agreements in
response to this RFA for a period of five years.  The anticipated starting
date for the initial annual period will be September 1, 2000. Funds for these
awards will include $20 million from the hazardous waste operations and
emergency response), $3 million for minority worker training and $3 million
for brownfields training.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), Section
126(g), authorizes an assistance program for training and education of workers
engaged in activities related to hazardous waste generation, removal,
containment or emergency response and hazardous materials transportation and
emergency response.  The Congress assigned responsibility for administering
this program to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
(NIEHS), an Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) within the
Public Health Service (PHS) of the US Department of Health and Human Services
(DHHS).

Hazardous material and waste workers include workers engaged in: active and
inactive waste treatment, storage and disposal, hazardous waste generation,
clean up and remedial action, emergency response, and workers engaged in
hazardous materials transportation including the safe loading, unloading,
handling, and storage.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor estimates as many as 1.8 million workers may
be at risk from exposure to hazardous materials associated with waste
operations or an emergency response to a toxic chemical spill.

Congress authorized funds for the SARA program for a five year period
beginning in October, 1986, with a three year extension in FY 1992.  The
original awardees have developed curricula and training materials, tested
these in pilot courses, and established management and evaluation systems. 
The original awardees reported training over 350,000 participants in the first
seven years of the program.  In addition to the initial statutory authority
for the operation of an assistance program to support worker safety and health
training activities established under Section 126 of SARA, two additional
statutes reference the program authorities of NIEHS which supplement the
program created by the Superfund statute.

In fiscal year 1990, the Congress authorized an extension of the NIEHS worker
training assistance program under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization
Act of 1986 (SARA) in fiscal years 1992, 1993, and 1994 for $20 million each
year making a total of $60 million over the period. In addition to the $20
million for Superfund worker training which is appropriated to EPA on an
annual basis, an additional $3 million was added to support the development of
pilot projects for minority worker training which is targeted to young people
in environmentally-contaminated communities and $3 million to support training
and job development activities at designated Brownfields cleanup and
redevelopment sites.

An essential component of health and safety programs for those who work with
hazardous materials is appropriate education and training.  The Superfund
Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 addresses this in Section 126 which
requires the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to
promulgate standards for the health and safety protection of employees in this
area.  OSHA final rule 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste and Emergency Response
Operations was promulgated on March 6, 1989 with an effective date of March 6
1990. Further information about OSHA resources and interpretations of HAZWOPER
training requirements can be found at:
http://www.osha-slc.gov/SLTC/hazardouswaste/index.html.

In addition to the statutory authority in SARA, Congress also passed the
Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act of 1990 (HMTUSA PL 101
615) to reform and upgrade protections of transportation workers and the
public during the process of transporting hazardous materials and to amend the
Hazardous Materials Transportation Act. Under Section 118 of HMTUSA, authority
for NIEHS to develop a new hazmat employee training assistance program is
established and applicable training requirements were established.  These
regulations are available at http://hazmat.dot.gov/regs/rules.htm.

Target populations for this training include those covered by requirements of
Federal Occupational Health and Safety Administration (Code of Federal
Regulations, Title 29, Part 1910) and Environmental Protection Agency (CFR,
Title 40, Part 311) standards for Hazardous Waste Operations and
Emergency Response, regulations governing the NIEHS Hazardous Waste Worker
Training Program (CFR, Title 42, Part 65), as well as hazardous materials
transportation workers regulated by the US Department of Transportation (49
CFR 171-177).

These model-training programs for hazardous waste workers and emergency
responders satisfied the minimum requirements as specified in Federal OSHA
rules and other related regulations that have been or may be promulgated.  The
training programs also meet the minimum requirements specified in the Minimum
Criteria for Worker Health and Safety Training for Hazardous Waste Operations
and Emergency Response, published April, 1990 as a result of an NIEHS
sponsored technical workshop on training quality.  Consideration was also be
given to the published Appendix E of 29 CFR 1910.120 (59 FR 43268, August 22,
1994), which references much of the NIEHS Minimum Criteria Worker Health and
Safety Training for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAMS

Hazardous Waste Worker Training Program (HWWTP)
The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) authorized an
assistance program for training and education of workers engaged in activities
related to hazardous waste removal, containment and emergency response. The
NIEHS hazardous materials worker training program are cooperative agreements
from qualified domestic nonprofit organizations with demonstrated access to
appropriate worker populations and have experience in implementing and
operating model worker health and safety education training programs for
hazardous materials or waste workers.

Through the encouragement of multi-state, university-based consortiums and the
development of national non-profit organizations which have focused on
specific workforce sectors, this HWWTP has established technically-proficient
curriculum materials and quality-controlled course presentations.  These
courses have been delivered to hazardous waste workers and emergency
responders in every region of the country and have established new national
benchmarks for quality worker safety and health training.  The program also
has represented a major prevention education activity for NIEHS as technical
scientific and basic research information is delivered to target populations
with high-risk toxic exposures. During the first eleven years of the Superfund
Worker Training Program (FY 87-98), the NIEHS has successfully supported a
total of twenty primary awardees.  These represent over ninety different
institutions that have trained over 730,000 workers across the country and
presented nearly 38,000 classroom and hands-on training courses, which have
accounted for over 11.0 million contact hours of actual training.

During the first five years of the NIEHS Superfund Worker Training Program
(WETP), the sixteen (16) initial awardees developed curriculum and started
training programs throughout the country to help employers meet OSHA training
requirements under 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency
Response. The model program encourages innovation for training difficult-to-
reach populations by addressing issues such as literacy, appropriate adult
education techniques, training quality improvement and other areas unaddressed
directly by the marketplace. The program enhances rather than replaces private
sector training responsibility by demonstrating new and cost-effective
training techniques and materials.

In order to develop a better understanding of the labor market for hazardous
waste workers, NIEHS contracted to study the labor market associated with
hazardous waste cleanup work. This study is available at 
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm. Based on the actual
experience at a number of hazardous waste sites across the nation, on-site
remedial action alone will require between 1990-2010 three million job years,
or 4.5 billion hours, of labor. Site operations and maintenance work will
require another one billion labor hours.  Using the reportþs projections from
EPA and DOE data, remediation job demand is expected to grow by 60 percent, or
almost 300,000 jobs, from the 1990-1995 five year period through the five year
period 1995-2000 -- from 447,000 to 740,000. Demand for jobs continues to grow
by nearly another 300,000 in the 2000-2005 time interval. During this peak
period nearly 2 million jobs will require workers. As many as 7.5 million more
workers will require training -- either basic or refresher. Demand remains
high from 2005-2010 and then begins to taper off -- with a rather optimistic
assumption that most cleanup activities will be completed in 25 to 30 years.

