METHODOLOGY AND MEASUREMENT IN THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Release Date:  February 25, 1998

PA NUMBER:  PA-98-031

P.T.

National Institute on Aging
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Cancer Institute
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institute of Dental Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institute of Nursing Research
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research
Office of Alternative Medicine

PURPOSE

The National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and
Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Child
Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Dental Research
(NIDR), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of Mental
Health (NIMH), National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Office of Behavioral and Social Science
Research (OBSSR), and Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) invite qualified
researchers to submit research grant applications on methodology and measurement
in the behavioral and social sciences.  Methodology and measurement issues in the
behavioral and social sciences include the processes that underlie self reports,
research design, data collection techniques, measurement, data analysis
techniques, and ethical issues in the above topics.  The goal of this program
announcement is to encourage research that will improve the quality and
scientific power of data collected in the behavioral and social sciences,
relevant to the missions of the NIH Institutes and Centers.  Research that
addresses methodology and measurement issues in diverse populations, issues in
studying sensitive behaviors, and issues in developing multidisciplinary and
multimethod approaches to behavioral and social science research is particularly
encouraged.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2000

The Public Health Service (PHS) is committed to achieving the health promotion
and disease prevention objectives of Healthy People 2000, a PHS-led national
activity for setting priority areas. This PA is related to the priority areas of
alcohol and other drugs, nutrition, tobacco, physical activity and fitness,
family planning, heart disease and stroke, oral health, cancer, HIV infection,
sexually transmitted diseases, and immunization and infectious diseases. 
Potential applicants may obtain a copy of Healthy People 2000 (Full Report: Stock
No. 017-001-00474-0 or Summary Report: Stock No. 017-001-00473-1) through the
Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402-
9325 (telephone 202-512-1800).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applications may be submitted by foreign and domestic for-profit and non-profit
organizations, public and private, such as universities, colleges, hospitals,
laboratories, units of state and local governments, and eligible agencies of the
Federal government.  Racial/ethnic minority individuals, women, and persons with
disabilities are encouraged to apply as principal investigators.

MECHANISM OF SUPPORT

The mechanisms of support will be the investigator-initiated research project
grant (R01).

Applicants may consult with program staff listed under INQUIRIES regarding other
mechanisms and relevant announcements on topics related to this program
announcement.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

In all areas of science, advances in methodology and measurement go hand in hand
with advances in substantive knowledge. This program announcement invites
research to improve the quality and scientific power of behavioral and social
science data relevant to the missions of the sponsoring institutes.  These
missions encompass a broad range of scientific questions related to the health
and well-being of our nation's people. The National Institute on Aging supports
behavioral and social research on the aging processes and on the diseases and
other special problems and needs of older people.  The National Institute on
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism supports basic and applied research on the effects
of alcohol on biobehavioral processes; research on the processes leading to
pathological drinking; and research to develop improved diagnosis, prevention and
treatment.  The National Cancer Institute supports social and behavioral research
related to the distribution, etiology, natural history, and prevention of human
cancer.  The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development supports
behavioral and social research related to reproduction and population change,
perinatal and infant health, nutrition, child development and behavior, mental
retardation and developmental disabilities, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
(AIDS), and medical rehabilitation.  The National Institute of Dental Research
supports behavioral and social research related to oral health promotion and the
prevention, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of oral diseases or systematic
diseases influence by oral health.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse supports
research related to the epidemiology, etiology, assessment, treatment, and
prevention of drug abuse, as well as the role of drug abuse in AIDS.  The
National Institute of Mental Health supports research on mental illness and
mental health, including studies of the brain, behavior, and mental health
services.  The National Institute of Nursing Research supports clinical and basic
research to establish a scientific basis for the care of individuals across the
life span, from management of patients during illness and recovery to the
reduction of risks for disease and disability and the promotion of healthy
lifestyles.  The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute supports behavioral and
social research relating to the causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of
heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases and blood resources.  The Office
of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research provides leadership and direction in
increasing the scope and support of research on the role of human behavior and
social processes in the promotion of health and prevention of disease.  The
Office of Alternative Medicine supports behavioral and social science research
on topics (e.g., mind-body medicine) that fall outside of mainstream medicine. 
Further information about the missions of participating institutes is available
from the contacts identified at the end of this announcement, or from the
National Institutes of Health web site (http://www.nih.gov).

