Full Text DC-94-002

NATIONAL MULTIPURPOSE RESEARCH AND TRAINING CENTERS

NIH GUIDE, Volume 23, Number 15, April 15, 1994

RFA AVAILABLE:  DC-94-002

P.T.


Keywords: 


National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  June 10, 1994
Application Receipt Date:  October 20, 1994

PURPOSE

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
(NIDCD) announces its intent to designate and support a limited
number of National Multi-purpose Research and Training Centers for
the multidisciplinary study of hearing and other communication
processes.  The goal of these Centers is the support of basic and
clinical research; research training; continuing education for health
professionals; and dissemination of information to the general
public, in one or more of the NIDCD program areas.

A National Multipurpose Research and Training Center is a national
resource and is dedicated to working with the NIDCD in furthering the
goals of the NIDCD, through a multidisciplinary, coordinated approach
involving basic and clinical research, research training, continuing
education for health care professionals, and dissemination of
information to the public.  A Center may focus on one or more of the
major scientific areas of the NIDCD (hearing, balance, smell, taste,
voice, speech, and language), but each of the components, including
the research training and continuing education components, must
relate to the central theme of the Center.  All of the components
must be of high quality, as judged by the NIH standards for
biomedical and behavioral research excellence.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health
promotion and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000,"
a PHS-led national activity for setting priority areas.  This RFA,
National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers, is related to
the priority area of education and community-based programs.
Potential applicants may obtain a copy of "Healthy People 2000" (Full
Report:  Stock No. 017-001-11474-0) or "Healthy People 2000" (Summary
Report:  Stock No. 017-001-11473-1) through the Superintendent of
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325
(telephone 202-783-3238).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Any of the following domestic organizations are eligible to apply:
non-profit institutions of higher education; other non-profit and
for-profit organizations; state and local governments and their
agencies; and authorized Federal agencies.  Domestic institutions may
include foreign components.  Holding a currently funded National
Multipurpose Research and Training Center, Program Project (P01),
Clinical Research Center Grant (P50) or Institutional Training Grant
(T32) does not preclude an organization from applying.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers will be funded
through the Comprehensive Center grant mechanism (P60).  Competitive
supplemental applications to the Center grant are not allowed.

FUNDS AVAILABLE

According to current budgetary predictions, it is anticipated that up
to five awards will be made, some in FY 1995 and some in FY 1996.
Five years of support must be requested at a direct cost not to
exceed one million dollars for the first year.  The award of National
Multipurpose Research and Training Center grants is contingent upon
the assessment of the applications by peer review and the allocation
of appropriated funds for this purpose.  Funding for Center grants
beyond the initial period will be subject to competitive renewal.

Although this solicitation is included in the plans for Fiscal Year
1995 and Fiscal Year 1996, support of grants pursuant to this request
for applications is contigent upon availibility of funds for this
purpose.  It is anticipated that up to five new and competing renewal
Centers may be funded under this RFA, some in FY 95 and some in FY96.
The level of funding of individual Centers will be influenced by the
individual merit of proposals, the level of support recommended by
the initial scientific review, and the amount of funds available to
the NIDCD.

It is expected that investigators collaborating within the Center
will not necessarily derive all of their support from the Center
grant mechanism.  However, if proposed projects within the Center
grant mechanism overlap with current support (for example, with an
ongoing R01), the investigator must accept the project support only
within the Center grant mechanism.  While the development of new
instrumentation or assistive devices may be a part of the Center,
support for such development alone should not be funded in the RTC.
In general, funds will not be provided for the purchase and
installation of expensive equipment.  NIDCD staff should be consulted
if an applicant has questions regarding these limitations.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background

In 1988, Congress established the National Institute on Deafness and
Other Communication Disorders in Public Law 100-553, which mandated
that "the Director of the Institute shall, after consultation with
the advisory council for the Institute, provide for the development,
modernization, and operation (including care required for research)
of new and existing Centers for studies of disorders of hearing and
other communication processes".