During 1991, Congress reauthorized the Superfund Program and extended the
NIEHS worker training program for an additional three-year period (9-1-92
through 8-31-94). After soliciting new applications through a November 1991
Federal Register announcement and a lengthy review by committees of outside
experts and other federal agencies, in the resulting competition NIEHS
announced eighteen (18) awards in September 1992 with over 70 participating
institutions in this program. This new support expands the scope of NIEHS-
supported training to include workers involved in generating and transporting
hazardous materials and wastes, oil spill cleanup workers and workers involved
in the cleanup of nuclear weapons facilities.

In 1995, NIEHS conducted another competition and made 18 awards for the HWWT,
for a five year period (1995-2000). Training delivery has been carried out in
all regions of the country to all relevant target populations regulated under
29 CFR 1910.120. The primary worker training awardees, in conjunction with
over seventy collaborating institutions, have delivered 4,810 courses,
reaching 84,261 workers, which account for 1,090,790 contact hours of health
and safety training during this period.  This training ranges from 4-hour
refresher programs through more complex train-the-trainer courses lasting up
to 120 hours in duration.  Between September 1, 1997 and August 31, 1998, 54%
of the training has been focused on delivering CERCLA cleanup worker training. 
This comprises 34,537 workers who received 80-hour training, basic 40-hour
training or 4-8 hour refresher courses out of the annual total of workers
reached by the program.  More information about the awardees and descriptions
of the programs can be found at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/wetp/epa.htm.

Minority Worker Training Program (MWTP)

The Minority Worker Training Program was established in September 1995 to
provide a series of national pilot programs to test a range of strategies for
the recruitment and training of young persons.  These are individuals who live
near hazardous waste sites or in the community at risk of exposure to
contaminated properties with the specific focus to obtain work in the
environmental field. This new pilot program represents a broad geographic
spread and reaches several urban populations in high risk contaminated areas.

These environmental career-oriented projects are developed within the context
of other social and health needs of the community. The different programs
provide pre-employment job training, including literacy, life skills,
environmental preparation and other related courses construction skills
training; environmental worker training including hazardous waste, asbestos
and lead abatement training; and safety and health training. Some training
also includes enrollment in apprenticeship programs for construction and
environmental remediation worker training. In addition, particular focus is
placed on establishing a program of mentoring. This program help to enhance
the participants problem solving skills, understanding of individual self-
esteem and team work in the application of technical knowledge to
environmental and related problems

This program promotes partnerships or sub-agreements with academic and other
institutions, with a particular focus on historically black colleges and
universities, and public schools and community-based organizations located in
or nearby the impacted area to provide pre-math, science or other related
education to program participants prior to or concurrent with entry into the
training program. The first cooperative agreements provided funding for seven
programs to train minority inner city youth to enter the environmental field. 
The six current programs are Clark Atlanta University, Jackson State
University, Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Center to Protect
Workers Rights, DePaul University, and the New Jersey/New York Consortium. 
The funding has been approximately $3 Million in Year 1, $2 Million in Year 2,
$1.4 Million in Year 3, and $3 Million in Year 4. The descriptions of the MWTP
can be found at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/wetp/mwtp.htm.

Brownfields Minority Worker Training Program (BMWTP)

As part of the Department of Health and Human Services commitment to the
Brownfields National Partnership Agenda, the NIEHS has provided support for
the establishment of the Brownfields Minority Worker Training Programs
targeting the Showcase Communities. The strategy of this initiative is to
broaden the NIEHS Minority Worker Training Program (MWTP) to include a new
component on Brownfields Worker Training, addressing the need for a more
comprehensive training program to foster economic and environmental
restoration of the identified brownfield sites.

Cleaning up the nationþs hazardous waste sites is an enormous undertaking,
requiring the efforts of millions of workers and hundreds of billions of
dollars.  Recently, though, there has been a new surge of cleanup activities,
which are assumed to be less intensive. Brownfield sites involve more than
just the cleanup of hazardous waste.  They represent the coming together of
many factors -- environmental, economic, community empowerment, and
environmental justice among them.  As defined by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), Brownfield sites are "abandoned, idled, or under-used
industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is
complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination." In June 1995,
GAO estimated that there were between 130,000 and 450,000 Brownfield sites
that will cost more than $650 billion to clean up. Others have estimated that
there are currently 500,000 or more Brownfield sites across the United States
and that the cost to clean up these sites is $600 billion. Additional
information on the Brownfields Initiative can be found at
http://www.epa.gov/brownfields.

The need for specific health and safety training for the workers at the
various sites across the US that require remediation/cleanup are numerous. The
scope of environmental and public health risks identified at Superfund and
other hazardous waste sites ranges from contaminated soil and air to hazardous
exposures through the food chain.  Due to the different types of sites and the
regulations that require cleanup of these sites, the degree of training for
workers in these surrounding communities represent an economic as well as
environmental challenge. Information on brownfields and environmental cleanup
can be found in the following document NIEHS Brownfields Report: "HazMat
Cleanup, But More" at http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm.

In 1998, the NIEHS awarded, through an interagency agreement with the US
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), $3 Million for the development of
brownfields environmental job training programs targeting people of color at
11 of the 16 Brownfields Showcase Communities. The 11 Communities are Lowell,
MA; Chicago, IL; Kansas City, MO; Baltimore, MD; Eastward Ho!, FL; Dallas, TX;
Los Angeles, CA; East Palo Alto, CA; Portland, OR; St. Paul, MN; and Salt Lake
City, UT. The awardees for the Brownfields Minority Worker Training Program
are Clark Atlanta University, Center to Protect Workers Rights, DePaul
University and Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund.  A description of
each of 4 programs is located at http://www.niehs.nih.gov/wetp/bfield.htm

GENERAL TRAINING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

These training goals and objectives apply to all programs, however, there are
specific goals and objectives restricted to the Minority Worker Training
Program and the Brownfields Minority Worker Training.  Applications which are
responsive to this solicitation must clearly delineate the training
populations being targeted by specifying a discrete training plan, program
resources and a segregated program budget which responds to a combination or
all of the authorized NIEHS assistance programs through Hazardous Waste Worker
Training Program, Minority Worker Training Program, and the Brownfields
Minority Worker Training Program.

Applicants should refer to SARA Section 126 requirements for training. 
Coverage of all hazardous waste and emergency response workers is based on
potential exposure and health risk.  The language of section 126 (d)(1) and
(g) is clear that training scope be broad.  Section 126 states that the
training be required for personnel engaged in hazardous substance removal or
other activities, such as those involved in transportation, which expose or
potentially expose such workers to hazardous substances.  The same section
later requires that special training be provided to workers who may be exposed
to unique or special hazards.  Section (g)(1) authorizes this training
assistance program for the training of workers who are or may be engaged in
activities related to hazardous waste removal or containment or emergency
response.

An essential component of health and safety programs for those who work with
hazardous materials is appropriate education and training.  The Superfund
Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 addresses this in Section 126 which
requires the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to
promulgate standards for the health and safety protection of employees in this
area.  OSHA final rule 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste and Emergency Response
Operations was promulgated on March 6, 1989 with an effective date of March 6
1990.

