THE ZEBRAFISH AS AN ANIMAL MODEL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE RESEARCH

Release Date:  May 21, 1998

PA NUMBER:  PA-98-074

P.T.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Cancer Institute
National Center for Research Resources
National Eye Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute
National Institute on Aging
National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
National Institute of Dental Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

PURPOSE

The purpose of this Program Announcement (PA) is to solicit applications as part
of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiative to increase our support of
the zebrafish as an animal model for research.  This PA is intended to continue
stimulation of a trans-NIH initiative that was started with RFA: DK-98-006,
entitled "Genomic Resources for the Zebrafish," NIH Guide for Grants and
Contracts, Vol. 26, No. 39, December 5, 1997.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of "Healthy People 2000," a PHS-led national
activity for getting priority areas.  Potential applicants may obtain a copy of
"Healthy People 2000" (Full Report: Stock No. 017-001-00474-0 or Summary Report:
Stock No. 017-001-00473-1) through the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-9325 (telephone: 202-512-1800).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applications may be submitted by domestic and foreign for-profit and non-profit
organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals,
laboratories, units of State and local governments, and eligible agencies of the
Federal government.  Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with
disabilities are encouraged to apply as Principal Investigators.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

The mechanism of support for this PA will be the NIH investigator-initiated
research project grant (R01) award.  Applications for R01s from new investigators
are particularly encouraged.  The total project period for an application
submitted in response to this PA may not exceed five years.

Responsibility for the planning, direction, and execution of the proposed project
will be solely that of the applicant.  Applications will compete with all
investigator-initiated applications and will be reviewed according to the
customary peer review procedures. Awards will be administered under PHS grants
policy as stated in the Public Health Service Grants Policy Statement.

This PA is the result of a trans-NIH initiative with participation of the
Institutes and Centers listed above, working though the Cross-NIH Zebrafish
Coordinating Committee, under the co-chairmanship of the National Institute of
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institute of
Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).  The principal awards will be made
through the Institute or Center whose mission is most closely related to the
proposed work.  Through the Cross-NIH Zebrafish Coordinating Committee, each
Institute will share with the other participating Institutes, research supported
as a result of this PA . All investigators funded under this initiative will be
expected to work together cooperatively so that the information learned and the
models developed will be of maximum usefulness to the community.

An applicant planning to submit a grant application requesting $500,000 or more
in direct costs for any year is required to contact, in writing or by telephone,
Institute or Center program staff when the application development process
begins.  Furthermore, the applicant must obtain agreement from Institute/Center
staff that the Institute or Center will accept the application for consideration
for award.  The applicant Principal Investigator must identify, in a cover letter
sent with the application, the program staff member and Institute or Center that
has agreed to accept assignment of the application.  An application received
without indication of prior staff concurrence and identification of that contact
will be returned to the applicant without review.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

Background

Vertebrate development has been characterized extensively using the methods of
classical embryology, molecular biology and biochemistry.  However, mutational
analysis in vertebrates, has lagged behind such investigations in invertebrates. 
As experimentation in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans has
established, mutational studies are a powerful tool to determine the events that
result in patterning and morphogenesis of the embryo.  When combined with genetic
combinatorial analyses, mutational analyses can identify specific genes that act
during embryonic development, provide insight into how they function, and clarify
the pathways in which they participate.  Studies that compare results from these
invertebrate systems with those obtained in vertebrates have established that
there is remarkable evolutionary conservation in the genetic programs that
determine embryo formation, including such early patterning events as formation
of the embryonic axes, but also including later events such as development of
eye, heart, and other organs.  Although invertebrate systems are extremely
powerful and numerous aspects of development are conserved, many aspects of
patterning and morphogenesis of the vertebrate embryo are distinct and cannot be
studied in invertebrates.  The vertebrate embryo has many features not present
in other models, including the substantially different organization and greater
complexity of the nervous system and the fact that some vertebrate organs have
no clear cognates in the simpler invertebrates.  Thus, understanding human
development will require application of experimental approaches to the formation
of the vertebrate embryo.  Some assessment of mutations that affect development
has been possible in the mouse, but the mouse embryo is inaccessible in utero
throughout much of its development.  Consequently, mutational studies in this
species have been limited largely to defects in post-natal maturation.  While
reverse genetics (e.g., knock-outs) have been useful in the mouse model, the
substantial costs of maintaining large mouse colonies has limited the
applicability of forward genetic approaches, which will have a profound impact
on our understanding of development.