The law further specified that each Center shall conduct--

(1) basic and clinical research into the cause, diagnosis, early
detection, prevention, control and treatment of disorders of hearing
and other communication processes and complications resulting from
such disorders, including research into rehabilitative aids,
implantable biomaterials, auditory speech processors, speech
production devices, and other otolaryngologic procedures;

(2) training programs for physicians, scientists, and other health
and allied health professionals;

(3) information and continuing education programs for physicians and
other health and allied health professionals who will provide care
for patients with disorders of hearing or other communication
processes; and

(4) programs for the dissemination to the general public of
information--

(A) on the importance of early detection of disorders of hearing and
other communication processes, of seeking prompt treatment,
rehabilitation, and of following an appropriate regimen; and

(B) on the importance of avoiding exposure to noise and other
environmental toxic agents that may affect disorders of hearing or
other communication processes.

In 1989, over 100 U.S. scientists representing various specialties in
the communication sciences met to develop a research plan for the
NIDCD.  One panel of these scientists addressed the issue of the
National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers.  With the
Congressional mandate providing guidance, the Task Force identified
and elucidated the critical features of such Centers, that is,
research, research training, continuing education, and information
dissemination.  In FY90, the NIDCD issued a Request for Applications
(RFA) for National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers.  Three
Centers were funded that year.  In FY91, two additional Centers were
funded.

The purpose of this current RFA is to request applications for:  (1)
new National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers and, (2) the
continuation of existing National Multipurpose Research and Training
Centers.

Scope

The purpose of the National Multipurpose Research and Training
Centers (RTC) is to enhance research in hearing and other
communication processes.  The Centers will stimulate important areas
of basic and clinical research.  By utilizing a multidisciplinary
approach, these Centers will provide broad-based solutions to complex
human communication problems.

Each Center must have research activity in the basic sciences. This
activity may include disciplines such as molecular biology and
genetics, cellular biology, neurochemistry, immunology, microbiology,
epidemiology, and biomedical engineering.  Ideally, the Center will
draw together the multidisciplinary resources of the institution to
investigate the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and
prevention of specific communication impairments.  The Center may
also undertake/conduct population-based studies and genetic studies
related to the specific communication disorder(s) being studied.

Clinical investigations will focus on the etiology, diagnosis,
treatment, rehabilitation, and/or prevention of specific impairments.
Suggested areas may include: deafness and hearing disorders in
children; presbycusis; balance or vestibular disorders, particularly
in the elderly; aphasia; stuttering; and disorders of smell and
taste.  Clinical research activities may also include studies of
implantable biomaterials and biomechanical diagnostic and assistive
devices.  Each Center should seek to establish the effectiveness of
new and improved methods of detection, referral, and diagnosis of
individuals at risk for developing the particular disorder(s) that is
the focus of the research program of the Center.

The Center will provide research training opportunities, thereby
strengthening the quality and increasing the number of investigators
in communication sciences.  Medical and surgical residents, pre- and
post-doctoral fellows, and students will benefit from research
training in a multidisciplinary environment.  Special emphasis may be
placed on independent investigators who apply such methods as
immunology or molecular biology to problems within the communication
sciences.  In addition, research training for clinical professionals
such as otolaryngologists, speech-language pathologists,
audiologists, and chemosensory psychophysicists is encouraged.

Each Center will develop continuing education programs for physicians
and other health care professionals who provide care to patients with
disorder(s) within the research focus of the Center.  Education
programs should include information on current methods of early
diagnosis and treatment, as well as seek to disseminate the results
of research activities.

Centers will also include programs for the dissemination of
information to the general public on the importance of early
detection of the particular disorders or impairments under study, of
seeking prompt treatment, rehabilitation, and when indicated, of
following an appropriate therapeutic regimen.  When appropriate,
these public information programs may also focus on the importance of
avoiding exposure to noise or other environmental toxic agents that
may affect the impairments under examination.

It is essential that the continuing education and information
dissemination programs develop and implement evaluation
instruments/tools that measure the effectiveness of these activities
so that useful techniques may be shared with other Centers and health
care providers.  The NIDCD expects each Center to develop its own
program in accordance with local strengths, talents, interests, and
resources.  Each RTC must be willing to cooperate actively with other
Centers awarded under this and other NIDCD Center solicitations;
collaboration is encouraged.