A minimum level of training for hazardous materials and waste workers and
supervisors is specified in SARA Section 126(d).  General site workers are
required to receive a minimum of 40 hours of initial instruction off site and
a minimum of three days of actual field experience under the direction of a
trained, experienced supervisor at the time of assignment.  Supervisors are
required to receive the same training as general workers and a minimum of
eight hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

The immediate goal of worker health and safety training is educational in
nature, designed to provide students with relevant information, program-
solving skills, and the confidence needed to use these tools.  Long-term goals
of the model training programs should be to assure that workers become and
remain active participants in determining and improving the health and safety
conditions under which they work and that avenues for collaborative employer-
employee relationships in creating safe workplaces are established.

Worker safety and health training is adult-based, action-oriented, and result-
centered. The goals and objectives of worker training focus on outcomes rather
than on learning for its own sake.  Workers come to training with a great
volume of experience, and are, in many ways, the richest resources of a
training class. Experience shows that successful adult education often
emphasizes peer-sharing activities, such as problem-solving and simulation
exercises, that tap the experience of the learner. Successful worker training
often mirrors the way people learn at work from each other. After training,
workers should be able to bring what they have learned in the classroom or
work-site training back to their jobs.

There is no limiting language regarding training coverage. Thus, scope covers
worker health protection from hazardous waste work and exposure to hazardous
substances in the broadest sense.

Two or more nonprofit organizations may join in a single application and share
resources in order to maximize worker group coverage, enhance the
effectiveness of training, and bring together appropriate academic disciplines
and talents.  Such arrangements are strongly encouraged.  Joint applications
must have specific plans and mechanisms to implement the cooperative
arrangements necessary for program integration and to insure effectiveness. 
Specific expertise, facilities or services to be provided by each
participating member must be identified.  Awardees submitting competing
continuation applications should describe, along with other progress, how they
have met special cooperative agreement terms and conditions of their awards,
including their interaction with other investigators and NIEHS program staff.

Lacking the usual ability to rely on exposure monitoring or medical
surveillance for ensuring the protection of workers, primary prevention of
disease and injury among hazardous waste workers requires heavy reliance on
use of engineering control methods, appropriate work practices and use of
personal protective equipment such as respirators and protective clothing. 
These approaches are highly dependent on individual workers being
knowledgeable in the use and application of these approaches and understanding
their limitations.  Therefore, training of hazardous waste and emergency
response workers plays a critical role in prevention of injury and disease.
The important role of worker training and education in prevention programs is
recognized in OSHA substance-specific regulations such as those that apply to
hazard communications, asbestos, lead, arsenic, and cotton dust.

Awards will be made for direct student and worker trainer training, technical
support of training, and training program evaluation.  It is believed that
adequate curricula and training materials exist for worker training that can
be adapted with minimal effort.  Means of multiplying training are also
encouraged to meet the need; thus, programs such as effective train the
trainer programs are encouraged.  Programs targeted to multi-state and
nationwide coverage to reach wider worker populations will be given preference
in review and funding.  Applications will not be considered that cover
municipalities or other jurisdictions covering less than two states. 
Applicants are also encouraged to develop plans for independently continuing
the program.

A list of curricula developed by current NIEHS awardees (On the Web at
http://204.177.120.20/forms/curricula/ in Adobe Acrobat format) and
copies of the Minimum Criteria for Worker Health and Safety Training for
Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (On the Web at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/mincrter.html) may be obtained from
the:

National Clearinghouse for Worker Safety and Health Training for Hazardous
Materials, Waste Operations and Emergency Response 
5107 Benton Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
Tele: 301-571-4226
Fax:  301-897-5848
Email: chouse@dgsys.com or rra@dgs.dgsys.com
Web Page: http://204.177.120.20/index.htm

Copies of individual curricula developed by current awardees are available in
the Clearinghouse reading room and may also be obtained from the Clearinghouse
at the above address for the cost of reproduction and handling.

NIEHS Focus on Health Disparities

Health disparities exist between citizens of lower socioeconomic status
(including minorities and other medically under-served citizens) and those
more economically advantaged. The President has committed the Nation to
eliminating such disparities while continuing the progress that has been made
in improving the overall health of the American people. As the primary federal
agency responsible for supporting research, prevention, and training efforts
to reduce the adverse health impact of environmentally related diseases, the
NIEHS seeks to expand its leadership role in addressing such conditions in
socio-economically disadvantaged populations and in developing tools and
strategies that will prove effective in eliminating health disparities. The
NIEHS is committed to supporting research and training activities aimed at
lessening the environmental health consequences associated with lower
socioeconomic status.

Activities conducted under this RFA should be consistent with Federal
Executive Order No. 12898 entitled, "Federal Actions to Address Environmental
Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations."  To the extent
practicable and permitted by law, applicants shall make achieving
environmental justice part of their project's mission by identifying and
addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health
effects of environmental contaminants on minority, low-income, and medically
underserved communities, including African, Hispanic, Asian, and Native
Americans. The complete text of the Federal Executive Order No. 12898 can be
found at http://www.epa.gov/docs/oejpubs/execordr.txt.html.  Additional
information on the Environmental Justice Initiative in EPA's Waste Programs
can be found at http://www.epa.gov/swerosps/ej.

Applications should include plans for reaching underserved workers in the
proposed target populations especially those disadvantaged in education,
language skills or limited in literacy.  The inclusion of institutions and
organizations that have historical involvement and expertise in responding to
environmental justice issues is also strongly encouraged.

Participation of minority institutions and community-based organizations from
people of color communities may include the:
o Adaptation of curricula to address health disparities and environmental
justice concerns;
o Development of training programs that outreach to environmentally
disadvantaged groups and non-English speaking populations; and
o Delivery of high quality training that can augment efforts to promote toxic
use reduction, emergency preparedness in the community, chemical process
safety and pollution prevention.

New Program Initiatives

Due to the complexity and the number of new emerging training innovations and
technologies occurring in the worker health and safety arena, NIEHS has
identified several training opportunities that are specifically related to the
advancement of the Worker Education and Training Program.  It is important
that these new emerging training technologies and approaches be woven and
integrated into the framework of the program. NIEHS has learned that
successful examples of training partnerships involve the creation of clear
mechanisms for assuring avenues for input and collaboration by labor,
management, local government officials and other stakeholders, as well as a
vision for integrating training into other workplace programs and initiatives. 
In addition, it is clear that the context and technical approaches to safety
and health training have undergone a rapid transition over the past decade, as
computer and telecommunications technology have unleashed a wealth of
technical information resources and established innovative modes of training
development, delivery and evaluation.