As a vertebrate, the zebrafish, Danio rerio, is more closely related to humans
than are yeast, worms or flies.  It has a number of valuable features as a model
organism for study of vertebrate development.  Many features of zebrafish
development have been characterized, including early embryonic patterning, early
development of the nervous system, and aspects of cell fate and lineage
determination.  The embryos are transparent and accessible throughout
development.  In live embryos, the same specific cell or even cellular processes
can in many cases be identified from individual to individual, affording a high
level of precision in characterizing the effect of developmental or genetic
perturbation.  Techniques for ablation and transplantation of individual cells
have been used to explore questions about induction and cell fate, and continue
to be refined.  There are also a growing number of molecular markers to
facilitate developmental studies.  Because of their relatively short reproductive
cycle, the large number of progeny that can be produced, and the relatively small
space needed to maintain large numbers of offspring, the zebrafish is an
efficient vertebrate model system for genetic analysis.  It is possible to
generate haploid progeny, which are viable to the point where many recessive
embryonic phenotypes can be identified, and also homozygous diploid progeny that
carry only maternal (or paternal) genetic information.  A genetic map of
approximately 2-3 centimorgan resolution is available, and mutations can be
readily placed on the map.  Positional cloning of genes identified by mutation
has recently been accomplished.  Finally, there are several promising methods for
transformation and insertional mutagenesis which are now being developed.

Two large-scale screens have been performed to date and the transparent embryos
screened for defects in overall embryonic pattern, morphogenesis or organ
formation.  As reported in the December 1996 issue of Development, these screens
have identified a substantial number of mutations that affect the formation of
organ systems, including defects in the nervous system, skeletal muscle,
craniofacial region, kidney and endocrine organs, cardiovascular and
gastrointestinal systems, and the sensory cells of lateral line systems which are
important to auditory and vestibular function.  For most of these mutations, the
gene defect has not yet been identified.  It is likely that many of these
mutations affect genes relevant to human development and disease processes such
as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.  The zebrafish offers the opportunity
of using classical genetics to define gene functions.

Scope

The objective of this PA is to promote the zebrafish as an animal model for the
study of development and disease.  The goals of this PA are to encourage new and
innovative research and approaches using the zebrafish to identify the genes and
elucidate the molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for normal and
defective development and disease.

Each of the participating Institutes and Centers has interests in using the
zebrafish as a model system to better understand particular processes, organs,
or diseases.  In addition, some may be interested in supporting development of
methods, either general techniques or techniques that may particularly apply to
their areas of interest.  Each Institute with their general statement of interest
is listed below in alphabetical order.  Some Institutes have included examples
of research topics that are appropriate for this PA; however, they are not to be
considered as exclusive or limiting.

Institute or Center Statement of Interest

NCI.  Generation and study of zebrafish models to identify and place genes in
functional pathways that affect growth and development; in particular,
genes/pathways which, when altered, result in uncontrolled or cancerous growth.

NCRR.  Research projects to broaden the utility of the zebrafish model.  Projects
should be applicable to a broad range of biomedical research and to more than one
categorical NIH Institute or specific disease.

NEI.  Fundamental mechanisms underlying all aspects of eye development, function
and disease, including retinal development and optic axon guidance.

NHGRI.  Proposals for the development of high throughput, widely applicable
technologies or methodologies to examine gene function on a genomic scale.  This
could include initial development of high throughput or large-scale methods for
examining gene expression, development of tools for comprehensive mutational
analysis, or genome-scale identification of regulatory regions.

NHLBI.  Cellular and molecular functions of the mutant genes in development as
models for human cardiovascular, blood and pulmonary disorders, and circadian
mechanisms underlying sleep/wake cycles.  Genetic basis of disorders of
cardiovascular development and function; developmental aspects of endothelial
dysfunction as the basis for systemic and pulmonary vascular disorders;
developmental defects in hematopoiesis and relationship to disorders of the
hematopoietic system; genetic basis of vasculogenesis; effect of mutations on
subsequent organ development leading to such disorders as lung hypoplasia and
bronchopulmonary dysplasia; and the genetic basis of circadian rhythm.