The NIDCD expects each Center to develop an External Advisory
Committee.  These committees should provide direction, evaluation,
and input to RTC staff on a regular basis.  NIDCD Health Scientist
Administrators (HSAs) will coordinate plans for any special
activities focusing on issues of mutual interest to the Institute and
the RTCs.  These may include training, information techniques, or
continuing education, for example.  NIDCD HSAs will be responsible
for evaluating progress.  To foster cooperation among Centers, the
Center Directors will meet with NIDCD staff at least once a year to
review progress and coordinate similar activities.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

Applicants for the "National Multipurpose Research and Training
Centers" Grant Award must propose a program that includes:

1.  Basic and Clinical Research.  The research program must have a
central theme, involving basic research and clinical research into
the etiology, diagnosis, early detection, prevention, and treatment
of one or more disorders of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice,
speech, and language.  There must be three or more related and
integrated research projects of high quality that provide a
multi-disciplinary yet unified approach to the problems being
investigated.  Each project must be described fully.  Each individual
research component must be meritorious.  The Center Director
coordinates all projects included in the Center and must have
recognized skills as both a scientist and a research administrator.

One or more cores, for the support of resources serving the research
projects, may be included.  These cores are most appropriate for
common resources such as equipment, histologic processing,
biostatistics, and so forth.

2.  Research Training.  The training program enables
cross-disciplinary training for physicians, pre-and post-doctoral
fellows, and students in the areas of communication sciences and
disorders which are the focus of the RTC.  The research training
component of the RTC must provide research training opprortunities
for individuals with varying levels of research experience.  Plans
for recruitment of underrepresented minorities, women, and
individuals with disabilities must be included within this component
of the application.

The RTCs follow the NRSA guidelines for Institutional Training Grants
(see the announcement in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol.
21, No. 11, March 20, 1992).  However, high school students and
undergraduates, although precluded by the NRSA program, may be
supported within the research training component of the RTC.  The
stipend levels for these trainees will be set in accordance with the
guidelines of the NIH-wide minority supplement program and the
National Center for Research Resources Minority High School Students
Research Apprentice Program (see the announcement in the NIH Guide
for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 22, No. 45, December 17, 1993).

In the preparation of an application, it is required that a
description of the institution's plan to provide instruction on
ethics in research training be included (see the announcement in the
NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Vol. 19, No. 30, August 17,
1990).

3.  Continuing Education.  Educational programs are designed for
physicians and other health and allied health professionals who will
provide care for individuals with disorders of hearing or
communication processes.  The design, scope, and steps in the
implementation of these programs are left to the applicants to
develop.

4.  Information Dissemination.  Information from the Center is
disseminated to the public and, when appropriate, technology is
transferred for clinical utilization and commercial product
development.  This component of the RTC should include programs for
the dissemination of information to the general public on the
importance of prevention and early detection of disorders of the
communication processes which are the focus of the Center, and on the
importance of seeking prompt treatment, rehabilitation, and following
an appropriate therapeutic regimen.

Other Activities

In addition, where appropriate, the Centers may pursue the following
activities:

a.  Evaluation of the effectiveness of existing, new, and improved
methods of habilitation and rehabilitation (especially with
hearing-impaired and language-impaired children, the elderly, and
multi-cultural populations); and detection, assessment, and treatment
of communication disorders.

b.  Epidemiologic and genetic studies related to specific
communication disorders.

Basic and clinical research should comprise approximately fifty
percent of the activity and resources of the Center.  Research
training should also be a significant proportion of the Center
activity.  The remaining resources may be distributed among
information dissemination, continuing education and other activities
(if included).

The Center director must be a scientist who can provide strong and
effective administrative leadership.  The Center director will be
responsible for the organization and operation of the RTC and for
communication with NIDCD on scientific and operational matters.

Interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary collaboration among scientists
working within the Center is considered a necessity for an effective
center grant.  Each application should contain a plan to assure
continuing interaction among participating scientists and among other
NIDCD-funded research and training Centers.

Scientific personnel and institutional resources capable of providing
a strong research base in the field of communication sciences and
disorders must be available.  In addition, the applicant institution
and pertinent department(s) should show a strong commitment to the
Center's support.  The Center should typically share common
resources, including technical, clerical, and administrative
personnel, instrumentation, computer resources, subject populations,
and data bases.

The Center may be a consortium of institutions, organizations, and
medical facilities.