Below are lists of these innovations, many of which have grown out of NIEHS-
sponsored technical workshops, with background information pertaining to these
new concerns and how they relate to the overall Worker Education and Training
Program. This list is provided to stimulate the thinking of potential awardees
by illustrating various types of training innovations and showing its
application, and potential linkages.  This list is not intended to be
complete, and investigators may study these and many other topics that meet
the objectives of the RFA.

o Targeted model training programs: Hazardous waste and emergency response
workers represent a diverse training population ranging from
technical/professional and supervisory personnel to trade and industrial
workers.  Because of this diversity, NIEHS and its awardees have needed to be
innovative in designing their training programs. Over the last eleven years,
several distinct models have emerged.  They include:

o Models for training a technical/professional audience - These models are
designed for a more educated learning audience, perhaps more comfortable in a
traditional classroom setting.  Curriculum materials are comprehensive,
including the development of instructor and student materials, slide and video
presentations, site simulations, and hands on training. In addition, borrowing
from the more participatory models described below, the technical training has
been augmented with more interactive learning approaches to aid in effective
problem analysis and problem solving.
o Models for low literacy, limited English language fluency - These models
utilized special learning materials and instructional techniques to
effectively reach their training audience. These populations are often poorly
served in the traditional training environment.  Learning materials have been
translated into appropriate languages and geared to the appropriate literacy
level of the particular training population.  In addition, these models
utilize an interactive and participatory approach to learning rather than the
more traditional lecture format.
o Trade or occupation specific models  - These models are tailored to specific
occupations or trade involved in hazardous waste handling and emergency
response (e.g. laborers, ironworkers, chemical workers).  They include
simulations or site specific problems encountered specifically by these
specific trades or occupations. While trainees are exposed to all the core
curriculum areas fundamental to hazardous wastes training, the curriculum also
includes trade specific information. Some of these models utilize aspects of
the train-the-trainer approach described below in order to maximize training
resources and expand the programmatic reach of hazardous waste training.
o Train-the-Trainer Models - These models are designed so that lay or
worker/supervisor trainers can guide trainees (co-workers) through classroom
activities and simulations, acting as facilitators.  Curriculum materials
include facilitator resource guides and student activities, including small
group research, problem solving exercises, interactive video and hands-on
activities (for example, proper use of respirators, spill response and
simulated site cleanups). In addition, worker trainers may play critical roles
in program evaluation and measuring the effectiveness of training impacts.

o Training and integration with workplace safety and health programs þ Health
and safety training is valuable as a key component of a comprehensive health
and safety program and can be an important catalyst for assuring employee and
employer involvement in illness and injury prevention.  In most work places,
workersþ ability to make changes or control health and safety hazards and
risks is limited.  Therefore, unless the training program is supported by a
strong health and safety program, it can help workers do little more than
understand how they and the organization might be able to improve conditions.
The most effective health and safety training is integrated with comprehensive
systems of safety.  It helps workers to understand their roles within those
systems and encourages their active participation in maintaining and
strengthening those systems. On November 12-13, 1998, a National Technical
Workshop was held in Silver Spring, Maryland at the George Meany Center to
develop a consensus document þGuidelines for Training in Support of Workplace
Safety and Health Programs.þ The purpose of this guideline document is to
provide a comprehensive source of guidance and information to aid employers,
trainers, training providers, and training program developers in the
development, delivery, evaluation and continual improvement of training to
support and enhance workplace safety and health. Opportunities for including
all stakeholders in an integrated workplace safety and health program will
enhance the training component and enhance overall worker protection. Further
information on this workshop report is available at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm.

o Innovative technology deployment and training - In defining ways to inject
health and safety considerations into the process of developing and deploying
innovative technologies in the workplace, a key strategy is to create worker
training opportunities when health and safety risks finally become the focus
of attention. Far too often, even when the focus is brought to bear on health
and safety, the risks addressed are those faced by the public, such as
contaminated drinking water from a hazardous waste site. Little information
has been developed regarding the safety and health hazards associated with
environmental remediation technologies. Consequently, those tasked with
technology selection often do not consider the safety and health implications
of their decisions and the costs associated with the use of personal
protective equipment (PPE), operator training, and the planning required to
ensure the safe operation of potentially hazardous cleanup technologies. This
is an important area for training development. Further information on NIEHS
efforts in examining innovative technology and training is available from the
report Innovative Technology Guidance Document:  Remembering the Worker. This
document is also available on the web at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm

o Advanced training technology and distance learning - The development and
application of advanced training technologies (ATT), which includes computer-
based training (CBT), internet-based training (WBT), distance learning,
teleconferencing, multimedia, and courseware applications, is advancing at an
explosive rate as computer and communication technology advances continue.
Through a recent workshop and technical report, NIEHS Worker Training Program
has attempted to develop a framework for evaluating the deployment and
application of ATT methods to Hazwoper and Hazmat safety and health training
programs.  This framework has considered specific media selection models, as
well as the institutional capacity, cost, and effectiveness of adopting ATT
methods.  Important challenges for the future of ATT will include: the
identification of issues involved in using virtual training instead of, or
alongside hands-on training; the efficacy of new technologies in responding to
the need to evaluate skills development and competency; developing effective
programs to help instructors master new technologies; and evaluating the
effectiveness of ATT methods.  Further information regarding the Technical
Workshop Report on ATT and Hazwoper Training is available at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm.

o Training partnerships and building effective consortia - The National
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) workshop on "Successful
Training Partnerships: Lessons Learned" brought representatives of industry,
small business entrepreneurs, labor, academia, and government together to
share the diverse nature of their partnerships and the details of how to make
them work. Creative arrangements and traditional partnerships were both
revealed, and there were lessons to be learned from all partnerships
discussed. Defining the elements that are integral to forming successful
training partnerships is a critical component of building an effective
training program.  As with many governmental and business collaborations,
enlightened organizational self-interest is a critical feature for all
partners. Only with a clear understanding of organizational goals and
strengths in a partnership and clear mechanisms for defining the nature of
collaboration can there be a win-win result for all parties, including the
trainees.  One common theme throughout the workshop was that partnerships are
often difficult to start, are hard to nurture and grow, and are likely to have
some rough stretches, even in the best of circumstances. Trust, honesty, and a
commitment to cooperation seem to be the glue that holds partnerships
together. Another useful ingredient for a successful, long-term partnership is
continuing support from the "people at the top" or upper management. Further
information on NIEHS training evaluation efforts is available from the
workshop report: "Successful Training Partnerships:  Lessons Learned."  This
document is available on the web at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/partnerships/partnerships_report.htm

o Integration of worker health and safety training and job skills training þ
Under the leadership of the Minority Worker Training Program, NIEHS has
explored avenues for more effective linking of health and safety training with
job skills training. A recent technical workshop, the Environmental Job
Training Summit, has explored the opportunities for promoting these linkages.
This Summit followed up the Environmental Job Training for Inner City Youth
Technical Workshop held on January 5-6, 1995, at Cuyahoga Community College in
Cleveland, Ohio explored opportunities, successes, and barriers that have
occurred during the past ten years of the Superfund Worker Training Program,
as well as the unique challenges that have been faced during the past two
years of the Minority Worker Training Program (MWTP).  The model of creating
smoother connections in the environmental cleanup industry between training
and jobs is a focal point of the success of the MWTP. Some of the strategies
of this model are: creating and sustaining collaborative dialogue among
various training organizations; exchanging ideas about training of special
populations; establishing frameworks for strengthening other job training
program by adding environmental training; and providing additional
opportunities for growth for all worker training programs by partnering with
community-based organizations. This document is available on the web at
http://204.177.120.20/wetp/clear/resource/minimum.htm.