NIA.  Basic research on the genetic and molecular basis of aging and longevity.
Generation and analysis of late-age onset or long-lived mutants that can be used
to identify, clone, and characterize genes involved in normal and pathological
aging.  Cellular and molecular function of genes expressed in the aging nervous
system as well as in other organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, immune, and
musculoskeletal systems.  Such genes include, but are not limited to, those
involved in neurodegenerative disorders, neuroplasticity, cell death, damage and
repair of DNA and proteins, and oxidative metabolism, and maintenance of
differentiated cell function.

NIAAA.  Mechanistic studies of ethanol-induced teratogenesis, behavioral
impairments, and organ damage.

NIAID.  Mechanisms underlying immune system development and function. 
Hematopoiesis, including the development of T cells, B cells, antigen presenting
cells, and cells of the innate immune system, such as natural killer cells. 
Regulation of key immune cell molecules during development, such as regulation
of genes encoding antigen receptors, co-receptors, cytokine receptors, and
cytokines.  Regulation of genes involved in mature immune cell function following
antigen encounter, including regulation and role of cytokines, receptor
expression, and any other determinants of humoral and cellular immunity following
antigen administration.

NIAMS.  Generation and analysis of mutant zebrafish that have the potential to
illuminate the development and function of the vertebrate musculoskeletal system
and skin.  The musculoskeletal system includes muscle, bone, articulated joints,
cartilage, tendon and ligament.  Priority will be given to the establishment of
collaborations between investigators with expertise in the zebrafish and
investigators with expertise in the musculoskeletal systems and skin of mammals
and humans.

NICHD.  Identification, cloning, and characterization of the genes important in
normal development as well as those mutant genes which cause developmental
defects.  Elucidation of the cellular, biochemical, molecular and genetic
mechanisms underlying normal and defective development.  This includes, but is
not limited to the study of general mechanisms of pattern formation and cell
lineage, cell specification, differentiation, migration and fate in early
development of many organs/systems.

NIDA.  Identification of mechanisms underlying tolerance, sensitization, and
addiction to drugs of abuse such as nicotine, amphetamine, cocaine, opiates,
barbiturates, and hallucinogens.  Identification of genetic suppressors and
enhancers of the teratological effects of drugs of abuse on behavior and the
nervous system.  Processes involved in the development of brain regions mediating
the hedonic properties of drugs of abuse.

NIDCD.  Identification and cloning of genes involved in the normal and disordered
development of hearing, balance, smell and taste sensory systems.  Elucidation
of the cellular, molecular, and biochemical mechanisms governing the
proliferative, plastic and regenerative capacities of these sensory cells and
tissues.

NIDDK.  Research on diabetes, other endocrine and metabolic diseases, disorders
of hematopoeisis, and for diseases of the digestive system, liver, kidney, and
urinary tract.  Studies aiming to clarify the cellular and molecular events which
dictate organ formation in all these systems are considered of relevance.  These
studies could include but need not be limited to studies to develop cell lines
from any of the organs of interest, studies to characterize normal or abnormal
function of organs of interest, methods to screen and identify additional
mutations in these systems, studies to define the molecular mechanisms which
dictate cell-specific gene expression in relevant cell types.

NIDR.  All aspects of normal and abnormal craniofacial development, including
genetics, complex origins of craniofacial disorders, cell lineages and
differentiation, cell signaling and gene regulation, embryonic patterning,
imaging, biomimetics, and new technologies for high-throughput genetic and
protein screens.

NIEHS.  Studies to examine the mechanism whereby environmental factors/agents
alter development.  Characterization of the interactions among genetics,
environmental agents and time during development that lead to structural or
functional abnormalities.  Development of a mechanistically based model for
testing environmental agents for developmental toxicity.

NIGMS.  Basic biomedical research that addresses fundamental biological
mechanisms such as those that underlie gene regulation, chromosome organization
and mechanics, cell growth and differentiation, pattern formation, sex
determination, morphogenesis, cell cycle control, behavior, the genetics of
complex traits, and the application of mathematical models to complex biological
systems.