This program announcement encourages applications in six general areas of
methodology and measurement research.  These areas, discussed in detail below,
include the processes that underlie self reports, research design, data
collection techniques, measurement, data analysis techniques, and related ethical
issues.  Within the broad spectrum of research defined by these areas, applicants
are particularly encouraged (but are not required) to consider studies that
address one or more of the following key issues:

Methodology and measurement issues in research relating to diverse populations,
for example, populations that are distinctive by virtue of age, gender, sexual
orientation, ethnicity, culture, literacy, or disability.

Issues in studying sensitive behaviors, such as drug use, sexual behavior,
abortion, abuse and violence, and other covert or illegal behaviors; and

Development of multidisciplinary and multimethod approaches to behavioral and
social science research.

Even where explicitly multidisciplinary and multimethod approaches are not
considered, potential applicants are encouraged to explore the ideas and methods
developed in social science and behavioral fields other than their own. 
Consulting relevant literature and collaborating with colleagues from other
disciplines may provide important opportunities for cross-fertilization in
developing improved methodology and measurement.

A.  PROCESSES UNDERLYING SELF-REPORTS

Self-reports are a primary source of information in a wide range of clinical and
research settings.  For example, recent investigations have begun to analyze the
cognitive processes that underlie self-reports of events, beliefs, feelings,
preferences, attitudes, and symptoms.  Such processes include the comprehension
of questions, the retrieval of information from memory, and the use of heuristics
and prior beliefs in formulating responses.  By understanding these processes,
and the biological, social, and cultural influences upon them, techniques for
improving the validity and reliability of self-reports can be developed.

Topics for new research on the processes underlying self-reports include, but are
not limited to:

1. Basic issues in cognition, including perception, attention, memory, reasoning,
decision-making, and communication, with particular focus on those processes that
contribute significantly to self-report behavior (e.g., temporal perception and
memory; comprehension, and decision processes that underlie survey responses).

2. Basic issues in the sensory, motor, social, cultural, and other psychological
processes that underlie self report.

3. Development of the processes that underlie self-reports across the lifespan.

4. Influences of arousal and affective states upon self-reports.

5.  Gender- and culture-related differences upon self-reports.

6.  Effects of physical and social context on self-report validity and
reliability.

7.  Effects of sensory, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric limitations or
disorders upon the processes that underlie self-reports, including effects of
alcohol and drugs.

8.  Construction of survey and interview instruments, including issues of format,
medium, and wording of instructions and items.

B. RESEARCH DESIGN

The study of diverse populations, sensitive behaviors and the incorporation of 
multi-disciplinary frameworks and methods involves a number of challenges to
behavioral research design.  Broadly, research design determines how well a
research plan can accomplish stated purposes and test hypotheses.  Research
design encompasses many decisions including the sampling plan; selection of
appropriate study designs, methods, procedures and measures; and, assuring
confidence in the studyþs internal and external validity.  An innovative sample
design and/or sampling frame can be the centerpiece of a research design.

Examples of questions on research design are, but are not limited to the
following:

1.  Methodological research to improve the design of survey research.

2.  Conceptual design issues in studying culture and self-identification of race-
ethnicity.

3.  Designs to improve causal inference from non-experimental research.

4.  Research to improve the design of research studies, including multi-wave
longitudinal designs.

5.  Methods for improving the design of community-based intervention trials
(e.g., health promotion/disease prevention programs).

6.  Conceptual and methodological issues in designing studies that use different
sources of information; for example, studies comparing self and proxy reports
(from surrogates þ family or friends -- and professional providers of care),
validation studies using biological markers and record sources, studies comparing
report data with data obtained by observing behavior, for example, patient
ratings of pain versus family ratings of patient pain; client report of symptoms
versus findings from clinical examination.