o Community involvement and outreach initiative þ This component is a new
outreach initiative to provide entry of a community contribution about worker
training activities concerning contaminated sites and hazardous work
environments.  The primary objective of this component is to establish methods
for linking members of a community, who are directly affected by adverse
environmental conditions, with training organizations. The development of
community-based strategies that will lead to pilots to address worker-training
needs of the community is a fundamental part of this initiative. The program
is designed to assist the development of new modes of communication through
training that will ultimately lead to identifying community and worker
concerns that can develop into collaborative partnerships.  Some of these
concerns may deal with general awareness level training, community right to
know, general life skills training, environmental restoration training and
emergency response training.  Additionally, there should be a concentrated
effort to identify possible exposures to community workers and residents,
promote community strategies for prevention and intervention activities
related to work injuries, and assist to facilitate other important sustainable
approaches to job training that ensure worker health and safety is a top
priority.  An example of a community involvement focus is the Superfund Jobs
Training Initiative which is described below.

o Superfund Jobs Training Initiative - The Superfund Job Training Initiative
(SuperJTI) is an EPA program designed to support job training programs in
disadvantaged communities affected by nearby Superfund sites, and to encourage
the employment of trainees at local site cleanups.  The SuperJTI program was
created as a result of the Agencyþs growing sensitivity to the reality that
many of the nationþs most contaminated sites are located in severely
disadvantaged communities.  The SuperJTI, a project of the Office of Community
Involvement for the EPA Superfund Program, has partnered with the NIEHS Worker
Education and Training Program to aid communities by training the local
workforce to safely and actively participate in the cleanup of local hazardous
waste sites.  Special attention to the development of partnerships with EPA
Regional Offices, community-based organizations and NIEHS training
organizations are essential to this program.  For more information about this
initiative, go to  http://www.epa.gov/superfund/tools/sfjti/index.htm .

The above examples of training initiatives are only illustrative of the types
of innovative training efforts that may be appropriate to the WETP and are not
meant to be all-inclusive or restrictive.  Nonetheless, it is important that
investigators submitting an application under this RFA propose
multidisciplinary approaches that are integrated and designed to produce
results in the hazardous waste worker training area.

Minority Worker Training Program Specific Goals and Objectives

The continuation of the Minority Worker Training Program will maintain to
focus on building strong training collaborative programs between worker
training organizations, such as labor-based organizations, community-based
organizations, and historically black universities and colleges.  Special
attention will be directed at programs that successfully integrate job skills
training with worker health and safety training.  Utilization of existing
curricula is the preferred method for development of specific training under
this program.

Major program goals are:
o Recruit target populations that are members of minority groups in the age
range of 18-25 years old who live in urban areas near hazardous waste sites or
in communities at risk of exposure to contaminated properties.  These
individuals must be unemployed or underemployed.
o Develop a training plan for a five year period for training at urban areas
across the country.  Training can be provided for multiple locations during
the five year period.
o Train students in the skills and knowledge required for different career
opportunities in environmental restoration. This experience should include the
ability to:
o conduct pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs for construction and
environmental remediation worker training;
o conduct mentoring programs aimed at assisting trainees in completing the
training course;
o conduct basic construction skills training as well as specialized training
related to environmental clean-up;
o conduct environmental worker training including hazardous waste, asbestos,
lead abatement, and technician/sampling level training; and
o conduct basic worker health and safety training.
o Develop partnerships with local community-based organizations (as defined in
the review criteria) to provide services such as:
o literacy training and related academic courses in reading writing, and math;
life skills training, problem solving skills, understanding of self-esteem and
team work in the application of technical knowledge to environmental and
related problems; and  environmental preparation and other related training.
o Develop formal arrangements with environmental clean-up contractors and
hazardous materials employers for placing and keeping participants in
environmental clean-up jobs.
o Develop strategies for increasing retention of participants throughout the
various phrases of the program.
o Provide evaluation of the retention of participants in the training program,
effectiveness of the training program and stability.
o Develop a tracking program that describes the longevity of post-training
employment of graduating training program participants, type of jobs, and
specific types of sites where participants work.

Brownfields Minority Worker Training Program Specific Goals and Objectives

The Brownfields Minority Worker Training Program will focus on the development
of specialized Minority Worker Training Programs that provide training to
disadvantaged residents surrounding the approximately 300 Brownfields
Assessment Pilots as listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency.
Development of joint applications with the Minority Worker Training Program is
required to receive funding under the Brownfields Minority Worker Training
Program. Applicants must develop partnerships with two or more non-profit
organizations with the MWTP in a single application.  Every effort should be
made to reduce duplication of efforts or overlap in training at the locations
selected under this program as related to similar job training programs. 
NIEHS will not support the development of two programs such as the MWTP, BMWTP
and the EPA Brownfields Job Training and Development Demonstration Pilots in
the same geographic area.  More information about the Brownfields Job Training
and Development Demonstration Pilots can be found at
http://www.epa.gov/swerosps/bf/job.htm

Major program goals are:

o Use the Minority Worker Training Program as a model to train and recruit
community members for environmental job training opportunities associated with
brownfield sites across the country.
o Establish collaborative programs in the form of partnerships and sub-
agreements with the Brownfields Assessment Demonstration Pilots to promote
this initiative on the local level. There must evidence of partnership with
organizations specifically the Brownfields Pilot Communities. A complete
listing of eligibility Brownfields Pilots with descriptions of each program
can be found at http://www.epa.gov/swerosps/bf/pilotlst.htm.
o Provide training up to five (5) Brownfields pilots under one application.
o Recruit minority program participants from all age groups.
o Ensure that actual training activity occurs in a close proximity of the
Brownfields Pilot Community such that extensive travel funds are not incurred
for the purposes of administrating the program.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

Terms and Conditions of Award

NIEHS will provide appropriate assistance, advice and guidance described
below.  The role of the NIEHS Program Administrator will be to facilitate, not
to direct, the development of a high quality national worker training
resource. These special Terms of Award are in addition to and not in lieu of
otherwise applicable OMB administrative guidelines, HHS Grant Administration
Regulations at 45 CFR Parts 74 and 92, and other HHS, PHS, and NIH Grant
Administration policy statements

The administrative and funding instrument used for this program is a
cooperative agreement U45, an "assistance" mechanism (rather than an
"acquisition" mechanism) in which substantial NIH scientific and/or
programmatic involvement with the awardee is anticipated during performance of
the activity. Under the cooperative agreement, the NIH purpose is to support
and/or stimulate the recipient's activity by involvement in and otherwise
working jointly with the award recipient in a partner role, but it is not to
assume direction, prime responsibility, or a dominant role in the activity. 
Consistent with this concept, the dominant role and prime responsibility for
the activity resides with the awardee(s) for the project as a whole, although
specific tasks and activities in carrying out training activities will be
shared among the awardees and the NIEHS Program Administrator.