NIMH.  Investigations which examine molecular, cellular, and biochemical bases
of genetic mutations affecting neurogenesis and mental behavior.  These studies
include, but are not limited to, screening for such mutants, identification,
isolation, and mapping of the defective genes, and their functional analyses.

NINDS.  Research on the development, normal function, and diseases of the nervous
system.  This research might include the use of mutants to understand the
mechanisms controlling the following processes: neurogenesis, nervous system
patterning, cell lineage, cell migration, programmed cell death, axon pathfinding
and regeneration, myelination, neural crest cell development, and motor and
sensory function.  Also of interest would be research into the functional
neuroanatomy of developing and adult nervous systems, the use of optical imaging
techniques to visualize neural activity and development of methods for analyzing
and perturbing gene function in single cells.

The areas of interest listed above are not in any order of priority.  They are
only examples of areas of research to consider.  Applications with areas of
interest to more than one Institute or Center will be assigned to multiple
Institutes or Centers for funding consideration.  Applicants are encouraged to
propose other areas that are related to the objectives and scope of this PA.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applications are to be submitted on the grant application form PHS 398 (rev. 
5/95) and will be accepted on the standard application deadlines as indicated in
the application kit.  Requests for continued funding of already funded projects
(Type 2) will be considered under this program announcement.  Application kits
are available at most institutional offices of sponsored research and may be
obtained from the Division of Extramural Outreach and Information Resources,
National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD
20892-7910, telephone 301/435-0714, email: Grantsinfo@nih.gov.

For identification and processing purposes, the PA number and title must be typed
in item 2 of the application face page and the "YES" box must be marked.

Submit a signed, typewritten original of the application, including the
Checklist, plus five signed photocopies, in one package to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, ROOM 1040 - MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD  20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD  20817 (for express/courier service)

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Applications will be assigned on the basis of established PHS referral
guidelines.  Upon receipt, applications will be reviewed for completeness by
Center for Scientific Review (CSR).  Incomplete applications will be returned to
the applicant without further consideration.  Applications will be evaluated for
scientific and technical merit by an appropriate peer review group convened in
accordance with the standard NIH peer review procedures.  As part of the initial
merit review, all applications will receive a written critique and undergo a
process in which only those applications deemed to have the highest scientific
merit, generally the top half of applications under review, will be discussed,
assigned a priority score, and receive a second level review by the appropriate
national advisory council or board.

Review Criteria

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health.  In the
written review, comments on the following aspects of the application will be made
in order to judge the likelihood that the proposed research will have a
substantial impact on the pursuit of these goals.  Each of these criteria will
be addressed and considered in the assignment of the overall score.

o  Significance: scientific, technical or medical significance and originality
of the proposed research will be evaluated.

o  Approach: Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses
appropriate and adequate to accomplish the aims of the project?  Does the
applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider alternative tactics?
Is the scientific and technical merit of the research proposed sufficient to
advance the objectives of the PA?

o  Innovation: Does the project employ novel concepts, approaches or method? Are
the aims original and innovative?  Does the project challenge existing paradigms
or develop new methodologies or technologies?

o  Investigator: Are the Principal Investigator and staff appropriately trained
and well suited to carry out this work?  Is the work proposed appropriate to the
experience level of the principal investigator and other researchers (if any)?

o  Environment:  Does the scientific environment in which the work will be done
contribute to the probability of success?  Do the proposed experiments take
advantage of unique features of the scientific environment or employ useful
collaborative arrangements?  Is there evidence of institutional support?

o  Budget and duration: Are the proposed budget and duration appropriate in
relation to the proposed research?

Availability of special opportunities for furthering research programs through
the use of unusual talent resources, populations, or environmental conditions in
other countries that are not readily available in the United States or that
provide augmentation of existing U.S. resources will be considered in the review.

The initial review group also will examine the provisions for the protection of
human and animal subjects, and the safety of the research environment.

AWARD CRITERIA

Factors that will be used to make award decisions are as follows:

o  Quality of the proposed project as determined by peer review;

o  Cost effectiveness of the proposed strategy;

o  Promise of the proposed program to accomplish the goals of this PA and address
the needs of the participating ICs as regards their interest in the zebrafish as
a model organism;

o  Availability of funds.

