TECHNOLOGIES FOR GENERATION OF FULL-LENGTH MAMMALIAN cDNA

Release Date:  March 5, 1999

RFA:  CA-99-005

P.T.

National Cancer Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute on Aging
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute of Mental Health
National Eye Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
National Library of Medicine

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  April 6, 1999
Application Receipt Date:  May 13, 1999

This RFA is a reissuance of CA-98-004, which was published in the NIH Guide,
Vol. 26, No. 39, December 5, 1997.

PURPOSE

In an effort to provide the research community with high quality, full-length
mammalian cDNA clones and sequences, the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
has established the Full-Length cDNA Initiative, managed by a trans-NIH
steering committee.  Ultimately, the clones and sequences produced through
this initiative will provide a "gold standard" set of reagents for use by the
research community.  This Request for Application (RFA) targets one component
of the initiative: cDNA cloning technology development.

The purpose of this RFA is to support the development of technologies that
will facilitate the generation of a complete set of full-length human cDNAs as
well as other mammalian cDNAs.  Current methods of cDNA clone and library
production favor shorter, more heavily represented genes.  In addition,
although current methodology for isolating mRNA for use in cDNA construction
works well with cell lines, reliable methodologies for extraction of high
quality mRNA from tissues remains a challenge.  Use of human tissues may be
necessary to achieve the goal of a complete set of human cDNA clones. Finally,
reliable, high-throughput methods to determine whether clones contain a copy
of the full transcript, the full coding region, or a partial transcript are
needed.  This RFA is intended to support innovative research projects aimed at
solving one or more of the problems currently associated with the production
of a complete set of full-length human cDNA clones and full-length cDNA clones
from other mammals.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS-led national
activity for setting priority areas. This RFA, Technologies for Generation of
Full-Length Mammalian cDNAs, is related to several priority areas, including
cancer, heart disease and stroke, diabetes and chronic disability conditions
and maternal and fetal health.  Potential applicants may obtain a copy of
"Healthy People 2000" (Full Report:  Stock No. 017-001-00474-0 or Summary
Report:  Stock No. 017-001-00473-1) through the Superintendent of Documents,
Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325 (telephone
202-512-1800), or at http://www.crisny.org/health/us/health7.html.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applications may be submitted by domestic and foreign, for-profit and
non-profit organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges,
hospitals, laboratories, units of State and local governments, and eligible
agencies of the Federal government.  Racial/ethnic minority individuals,
women, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply as Principal
Investigators.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

Support for this program will be through the NIH research project grant (R01)
and exploratory/developmental research grant (R21) mechanisms.  Investigators
may propose small, high-risk pilot projects, requiring budgets of up to
$100,000 direct costs per year for two years using the R21 funding mechanism
or they may propose larger research projects of up to three years using the
R01 funding mechanism.  The total project period for an application submitted
in response to this RFA may not exceed two years for an R21 and three years
for an R01.  The anticipated award date is September 30, 1999.

This RFA is a one-time solicitation although it may be reissued if this area
of research remains an identified area of high priority by the advisory groups
to the NIH Full-Length cDNA Program.  Future unsolicited competing
continuation applications will compete with all investigator-initiated
applications and will be reviewed according to the customary peer review
procedures.  Awards will be administered under NIH grants policy as stated in
the NIH Grants Policy Statement, NIH Publications No. 99-8, October 1998.  The
responsibility for the planning, direction, and execution of the proposed
project will be solely that of the applicant.

FUNDS AVAILABLE

The participating Institutes and Centers intend to commit $2.0 million (total
costs per year) to fund grants through this RFA.  Approximately ten awards are
expected to be made from the pool of applications received.  The number of
awards made will be contingent upon the quality of the applications received
and the availability of funds.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background:

Access to high quality mammalian cDNA clones and sequences is critical for the
rapid progression of biomedical research.  Although a variety of cDNA
development and production efforts have been and continue to be supported by
the NIH, there is a need to expand upon and consolidate these existing
efforts.  To this end, the NIH  has established the Full-Length cDNA
Initiative.  The ultimate goal of this NIH-wide initiative is to generate a
complete set of full-length human cDNA clones and their sequences as well as
cDNA clones and sequences from other mammalian species.  The NIH Full-Length
cDNA Initiative will support a variety of complementary efforts leading toward
the efficient production and sequencing of full-length mammalian cDNAs. The
success of this initiative depends on the timely availability of  all the
clones and sequences generated by this initiative, to ensure a publicly
accessible gold standard set of  reagents for biomedical research.