Budget Guidelines

o  Five years of support must be requested at a direct cost not to
exceed one million dollars for the first year.  Budget increments
after the first year will be limited to necessary cost-of-living
increases.

o  Requests for travel should include an estimate for one meeting per
year for the Center Director, and one other Center staff member, with
NIDCD staff in Bethesda, Maryland.

o  Stipends for research trainees, provided from funds for the RTC,
will be set at the level of the NIH National Research Service Award
(NRSA) program.  Trainee-related expenses should be requested in
accordance with NRSA guidelines.

o  Consideration should be given in budget planning to those
activities that would not be able to start immediately such as
continuing education or information dissemination.  Costs should be
phased in for these activities based on realistic start dates.

o  All costs must be well justified by the programmatic activities of
the Center.

STUDY POPULATIONS

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN
SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups
and their subpopulations must be included in all NIH supported
biomedical and behavioral research projects involving human subjects,
unless a clear and compelling rationale and justification is provided
that inclusion is inappropriate with respect to the health of the
subjects or the purpose of the research.  This new policy results
from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (Section 492B of Public Law
103-43) and supersedes and strengthens the previous policies
(Concerning the Inclusion of Women in Study Populations, and
Concerning the Inclusion of Minorities in Study Populations), which
have been in effect since 1990. The new policy contains some
provisions that are substantially different from the 1990 policies.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should
read the "NIH Guidelines For Inclusion of Women and Minorities as
Subjects in Clinical Research," which have been published in the
Federal Register of March 9, 1994 (FR 59 11146-11151) and reprinted
in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Volume 23, Number 11,
March 18, 1994.

Investigators also may obtain copies of the policy from the program
staff listed under INQUIRIES.  Program staff may also provide
additional relevant information concerning the policy.

LETTER OF INTENT

To facilitate NIDCD planning, applicants are requested to submit a
letter of intent by June 10, 1994.  The letter should include a
descriptive title, names of investigators who might be involved, and
names of any participants outside the applicant institution.  The
NIDCD requests such letters only for the purpose of providing an
indication of the number and scope of applications to be received
and, therefore, does not acknowledge their receipt.  A letter of
intent is not binding, it will not enter into the review of any
application subsequently submitted, nor is it a requirement.

The letter of intent is to be sent to Dr. Ralph F. Naunton at the
address listed under INQUIRIES.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

It may be helpful to develop applications in close communication with
NIDCD extramural program officials, who will provide guidance to
applicants on administrative issues prior to submission.

The applicant is to prepare a complete application form PHS 398 (rev.
9/91) for a research grant application.  The training component must
be submitted in accordance with the section for Institutional
National Research Service Awards.  This form is available in the
applicant institution's office of sponsored research and may be
obtained from the Office of Grants Information, Division of Research
Grants, National Institutes of Health, Westwood Building, Room 449
Bethesda, MD 20892, telephone 301/435-0714.

Applicants should utilize the instructions described in the document
"Application Guidelines:  National Multipurpose Research and Training
Centers (RTC)," available upon request from the program staff listed
under INQUIRIES.  To identify the application as a response to this
RFA, check "YES" in Item 2a on the face page of the application and
enter the title "National Multipurpose Research and Training Centers"
and the RFA number DC-94-002 in the space provided.

The RFA label available in the form PHS 398 (rev. 9/91) application
kit must be affixed to the bottom of the face page of the original
completed application form.  Failure to use this label could result
in delayed processing of the application such that it may not reach
the review committee in time for review.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including
the checklist, and three signed photocopies, in one package to:

Division of Research Grants
National Institutes of Health
Westwood Building, Room 240
Bethesda, MD  20892**

At the time of submission, two additional copies of the application
must also be sent to:

Chief, Scientific Review Branch
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
Executive Plaza South, Room 400-C
6120 Executive Boulevard
Rockville, MD  20892

Applications must be received by October 20, 1994.  If an application
is received after that date, it will be returned to the applicant.
The Division of Research Grants (DRG) will not accept any application
in response to this RFA that is essentially the same as one currently
pending initial review, unless the applicant withdraws the pending
application.  The DRG will not accept any application that is
essentially the same as one already reviewed.  This does not preclude
the submission of substantial revisions of applications already
reviewed, but such applications must include an introduction
addressing the previous critique.