C.  MEASUREMENT ISSUES

Developing and validating research instruments and questions are vitally
important for collecting accurate information, and have an obvious impact on data
validity and reliability.  For example, health care practitioners must collect
accurate reports of symptoms from their patients in order to accurately diagnose
disease.  Data collection instruments and questions developed for a particular
age, gender, or cultural group may not be valid for other groups.  For example,
a dietary history questionnaire developed for Americans of European descent may
not contain the foods commonly eaten by Americans of African, Asian, or South
American descent.  Continued improvement and innovation in validating data
collection instruments is important for all types of research settings, ranging
from the clinical interview to the observational study and the survey interview.

Examples of measurement issues include, but are not limited to the following:

1. Development and refinement of measures used in behavioral and social science
research.  Topics include, but are not limited to: preferences for outcomes
(health states), outcomes worse than death, perceptions of risks and benefits of
treatments, perceptions of risks of diseases; desired role in medical
decision-making; impact of disease on families (caregiver burden) and on
patients; self-efficacy/fatalism about health outcomes (self-care and
care-seeking behaviors are related to this belief structure, dental pain and
anxiety about dental treatment); social support, socioeconomic status, and
stress; and techniques for measuring social context or environment.

2. Research to develop self ratings of quality of life for clinical trials, to
include the determination of the cognitive and other factors that underlie self
reports of subjective well-being and quality of life.

3. Measurement issues in communication between health practitioners and
patients/clients to include diagnostic interviews, to include the impact of time
per patient on communicative strategies and effectiveness, and techniques that
may improve the conduct of diagnostic interviews.

4. Age, gender, and cultural differences in instrument design; instrument design
issues in studying age, gender and culture, including methods of studying culture
and self identification of race/ethnicity.

5. Calibration of instruments and methods with different population subgroups.

6. Psychometric studies of data collection instruments.

7. Assessment techniques of individuals and organizations, including methods such
as q-sorts.

8. Measurement issues in collecting data on organizational processes.

9. Studies of what levels of precision are required in behavioral and social
research.

10. Measurement issues in using technology such as computer assisted data
collection.

D. DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUES

Data collection techniques are the tools and procedures scientists use for
implementing research designs and obtaining measurements.  Methodologies for
collecting research data have an important impact on data validity and
reliability.  For example, studies of mode effects have suggested that use of
self-administered instruments can facilitate the reporting of sensitive or
illegal behaviors.  Innovative methodologies can also open the door to the
collection of new or more complex types of data by behavioral scientists.  For
example, recent developments in computer-assisted interviewing have permitted
more complex question sequences in survey research, and the development of hand-
held "beepers" programmed for data entry have permitted the collection of time-
specific data on activities such as cigarette smoking.  Continued improvement and
innovation in data collection methodologies is important for all types of
research settings, ranging from the clinical interview to the observational study
and the survey interview.  In addition, more research is needed to understand how
methodologies work in diverse populations, and how they can be modified to
address the specific needs of populations.

Potential topics for research include, but are not limited to:

1. Methodologies to improve data collection in surveys, ethnographic and other
qualitative studies, and multi-method studies; this may include new approaches
to instrument design and manipulation of mode, length, setting, and interpersonal
factors in data collection exchanges; new methodologies for qualitative research;
and techniques that facilitate integration of qualitative and quantitative
measurement.

2. Methodologies to reduce nonresponse bias in research studies, including
techniques to improve the coverage of relevant populations in household surveys,
to increase the voluntary participation of eligible subjects, and to reduce
attrition in longitudinal studies and clinical trials.

3. Techniques for collecting contextual data (e.g,. neighborhood composition,
peer group characteristics) and for operationalizing the boundaries of particular
social contexts.

4. Innovative technologies for data collection and their impact on response
quality in a variety of populations and substantive areas.

5. Data collection techniques that address the needs of special populations
(e.g., physically or mentally disabled, nonliterate populations, the homeless and
incarcerated, children and the elderly) and that study the impact of
methodologies on data quality and completeness across diverse populations.