It is expected that by using current cDNA cloning and selection methods on
human cell lines, the full coding sequence of the majority of human and other
mammalian genes can be isolated as cDNA clones.  However, the genes that
remain present several cloning challenges.  Since current methodology favors
shorter clones,  genes with long coding regions are absent or are present as
partial clones in cDNA libraries.  Current methods also favor more highly
expressed genes.  In addition, splice variants are represented differently in
different tissues.  Obtaining  a full set of human cDNAs and understanding
patterns of tissue-specific gene expression may be impossible using cell lines
alone.  High quality mRNA may be isolated from some human specimens, such as
blood or spleen; however mRNA isolated from most tissues is of poor quality
and it is often difficult to obtain full-length cDNA clones from these
sources.  Finally, methods that distinguish full-length cDNAs (those that
represent a full copy of the mRNA) from cDNAs which contain the full coding
region of the gene (complete set of exons), or from simply long clones (which
may represent unprocessed hnRNA or represent partial sequences from genes with
long coding regions) need to be developed.

In order to judge the feasibility of the proposed studies, it is necessary to
establish criteria for scientific progress.  Therefore, in their applications,
investigators must propose specific, quantifiable milestones that can be used
to measure the progress of the studies.  Although the details are left to the
investigator, the milestones proposed must consist of clear, well defined
criteria for measuring progress.  They must be appropriate for the proposed
studies and as specific as possible.  Investigators should also propose a
clear time line for successfully completing the proposed milestones.

Objectives:

Improved cDNA construction technologies will enable the NIH to reach the long
term goal of the Full-Length cDNA Initiative: to obtain the full-length clone
and its associated sequence for cDNAs corresponding to each human gene and the
genes of mouse and possibly other mammals.  This RFA will support the
development of technologies leading to the production of the complete set of
full-length human cDNAs as well as other full-length mammalian cDNAs. 
Improvements on existing techniques and novel approaches to one or more of the
problems associated with obtaining the complete set of full-length human cDNAs
and other mammalian cDNAs will be considered responsive to this RFA.

Investigators may propose to develop technologies that solve one or more of
the problems associated with obtaining a complete set of full-length cDNAs. 
What follows is a list of examples for cDNA construction improvement; these
are examples and are not meant to be limiting.  Investigators proposing
methods that do not fall into the following categories are encouraged to
contact NIH program staff, listed under INQUIRIES to discuss the
appropriateness of the proposed project for this RFA.

o  New or improved methods that increase the length of cDNA clones produced,
such as more processive enzymes.
o  Improved methods for the selection of clones containing a copy of the full
transcript.
o  Improved methods for obtaining high quality mRNA, suitable for full-length
cDNA cloning, from difficult mammalian sources, such as human tissues.
o  Methods that increase the efficiency of cloning 5' ends of transcripts,
such as random primed cDNA libraries.
o  Efficient single clone or library-free systems targeting genes that have
been difficult to obtain through standard cDNA library construction methods.
o  Efficient biological and/or computational methods for determining whether
cDNA clones produced contain a copy of the full transcript, full coding
region, or partial transcript.
o  Efficient biological and/or computational methods for determining whether
cDNA libraries contain a high proportion of full-length clones.
o  Efficient methods for retrieving or identifying splice variants.
o  New or improved vectors or cloning systems that allow clones to be both
readily sequenced and used in functional assays.

Data and Materials Dissemination:

It is anticipated that in the process of testing or validating the
technologies being developed under this RFA, reagents such as cDNA libraries,
clones or sequences may be generated.  The clones and their associated
sequences, generated as part of the NIH Full-Length cDNA Initiative, will most
effectively contribute to a resource for the research community if they are
made publicly available without restriction in a timely manner.  The sharing
of materials and data in a timely manner has been an essential element in the
rapid progress that has been made in biomedical research.  While Public Health
Service (PHS) policy requires that investigators make unique research
resources, including DNA sequences readily available when they have been
published (PHS Grants Policy Statement, April 1, 1994, pp. 8-25 to 8-26), the
NIH is interested in ensuring that clones and their associated sequences
developed through this RFA become readily available to the research community
for further research and development more rapidly, in the expectation that
this will more rapidly and effectively lead to products of benefit to the
public.