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed by the DRG for
completeness.  Incomplete applications will be returned to the
applicant without further consideration.  Evaluation for
responsiveness to the program requirements and criteria stated in the
RFA is an NIDCD staff function.  If the application is not
responsive, it will be returned to the applicant.

Those applications that are complete and responsive will be evaluated
in accordance with the criteria stated below for scientific/technical
merit by an appropriate peer review group convened by the NIDCD.  If
the number of applications is large compared to the number of awards
to be made, a preliminary scientific peer review may be conducted and
applications withdrawn from further competition if deemed not
competitive for the award.  The NIDCD will notify the applicant and
institutional official of this action.

Those applications judged to be competitive will be further reviewed
for scientific and technical merit in accordance with NIH peer review
procedures by an initial review group specifically convened by the
NIDCD for this RFA.  A site visit or applicant interview in Bethesda,
Maryland will be considered, if appropriate.  The site visit team
and/or IRG may recommend adjustments, as judged appropriate, in the
requested budgets and periods of support for the components of the
program which are deemed to be of significant and substantial merit.
Following the review, the applications will be given a second level
of review by the Advisory Council unless not recommended for further
consideration by the initial review group.

Review criteria for RFAs are generally the same as those for
unsolicited research grant applications.

o  scientific, technical, or medical significance and originality of
proposed research;

o  appropriateness and adequacy of the experimental approach and
methodology proposed to carry out the research;

o  availability of resources necessary to perform the research;

o  appropriateness of the proposed budget and duration in relation to
the proposed research;

Additional scientific/technical merit criteria specific to the
objectives of the RFA are:

1.  Review Criteria for Individual Research Projects and Other
Activities

o  Scientific, technical, or clinical significance and originality of
the proposed research; each project should be rated on its own merit.

o  Appropriateness and adequacy of the experimental approach and
methodology proposed to carry out the research.

o  Qualifications and research experience of the individual project
principal investigator and staff, particularly, but not exclusively,
in the area of the proposed research.

o  Availability of resources necessary for the research.

o  Appropriateness of the proposed budget and timetable in relation
to the scope of the proposed research.

o  The adequacy of the proposed means for protecting against or
minimizing potential adverse effects upon humans, animals, or the
environment.

o  Adequacy of adherence to guidelines for including gender and
minority representation in any study populations.

2.  Review Criteria for Individual Cores

o  Utility of the core to the research and training center; each core
must provide essential facilities or service for two or more projects
judged to have substantial scientific merit.

o  Quality of the facilities or services provided by this core
(including procedures, techniques, and quality control and criteria
for prioritization of usage).

o  Qualifications, experience, and commitment of the personnel
involved in the core.

o  Appropriateness of the budget.

In the case of the review of a competing continuation (renewal)
application, the progress made during the past period of funding is
also an important consideration in the review of projects and cores.

3.  Review Criteria for Overall Center

The relationship and contributions of each research component and
core (excluding those recommended for no further consideration) to
the overall theme of the center are discussed and evaluated.  This is
a separate consideration which is not influenced by the merit ratings
of the individual projects.  Although projects recommended for no
further consideration automatically are removed from consideration as
part of the overall center, this will reflect on the leadership
capabilities of the principal investigator/program director.

The overall center application is evaluated considering the remaining
projects, supporting cores, and the administrative structure.  For
the center to receive a priority score, it must consist of at least
three projects (each found to have significant and substantial merit)
for the duration of the project period.  Each core must provide
essential functions or services for at least two of these projects.

Specific factors to be evaluated in the consideration of the overall
center are as follows:

a.  Scientific Considerations

o  Scientific merit of the program as a whole, as well as that of
individual projects.

o  Significance of the overall program goals.

o  Scientific gain of combining the component parts into a center
(beyond that achievable if each project were to be pursued
separately).

o  Cohesiveness and multidisciplinary scope of the program and the
coordination and interrelationship of all individual research
projects and cores to the common theme.

o  Leadership and scientific ability of the principal
investigator/program director and his or her commitment and ability
to develop a well-defined central research focus and to devote
adequate time and effort to the program.

o  Past accomplishments of the program or a demonstrated ability in
mounting similar programs.