INQUIRIES

Written and telephone inquiries concerning this PA are encouraged.  The
opportunity to clarify any issues or questions from potential applicants is
welcome.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Dr. Deborah Henken
Center for Research for Mothers and Children
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B01 MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-5541
FAX:  (301) 402-4083
Email:  dh50g@nih.gov

Dr. David G. Badman
Division of Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 6AS-13C MSC 6600
Bethesda, MD  20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-7717
FAX:  (301) 480-3510
Email:  David_Badman@nih.gov

Dr. Grace L. Shen
Division of Cancer Biology
National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 501
Rockville, MD  20892-7381
Telephone:  (301) 435-5226
FAX:  (301) 496-8656
Email:  gs35r@nih.gov

Dr. Jill L. Carrington
Comparative Medicine
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6164 MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD  20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0776
FAX:  (301) 480-3659
Email: jillc@ep.ncrr.nih.gov

Dr. Maria Y. Giovanni
Fundamental Retinal Processes
National Eye Institute
Executive Plaza South, Suite 350 - MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-0484
FAX:  (301) 402-0528
Email:  myg@nei.nih.gov

Dr. Carol H. Letendre
Division of Blood Diseases and Resources
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7950
Bethesda, MD  20892-7950
Telephone:  (301) 435-0080
FAX:  (301) 480-0867
Email:  letendrc@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov

Dr. Adam Felsenfeld
National Human Genome Research Institute
38 Library Drive, Room 614, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 496-7531
FAX:  (301) 480-2770
Email:  felsenfa@odder.nhgri.nih.gov

Dr. Bradley C. Wise
Neuroscience and Neuropsychology of Aging Program
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 3C307, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-9350
FAX:  (301) 496-1494
Email:  bw86y@nih.gov

Dr. Robert W. Karp
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 402, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-2239
FAX:  (301) 594-0673
Email:  rkarp@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Dr. Vicki Seyfert
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation
National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Disease
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4A21, MSC 7610
Bethesda, MD  20892-7610
Telephone:  (301) 496-7551
FAX:  (301) 402-2571
Email:  vs62y@nih.gov

Dr. Richard W. Lymn
Muscle Biology Branch
National Institute on Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 5AS-49E, MSC 6500
Bethesda, MD  20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-5130
FAX:  (301) 480-4543
Email:  r128b@nih.gov

Dr. Chyren Hunter
Division of Human Communication
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400-C, MSC 7180
Bethesda, MD  20982-7180
Telephone:  (301) 402-3461
FAX:  (301) 402-6251
Email:  chyren_hunter@nih.gov

Dr. Norman Braveman
Inherited Diseases and Disorders Program
National Institute of Dental Research
45 Center Drive, Room 4AN24, MSC 6402
Bethesda, MD  20892-6402
Telephone:  (301) 594-2089
FAX:  (301) 480-8318
Email:  Bravemann@de45.nidr.nih.gov

Dr. Jonathan D. Pollock
Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10A19
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6300
FAX:  (301) 594-6043
Email:  jp183r@nih.gov

Dr. Jerrold J. Heindel
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233 (md EC-23)
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-0781
FAX:  (919) 541-5064
Email:  heindelj@niehs.nih.gov

Dr. Judith H. Greenberg
Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
45 Center Drive, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD  20892-6200
Telephone:  (301) 594-0943
FAX:  (301) 480-2228
Email:  greenbej@nigms.nih.gov

Dr. Hemin R. Chin
Division of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Research
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10C-26
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-1706
FAX:  (301) 443-9890
Email:  hemin@codon.nih.gov

Dr. Gabrielle G. Leblanc
Division of Fundamental Neurosciences and Developmental Disorders
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
7550 Wisconsin Avenue, Room 8C08
Bethesda, MD  20892-9170
Telephone:  (301) 496-5745
FAX:  (301) 402-1501
Email:  gl54h@nih.gov

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal and administrative matters to:

Mr. E. Douglas Shawver
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 8A17, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-1303
FAX:  (301) 402-0915
Email:  Shawverd@exchange.nichd.nih.gov

Ms. Aretina Perry-Jones
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 6AN-38B, MSC 6600
Bethesda, MD  20892-6600
Telephone:  (301) 594-8862
FAX:  (301) 480-3504
Email:  PerryA@extra.niddk.nih.gov