The NIH is concerned that patent applications on clones and their associated
sequences, in the absence of demonstrated function, might have a chilling
effect on the future development of products that can improve the public
health. At the same time, NIH recognizes the rights of grantees to elect and
retain title to subject inventions developed under Federal funding under the
provisions of the Bayh-Dole Act.  To address the joint interests of the
government in the availability of, and access to, the results of publicly
funded research and in the opportunity for economic development based on those
results, NIH requires applicants who respond to this RFA to develop and
propose specific plans for sharing the data and materials generated through
the grant.  Specifically, applicants should

o  propose a plan for placing both clones and their associated sequences in
public databases and repositories,
o  address if or how they plan to exercise their intellectual property rights,
and
o  discuss the existence of any pre-existing intellectual property rights,
including options to for-profit research sponsors, that might be associated
with the clones and sequences that may be generated.

In developing these plans, applicants should understand that NIH's interest is
solely in the availability of and access to any clones produced during the
proposed research, and their associated sequences, but not to any intellectual
property associated with technologies for library generation (e.g. new
vectors, enzymatic methods, etc.).

The initial review group will comment on the proposed plans for sharing data
and materials generated through the grant. The adequacy of the plans will also
be considered by NIH staff as one of the criteria for award.  Because
dissemination is a critical aspect and fundamental purpose of this RFA, the
proposed sharing and data release plans, after negotiation with the applicant
when necessary, will be made a condition of the award. Evaluation of renewal
applications will include assessment of the effectiveness of data and material
release.

Applicants are also reminded that the grantee institution is required to
disclose each subject invention to the Federal Agency providing research funds
within two months after the inventor discloses it in writing to grantee
institution personnel responsible for patent matters.

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact Dr. Couch, at the address
listed under INQUIRIES, if they have any questions related to data and
materials dissemination.

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and
their subpopulations must be included in all NIH supported biomedical and
behavioral research projects involving human subjects, unless a clear and
compelling rationale and justification is provided that inclusion is
inappropriate with respect to the health of the subjects or the purpose of the
research.  This policy results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (Public
law 103-43).

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Guidelines For Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical
Research," which have been published in the Federal Register of March 28, 1994
(FR 59 14508-14513) and in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Volume 23,
Number 11, March 18, 1994, available on the web at:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not94-100.html.

Investigators may also obtain copies of the policy from the program staff
listed under INQUIRIES.  Program staff may also provide additional relevant
information concerning the policy.

INCLUSION OF CHILDREN AS PARTICIPANTS IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of NIH that children (i.e., individuals under the age of 21)
must be included in all human subjects research, conducted or supported by the
NIH, unless there are clear and compelling scientific and ethical reasons not
to include them.  This policy applies to all initial (Type 1) applications
submitted in response to this RFA.

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Policy and Guidelines on the Inclusion of Children as Participants in
Research Involving Human Subjects" that was published in the NIH Guide for
Grants and Contracts, March 6, 1998, and is available at the following URL
address: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide. As part of the scientific and
technical merit evaluation of the research plan, reviewers will be instructed
to address the adequacy of plans for including children as appropriate for the
scientific goals of the research, or justification for exclusion.

LETTER OF INTENT

Prospective applicants are asked to submit, by April 6, 1999, a letter of
intent that includes a descriptive title of the proposed research, the name,
address, and telephone number of the Principal Investigator, the identities of
other key personnel and participating institutions, and the number and title
of the RFA in response to which the application may be submitted.  Although a
letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not enter into the
review of a subsequent application, the information that it contains allows IC
staff to estimate the potential review workload and avoid conflict of interest
in the review.