1. Awardee Rights and Responsibilities

Awardees have primary authorities and responsibilities to define objectives
and approaches, and to plan, conduct, analyze, and publish results,
interpretations, and conclusions of their studies and training activities. It
is the responsibility of each awardee to develop the details of the training
plan, which will be required to describe the technical approaches, target
population access and recruitment, curricula modification, training
methodology, and program evaluation procedures.

o Awardees will be required to meet at least twice annually to review
progress, share information, and to coordinate training activities.  Since
awards may be made to institutions that are unfamiliar with NIH grant
assistance procedures, business officials are expected to meet at least
annually to review NIH grant management policies.

o Awardees must submit draft copies of training manuals, instructor guides,
course curricula and other materials developed for use in training activities
supported by NIEHS to the Program Administrator for NIEHS approval, in order
to receive technical comments and suggestions regarding the adequacy,
technical accuracy and suitability of materials to be used for worker safety
and health training.  Final copies of all materials developed with support
from NIEHS will be transmitted by the awardees to the National Clearinghouse
for Worker Safety and Health Training for Hazardous Materials, Waste
Operations and Emergency Response and made available to the general public,
subject to any specific legal caveats on use or copyright protection.

o Each awardee will submit an annual progress report to the NIEHS Program
Administrator which describes the number, location and nature of all training
activities and the characteristics of the trainees reached during a particular
fiscal year.

o Results and findings from training program evaluations will be summarized by
each awardee and submitted to the NIEHS Program Administrator on an annual
basis.  Program evaluation reports shall quantitatively describe the current
status of instructor effectiveness, trainee retention of knowledge and skills,
and positive impacts of training activities on work practices, workplace
safety and health conditions, and overall worker protection from on the job
hazards.

o Each awardee shall participate annually in two technical workshops, which
will be sponsored and planned by the NIEHS Program Administrator.  The
technical workshops will present relevant and topical information to assure
the continued high quality of worker safety and health training activities
carried out by the awardees and encourage the exchange of significant
information regarding effective raining techniques and approaches.

o Each awardee will be required to convene a Board of Advisors representing
user populations, labor, industry, governmental agencies, academic
institutions or professional associations with interest and expertise in
worker health and safety training related to hazardous materials and waste
operations and emergency response.  The Board of Advisors must meet annually
to evaluate training activities and provide advice to the program director.

o Each awardee is required to have one individual assigned the responsibility
for information technology transfer and dissemination as the point of contact
for the NIEHS Program Administrator. This person would ensure the effective
communication and transfer of important training and administrative
information to NIEHS and other appropriate audiences, including trainee
tracking activities, computation and submittal  of training data, coordination
of special meetings/conferences, and other training activities conducted by
the program.

o Each awardee will retain custody of and primary rights to the data and the
curricula materials developed under these awards, subject to appropriate
Government rights of access consistent with current HHS, PHS and NIH policies.

2. NIEHS Staff Responsibilities

Specifically, the substantial programmatic involvement by the NIEHS Program
Administrator will include the following activities:

o The NIEHS Program Administrator will coordinate activities of mutual
interest and benefit to awardees and the Institute.  The primary objective of
the Worker Education and Training Program will be to stimulate collaborative
work between NIEHS and the awardees in the creation of model worker safety and
health training programs.  Substantial programmatic involvement by the NIEHS
Program Administrator will assure that there is not duplication of efforts or
overlap in worker safety and health training delivery and program development
by the awardees.

o In order to provide consistent use and delivery of existing curricula for
high quality worker safety and health training, the NIEHS Program
Administrator will ensure that there will be close coordination among
awardees, other state and federal governmental agencies, and other training
providers.  Such program coordination between NIEHS and the awardees will make
maximum use of worker safety and health training materials and curricula that
have already been developed, evaluated, and used.  Training materials
developed by the awardees will be submitted for review by the NIEHS Program
Administrator for consistency, appropriateness and technical accuracy before
the initiation of worker safety and health training activities.

o To facilitate exchange and coordination between awardees and the NIEHS
during the initial year, the NIEHS Program Administrator will convene and
sponsor a two day working meeting for the program director who represents each
awardee.  In addition, it is anticipated that awardees under this program will
meet at least twice annually to review progress, share information, discuss
technical issues and to coordinate training activities.

o The NIEHS Program Administrator will provide ongoing technical assistance to
the awardees through arrangement of technical workshops related to the
substantive technical issues that affect the program. Technical workshops will
bring together program directors from each awardee with the relevant technical
experts from a number of scientific fields involved in hazardous waste,
occupational health, environmental health sciences, and adult education. 
Examination of training technologies and technical issues which are specific
to the program will be developed and coordinated through technical workshops,
which will be held at least twice per fiscal year.

o To assure that training programs which are developed with assistance from
NIEHS will comply with all applicable federal safety and health regulations,
the NIEHS Program Administrator will assist the awardees through continual
involvement with other federal regulatory agencies.  Operational monitoring by
the NIEHS Program Administrator will ensure that awardees are in compliance
with general federal statutory requirements regulating worker safety and
health training activities.

o The NIEHS Program Administrator will coordinate overall program evaluations
to show the impact of the training on improving work practices, reducing work
related injury and illness and to document the increased understanding of
relevant environmental health sciences by workers involved in environmental
cleanups, hazardous waste management and emergency response to chemical
releases.  While each awardee must have its own evaluation program, the NIEHS
Program Administrator will strive to assess the overall effectiveness of the
training programs supported under the cooperative agreements in terms of the
nation's needs and in relation to the target populations identified by
Congress in SARA Section 126 and related statutes which are referenced above.

o NIEHS maintains a National Clearinghouse for Worker Safety and Health
Training for Hazardous Materials, Waste Operations and Emergency Response to
assist awardees by providing information and technical support services to the
program directors of NIEHS funded hazardous materials, waste operations, and
emergency response worker training programs.  The Clearinghouse will also
function as a national resource for the dissemination to the general public of
program related information and curricular materials that have been developed
by the awardees.

3. Arbitration

o When mutually acceptable agreement regarding program activities cannot be
reached between the awardee and the NIEHS Program Administrator, an
arbitration panel composed of one member nominated by the awardee recipient
group, one NIEHS nominee, and a third member with appropriate expertise chosen
by the other two members will be convened.  The ad hoc panel will receive
written explanations of the disagreement from all parties, review relevant
documents, interview representatives of the parties and render an opinion
regarding resolution of the dispute.  These special arbitration procedures in
no way effect the awardee's right to appeal an adverse action in accordance
with PHS regulations at 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D, and HHS regulations at 45
CFR Part 16.