Mr. Bill Wells
Grants Administration Branch
National Cancer Institute
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 243
Bethesda, MD  20892
Rockville, MD  20852 (express/courier service)
Telephone:  (301) 496-7800, ext. 250
FAX:  (301) 496-8601
Email:  ww14j@nih.gov

Ms. Louise Amburgey
Office of Grants Management
National Center for Research Resources
6705 Rockledge Drive, Room 6086 MSC 7965
Bethesda, MD  20892-7965
Telephone:  (301) 435-0844
FAX:  (301) 480-3777
Email:  louisem@ep.ncrr.nih.gov

Ms. Carolyn E. Grimes
Grants Management Branch
National Eye Institute
Executive Plaza South, Suite 350, MSC 7164
Bethesda, MD  20892-7164
Telephone:  (301) 496-5884
FAX:  (301) 496-9997
Email:  cegrimes@nei.nih.gov

Ms. Jane R. Davis
Division of Extramural Affairs
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7926
Bethesda, MD  20892-7926
Telephone:  (301) 435-0166
FAX:  (301) 480-3310
Email:  jane_davis@nih.gov

Ms. Jean Cahill
Grants Management Office
National Human Genome Research Institute
38 Library Drive, Room 613, MSC 6050
Bethesda, MD  20892-6050
Telephone:  (301) 402-0733
FAX:  (301) 402-1951
Email:  cahillj@odder.nhgri.nih.gov

Mr. Joseph Ellis
Grants Management Officer
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2N212, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-1472
FAX:  (301) 402-3672
Email:  ellisj@exmur.nia.nih.gov

Ms. Linda Hilley
Office of Planning and Resource Management
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 504, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-4703
FAX:  (301) 443-3891
Email:  Lhilley@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Ms. Lesia Norwood
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Disease
6003 Executive Boulevard, Room 4B27, MSC 7610
Bethesda, MD  20892-7610
Telephone:  (301) 402-6581
FAX:  (301) 480-3780
Email:  Lnorwood@mercury.niaid.nih.gov

Ms. Sally A. Nichols
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
45 Center Drive, Room 5AS-49F, MSC 6500
Bethesda, MD  20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-3535
FAX:  (301) 480-5450
Email:  sn21q@nih.gov

Ms. Sharon Hunt
Grants Management Office
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 400-B, MSC-7180
Bethesda, MD  20982-7180
Telephone:  (301) 402-0909
FAX:  (301) 402-1758
Email:  sh79f@nih.gov

Ms. Eileen Teng
Grants Management Office
National Institute of Dental Research
45 Center Drive, Room 4AN32J, MSC 6402
Bethesda, MD 20892-6402
Telephone:  (301) 594-4800
FAX:  (301) 402-1517
Email:  Eileen.Teng@nih.gov

Ms. Catherine Mills
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane,  Room 8A-54
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6710
FAX:  (301) 594-6847
Email:  cm108w@nih.gov

Mr. David L. Mineo
Division of Extramural Research and Training
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
P.O. Box 12233 (md EC-22)
Research Triangle Park, NC  27709
Telephone:  (919) 541-7628
FAX:  (919) 541-2860
Email:  mineo@niehs.nih.gov

Ms. Marcia Cohn
Grants Management Office
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
45 Center Drive, Room 2AN-44E, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD  20892-6200
Telephone:  (301) 594-3918
FAX:  (301) 480-1969
Email:  cohnm@nigms.nih.gov

Ms. Diana S. Trunnell
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 7C-08
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-2805
FAX:  (301) 443-6885
Email:  dt21a@nih.gov

Ms. Tina Carlisle
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Federal Building, Room 1004
Bethesda, MD  20892-9190
Telephone:  (301) 496-9231
FAX:  (301) 402-0218
Email:  tc48k@nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No.
93.865 - Research for Mothers and Children, National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public Health
Service Act, Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law
99-158, 42 USC 241 and 285) and administered under PHS grants policies and
Federal Regulations 42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Part 74. This program is not subject to
the intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health
Systems Agency review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a smoke-
free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In addition,
Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in certain
facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which regular or
routine education, library, day care, health care or early childhood development
services are provided to children.  This is consistent with the PHS mission to
protect and advance the physical and mental health of the American people.


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