The letter of intent is to be sent to Dr. Couch at the address listed under
INQUIRIES.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

The research grant application form PHS 398 (rev.4/98) is to be used in
applying for these grants.  Applications kits are available at most
institutional offices of sponsored research and may be obtained from the
Division of Extramural Outreach and Information Resources, National Institutes
of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD 20892-7910, telephone
301/435-0714, email: grantsinfo@nih.gov. Application kits are also available
at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms.htm

The RFA label available in the PHS 398 (rev. 4/98) application form must be
affixed to the bottom of the face page of the application.  Failure to use
this label could result in delayed processing of the application such that it
may not reach the review committee in time for review.  In addition, the RFA
title and number must be typed on line 2 of the face page of the application
form and the YES box must be marked.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including the
Checklist, and three signed, photocopies, in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040 - MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD  20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

At the time of submission, two additional copies of the application must be
sent to:

Ms. Toby Friedberg
Division of Extramural Activities
National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 636
Bethesda, MD  20892-7399
Rockville, MD  20850 (for express/courier service)

Applications must be received by May 13, 1999.  If an application is received
after that date, it will be returned to the applicant without review.  The
Center for Scientific Review (CSR) will not accept any application in response
to this RFA that is essentially the same as one currently pending initial
review, unless the applicant withdraws the pending application.  The CSR will
not accept any application that is essentially the same as one already
reviewed.  This does not preclude the submission of substantial revisions of
applications already reviewed, but such applications must include an
introduction addressing the previous critique.

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by CSR and
responsiveness by the members of trans-NIH committee.  Incomplete applications
will be returned to the applicant without further consideration.  If the
application is not responsive to the RFA, CSR staff may contact the applicant
to determine whether to return the application to the applicant or submit it
for review in competition with unsolicited applications at the next review
cycle.  Applications that are complete and responsive to the RFA will be
evaluated for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate peer review
group convened by the NCI in accordance with the review criteria stated below.

As part of the initial merit review, all applications will receive a written
critique and undergo a process in which only those applications deemed to have
the highest scientific merit, generally the top half of applications under
review, will be discussed, assigned a priority score, and receive a second
level review by the appropriate national advisory council or board.

Review Criteria

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health.  The
reviewers will comment on the following aspects of the application in their
written critiques in order to judge the likelihood that the proposed research
will have a substantial impact on the pursuit of these goals.  Each of these
criteria will be addressed and considered by the reviewers in assigning the
overall score weighting them as appropriate for each application.  Note that
the application does not need to be strong in all categories to be judged
likely to have a major scientific impact and thus deserve a high priority
score.  For example, an investigator may propose to carry out important work
that by its nature is not innovative but is essential to move a field forward.

1.  Significance.  Does this study address an important problem? If the aims
of the application are achieved, how will scientific  knowledge be advanced? 
What will be the effect of these studies on the concepts or methods that drive
this field?

2.  Approach.  Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses
adequately developed, well-integrated, and appropriate to the aims of the
project?  Does the applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider
alternative tactics?

3.  Innovation.  Does the project employ novel concepts, approaches or method? 
Are the aims original and innovative? Does the project challenge existing
paradigms or develop new methodologies or technologies?

4.  Investigator.  Is the investigator appropriately trained and well suited
to carry out this work?  Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience
level of the principal investigator and other researchers (if any)?

5.  Environment.  Does the scientific environment in which the work will be
done contribute to the probability of success?  Do the proposed experiments
take advantage of unique features of the scientific environment or employ
useful collaborative arrangements? Is there evidence of institutional support?

The initial review group will also examine: the appropriateness of proposed
project budget and duration; the adequacy of plans to include both genders,
children, minorities and their subgroups as appropriate for the scientific
goals of the research and plans for the recruitment and retention of subjects;
the provisions for the protection of human and animal subjects; and the safety
of the research environment.

Additional Review Criteria

o  The degree to which the technology meets the ultimate objective of
obtaining a complete set of full-length cDNA clones.
o  Efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the proposed technology.
o  The appropriateness of the time-frame and mile posts proposed by the
investigator to evaluate the progress of the technology development and/or
implementation.
o  The adequacy of plans to make data and/or material resources publicly
available in a timely manner.

For R21 applications, preliminary data are not required.  However, the
applicant is responsible for developing a sound research plan and for
presenting any other information that can be considered as evidence of
feasibility.