INFORMATIONAL MEETING

A briefing for applicants will be held at NIEHS in RTP, NC on Friday,
September 17, 1999 from 1-5 PM in Building 101, Conference Rooms A-B-C.  A
summary of responses from the briefing, all relevant information for potential
applicants and Special Instructions will be available upon request from NIEHS
(wetp@niehs.nih.gov) and will be posted on the NIEHS Worker Education and
Training Program (WETP) home page at:  http://www.niehs.nih.gov/wetp.

LETTER OF INTENT

Prospective applicants are asked to submit, by September 10, 1999, a brief
letter of intent that includes a descriptive title of the proposed research,
the name, address and telephone number of the Principal Investigator, the
identities of other key personnel and participating institutions, and the
number and title of the RFA in response to which the application may be
submitted.  Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and
does not enter into the review of subsequent application, the information that
it contains allows NIEHS staff to estimate the potential review work load and
to avoid conflict of interest in the review.  Specific questions pertaining to
this RFA can also be submitted to NIEHS at this time.

The letter of intent is to be sent to:

David Brown, M.P.H.
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
111 Alexander Drive, MD EC-24
P.O. Box 12233
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-4964
FAX:  (919) 541-2503
Email:  brown4@niehs.nih.gov


APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applications are to be submitted on the grant application for PHS 398 (rev.
4/98).  Application kits are available at most institutional offices of
sponsored research and may be obtained from the Division of Extramural
Outreach and Information Resources, National Institutes of Health, 6701
Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD  20892-7910, telephone 301/435-0714,
email:  GrantsInfo@nih.gov.

The RFA Label and line 2 of the application should both indicate the RFA
number.  The RFA label must be affixed to the bottom of the face page. 
Failure to use this label could result in delayed processing of the
application such that it may not reach the review committee in time for
review.

The RFA label is available at:
http://www.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/label-bk.pdf has been modified to
allow for this change.  Please note this is in pdf format.

Submit a signed typewritten original of the application, including the
checklist, and two (2) signed photocopies in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW (CSR)
NATIONAL INSTITUES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040, MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD  20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

No appendices should be submitted to the Center for Scientific Review.  At the
time of the submission, three (3) additional signed copies and five (5) copies
of the appendices must be sent to:

David P. Brown, M.P.H.
Scientific Review Branch
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P. O. Box 12233
79 T. W. Alexander Drive, 4401 Bldg.
Mail Drop EC-24
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-4964
FAX:  (919) 541-2503

Applications must be received at CSR by the close of business November 19,
1999 to ensure review. If an application is received after that date, it will
be returned to the applicant without review.  Copies sent to the NIH Center
for Scientific Review should clearly indicate that three copies have been sent
directly to NIEHS.  This is a modification of current instructions for
submission of Form PHS 398.

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications and supporting material will be examined for
completeness by the Center for Scientific Review, NIH.  In addition, the
Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT), NIEHS will do an
administrative review for completeness and responsiveness to the RFA;
incomplete applications will be returned to the applicant without further
consideration. The specific points of consideration are: (1) the
appropriateness of the training plan proposed in regard to the mission of the
NIEHS and the WETP; and  (2) the general completeness of the application
including responsiveness to programmatic requirements and the organizational
adequacy for review (this includes scientific, technical, and budgetary
considerations.)

Applications that are complete and responsive to this RFA will be evaluated
for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate peer review group
convened by NIEHS in accordance with the review criteria stated below.  The
committee will be composed primarily of non-government members with expertise
in occupational health and safety training related to hazardous materials,
waste operations and emergency response.

Since these applications are complex, it is essential that applications be
thoroughly prepared and that they be well organized in accordance with the
guidelines.  As part of the initial merit review, all applications will
receive a written critique and undergo a review in which only those
applications deemed to have the highest scientific merit will be discussed,
assigned a priority score based on the technical merit of the overall
application, and receive a second level review by the National Advisory
Environmental Health Sciences (NAEHS) Council.

It is important to note, peer review group members will examine proposed
budgets closely. The peer review group may recommend adjustments, as judged
appropriate, in the requested budgets and periods of support for the
components of WETP applications that are deemed to have significant and
substantial merit.

Review Criteria

The following factors shall be considered for review of all applications:

1) Evaluation of the methods and techniques to be used for identifying,
describing, and accessing target specific worker populations for worker health
and safety training and anticipated impact of the proposed program.
o Applicants must identify, describe, and fully document access to specific
target worker populations, whether organized or not, that are engaged in
hazardous materials and waste operations and transportation and related
emergency response.
o This information must include size of the target population, worker
profiles, trades and job categories to be trained, geographic locations of
workers and degree of worker health and safety training already received.
o Applicants must provide assurances of access to these workers for training
and delineate the target populations with respect to each of the statutory
authorities referenced above for EPA, OSHA and DOT.

2) Evaluation of the organization's performance and effectiveness in planning,
implementing and operating appropriate worker health and safety training and
education programs.
o Evidence should include demonstrated past success in development and
implementation of worker health and safety training and education programs and
application of appropriate adult education techniques.
o Evidence should include documentation of the program's achievement of
compliance with the requirements of the NIEHS Minimum Criteria for Worker
Health and Safety Training for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency
Response.

3) Adequacy of the detailed program plan for worker health and safety training
in adapting existing curricula, training of instructors, distributing course
materials, direct worker training, and conducting program evaluations.
o The plan must include information on the number of students to be trained,
number of training classes to be held, duration of training, appropriate adult
education techniques to be employed, and course content.
o Plans for hands on demonstration and instruction must be provided as well as
plans for monitoring student's progress and performance.
o The plan shall include involvement of appropriate health and safety
disciplines.
o The plan must describe a system for tracking trainee employment in hazmat-
related jobs.
o The plan must identify and describe the curriculum to be used.

4) Evidence of appropriate combinations of classroom instruction and hands on
demonstration and instruction that simulates site activities and conditions.
o It is intended that offsite instruction funded by the NIEHS assistance
program will be supplemented with onsite training under the direct supervision
of trained, experienced personnel at the time of initial job assignment.
o Appropriate adult education techniques must be applied and the use of
advanced training technologies as a program delivery component is encouraged.
o Both initial and appropriate refresher training will be covered.

5) Ability to immediately initiate direct worker health and safety training,
program evaluation, and related support activities.

6) Evidence of experienced and technically qualified key personnel.
o The Principal Investigator must demonstrate the capacity for providing
leadership and assuring productivity of appropriate worker health and safety
training and education programs and for overall management of the training
programs including quality assurance and program evaluation.
o Evidence of the technical, managerial and professional expertise of present
or proposed key personnel. Such expertise will be evaluated by resumes,
minimum position qualifications and position descriptions.
o Evidence that the administrative official has experience or knowledge in the
management of federal programs and will participate in program decisions
should be contained in the application.
o Evidence of sufficient program staff with demonstrated training experience
using appropriate adult education techniques to assure effective direct
training, and quality assurance.
o Availability and continuing access to appropriate technical expertise
including but not limited to adult education techniques for workers,
toxicology and industrial hygiene must be available.