E.  ANALYTIC METHODS

Analytic methods encompass the concepts and techniques used in analyzing data and
interpreting and reporting results.  The goal of new and improved analytic
methods is to help make estimation, hypothesis testing, and causal modeling based
on scientific data as sound as possible.  Challenges include developing
techniques that distinguish underlying regularities from the noise created by
variability and imprecise measurement; developing causal inferences from
observational data; improving both the internal validity and external validity
(generalizability) of studies; and developing appropriate analytic techniques for
use with new kinds of data and new approaches to behavioral and social science
research.

Examples of areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

1.  Research to improve the analysis of longitudinal studies (in particular, the
analysis of correlated data and modeling of different sources of error and of
missing data).

2.  Methods for improving the analysis of  community-based intervention trials
(e.g., health promotion/disease prevention programs).

3.  Methodological research to improve the analysis of complex survey data,
including the statistical modeling of nonresponse and other survey errors.

4.  Analytic issues in and innovative techniques for improving causal inference
from non-experimental research.

5.  Multidimensional scaling approaches.

6.  Analytic methods for integrating evidence from qualitative and quantitative
research.  Research to examine and account for the complex relationships among
multiple sources of information on a single construct, such as self and proxy
reports, clinical examinations and testing, laboratory tests, and other record
sources.  For example, patient ratings of pain versus family ratings of patient
pain; client report of symptoms versus findings from clinical examination.

7.  Analytic methods that model social structures and social processes, such as
social networks, social influence, diffusion, and contextual effects.

8.  Methods to model and adjust for biases in choice-based samples (e.g., clinic
patients, program participants) in drawing inferences about larger populations.

9.  Methods for handling missing data.

F. RESEARCH ETHICS IN METHODOLOGY AND MEASUREMENT

Laboratory and community-based researchers face an array of ethical dilemmas when
asking volunteers to report about their behavior or experiences, especially when
the behaviors are illegal or stigmatized. These ethical difficulties are not
simply centered on the informed consent process and confidentiality issues, but
may involve virtually every stage of the research, including design, data
collection, and analysis and dissemination.  Applications may explore the
perspective not only of researchers, but also the perspective of research
volunteers, survey respondents, and their families.  Potential legal issues such
as mandatory reporting to criminal justice authorities when behaviors such as
child abuse are disclosed may also be a legitimate area of investigation.

Examples of areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

1. Ethical issues in self report such as how to respond when suicidal ideation
is or the respondent becomes upset during an interview.

2. Ethical issues in the use of record sources as data or data validation.

3. Methodological techniques for protecting confidentiality of data shared for
secondary analysis.

4. Issues concerning how to obtain and maintain genuinely informed consent from
research participants throughout the course of a study.

INCLUSION OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

It is the policy of the NIH that women and members of minority groups and their
subpopulations must be included in all NIH supported biomedical and behavioral
research projects involving human subjects, unless a clear and compelling
rationale and justification is provided that inclusion is inappropriate with
respect to the health of the subjects or the purpose of the research.  This
policy results from the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (Section 492B of Public
Law 103-43).

All investigators proposing research involving human subjects should read the
"NIH Guidelines for Inclusion of Women and Minorities as Subjects in Clinical
Research," which have been published in the Federal Register, March 28, 1994 (FR
59 14508-14513) and in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Volume 23, Number
11, March 18, 1994.

Investigators may obtain copies of the policy from the program staff listed under
INQUIRIES or from the Internet at http://www.med.nyu.edu.  Program staff may also
provide additional relevant information concerning the policy.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Applications are to be submitted on the grant application form PHS 398 (rev.
5/95) and will be accepted at the standard application deadlines as indicated in
the application kit.  Applications kits are available at most institutional
offices of sponsored research and may be obtained from the Division of Extramural
Outreach and Information Resources, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge
Drive, MSC 7910, Bethesda, MD 20892-7910, telephone 301-435-0714, email:
ASKNIH@od.nih.gov.