AWARD CRITERIA

The anticipated date of award is September 30, 1999.  The following criteria
will be considered in making funding decisions:

o  the quality of the proposed project as determined by peer review,
o  the responsiveness of the proposed project to the goals of this RFA,
adequacy of plans to make data and material developed as a result of the
proposed research accessible to the biomedical research community in a timely
manner,
o  and the availability of funds.

Post-Award Management:

During the course of the award period, the principal investigators may be
invited to meet with NIH program staff, to review and share scientific
progress.  Other scientists external to and knowledgeable about these studies
may also be invited to participate.  Budget requests should include travel
funds for the principal investigator to meet annually in the metropolitan
Washington, D.C. area.

Schedule

Letter of Intent Receipt Date:  April 6, 1999
Application Receipt Date:       May 13, 1999
Council Review:                 September 1999
Anticipated Award Date:         September 30, 1999

INQUIRIES

Inquiries concerning this RFA are encouraged.  The opportunity to clarify any
issues or questions from potential applicants is welcome.  General inquiries
and inquiries regarding data and materials dissemination should be directed to
Dr. Couch, at the address listed below.  Institute-specific inquiries may be
directed to the appropriate institute or center contact listed below.

Jennifer Couch, Ph.D.
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis
National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 700
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone: (301) 402 4185
FAX:  (301) 402 7819
Email:  jc332a@nih.gov

Anne M. McCormick, Ph.D.
Biology of Aging Program
National Institute of Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2C231, MSC 2292
Bethesda, MD  20892-2292
Telephone:  (301) 496-6402
FAX:  (301) 402-0010
Email:  mccormia@exmur.nia.nih.gov

Michael E. Whalin, Ph.D.
Center for Research for Mothers and Children
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B01, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-5541
FAX:  (301) 480-0303
Email:  mw115j@nih.gov

Jonathan D. Pollock, Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 4274
Rockville, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 443-6300
FAX:  (301) 594-6043
Email:  jp183r@nih.gov

Gabrielle Leblanc, Ph.D.
Division of Fundamental Neuroscience and Developmental National Disorders
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 816, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD 20892-9165
Telephone:  (301) 496-5745
FAX:  (301) 402-1501
Email:  GL54h@nih.gov

William J. Sharrock, Ph.D.
Musculoskeletal Diseases Branch
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 5AS-37A
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 594-5055
FAX:  (301) 480-4543
Email:  ws19h@nih.gov

Robert W. Karp, Ph.D.
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 402, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-2239
FAX:  (301) 594-0673
Email:  rkarp@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Vicki Seyfert, Ph.D.
Division of Allergy, Immunology and  Transplantation
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4A21
Bethesda, MD  20892-7610
Telephone:  (301) 496-7551
FAX:  (301) 402-2571
Email:  vs62y@nih.gov

Maria Y. Giovanni, Ph.D.
Fundamental Retinal Processes
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-0484
FAX:  (301) 402-0528
Email:  myg@nei.nih.gov

Peter Clepper
National Library of Medicine
8600 Rockville Pike, Room 5S518
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 594-4882
FAX:  (301) 402-0421
Email:  pc49n@nih.gov

Philip F. Smith, Ph.D.
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 Center Drive, MSC 6600
Bethesda, MD  20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-8816
FAX:  (301) 480-3503
Email:  ps56z@nih.gov

Elise Feingold, Ph.D.
Genome Analysis Program
National Human Genome Research Institute
Building 38A, Room 614, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD 20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 496-7531
FAX:  (301) 480-2770
Email:  elise_feingold@nih.gov

Hemin R. Chin, M..D.
Division of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Research
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10C-26
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-1706
FAX:  (301) 443-9890
Email:  hemin@nih.gov

Susan Banks-Schlegel, Ph.D.
Division of Lung Diseases
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 10018, MSC 7952
Bethesda, MD  20892-7952
Telephone:  (301) 435-0202
FAX:  (301) 480-3557
Email:  SchlegeS@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov

Rochelle Small, Ph.D.
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Plaza Boulevard, Room 400C16
Rockville, MD  20852
Telephone:  (301) 402-3464
Email:  smallr@ms.nihnidcd.nih.gov

Jose Velazquez, Ph.D.
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-4998
FAX:  (919) 541-2843
Email:  jv42a@nih.gov