7) Evaluation of an applicantþs organizational structure that provides
adequate knowledge and oversight of resources and administrative management of
the program.  These should include:
o Details on how the proposed program fits into existing organizational
structure of the non-profit, if applicable.
o Organization chart of the proposed program.
o Details of an external board of advisors that represents user populations,
labor, industry, governmental agencies, academic institutions or professional
associations with interest and expertise in worker health and safety training
related to hazardous materials and waste operations and emergency response.
o Plans, membership (proposed or invited) and minutes (if applicable) that
show that the external board will meet regularly to evaluate training
activities and will develop formal procedures to provide advice to the Program
Director.
o Demonstration of the ability to maintain satisfactory management and
accounting systems to control funds and expenditures
o Flow chart or description of financial management and fiscal accountability
policies and procedures.

8) Availability of appropriate facilities and equipment to support the
described worker health and safety training and education activities including
hands on instruction.
o Operation of training facilities must assure the protection of prospective
trainees during program delivery.
o Appropriate policies and procedures for assuring fitness for training and
medical clearance, assuring the provision of first aid and emergency medical
services and the implementation of high quality site safety and health plans
must be included.

9) Evidence of methods proposed for evaluating appropriateness, quality,
impact and effectiveness of worker health and safety training.
o This should include student feedback mechanisms, review of course critiques
and Board of Advisors evaluations and other appropriate evaluations and
quality assurance procedures.

10) Feasibility of plans for independently continuing the program.
o Plans for generation of program income, if applicable.
o Plans for institutionalization of the program.
o Other applicable procedures for assuring the long-term viability of the
program.

11) Evaluation of plans for reaching underserved worker populations especially
those disadvantaged in education, culture, or language or limited in literacy
and access to training.
o Evidence of mechanisms to assure the inclusion of institutions and
organizations which have historical involvement and expertise in responding to
environmental justice issues.
o A community outreach and involvement component which can augment the
delivery of high quality training in order to promote toxic use reduction,
emergency preparedness in the community, and community awareness of chemical
process safety and pollution prevention.

12) Reasonableness of all direct cost categories requested in the budget and
budget justification in relation to proposed program activities for worker
health and safety training.

13) Adequacy of prior awardeeþs progress in competitive renewals.
o Demonstration of meeting established terms and conditions of prior awards.
o Demonstration of attainment of program goals and objectives of prior awards.
o Demonstration of ability to manage and expend funds in a timely manner in
prior budget periods.

14) Evidence of inclusion of worker training initiatives and innovations.
o The plan must integrate an appropriate mix of new program initiatives as
listed in solicitation that meets the needs of each applicantþs target
populations.

The Minority Worker Training Program  - In addition to the RFA review criteria
#1-14 for all programs, the following review criteria are applicable to the
MWT program:

1.  Demonstration of applicants' ability to recruit workers from the target
population for environmental clean-up jobs.

2.  Experience in conducting effective jobs skills training and worker health
and safety training programs for environmental clean-up.

3.  Demonstration of partnerships or sub-agreements with local community
groups, labor unions with apprenticeship programs, academic and other
institutions, with a particular focus on historically black colleges and
universities, and public schools located in or nearby an environmentally-
impacted urban area to provide pre-math, science or other related education to
program participants prior to, or concurrent with, entry into the training
program.

4.  Evidence of formal arrangements with environmental clean-up contractors
and hazardous materials employers for placing and keeping participants in
environmental clean-up jobs.

5.  Evaluation of the retention of participants in the training program,
effectiveness of the training program and stability and longevity of post-
training employment of graduating training program participants.

Brownfields Minority Worker Training Program - In addition to the criteria #
1-14 and the MWTP criteria, additional review criteria applicable to the BMWTP
only are:

1.  Demonstrate the sharing of resources with the MWTP in order to maximize
worker group coverage, enhance the effectiveness of training, and bring
together appropriate academic disciplines and talents. Such arrangements are
strongly encouraged.

2.  Evaluation of the specific plans and mechanisms to implement the
cooperative arrangements necessary for program integration and to insure
effectiveness such as identifying specific expertise, facilities or services
to be provided by each participating member.

3.  Evaluation of the plans to identify the training populations being
targeted by specifying discrete training plan and program resources.

4.  Evaluate the plan to develop partnerships with EPA Brownfields Assessment
Demonstration Pilots.

5.  Evidence of connections with other job training and economic development
programs such as Job Training and Partnership Acts, Welfare to Work, School to
Work, Community College Programs, Community Development Programs and HUD
Empowerment/Enterprise Program.

6.  Evaluate the ability to track program participants for up to one year
after completion of the program.

7.  Evidence to specifically target cleanup contractors involved with
Brownfields, state voluntary clean-up sites, and other contaminated urban
sites.

8.  Demonstrate that actual training activity occurs in a close proximity of
the Brownfields Pilot Community such that extensive travel funds are not
incurred for the purposes of administrating the program.

9.  Evaluate the ability to track program participants for up to one year
after completion of the program.

Schedule

Letters of Intent Receipt Date:  September 10, 1999
Briefing for Applicants:         September 17, 1999
Application Receipt Date:        November 19, 1999
Secondary review by NAEHSC:      May 16, 2000
Initiation of New Awards:        September 1, 2000

AWARD CRITERIA

Because the funding level of this program may vary from that appropriated,
actual award levels for approved and funded applications will be based on
program balance, coverage of target populations and the availability of funds,
in addition to the technical merit considerations of the review process.

INQUIRIES

NIEHS welcomes the opportunity to clarify any issues or questions from
potential applicants concerning this RFA.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Joseph Hughes, Director
Worker Education and Training Program
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
79 TW Alexander Drive, MD EC-25
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709-2233
Telephone: (919)-541-0217
Fax: (919) 541-0462
Email: hughes3@niehs.nih.gov

Sharon Beard, Industrial Hygienist
Worker Education and Training Program
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
79 TW Alexander Drive, MD EC-25
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709-2233
Telephone: (919)-541-1863
Fax: (919) 558-7049
Email: beard1@niehs.nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Dorothy Duke, Grants Management Officer
Office of Program Operations
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
79 TW Alexander Drive, MD EC-22
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709-2233
Telephone:  (919) 541-2749
Fax: (919) 541-2860
Email:  duke3@niehs.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, No.
93.142, Superfund Worker Training Grants.  Awards will be made under the
authority of the Public Health Service Act, Title III, Section 301 (Public Law
78 410, as amended; 42 USC 241) and Section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments
and Reauthorization Act of 1986 and administered under PHS grant policies and
Federal Regulations 42 CFR Part 52 and 45 CFR Part 74.  This program is not
subject to the intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372
or Health Systems Agency review.  The program is administered according to 42
CFR 45 Part 74 and Part 92, DHHS Administration of Grants; 42 CFR Part 65,
Special Regulations for National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Hazardous Waste Worker Training; the PHS Grants Administration Manual; and PHS
Grants Policy Statement.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a
smoke-free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In
addition, Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking
in certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which
regular or routine education, library, day care, health care or early
childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent
with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of
the American people.


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