Additional criteria for competing continuation (renewal) applications
include:

o  Progress and achievements specific to this center since the
previous competitive review and the documentation through
publications, conferences, etc., that collaboration has occurred;

o  Evidence that the previous specific aims have been accomplished
and that the new research goals are logical extensions of ongoing
work;

o  Previous performance and estimated use of the core(s);

o  Justification for adding new projects or cores or for deleting
components previously supported.

b.  Administrative Considerations

For all center applications (new and competing continuation), in
addition to evaluating the scientific components, the review also
will assess:

o  Academic environment and resources in which the research will be
conducted, including availability of space, equipment, human
subjects, animals, or other resources as required, and the potential
for interaction with scientists from other departments;

o  Institutional commitment to the requirements of the program,
including fiscal responsibility and management capability of the
institution to assist the principal investigator/program director and
his or her staff in following DHHS, PHS, and NIH policy;

o  Administrative planning and leadership capability to provide for
internal quality control of ongoing research, allocation of funds,
enhancement of internal communication and cooperation among the
investigators involved in the program, and replacement of the
principal investigator/program director if required on an interim or
permanent basis;

o  External Advisory Committee and its proposed purpose, membership
and function.

o  Appropriateness of the budget in relation to the proposed program;

o  Human subjects protection, animal welfare, and biohazard issues.

4.  Review Criteria for Research Training Component

o  Past research training record for both the program and the
designated preceptors in terms of the rate at which former trainees
establish independent and productive research careers.

o  Past research training record in terms of the success of former
trainees in obtaining individual awards such as fellowships, career
awards, and research grants for further development.

o  Objectives, design, and direction of the research training
program.

o  Caliber of preceptors as scientists including successful
competition for research support.

o  Training environment including the institutional commitment, the
quality of the facilities, and the availability of research support.

o  Recruitment and selection plans for appointees and the
availability of high quality candidates.

o  The record of the research training program in retaining
health-professional postdoctoral trainees for at least two years in
research training or other research activities.

o  When appropriate, the concomitant training of health-professional
postdoctorates (e.g., individuals with the M.D., D.O., D.D.S.) with
basic science postdoctorates (e.g., individuals with a Ph.D., Sci.D.)
will receive special consideration.

5.  Review Criteria for  Continuing Education Component

o  the major continuing education goals and functions of the
sponsoring organization;

o  the audience served (i.e., the range of professionals who would
participate);

o  procedures to be used to determine the continuing education needs
of the audience served;

o  the adequacy of the proposed program content and plans for its
provision;

o  qualifications of the individual responsible for the continuing
education component and the teaching staff;

o  appropriateness, range, and scope of the educational programs
offered to health-related professionals;

o  administrative support and physical facilities available for these
activities; and

o  adequacy of evaluation methodology to determine the effectiveness
of the continuing education program.

6.  Review Criteria for Information Dissemination

o  The appropriateness of the proposed methods to assure the quality
of information disseminated (for example, review by peers in the
field);

o  the adequacy of the proposed plan for information dissemination
and technology transfer;

o  the format and content of the information to be disseminated;

o  the breadth or range of audiences that will be served, with
special attention to the needs of users of languages other than
English;

o  previous experience of the applicant organization in information
dissemination and technology transfer; and

o  adequacy of evaluation methodology to determine the effectiveness
of the information dissemination programs.

AWARD CRITERIA

Funding decisions will be based on priority score, availability of
funds, and programmatic priorities.

INQUIRIES

Written and telephone inquiries concerning this RFA are encouraged.
The opportunity to clarify any issues or questions from potential
applicants is welcome.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Ralph F. Naunton, M.D.
Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
Executive Plaza South, Room 400-C
6120 Executive Boulevard
Rockville, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-1804
FAX:  (301) 402-6251

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Ms. Sharon Hunt
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
Executive Plaza South, Suite 400-B
Rockville, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 402-0909

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic
Assistance No. 93.3 .  Awards are made under authorization of the
Public Health Service Act, Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as
amended by Public Law 99-158, 42 USC 241 and 285) and administered
under PHS grants policies and Federal Regulations 42CFR 52 and 45 CFR
Part 74.  This program is not subject to the intergovernmental review
requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems Agency
review.

The Public Health Service strongly encourages all grant recipients to
provide a smoke-free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco
products.  This is consistent with the PHS mission to protect and
advance the physical and mental health of the American people.

.

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