The title and number of the program announcement must be typed in line 2 on the
face page of the application.  The completed original application and five
legible copies must delivered to:

CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC REVIEW
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
6701 ROCKLEDGE DRIVE, SUITE 1040, MSC 7710
BETHESDA, MD 20892-7710
BETHESDA, MD 20817 (for express/courier service)

REVIEW CONSIDERATIONS

Applications will be assigned on the basis of established Public Health Service
referral guidelines. Applications will be reviewed for scientific and technical
merit by appropriate review committees of NIH, in accordance with the standard
NIH peer review procedures. As part of the initial merit review, all applications
will receive a written critique and undergo a process in which only those
applications deemed to have the highest scientific merit, generally the top half
of applications under review, will be discussed, assigned a priority score, and
receive a second level review by the appropriate national advisory council or
board.

Review criteria

The goals of NIH-supported research are to advance our understanding of
biological systems, improve the control of disease, and enhance health.  In the
written review, comments on the following aspects of the application will be made
in order to judge the likelihood that the proposed research will have a
substantial impact on the pursuit of these goals.  Each of these criteria will
be addressed and considered in the assignment of the overall score.

o  Significance.  Does this study address an important problem? If the aims of
the application are achieved, how will scientific knowledge be advanced?  What
will be the effect of these studies on the concepts or methods that drive this
field?

o  Approach.  Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses
adequately developed, well-integrated, and appropriate to the aims of the
project?  Does the applicant acknowledge potential problem areas and consider
alternative tactics?

o  Innovation.  Does the project employ novel concepts, approaches or method? 
Are the aims original and innovative? Does the project challenge existing
paradigms or develop new methodologies or technologies?

o  Investigator.  Is the investigator appropriately trained and well suited to
carry out this work?  Is the work proposed appropriate to the experience level
of the principal investigator and other researchers (if any)?

o  Environment.  Does the scientific environment in which the work will be done
contribute to the probability of success?  Do the proposed experiments take
advantage of unique features of the scientific environment or employ useful
collaborative arrangements?  Is there evidence of institutional support?

The initial review group will also examine: the appropriateness of proposed
project budget and duration; the adequacy of plans to include both genders and
minorities and their subgroups as appropriate for the scientific goals of the
research and plans for the recruitment and retention of subjects; the provisions
for the protection of human and animal subjects; and the safety of the research
environment.

AWARD CRITERIA

Applications will compete for available funds with all other approved
applications assigned to that Institute/Center (IC). The following will be
considered in making funding decisions: Quality of the proposed project as
determined by peer review, availability of funds, and program priority.

INQUIRIES

Inquiries are encouraged. The opportunity to clarify any issues or questions from
potential applicants is welcome.

Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to:

Jared B. Jobe, Ph.D.
Behavioral and Social Research
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 533, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-3137
FAX:  (301) 402-0051
Email:  Jared_Jobe@nih.gov

Kendall J. Bryant, Ph.D.
Program Officer for Prevention Methodology Development
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 505
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-1677
FAX:  (301) 443-8774
Email:  kbryant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Frances Stillman, Ed.D.
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences
National Cancer Institute
6130 Executive Boulevard, Room 241
Rockville, MD  20852
Telephone:  (301) 496-0274
FAX:  (301) 496-8675
Email:  stillmaf@dcpcepn.nci.nih.gov

Christine A. Bachrach, Ph.D.
Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 8B13, MSC 7510
Bethesda, MD  20892-7510
Telephone:  (301) 496-1174
FAX:  (301) 496-0962
Email:  bachracc@hd01.nichd.nih.gov

Patricia Bryant, Ph.D.
Division of Extramural Research
National Institute of Dental Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AN-24E
Bethesda, MD  20892-6500
Telephone:  (301) 594-2095
FAX:  (301) 480-8318
Email:  BryantP@DE45.nidr.nih.gov

Bennett Fletcher, Ph.D.
Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 10A30
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-4060
FAX:  (301) 443-6185
Email:  bf31v@nih.gov

William E. Narrow, M.D., M.P.H.
Epidemiology Program
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 18C-14
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-1636
FAX:  (301) 443-4611
Email:  wnarrow@nih.gov