Judy Small. Ph.D.
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AN-24J
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 594-2425
FAX:  (301) 480-8318
Email:  js134h@NIH.GOV

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Jill Rogers
National Cancer Institute
Executive Plaza South, Room 243
Bethesda, MD  20892-7399
Telephone:  (301) 496-7800, Ext 256
FAX:  (301) 496-8601
Email:  rogersj@gab.nci.nih.gov

Joseph Ellis
Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2N212, MSC 2292
Bethesda, MD  20892-2292
Telephone:  (301) 496-9322
FAX:  (301) 402-3672
Email:  ellisj@exmur.nia.nih.gov

E. Douglas Shawver
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 8A17F, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-1303
FAX:  (301) 402-0915
Email:  ds117g@nih.gov

Gary Fleming, J.D., M.A.
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard
Rockville, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 443-6710
FAX:  (301) 594-6847
Email:  gf6s@nih.gov

Tina Carlisle
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 1004, MSC 9165
Bethesda, MD  20892-9165
Telephone:  (301) 496-9231
FAX:  (301) 402-0219
Email:  carlislt@ninds.nih.gov

Sally A Nichols
Grants Management Office
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 5AS-49F, MSC 6500
Bethesda, MD  20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-3535
FAX:  (301) 480-5450
Email:  NicholsS@ep.niams.nih.gov

Linda Hilley
Office of Planning and Resource Management
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 504, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-4703
FAX:  (301) 443-3891
Email:  lhilley@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Pam Fleming
Grants Management Specialist
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4C25
Rockville, MD  20852
Telephone:  (301) 402-6580
FAX:  (301) 480-3780
Email:  pf49e@nih.gov

Carolyn Grimes
Grants Management Branch
National Eye Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-5884
FAX:  (301) 496-9997
Email:  cegrimes@nei.nih.gov

John Seachrist
Grants Management Officer
National Library of Medicine
8600 Rockville Pike, Room 5S522
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-4221
FAX:  (301) 401-0421
Email:  js132f@nih.gov

Kieran Kelley
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 Center Drive, MSC 6600
Bethesda, MD  20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-0417
FAX:  (301) 480-3504
Email:  kk27g@nih.gov

Jean Cahill
Grants Management Office
National Human Genome Research Institute
Building 38A, Room 613, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 402-0733
FAX:  (301) 402-1951
Email:  jean_cahill@nih.gov

Diana S. Trunell
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 7C-08
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-2805
FAX:  (301) 443-6885
Email:  dtrunell@mail.nih.gov

Marie Willett
Division of Extramural Affairs
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7156, MSC 7926
Bethesda, MD  20892-7926
Telephone:  (301) 435-0144
FAX:  (301) 480-3310
Email:  WillettM@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov

Sharon Hunt
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400B2
Rockville, MD  20852
Telephone:  (301) 402-0909
Email:  hunts@ms.nihnidcd.nih.gov

David Mineo
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-1373
FAX:  (919) 541-2860
Email:  dm44x@nih.gov

Martin Rubinstein
Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AN44A
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 594-4799
FAX:  (301) 480-8318
Email:  mr49c@NIH.GOV

Direct inquiries regarding review matters:

Toby Friedberg
Division of Extramural Activities
National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 636, MSC 7399
Bethesda, MD  20892-7399
Telephone:  (301) 496-3428
FAX:  (301) 402-0275
Email:  tf12w@nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No.
93.394.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public Health Service Act,
Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law 99- 158, 42 USC
241 and 285) and administered under PHS grants policies and Federal
Regulations 42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Part 74 and 92.  This program is not subject
to the intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or
Health Systems Agency review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a
smoke-free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In
addition, Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking
in certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which
regular or routine education, library, day care, health care or early
childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent
with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of
the American people.


Return to Volume Index

Return to NIH Guide Main Index


Office of Extramural Research (OER) - Home Page Office of Extramural
Research (OER)
  National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Home Page National Institutes of Health (NIH)
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland 20892
  Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) - Home Page Department of Health
and Human Services (HHS)
  USA.gov - Government Made Easy


Note: For help accessing PDF, RTF, MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Audio or Video files, see Help Downloading Files.