Carole I. Hudgings, Ph.D., R.N.
Division of Extramural Activities
National Institute of Nursing Research
45 Center Drive, Room 3AN-12, MSC 6300
Bethesda, MD  20892-6300
Telephone:  (301) 594-5976
FAX:  (301) 480-8260
Email:  Carole_Hudgings@nih.gov

Carolyn Voorhees, Ph.D.
Behavioral Medicine Research Group
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7936
Bethesda, MD  20892-7936
Telephone:  (301) 435-0435
FAX:  (301) 480-1773
Email:  VoorheC@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov

Virginia S. Cain, Ph.D.
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research
National Institutes of Health
1 Center Drive, Room 326
Bethesda, MD  20892-1146
Telephone:  (301) 402-1146
FAX:  (301) 402-1150
Email:  Virginia_Cain@nih.gov

Richard Nahin, M.P.H., Ph.D.
Office of Alternative Medicine
National Institutes of Health
9000 Rockville Pike, Room 5B-36
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-4792
FAX:  (301) 480-3519
Email:  NahinR@OD31EM1.OD.NIH.GOV

Direct inquiries regarding fiscal matters to:

Mr. Joseph Ellis
Grants and Contracts Management Office
National Institute on Aging
7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2N212, MSC 9205
Bethesda, MD  20892-9205
Telephone:  (301) 496-1472
FAX:  (301) 402-3672
Email:  Joseph_Ellis@nih.gov

Mr. Edward B. Ellis
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Suite 504
Bethesda, MD  20892-7003
Telephone:  (301) 443-4706
FAX:  (301) 443-3891
Email:  eellis@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

Ms. Melinda Nelson
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Building 61E, Room 8A17
Bethesda, MD  20892
Telephone:  (301) 496-5481
FAX:  (301) 402-0915
Email:  nelsonm@hd01.nichd.nih.gov

Mr. Martin R. Rubinstein
Division of Extramural Research
National Institute of Dental Research
Natcher Building, Room 4AN-44A
Bethesda, MD  20892-6402
Telephone:  (301) 594-4800
FAX:  (301) 402-1517
Email:  RubensteinM@DE45.nidr.nih.gov

Gary Fleming, J.D., M.A.
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 8A-54
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-6710
FAX:  (301) 594-6847
Email:  gf6s@nih.gov

Mr. Bruce L. Ringler
Grants Management Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 7C-08
Rockville, MD  20857
Telephone:  (301) 443-2811
FAX:  (301) 443-6885
Email:  Bruce_Ringler@nih.gov

Mr. Jeff Carow
Grants Management Officer
National Institute of Nursing Research
45 Center Drive, Room 3AN-12, MSC 6301
Bethesda, MD  20892-6301
Telephone:  (301) 594-6869
FAX:  (301) 480-8260
Email:  Jeff_Carow@nih.gov

Ms. Jane R. Davis
Grants Operations Branch
Division of Extramural Activities
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7926
Bethesda, MD  20892-7926
Telephone:  (301) 435-0166
FAX:  (301) 480-3310
Email:  DavisJ@gwgate.nhlbi.nih.gov

AUTHORITY AND REGULATIONS

This program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Nos.
93.866, 93.399, 93.273, 93.393, 93.396, 93.399, 93.242, 93.865, 93.361, and
93.837, 93.121.  Awards are made under authorization of the Public Health Service
Act, Title IV, Part A (Public Law 78-410, as amended by Public Law 99-158, 42 USC
241 and 285) and administered under PHS grants policies and Federal Regulations
42 CFR 52 and 45 CFR Part 74. This program is not subject to the
intergovernmental review requirements of Executive Order 12372 or Health Systems
Agency review.

The PHS strongly encourages all grant and contract recipients to provide a smoke-
free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products. In addition,
Public Law 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in certain
facilities (or in some cases, any portion of a facility) in which regular or
routine education, library, day care, health care or early childhood development
services are provided to children.  This is consistent with the PHS mission to
protect and advance the physical and mental health of the American people.


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